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The 432 Oct 7, 1987

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 UBC Archives Serial
"2
Q Contest
Winners!
Page 4/5
some distance from
or petroleum are
nitrogen oxides  reach
in whatever water  is
Luo
W   E   D   N   E   S   D   A   Y
Acid rain is not strictly rain that is acidic. Acid rain is the physical process by which
sulphur and nitrogen compounds enter the atmosphere and fall' to the ground
where they were released.
When fuels such as coal
burned, sulphur from the fuel and nitrogen from
the air combine with oxygen to form sulphur dioxide and various nitrogen oxides. These compounds
are carried up into the atmosphere as part of the
smoke from the burning fuel. If the sulphur
dioxide and nitrogen oxides reach the ground
before being further oxidized in the atmosphere,
it is called dry deposition. If the compounds
remain suspended in the atmosphere the sulphur
dioxide will be oxidized to sulphuric acid and the
nitrogen oxides will be oxidized to nitric acid by
solar energy. These two acids can then combine
with water in clouds and fall to the earth in rain
or snow. This process is called wet deposition.
Normally, rain is slightly acidic; it has a
pH of about 5.6 due to dissolved carbon dioxide.
Anything more acidic is considered acid rain. It
is not uncommon for rain in many parts of North
America to be about pH 4.6, or about 10% as acidic
as normal rain.
When the sulphur and
the ground, they dissolve
available and release protons. Aside from the
straight forward effects changes in pH can have on
proteins and other cellular structures, the increased acidity of the ground water helps dissolve
metals such as iron, manganese, and aluminum.
These metals increase in concentration as the
acidity increases leading to levels that may cause
defects in plants and animals. One link has already been found between toxic-aluminum phenomenon
growth factors out of plants. The result is stunted plant growth. -,
Another phenomenon associated with acid rain
is acid-shock. During the winter the acids remain
locked up in snow and ice. However, during the
spring thaw most of the acid is released at once,
resulting in sudden decreases in the pH of ground
water. Such shocks often occur around spawning
time resulting in widespread deformities and death
of young trout and salmon. Whole generations of
organisms can be wiped out.
Acid rain, also causes an increase in various
heavy metals  in the  food chain;  supposedly the
metals are drawn out of the  bedrock by the acid
rain.  Lead, mercury,  arsenic, and cadmium are
some examples.   All of these metals are toxic and
accumulate in the food chain.  Of greatest concern
is what effect the accumulation-of heavy metals in
the decomposers and nitrogen fixing bacteria will
have on the growth of forests.  Without the fungi
and bacteria  to replace  the lost nutrients, the
soil may die and the forest with it.
More obviously, acid precipitation is a
stronger weathering agent than normal rain. It
erodes stone, soils and metals much faster than
ordinary rain.
The greater part of all sulphur dioxide
emissions in North America comes from American
Electrical Utilities and Canadian Smelters. The
largest source of nitrogen oxide emissions is from
the transportation sector: cars, buses, planes.
Approximately two-thirds of all North American
emissions occur in the eastern highly industrialized sector. Due to the wind direction, predominantly towards the east and northeast, most of the
damage is done on the east coast of North America.
As a result 50\ of the acid rainfall in Canada is
from American sources while only 10% of American
acid rainfall is from Canadian sources.
Pollutants may be carried hundreds, even
thousands of kilometers depending on the winds.
It is possible that the west coast is receiving
pollutants that orginate in Asia.
- The phenomenon of acid rain dates back to the
industrial revolution in the 18th century^ However, its effects only started to be notices in
the 1950's. A Swedish soil scientist, Svante
Oden, published data in 1968 indicating that lakes
and rivers in Sweden were becoming more acidic and
drew attention to the spread of acid precipitation
in Northern Europe. About the same time, Americans in North-East United States were finding
similar problems. Now the Canadian Atmospheric
Environment Service and the U.S. National Oceano-
graphic arid Atmospheric Administration, as well as
various universities are conducting studies on the
long range transport of air borne pollutants while
other groups analyze the effects of acidic environments on biological systems in plants and
aquatic organisms.
The necessary technology to reduce sulphur
dioxide emissions exists, the problem is one of
costs.   Although it  is understood that acid rain
l.M. STIEN ^ KteOB.,
CAREFUL KALPH , I   HEAR THAT THEV
CAM SMEU. FEAR /
THE PAPER
FOR SCIENCE
STUDENTS
UBC, Vancouver
Oct.   7/87
NUMBER   3
could eventual1
? dollar, cost is. put on the possible damage.  In
he meantime,  sulphur dioxide emissions and acid
rain continue.
by PETER MacDOUGALL
SUS & ESA
Proudly Present
A Lip Sync
Contest AND
A dance
Featuring
WIRED
I       Sign Up Scarfe 9
See  Page   7 A heavy emphasis on practical payoff is not the
route to world-class science.
All Canadians can rejoice that in November
John Polanyi won the Nobel Prize. I can't imagine
a better person to represent the scientific
community. His interests and areas of social
responsibility - he is a member of Pugwash (an
international disarmament group) and is an
outspoken peace advocate. He offers a marvelous
role model for our young people to look up to and
aspire to emulate.
It is ironic that this all-too-rare honor
came at the very moment the federal government was
imposing severe cuts on segments of the scientific
community. Ever since I returned to Canada from
the US in 1962, science has been woefully underfunded relative to the rest of the industrialized
world. We have never come close to having grants
that would make Canadian scientists competitive
with their colleagues in the US or Europe.
In recent years, provincial governments have
begun to commit substantial amounts to research.
But like their federal counterparts, they place a
heavy emphasis on practical payoffs. Mission
orientation, strategic funding, applied work-by
whatever name, practical applications are assumed
to be the goal of today's research. But I have
yet to meet a politician who understood the relationship between science and application, and I've
met all but a couple of the Ministers of State for
Science and Technology.
In British Columbia, the former provincial
Minister of Science did not understand, even
though he is himself a scientist. Intrigued by
Silicon Valley, he wanted to create its counterpart in BC The Science Minister's solution was
to set aside "Discovery Parks" adjacent to the
four universities and the technical school. These
are, to be industrial areas where university
scientists and private enterprise could
•interface'. And so, BC is supposed to have not
one but four Silicon Valleys.
As a scientist, the Minster should have known
better, but like all politicians, he failed to
understand how- Silicon Valley arose. Its neighbors are the world-class faculties at Stanford
University and the University of California at
Berkeley! There is no short-cut to first-class
science. You have to invest your money in top
people, allowing them freedom to  follow their
Basic    Research...
interests and attract a ojcoug ofv top_noteh colleagues.  From them, new inventions come.
Building a top scientific group is not the
same as gearing up to make shoes or cars. There
has to be a social environment that provides respect and steady, long-term support for outstanding
intellect. For that, universities have to be well
regarded and their faculty well supported. That
has not been the case in BC. Even now, when
politicians speak of the need for more scientific
research, our funding agencies receive very little
money. Is it realistic to expect Canadians to
produce world-class research after decades of
chronic underfunding, any more than a starving
Ethiopian might become an Olympic athlete after
being fed for a few days?
Moreover, we should realize that Canadian
scientists are responsible for less than 4 per
cent of all of the research done around the world.
That means that the probability of a major
breakthrough in Canada with important practical
application is small. Nevertheless, a community
of top-notch scholars is vital. Much of the
business of science takes place at exclusive and
restricted meetings. Our community of world-class
scientists is the price of a front row seat at the
cutting edge of new ideas-they keep us plugged in.
We should look at the history of labs like
Polanyi's to find out how science grows. We would
see very auickly that science doesn't proceed in a
linear fashion, from A to B to C to a cure for
cancer or a new widget. No one could have predicted that Polanyi's interest in the nature of
chemical reactions would lead to the invention of
the chemical laser(perhaps that's why his application for a strategic grant was once turned down).
But' Polanyi is a brilliant scientist, and it would
have been very surprising if his work didn't lead
somewhere important.
There should be much more money for research
in this country. We should support outstanding
scientists at a level that allows them to be
competitive with labs anywhere else In the world.
Good scientists should be assured of that support
for a period of time long enough to allow them to
build a  serious research  group around them.  And
they should be allowed to go wherever their
interest leads them, for the history of scientific
invention shows that you can't direct research to
a specific answer. Unless we understand how
science works and begin to change the way we
support people, we will continue to waste money
for political expediency, assuring that Canadian
Nobel Prizes will remain few and far between.
Dimensions March 87
With permission from Dr. David Suzuki
Ubyssey
Discovers
High Tech
by MORGAN BURKE
Those of you who like to keep up on current
events may have noticed the "new look" of the
Ubyssey newspaper this year. This is more than
just a facelift: the Ubyssey has at last forsaken
its respectable collection of ancient Underwood
typewriters, and embraced high technology, in the
form of an elaborate desktop publishing computer
system.
The computer system, financed and operated by
the AMS, was -obtained at the beginning of the
summer at the behest of AMS Director of Finance
Don Issak. The plan was originally to try and cut
the Ubyssey's annual typesetting costs of $80,000.
Now Issak would like to see the system expand to
cover all the publishing needs of not only the
Ubyssey, but the AMS, Intramurals, the faculties,
and any others who may have need of it. The
hardware costs of the computer system alone amount
to some $45,000, with operating costs above and
beyond that, including the salaries of "two and a
half" full time typesetters/ system operators.
Issak estimates that the system will pay for .itself within two years.
No less than six new computers now grace the
official campus paper's offices, including four
Laser XT's (IBM compatibles), an Apple Macintosh
SE (coded 'Max Headroom'), and an Apple Macintosh
II ('Darth Vader'). Of the four XT's, one is
equipped with a 20 Mb hard disk, the others being
floppy drive systems only. Both Macintoshes are
equipped with 'The Big Picture' 15" hi-res
screens, used for page layout and design, and
gouts of RAM and disk storage. An assortment of
printers, including a 300 dpi (dots per inch)
Apple Laser Writer provide hardcopy. The marriage
of all this diverse hardware is accomplished
through a network system called Tops, which facilitates quick and easy communication and file
transfer between the IBM compatibles and the
Apples.
Writers for the paper work on the IBM compatibles, storing their writing to floppy disk when
done. The disks are then turned over to the
editors who label the files and store them on the
XT's hard drive where they can be easily accessed
and manipulated by the Macs.   When  satisfactory,
the copy is formatted and output on the Laser
Writer, and then pasted up as we see It every
Tuesday and Friday. The extraordinary graphics
capabilities of the Macintoshes allow much of the
artwork and advertising to be created on the computers as well.
The bugs are still being worked out of the
system and its users, but Don Issak hopes the
system will be running smoothly by mid-November,
when other organisations (including the 432) will
have access to it.
^Editors
VINCE JIU
JEAN GUAY
Layout
LESLIE   CHAN
Artists     Journalists
NICOLE BRAND
KEN OTTER
JOE WU
MORGAN BURKE
PETER MacDOUGALL
GILLIAN McNAMARA
DAVID NEW
The Science
Undergraduate
Society
SCARFE 9, UBC
228-4235 cience
PRESENT:  Todd Abiett, President; Martin Lampa, 1st Vice;
Tim Black, Social Coordinator; Jean Antholne, Secretary;
Stella Wong, Sports Coordinator; Michael Glenlster,
Treasurer; Brian Pataky, AMS Rep.; Doni Jacklln, Public
Relations; Derek Miller, Publications; Andrew Colbeck.
Science Senator; Jan Weisbrod, 4th Year Rep.; Shawn McDuff,
Sheryl Tewnion, Carl Jacobson, 3rd Year Rep.; Margaret
Fraser, Physsoc President; Linda Lo, Chem Rep./Achedenics
Coordinator; Alex Pope, CS3; Patty Carmichael, Dawson Club;
Dale Shewchuck, Sales Manager; Grover Wong, Charity
Coordinator
GUESTS:  Pat Vhithca, Social Coordinator (Education);
Caroline Peters, Promotions(Education); Dave Rose
(President), Microbiology Club; James Chan (Vice-Prez),
Microbiology Club; Ben Wong, Claudlo de los Rios, David New
Ari Giliquer: Science Students.
The meeting was called to order by Todd Abiett at 1:35pm.
October   i,   1987
Submitted by
Jean Antoine
Secretary
NEW BUSINESS:     Nominations  and  Elections   opened   for   council
positions.
-2nd  Vice  President
-2nd   Year   Rep.
-2(two)   1st  Year  Reps.
Benjamin Wong and Claudlo de   los  Rlos are applying  for  the
position  of   2nd  Vice  Rep.     Claudion de   los  Rios  was  elected
as  the  new Science   2nd Vice  President   in a closed  ballot.
Eric  Bellickon  and  David  New were   elected   by acclamation as
1st  Year   Reps.
GREAT  TREK   DINNER
Moved  and  seconded   that  tickets   be  purchase   for   the
President,   Vice-President  and  AMS  Rep.   to  represent  the
Science  Undergraduate   Society  for   the  Great  Trek   Dinner.
The   total  cost   is   $45.   Carried.
Moved  that   tickets   be   subsidized   $5.00   for   any other   council
members   wishing  to  go   to  the  Great  Trek   Dinner.   Carried.
REPORTS
SPORTS
BLOOD   DRIVE
-Air   Band
-United   Way
Soccer:   6   men's/2  women's
Ice   Hockey:   5  men's/1   women's
Basketball:   3 men's/2  women's
Day  of   the   Long  Boat
-takes  place during Science Week
-maximum capacity:   265   people/day
-location:     student  lounge
The  meeting was  adjourned  by Todd  Abiett  at
2:20pm.
The   Science  Undergraduate  Society  is   looking   for
able  bodies  of   fill   the   following  vacant  positions.      If   you are   interested,   see  Todd  Abiett  at
once.
EX-OFFICIO   OFFICER
PERSON   IN
POSITION
YEARBOOK   EDITOR
SCIENCE   SALES   MANAGER
SUDS   BEER   GARDEN   MANAGER
4 32   NEWSPAPER   EDITORS
ACADEMICS   COMMITTEE  COORDINATOR
BLOOD   DRIVE   COORDINATORS
MEN'S   INTRAMURAL   SPORTS   REP
WOMEN'S   INTRAMURAL   SPORTS   REP
CONCERTS   AND   SECURITY  MANAGER
CHARITY   COORDINATOR
SCIENCE   WEEK   COORDINATOR
ARCHIVIST
* Vacant  *
DALE   SHEWCHUK
* Vacant   *
VINCE  JIU
+   JEAN   GUAY
LINDA  LO
SARA  FISHER
+   IAN   WAKEFORD
* Vacant   *
* Vacant   *
* Vacant   *
GROVER   WONG
* Vacant   *
JEAN  GUAY
SPORTS   AND   RECREATION   COMMITTEE
OVERALL COORDINATOR    STELLA WONG
CHEMISTRY
BERNARD LAKOWSKI
COMPUTER SCIENCE       GAUTAM LOHIA
GEOLOGY
JOANNE BLACK
+ STEVE SZALKAI
OCEANOGRAPHY
HENRY WU
ASTRONOMY
KEVIN DEMAS
The following
departments still need
representation
to the
Science Sports
and Recreation Council
FIRST YEARS
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
BIOLOGY
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
BIOCHEMISTRY
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
CHEMISTRY
WOMEN'S REP
ZOOLOGY
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
PHYSICS
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
MATHEMATICS
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
PSYCHOLOGY
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
PHYSIOLOGY
ONE REP NEEDED
PHARMACOLOGY
ONE REP NEEDED
iiilllliWiWiii
lfcl^BlWii»pli^pH^iiiiii
BBili^HpiiBillWiiiii
budget were passed* The
amine ndments all dealt
with honourariuw that are
■paid to organizations
such as CXTR, Speakeasy,
Volunteer Connection*,
e *t «c
-Great '-- "Txekfeer -dinner
this Thursday  in  SUB
[Ballroom-at 7 pm» $33 per
[student.  (Open  to' any
.student who
[the money!)
can fork out
Brian' Pataky
AMS Rep*
HE 432 is
looking for fast
typist to work on
a word processor.
Candidates need
not have
experience - we
will teach you
how to use the
program
(Microsoft Word).
We are also
looking for
writers who are
willing to search
high and low for
THE story.  If
you*re
interested, come
and
join our team.
We'll be waiting.
This year has already seen the rapid growth of
the Science Undergrad Society. The job of president
during these times has definitely had its ups and
its downs but the people that are involved are what
make it all worth while. I will tell you about a
few of them.
Take  this newspaper  for example,  the  432.
two editors  (Vince Jiu and Jean Guay) deserve
of credit  for the  task they have  completed.
many undergraduate  societies do you know that
their own Newspaper?  Not a  one or  two page
monthly photocopied  newsletter  but a  twice
The
alot
How
have
sorta
monthly 8 page NEWSPAPER!
The sports coordinator deserves a very special
mention. Stella Wong in one year has managed to do
more to get more of you involved in one sport or
another than I would humanly expect possible. She
has even started a sports council for Science in the
hopes of getting even more of you active. In every
Intramurals registration this year we have had more
teams or participants entered than the year before.
Linda Lo has done alot to turn the academics
committee from a concept or dream Into a concrete
reality. We now have an Academics committee that
meets every Wednesday at 5:30pm in the Scarfe
Student Lounge. If you have any concerns or believe
you should be a member of this very important
committee then go to a meeting or drop by Scarfe 9.
Many other individuals deserve special mention
such as Mike Wong, Alex Pope, Scott Davidson,
Margaret Fraser, Dale Shewchuk and many others.
Todd  Abiett
SUS President   87/88
It was only one year ago when the Science
Undergrad Society council consisted of aproximately
ten or eleven people. There are now ten executive
council members, ten year reps, five club reps,
seven ex-oficio officers, sixteen people involved in
the 432, seven people on the sports council, twelve
people on the academics committee and everyone of
these are increasing either their membership or
effectiveness or both.
By the end of last year we made an $1100
contribution to Rick Hansen. This year we have
already raised $400 dollars for charity.
I want to thank all of you who make this job
very rewarding. I hope those of you who didn't get
mentioned realize its because of the lack of space
and those of you who were mentioned don't die of
embarrassment.
In closing I will again appeal to those of you
who are thinking about getting involved but are
either too shy or figure you don't have the
experience or skills or time to be effective. Don't
miss your opportunity to be part of a growing
organization. It may be one of the most rewarding
things you ever do. El
Academics
Committee
So far, the best response for the Academics
Committee has been from the physics & chemistry
department -- WHERE ARE THE REST OF YOU SCIENTISTS
??? (i.e. the mathematicians, computer scientists,
microbiologists, etc.)
For those who are unaware, the Academics
Committee is a brand new committee set out to:
(i)   -improve communication between the student
body and the science departments,
-establish a Teaching Excellence Award,
-and to coordinate the 'Black & Blue'
Review.
why we need dedicated student represen-
titives from all departments on our committee. So
sign up at Scarf 9, or join our meeting on
Wednesdays at 5:30pm in the Scarff Lounge. This
will be a great opportunity for you to help your
fellow students, to meet people from other departments, and to GET INVOLVED. Let's see some
support from all departments.
Linda LO
Academics Coordinator
(ii)
(ill)
This is STATISTICS
Dr. Zidek writes that his duties are
very similar to that of other Heads
in the Faculty; half of the time is
spent on research related activity
and the remaining half on teaching.
He continues to say that teaching is
the university's most manifest
activity.
There is a tremendous amount of work
that goes on behind the scenes in
the development of courses,
selecting textbooks, registering
students and etc.  He says that all
faculty are involved in this
activity but a heavier load lies on
the Heads to maintain order in the
administrative end.
"It is obvious that the store of
scientific knowledge is increasing
very rapidly so, of course, planning
and preparation has to be done on an
on-going basis."
Aside from new textbooks having to
be written reflecting changes, there
is an ever-flowing stream of
technology finding its way into the
classroom and into the syllabus.  He
believes that by doing research, it
aids one to become a better
undergraduate classroom teacher.
Dr.  Zidek's work involves the
statistical problem of measuring the
effects of acid deposition.
Dr.   Zidek
    __         ^        _    n:^f|;Sv|5:!;;
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The  ratio     of  good   looking  SUS  members  to  good   looking EUS
members   is   43:2.
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.    _<-   from B
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-lot  to  Scarfe  9.
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The total a^nt
tuition  is  s"-
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,.ff's acco
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•6^
4.00,   3.00,   2.00  are   the   starfleet  coordinates   of  the   SUS's
office.
Tht
3   favorite   expressions:
'Beam me   up  Scotty*   -Star   Trek (HOffers)
•Book   ' em,   Damo'   -Hawaii  Five  0 (3 Idkk/x)
'Look  pal*-Miami  Vice & Utters)
/^^ZZ^
a. w     »o o*-
edA
,  >pO*e .-\V^'
<>6 ^
\* ^
"Do you know something about  irradiation?"
"Do  you have an opinion on irradiation?"
SEND US YOUR THOUGHTS (preferably in writing)
to THE  432-  in Scarce  9.
*4        v^
The average number of commercials from Monday to Saturday on
one channel.
As this is the last week for entries to
our contest, get those pens and pencils
rolling!  Do you know why the paper is
called THE 432?
You may be the lucky one 	
to take a friend out to "FOGG
AND SUDS"
with a gift certificate for $40.  Other
prizes include Science Wind-breakers,
worth $30 and the ever-popular "SUDS" t-
shirt.  Let's hear from you!
GRAND PRIZE:
Dinner for two at
"FOGG  AND SUDS".
BI-WEEKLY PRIZE:
A Science wind-
breaker for the
best entry.
ENTRY PRIZE
"SUDS" shirt, drawn
from entries meetina
deadline. 4 will be
given away.
O
o
o
CONTEST RULES
1. The contest 1b open to Science students only.
SUS executives are not eligible to enter.
2. Each entry must be accompanied by a fully
completed ORIGINAL entry form.  Copies of the
entry form will not be accepted.
3. All entries will be considered for the Bi-
. weekly Prize and the Entry Prize meeting the
bi-weekly entry deadline.
4. All entries become the property of the SUS and
will not be returned.
5. The contest closes OCTOBER 16, 1987.
6. The decision of the judges is final.
THE    432
c&nfed/
Name:
Phone:
'00 a J^ & c d   /
m
Drop off your entries in the SUS
Contest Box, Scarfe 9, immediately! bi. ca <L» ti £5 *»  1 sir 66
Lines   (approx.25  words).
For  bulk  rates   inquire  at
Scarfe   9  or   leave  message
with  Jean  Guay  228-4235.
«
Wanted:
- Berne   +  Levy Physiology
40$
- Zar   Biostatistics        35$
- Alcock  Animal   Behavior
25$
Call John 922-4036 Aft.7
p. m.
For   Sale:
- Datsun 1979 Pick-up
Truck.      Ideal  work   truck.
Will  consider   trade   for
good motorcycle (400 -
750) $1500
Phone: T.J.      734-1357
After   6   p.m.
'hilst roaming about the expanses of this university, I have
happened upon the few of you brave enough to make comments
about this paper, the 432. Most of you ask what the name
means. Although I am one of the four or so people who knows,
if you think this article will tell you, you're wrong. That,
however, is quite irrelevant.
What I was going to say was that, in talking to the
above-mentioned people, I heard mostly positive comments,
especially when the 432 was compared with the pink-papered
journal published by those who inhabit the nether regions in
the vicinity of B-lot. However, one recommendation surfaced:
more humour. This paper isn't funny enough, you said. I'm
here to rectify that.
I could begin by swamping you with witty sayings, hilarious
cartoons, side-splitting jokes, and tastefully avant-garde
satire, but I won't, for two reasons: (a) I'm not that
funny, and (b) I'm not that funny. As well, I wouldn't want
to  induce  some kind of horrific culture shock.
^J CO CM
In the year 1875, a cowboy was riding his horse along a
well-used trail in Montana. He came upon a sign which read:
MAN WITH BEST MEMORY IN THE WORLD 10 MILES  >
The cowboy directed his horse to follow the sign. After ten
miles of riding along a winding, dusty trail, he came upon a
brightly painted teepee sitting dlsarmingly in the middle of
the desert. Somewhat surprised, the cowboy dismounted and
entered the teepee, preparing to utter the customary native
Indian greeting, "How!" He was so surprised by the
incredible penetrating eyes of the old Indian man sitting
cross-legged on the floor that he entirely forgot to do so,
and merely blurted out his question.
"What did you have for breakfast on October 19th, 1862?"
The Indian looked at him with those piercing eyes and
replied confidently: "Eggs."
The cowboy was satisfied and impressed, gave the old man
some money for his trouble, and left.
Some ten years later, the same cowboy was riding along the
same trail and saw the same sign, by now somewhat weathered
and  battered, but still reading: MAN WITH BEST MEMORY IN THE
WORLD  10 MILES  >. Again he followed it and came upon the
same teepee, now faded and cracked. This time, the cowboy
steeled himself against the man's eyes, walked in, raised
his right hand, and proclaimed "HowJ" in a very dignified
manner.
P HYSIGS
UBC
ATTENTION;
All Science Students .
Have you ever wanted your
own quiet study place
that you can call home?
Then sign up now for a
carrell in the Physics
Society located in
Hennings   307.
Uhemistry!
Astronomy!
Aerospace!
Comp. Sc.I
Microbiology!
Math!
Geology!
Let's   hear   from
vou!   Your  audience
is  waiting.
"Scrambled," replied the old man.
CLUB: Pre-Medical Society
PLACE:       Meet at  IRC Building?  G-30  for Field Trip
to childrenfs Hospital.
TIME:       -12:30  -  2:15 October  8.-1987
CLUB: Pre-Medical Society
PLACE: WOOD #1  in  IRC Building
TIME: 12:30  -  1:30  October  13  1987
TOPIC: B.C* .Health Care by Dx»Blather wick
CLUB: Pre-Dental,Society
PLACE:       WOOD  #5   in  IRC Building
TIHE: 12:30 - 1:30 October 8  1987
TOPIC:     .Dean of Admissions -in -Dentistry will talk
on requirements.  Hew Members welcome.
WE      CMALLiENGE:      YOU 1
DEPARTMENT
NO. OF
STUDENTS
TEAMS       % OF
CHALLENGED DEPARTMENT
FIRST YEARS
1100
3
2.7
BIOLOGY
543
2
5.5
GENERAL SCIENCE
255
1
3.9
BIOCHEMISTRY
246
1
4.1
CHEMISTRY
228
1
4.4
COMPUTER SCIENCE
204
1
4.9
ZOOLOGY
186
1
5.4
MICROBIOLOGY
181
1
5.5
GEOLOGY/GEOGRAPHY
157
1
6.4
PHYSICS
155
1
6.5
MATHEMATICS
151
1
6.6
PSYCHOLOGY
99
C
0.0
ASTRONOMY/GEOPHYSICS
66
0
0.0
PHYSIOLOGY
66
0
0.0
PHARMACOLOGY
44
0
0.0
TOTAL
3681
14
3.8
The Science students of the department of
PHYSICS challenge all other departments to
have at least one team in the Day of the
Longboat. Even though we are one of the
smaller departments, we will once again prove
our physical ability (our mental prowess is
undisputed) as the rest of you whine or make
excuses for your larger departments. To make
it easier for you we won't specify men's,
women's or corec teams. Just raise one team.
Remember profs and TAs are eligible to be on
your team so don't  be shy.   This should be
1 one of the most enjoyable events of the year
so come out for a couple of hours and
remember the free clam bake (seafood) and
bzzr garden that follows.  See you there!
A glossary for research reports
C D GRAHAM, JR.
FnmMtuiPn-    it has lone been known that. .
#»»?». 75 ("917).
I haven't bothered to look up
the original reference
... interesting to me
... of great theoretical and
practical importance
While it has not been possible to The experiments didn't work
provide definite answers to these out, but I figured I could at
questions ... least get a publication out of it
The W-Pb system was chosen as The fellow in die next lab had
especially suitable to show the some already made up
predicted behaviour. ...
High-purity...
Very high purity .. .
Extremely high purity . ..
Super-purity. ..
Spectroscopically pure ...
A fiducial reference line ...
Three of the samples were
chosen for detailed study	
... accidentally strained during
mounting
... handled with extreme care
throughout the experiments
Typical results are shown ...
Although some detail has been
lost in reproduction, it is clear
from the original micrograph
that...
Presumably at longer times ...   I didn't take time to find out
The agreement with the
predicted curve is excellent
Composition unknown except
for the exaggerated claims of
the supplier
A scratch
The results on the others didn't
make sense and were ignored
... dropped on the floor
... not dropped on the floor
The best results are shown
It is impossible to tell from the
micrograph
good
satisfactory
fair
fair
poor-
doubtful
imaginary
.. as good as could be
expected
These results will be reported
at a later date
The most reliable values are
those of Jones
It is suggested that...
It is believed that...
It may be that...
It is generally believed that..,
It might be argued that...
I might possibly get around to
this sometime
He was a student of mine
I think
A couple of other guys think
so too
I have such a good answer to
this objection that I shall now
raise it
I don't understand it
Neither does anybody else
Wrong
It is clear that much additional
work will be required before a
complete understanding ...
Unfortunately, a quantitative
theory to account for these
effects has not been formulated
Correct within an order of
magnitude
It is to be hoped that this work  This paper isn't very good,
will stimulate further work in     but neither are any of the
the field others in this miserable
subject
Thanks are due to Joe Glotz for Glotz did the work and Doe
assistance with the experiments  explained what it meant
and to John Doe for valuable
discussions
Technological progress has merely provided us with more efficient means for going backwards.
ALDOUS HUXLEY m   n
1 ' ■/%
(T~*
■w+-m
lr
W T
1  ■
■
_.H«
■
■
H
« J*
1  . ■
■ JT ■
■
■
M
w
L J ■
■
■. M
■
■
B.
*
■ ■ ■
■ ■ ■
The United Way is holding their 3km Charity
Run on Friday, October 23 at 12:30 noon outside
the SUB. Let's show our full forces by donating a
and $2 for this special occasion. But
you have to run? Walk, jog, or crawl!
friend to piggy back you, get someone to
in a wagon or drag somebody along. Let's
get out there and show that SCIENCE cai:es.
Last year, the faculty/staff from UBC had
13.4% participation and raised $115,000. If they
can do it, why can't we? Let's get 15% out there!
That's approximately 700 students. As th« motto
goes:  "United we stand."
Grover Wong, Charity Co-ordinator
1/2 hour
who said
Get you
pull you
THE
S c i. « r> cs e
Undergraduat e>
S ©i c 1 e t. y
£t
Ed ucat i on  St udent
Ass ociat 1 on
Proudly      IPirosera*
A Lip Sync Contest with $900 in Prizes
AND
A DANCE, Featuring the Band
W I RE D
In one spectacular Night:
Friday November 13th
in SUB Ballroom
Tickets 5.00
AVAILABLE NOW
SUB AMS Box Office
Contestants for Lip Sync still accepted
Sign up with a few friends and have a
Ball in the Ballroom!
BRIEF
UBC Radio is cele-
brationg its 50th
anniversary.  A
review show and  a
banquet will be
held in the SUB
Ballroom at 7:00pm.
Tickets are $15 at
the door for students and $25 for
non-students.  The
event is held on
October 8.  See you
there!
Come to school on
October 9 wearing
gold and blue to
show school spirit.
Remember, blue is
our color!
UBC Hockey is
playing for the
Empress Cup on
Friday Oct. 9 at
8:00pm.  If you
wear blue or gold,
you'll be eligible
to shoot a puck and
win great prizes!
If you come in a
group of 15 or
more, a free
draught is on the
house if we win.
Let's cheer them
on!  It's free.
Careers Day in the
SUB today, tomorrow and Friday.
Come and see your
future.
WHEN 'PROFESSOR
G120UT>   -PsycMOkOtiK-
Ed's Note
\
On Fridjv
Octobe
y    ?  THF 4 ■* ">
received a letter.  Cut and
Basted wi
th iett.
lis from our
newsDaper, it
read:  'To the
Editor of
THE 4 3
7 . '  This seemed
verv susd
icious.  Tearina
open the
letter,
we were shoe
ked
to find a
letter from the
infamous
"BLACK
HAND".  Tvoed
: 4-
i      J- 1-
read as
follows:
This
is a nessacre from K
ilroy, leader
of the Blackhand.
Don't exist huh.
..then how do
vou
explain
this little note
then...a
f iament
of vou fermented
imaainat
ion.  We exist and
vou know
it!  Bu
t we're still
not
easv to
find and even
harder to
catch.
We know who
you
are and
we know where you
live.  Te
11 the
authorities t
o qo
to hell.
Remember Science
holds the
power.
..and we have
ass
umed cont
rol...we have
assumed control.
..we have assumed
control.
..we have assumed
control..
•
It was sianed wi
th an imDrint
of
a hand; 1
eft-hand, by the
way.  Ta k
ing precaution, we have
sent the
letter to the
crime ana
1 vs i s j
ab  on campus.
We
should k
now the results
within two weeks
.  THE 432 wi
11 keeo you posted.
To svtovo yoo ALU
THAT MWJ-KS A£EAl'T
TT"""-" ™"	
J^ was   £
first y
UBC. H
majors,
in Engl
sure we
interes
bit sur
calling
Smith)
thought
educati
of Engl
infamou
despair
resh out of high school, like all other
ear science students, and happy to be at
aving chosen Science over English as my
I was looking forward to my first day
ish 100 (Section Z) nevertheless.  I was
would get a good professor and
ting reading material.  However, I was a
prised to find our stern professor
us by our last names (ie. Mr./Miss
and making "witty" remarks(or so he
) by putting down science students,
on students and his last year's section
ish 100.  This Dr. "X", the soon-to-be
s professor led our section into
We found out that Dr. X presented his lectures
in an "interesting" way.  He would make vague
references to pieces we had read in the course
book and then spent an hour pontificating about
several literary works that we had never read
or in some cases, never heard of, with the same
supposed theme as our actual assignment.
Discussion in class was not encouraged and so,
we sat and stared as he gabbed	
INSIGHT
Further shock came with the return of our first
essays (the Monday after the last week of
course changes -yes, I'm prepared to believe he
planned it).  As we stared in horror at the
grades. Dr. X explained: "I've given you all C-
on this paper to give you an idea of what is
expected in this course."  Dr. X's subseguent
"marking scheme" did not change; with the
average assigned grade being "C".  The class
started to regard the whole matter as ci bit of
a joke; all of our assignments were either
overnight or in-class essays.  Surely, the
English department, we thought, would have to
scale the grades.  Slowly but surely, the
original enthusiastic attitude of the class
disintegrated and the hostility we felt towards
Dr. X for was vented in our final professor
evaluation.
Our section's mark were not scaled upwards and
at least 11 out of the 19 students received a
grade of "P", which is a low average for a
section considering that the students had
excelled in high school English and received
88% or higher on the EPT.  A few students went
to the Head of English 100 to complain but to
no avail.  The problem, we were told, was that
an English 100 class's marks was only scaled
according to the number of failures.  One
student was told that the class evaluations of
Dr. X was not read as it was an "experimental"
section for him, whatever that meant.
It is disgusting, in a course all first year
students take, that there is no system for
making sure assigned grades are fair or that
mark distribution between sections are
balanced.  Thank God I chose to major in
Science,, where a mark depends on skill and the
quality of work done, rather than on a
professor's marking bias.
ome   Profs
7 Flash
Congradulations
to Stella  Wonq,
Science Sports
Coordinator for
winning a murial
from intramurals
for being
coordinator for
the month of
September.
Congrats!
Science women won
the touch
football
tournament on
October 26.
Congradulations!
They also won the
mascot contest!
Men's Div. II
(Microbioloqy)
won the Div II
touch football
tournament too!
Well Done!
Science I placed
5th in the Logan
Cycle 200 and
Science II made
it into the
finals.
Way to go!
In the Inaugural
road run, 4
science women
placed in the top
ten. Hey!
The novice
category of the
Cycle Criterium
was won by Carl
Jacobson. Great!
SPORTS
at
^SSZSESSSl
SCIENCE    STUDENTS
SUNDAY OCTOBER
JS**^r^SttP
£jiMS «f* TEN/
)$£»'$,\JotfHS»rG«E<
K\\l
Catb&oiubs
DAY OF THE LONG BOAT
In celebration of our splendid native Indian heritage
Intramural Sports Is hosting a colourful long-boat
\ canoe race along the sandy shores of Spanish Banks..'
A And to make this unique event even more memorable |
A you are Invited to a delicious clam bake on the beach j
following the event.
K.^\\VKmKOMK\^x.
iir I'MFs
Cost UbO^Tm^iw   ";^1^\
<:««   reaisW a.V SCAftFF*c? ?"*" *T"**t' O
<~pk 222-1235 ^""^ « » ***<- f\
Details:
Saturday, October 24 (10:00)
Pre-race clinic at False Creek
Canoe Club -instructions and
race strategy will be covered
-comopulsory for all
participants
Sunday, October 25
(Spanish Banks)
-heats begin at 10:00am
-teams must check In on beach
-captains will be issued
paddles/life jackets -ALL
paddlers must wear lifejackets
-teams enter canoes in water
(wear runners I) -boats begin
race by the sound of a drum
-patrol boats will act as
escorts en route -at Jericho,
one member runs up, rings bell,
returns to boat -the boat races
back to Spanish Banks -CLAMBAKB
follows
-each paddler receives a ticket
in the registration packet to
enter the serving area -awards
follow
Sounds like fun? There's only
one way to find out.  Get on a
team and let the games
begin....
oin  in a new Intramural event this year!  "Day of the Long
Boats" is a canoe race along Spanish Banks and after the
event, there is a CLAMBAKE on the beach, with all the food
provided by Tortellini's.  (BZZR-anyone?...)
Teams are made up of 10 people-men, women or co-rec.
Starting in the water, teams will paddle to the Jericho
Sailing Club and back to Spanish Banks.  The fastest boat in
each category wins INCREDIBLE prizes!
Science wants to make this a really special event and we
are offering commemorative badges to all participants on
Science teams.  It will identify you as a participant in the
very first UBC Intramural Long Boat Race.
To offset the cost, science will rebate you for 1/3 of
the cost to enter; for all teams.  Registration cost is
$150/team ($15/person) and so with your rebate, it ONLY costs
$10/person to register for the pre-race clinic, the race, and
the post-race party.  How's that for a deal!
To make this event more interesting, Physics has issued
a challenge to ALL other departments to raise at least ONE
TEAM for this race. ONLY 10 people. If you want to
participate but can't quite get ten people together, come to
SCARFE 9 or phone 228-4235 and talk to Stella. We'll do the
rest. Register soon because the deadline is Friday, OCT. 16
at 1:00pm.
5=30*00
Chis year's First
Science Bszr Garden!
Don't miss it!
V

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