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UBC Library News Jul 31, 1972

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 ni.B.C LIBRARY NEWS
Vol. 5, No. 5
June - July, 1972
Vancouver, B.C.
This newsletter is published as an information service for UBC faculty, students and other readers outside the Library. It
contains feature articles and news about developments in the library system which we feel will be of interest or concern to the
larger community. The News welcomes all comments, criticisms and suggestions for future articles.
INTERSESSION LIBRARY HOURS
When Summer Session ends on August 18, campus libraries will reduce their hours of service. Most will be closed in the
evenings and on weekends until the start of the fall term (Monday, September 11). A full schedule for this period is given below:
WOODWARD LIBRARY
August 19 - September 1
September 2 - 4
September 5-7
September 8
September 9
September 10
MAIN LIBRARY AND
ALL OTHER BRANCHES
MONDAY - SATURDAY
SUNDAY
SATURDAY - MONDAY
TUESDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
August 19 - September 10*
*   These libraries will also be closed on Labour Day (Monday, September 4).
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY - SUNDAY
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed
Closed
8 a.m. - 9 p.m.
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed
LIBRARY ADDS NDP FILES
The Special Collections Division has recently acquired 45 linear feet of material relating to B.C.'s New Democratic Party.
Included are correspondence, minutes of meetings, election and convention material, pamphlets, press releases, and membership,
organizational and related material from the inception of the party (1961) to the present. There is also one box of CCF records
dating from the time of the party's changeover to become the NDP.
This material is a valuable addition to the growing collection of political records in the Manuscript Collection. It supplements such important sets as the Angus Maclnnes Memorial Collection of CCF material. A preliminary inventory of the NDP
records is available now in Special Collections.
AUGUST EXHIBITS
Four sailing ships and a sage will be featured in Main Library display cases until the end of Summer Session.
On view in the entrance hall are large watercolours of four ships: the Mathew, Grande Hermine, Nonsuch and Resolution.
Their names should have a familiar ring to those who remember their Canadian history. Each played a major role in early exploration or trade.
It was the Mathew that brought John Cabot and his three sons to the Atlantic coast of Canada in 1497. There has never
been exact agreement as to the area they visited, but it was certainly in the Newfoundland - Cape Breton region. Jacques Carrier's ship, the Grande Hermine, was one of three used on his second voyage to Canada in 1535. After sailing
up the Saint Lawrence to what is now Montreal, the group was decimated during a bad winter at Stadacona (Quebec). They
returned to St. Malo in the Grande Hermine and a sister ship next spring, having claimed the new country for France.
This July Vancouverites had a chance to see an exact replica of the Nonsuch, which had so much to do with the founding
of the Hudson's Bay Company. The original Nonsuch made a highly successful fur-trading voyage to James Bay in 1668-9.
This led to the granting of the Company's famous charter on May 2, 1670.
It was over a century later before any European ships visited the Pacific Coast of Canada. Captain James Cook's Resolution
was the first to do so. Cook's third and last voyage took him via New Zealand, Tasmania and Hawaii to Nootka on the west
coast of Vancouver Island, where he anchored in 1778. A voyage north later that year ended when he encountered ice in Bering
Strait. Just months after this visit to the northwest coast, Cook was killed in the Hawaiian Islands.
All four ship paintings were commissioned by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1970 to mark its 300th anniversary. The
artist, Melbourne Smith, is a former sailing master. Following this display, the material will be available in Special Collections.
Upstairs in the Ridington display case, the focus is on the other side of the world. Sri Aurobindo Ghose, a distinguished
Indian philosopher and writer, was born on August 15,1872, and his centenary is being observed this month. It coincides with
the 25th anniversary of India's independence (August 15, 1947).
During the 78 years of his life, Sri Aurobindo was active in many phases of Indian culture and politics. Born in Bengal,
he was educated in England and took a first at Cambridge. The political phase of his writing began shortly after his return to
India. He was jailed once for editing the English-language newspaper Bandemataram, which published politically inflammatory
material. However, he was later acquitted of the charges laid against him.
In the years 1908 - 1926 Sri Aurobindo combined political activity with an increasing interest in yoga and spitirual development. He founded the famous Sri Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry, which continues to attract those looking for spiritual
guidance and enlightenment. Between 1926 and 1938 he chose to retire completely from political life, and his writings after
1938 were largely mystical.
The Ridington display illustrates Sri Aurobindo's role as one of the spiritual and philosophical leaders of India. To
celebrate his centenary, a 30-volume set of his complete works is being issued, and these are being added to the Main Library's
collection as they are published.
THE SUMMER OF '72 AT CRANE
When the Crane Library for the Blind opened in 1968, it served a total of 18 blind and sight-restricted students. Its
Braille collection numbered less than 4,000 volumes, and it had almost no tape-recorded or large-print materials. Even so,
the one-room library was the most comprehensive one available for blind university students in Canada.
Now, four years later, the picture has brightened considerably. The number of blind and partially-sighted UBC students
has reached about 45, and is expected to keep climbing. Crane's floor space has doubled; its Braille and large-print holdings
now exceed 10,000 volumes; and teams of readers have recorded more than 3,000 titles for the growing collection of taped
books. Use of the library has more than kept pace with its holdings. In the last full year for which records are available (May,
1971 to April, 1972) over 24,000 personal and interlibrary loans were recorded.
Each summer Crane has carried out one or more major projects aimed at making further improvements to the collection
and services. This year three have been running simultaneously, all financed by gifts and grants.
The first began at the end of March, when the 1972 graduating class donated $4,600 to the Crane Library. Reports in the
local press erroneously stated that the money would be used to buy more Braille books. Actually it is supporting a pilot project
being carried out by a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science. The program under development would convert ordinary printed
books directly into Braille text. It is hoped that the current project will end by producing a workable computer program, all
necessary hardware, and about 10,000 pages of printed Braille. If the process is successful, it would eliminate the need for
trained Braille typesetters, and would cut the time usually taken to produce Braille books by nearly 70%.
For the time being, however, the fastest way to produce books for the blind is by tape-recording them. Most News
readers are aware that Crane's volunteer taping program has been running nonstop for three years. In January, however, a Local
Initiatives grant of nearly $28,000 enabled the library to hire eight additional full-time readers. By May they had added over
400 titles to the tape collection. Special emphasis was placed on Canadian history and literature in both French and English,
since these are the most inacessible to non-print readers. In May word came that an additional $20,800 would be made available
so that the project could be extended to the end of September.
The Local Initiatives grant also allowed Crane to produce a much-needed book catalogue of its collection. Issued early in
July, the 110-page listing gives readers outside the library complete information about holdings in all media. Besides making use of the Crane Library more convenient for local readers, it should greatly speed up interlibrary loans. When copies of the catalogue
were sent to a selected group of Canadian university libraries, requests for books artd assistance came almost by return mail.
Any News readers interested in this catalogue can obtain copies from the Crane Library, or from the Main Library's Gifts
and Exchange Division. A supplement listing newly produced phonotape titles will be ready by the middle of September.
Crane has also undertaken a project involving recording foreign-language textbooks for blind students at several Eastern
universities. Readers with a background in German or Spanish are urgently needed for a short period in order to complete this
by fall. Anyone interested is invited to call Crane at 228-2373.
REPORT ON MAIN LIBRARY JOURNALS SURVEY
Those who used the Main Library this spring may remember that a large-scale survey was carried out in March. Its aim
was to find out what problems faculty and students were having in finding the journals they needed, and to indicate areas where
useful changes might be made. A similar survey had been conducted in the Woodward Biomedical Library the previous fall. (See
UBC Library News, December - January, 1971 - 72.) By comparing results, library staff hoped to find out whether Main Library
users faced the same kind of difficulties as readers in Woodward. Were journals harder to find in the larger library, and if so, why?
From March 13 to 24, the library tried to keep an exact count of the number of journals successfully found and used.
Readers were also asked to report whenever they had problems locating a journal. Each report was followed up by a trained
search team. The main findings of the survey are described below. For comparison, figures from the Woodward survey have
been given in brackets.
GENERAL
During the 12-day survey period, readers successfully found and used a total of 8,695 Main Library journals. This was almost
exactly twice the number found and used during the same length of time in the Woodward survey (4,326). In both libraries, users
appeared to prefer reading their journals in the building rather than borrowing them. Sixty-three per cent of the items found in
the Main Library were used there, and 37% were borrowed (68% and 32% in Woodward).
Reports of items not found totalled 607, or 7% of the total number of journals which were successfully found and used.
Surprisingly, Main Library users seemed to have fewer difficulties in this area than Woodward readers:  problems reported during
the Woodward survey came to 8.6% of total journal use. However, these figures may not be totally reliable, as there is no way
of telling whether all users co-operated in reporting problems during the two surveys.
PERSONS REPORTING
In both libraries, undergraduates accounted for most reports of unfound journals. During the Main Library survey 54% of
the reports came from undergraduates, as opposed to 45% in Woodward. Graduate students submitted 24% of the reports (27%)
and faculty 4% (14%). A further 11% of the Main Library reports were filed by Interlibrary Loan searchers.
Anyone turning in a report was asked to say whether or not he wished action to be taken on it. (Actually, items in both-
categories were followed up by the search team, but "action" requests had priority over "no action".) The percentage of faculty
who wanted action to be taken was the same as in Woodward:  81%. However, a much higher proportion of graduate students - -
64% - - and undergrads - - 69% - - requested action (42% and 47% in Woodward).
TIME TAKEN TO LOCATE MATERIAL
In the Woodward survey, 29% of the "missing" journals were found by library staff within 10 minutes. The Main Library's
score was not quite as high, but still impressive. Twenty per cent were found in 10 minutes or less, and a cumulative total of
26% by the end of the day (31% in Woodward). Within 24 hours the Main Library was able to find 39% of all journals reported
missing, as opposed to 45% in Woodward. However, there was little difference by the seventh day (Main had found 61% and
Woodward 62%) or the fourteenth (68% and 69% respectively).
REASONS JOURNALS WERE NOT FOUND
This was one area where differences between the two libraries were apparent. In the Woodward Library, the main reason
journals were not found was that they were not owned by the library, or had not been received yet. This accounted for 27% of
all reports of "missing" journals. Circulation was another major factor: a further 26% were not available because they were in
use by other readers.
In the Main Library, it was a different story. The greatest number of problems (26%) were caused by what might be
termed administrative reasons. The journals were available, and most locations were on record, but they were held in backfiles, being routed to the shelves, held in a reference division instead of the bookstacks, misshelved, or on hold in Circulation for
other borrowers. As in Woodward, use by other readers was the second most common reason for journals not being found,
but it only accounted for 21% of the Main Library problems. Sixteen per cent of the reports involved journals that were not
owned at all, or had not been received. Almost as many (15%) were for items that readers had been unable to find, but which
were either on the shelves when the searchers first checked, or reappeared on the shelf later on. The comparable percentage
for Woodward was 5%. User error was almost certainly involved in some of these cases, although it could not be absolutely
proved. Actually the percentage of problems which were directly traceable to users (incorrect data, misunderstanding of
shelving arrangement, etc.) was higher in the Woodward survey than it was in the Main Library (11% and 8% respectively).
Although the bindery and prebindery had been a source of problems in Woodward (18% of the needed journals were in
some stage of binding) the figure dropped to 10% in the Main Library, making it fifth out of the six main reasons why journals
were not found.
EFFECT OF CIRCULATION ON AVAILABILITY OF JOURNALS
Although circulation (i.e. lending for use outside the library) is often thought to be the main reason why journals are not
available, this was not borne out by the survey results. During the Main Library survey 8,695 journals were used by readers, and
only 113 could not be used because they were out on loan.
However, once they were borrowed, it proved difficult to predict when they would be returned. Checks were run on the
items which were out on loan when requested. Although only 20% were overdue at the time the request was placed (as compared
to 30% in Woodward) 60% were overdue by the time they were returned for the next borrower.
This is a disturbing figure, as the survey results also showed that over 60% of the journals in circulation are requested by
another user within a week of the time they are signed out. (Main Library loan periods for journals are: overnight for undergraduates; one week for graduate students; and two weeks for faculty.)
WHO WANTED WHAT, AND WHO HAD IT
The longer loan periods granted to graduates and faculty members still seem to be causing problems for undergraduates.
Circulation data from the Woodward survey showed that only 9% of the items sought by faculty and graduate students were on
loan to undergraduates, but that 56% of the journals undergraduates wanted were on loan to faculty or graduate students. The
figures for Main were 5% and 44% respectively. Attempts are now being made to gather more data on this aspect of library use.
The information collected will also show whether items out to graduates and faculty were overdue by the time they were returned
for other borrowers.
In 19 cases two people, and in two cases three people, needed the same volume or issue of a Main Library journal. (Compare
with Woodward: 19 cases - - two people; one case - - three people; one case - - four people.) Altogether, 439 titles accounted for
607 Main Library reports. A list of the titles most in demand is being prepared.
NOTES FOR READERS
For those who use Main Library journals, the most startling figure produced by the survey is this:  between 40% and 50% of
the "missing" journals need never have become problems in the first place. These items were either:
- - never in the Main Library to begin with, and sometimes not held at UBC
- - on the shelf, but not found because of user error
- - not on the shelf, but available in minutes with staff assistance
This suggests a set of basic guidelines which should increase anyone's journal-finding ability by as much as 50%:
1) Always start off by getting the correct CALL NUMBER of your journal. To do this, look up the journal title in the
Serial Holdings List or the Main Library's Author/Title File - - or call local 2077 to have someone do it while you
wait.
2) Then find your call number in the Main Library's LOCATION FILE. (Again, the staff at 2077 can do this for you.)
There will be a location card telling where bound volumes of your journal are held, and where to find the unbound
ones. If second and third sets are available, the location card will tell where they are, and what volumes are included.
3) If anything goes wrong during steps 1 or 2, or if your journal is not on the shelf when you get there, PLEASE ASK!
If it is out on loan the staff can usually place a hold on it for you. If it isn't on loan, it may well be in a backfile or
en route to the shelf. In either case, you will want to have a staff member check for it. If a journal is not available for some reason, library staff will see whether it is held at any other library in the Vancouver
area. Items which UBC should have had,but which are missing,are available to all borrowers on interlibrary loan.
QUICK COMPARISON OF SURVEY RESULTS
The table below shows the chief findings of the Woodward and Main Library journal surveys.
JOURNALS FOUND DURING SURVEY PERIOD (12 DAYS):
- - Issues or volumes borrowed
- - Issues or volumes used in library
TOTAL
MAIN LIBRARY
Total           Percentage
WOODWARD
Total           Percentage
3,219                  37%
5.476                  63%
1,373
2,953
32%
68%
8,695                100%
4,326
100%
JOURNALS NOT FOUND:
ADMINISTRATIVE REASONS
- - In "Morgue", backfiles, etc.
- - Missing (i.e. not available 18 days after
end of survey)
- - On microform; in Government Publications;
in a reference collection
- - Awaiting reshelving (except after in-library use)
- - Misshelved
- - In Cataloguing; routing to staff; New Serials
shelves, etc.
- - On hold for another borrower
61
10%
14
4%
49
8%
14
4%
14
2%
—
— .
14
2%
1
—
9
1%
5
1%
5
1%
2
1%
8
1%
4
1%
TOTAL
160
26%
40
11%
IN USE BY OTHER READERS
- - On loan
- - In use in library
TOTAL
113
15
128
19%
2%
21%
64
34
98
17%
9%
26%
NOT HELD OR NOT YET RECEIVED
- - Not held by UBC
- - Not held in Main (Woodward) but held
elsewhere at UBC
- - Not yet received
60
27
11
TOTAL
98
10%
4%
2%
16%
39
50
11
100
11%
14%
3%
27%
REASON NOT DETERMINED
- - On shelf when first checked by staff, or on shelf
at a later check TOTAL
89
15%
23
6%
IN BINDING
- - In various prebinds
- - In bindery
TOTAL
41
21
62
7%
3%
10%
43
23
66
12%
6%
18%
USER PROBLEMS
- - Data incomplete or incorrect
- - Shelving arrangement misunderstood,
confusion between bound and unbound
OTHER REASONS
TOTAL
TOTAL
24
4%
10
3%
27
4%
31
41
8%
51
8%
11%
19
3%
2
1%
GRAND TOTAL OF JOURNALS NOT FOUND
607
370 SPEAKING OF SERIALS NOT FOUND .
Since the News started carrying notes from the Serials Bibliographer about issues needed to complete library sets, readers'
response has been most helpful. This month the feature area is commerce and business. We are trying to obtain these two back
issues:
Canadian Banker, Vol. 78, No. 1 (January/February, 1971)
Fortune, Vol. 84, No. 1 and 5-6 (July and November/December, 1971)
If you have these, and can spare them, please call Mr. G. Elliston, Bibliography Division, at 228-2304.
NEWS FLASH
Just before press time, a change was made in the hours reference service will be available from the Sedgewick Undergraduate Library. It was felt that the small number of evening reference questions received there during July did not warrant
having a librarian on duty after 5 p.m. Therefore, as an experimental policy, reference service will be given only up to 5 p.m.
during the last two weeks of Summer Session.
All other Sedgewick services will be maintained as usual.
Editor:  Mrs. E. de Bruijn Information & Orientation Division

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