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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2002-02-27

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 The University  of  British  Columbia
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF FEBRUARY 27, 2002
Attendance
The Sixth Regular Meeting of the Senate of the University of British Columbia for the
Session 2001/02 was held on Wednesday, February 27, 2002 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 102,
George F. Curtis Building.
Present: President M. C. Piper (Chair), Vice President B. C. McBride, Dean F. S. Abbott,
Dr. P. Adebar, Mr. R. Affleck, Ms. C. Bekkers, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dr. R. W. Blake, Mr. P.
T. Brady, Dr. H. M. Burt, Dean J. A. Cairns, Mr. T. C. Y. Chan, Mr. C. Eaton, Dr. D. W.
Fielding, Dr. D. Fisher, Ms. M. Friesen, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Dr. D. Granot, Dr. S. W.
Hamilton, Dr. P. E. Harding, Ms. J. Hutton, Dr. R. Irwin, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. C.
Jillings, Mr. I. Kathrada, Dr. B. S. Lalli, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Dr. M. MacEntee, Dean pro
tem. A. Martin-Matthews, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dr. K. MacQueen, Ms. V. G. Mirehouse,
Mr. R. W. Morasiewicz, Dr. F. P. D. Navin, Dr. P. N. Nemetz, Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Dr. J.
Perry, Ms. C. Quinlan, Dr. V. Raoul, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten, Prof. A. F. Sheppard, Dr. C.
Shields, Mr. B. Simpson, Dr. D. Sjerve, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Ms. D. Soochan, Mr. C. Ste-
Croix, Dr. B. Stelck, Dr. R. Tees, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dean R. J. Tierney, Mr. D.
Tompkins, Ms. G. Y. C. Tsai, Mr. D. R. Verma, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. R. A.
Yaworsky, Dean E. H. K. Yen, Mr. W. Yuen.
Regrets: Dr. W. L. Sauder (Chancellor), Dean J. Blom, Mr. P. T. Burns, Mr. A. Campbell,
Dean F. Granot, Mr. E. Greathed, Ms. M. Hassen, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Rev. T. J.
Hanrahan, Dr. J. Helliwell, Mr. R. R. Hira, Dr. D. D. Kitts, Dean M. M. Klawe, Dr. S. B.
Knight, Dr. V. LeMay, Mr. G. Lloyd, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Mr. B. J. MacLean, Dr. P. L.
Marshall, Dr. W. R. McMaster, Dean D. Muzyka, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon, Dean M.
Quayle, Ms. H. E. Roman, Dean J. N. Saddler, Dr. K. Schonert-Reichl, Ms. L. M.
Sparrow, Mr. E. Storm, Mr. W. Tong, Dr. R. Wilson.
Senate Membership
Dr. Rita Irwin replaced Dr. Ricki Goldman-Segall as faculty representative from the
Faculty of Education.
Vol. 2001/02 12846
 Vancouver Senate 12847
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
The following corrections were accepted by the Secretary of Senate:
1. Attendance. Add Dean M. Isaacson and Dr. P. Adebar to the list of attendees.
2. Other Business, Universitas 21 and U21 Global. Add the following sentence, "The
President remarked that the questions outlined in the email message would be
addressed in upcoming regular reports to Senate about Universitas 21 by the Vice
President, Academic & Provost."
Dr. Tees l        That the Minutes of the meeting of January 23,
Dr. Williams J       2002 be approved with the above
amendments.
Carried.
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
CANADA FOUNDATION FOR INNOVATION (CFI)
The President announced that UBC had recently been awarded $76 million in federal
research funding through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI). UBC had
submitted proposals in the total amount of $140 million, and President Piper had been
hopeful that one third of that amount would be approved. The President was pleased to
report that funding levels had surpassed her initial hopes, and that UBC had placed first
in Canada. A wide range of projects were funded, including projects in the humanities,
social sciences, and science.
PROVINCIAL BUDGET
The provincial government had released its budget for 2002 - 2003 on February 19, 2002.
Although the University had not yet received official notice, government representatives
had indicated that funding was to remain static for the following three years. The
President anticipated a balanced budget, without any significant cuts.
As the freeze on tuition fees had been lifted, the University was engaged in discussions
about possible tuition fee increases. Proposed tuition fee levels would be submitted to the
Senate Budget Committee to the Board of Governors or its approval in March 2002.
 Vancouver Senate 12848
Minutes of February 27,2002	
From the Board of Governors
FUNDING FOR INDIRECT RESEARCH COSTS
It had been confirmed that UBC was to receive approximately $14 million in federal
funding toward the indirect costs of research. Of the $14 million, approximately $2
million had been allocated to hospital infrastructure costs.
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations: subject, where
applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented without formal
reference to the President, and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new programs
be asked to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
i.      The establishment of the Harold and Dorrie Merilees Chair for the Study of
Democracy
(p. 12841)
ii.      Curriculum proposals from the Faculties of Arts, Forestry, Graduate Studies, and
Science
(pp. 12836-9)
Academic Policy Committee
DEFERRED AND SUPPLEMENTAL EXAMINATIONS
Dr. Tees presented the following report as Chair of the Committee.
A Proposal to Modify the Calendar Statements on Deferred Examinations
Current Statements in the UBC Calendar 2001/02
p. 36 Examinations
Deferred and Supplemental Examinations
Deferred and Supplemental examinations will be held in late July or early August.
Applications may be made to Enrolment Services by June 24, 2002 and must be accompanied
by the required fee. Examinations may be written at the University or arrangements may be
made to write off campus with the approval of Enrolment Services.
In special cases a student may be permitted to write examinations at a university outside
British Columbia or at a special centre other than a university if satisfactory arrangements can
be made within Canada. Since permission is contingent on completion of arrangements, only
early applications to write in special centres will be considered.
In the event that a candidate is unable to write an examination, a refund of the required fee
will be considered if the candidate submits an adequate explanation to the Registrar prior to
the scheduled examination period.
p. 37 Grading Practices
 Vancouver Senate 12849
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Academic Policy Committee
STANDINGS
Deferred Standing (SD) may be granted when a student has a valid reason for not completing
course requirements as scheduled and does not qualify for Aegrotat standing. Students granted
Deferred standing in Winter Session courses must complete all outstanding course
requirements by August 23 following. Students granted Deferred standing in Summer Session
courses must complete all outstanding work by December 25 following. Students granted
Deferred standing are responsible for making satisfactory arrangements with their instructors
for completion of outstanding course requirements. If a student fails to complete the deferred
requirements by the dates specified, the Deferred standing will be replaced with a grade or
standing that reflects requirements completed in the course. Students unable to meet the
specified deadlines because of further medical, emotional or other difficulties must make an
additional application for Academic Concession no later than August 31 for Winter Session
courses or December 31 for Summer Session courses following the original deferral. See
"Deferred and Supplemental Examinations", p.36.
The Issues
The " outstanding work" referred to under " STANDINGS" usually is the final examination
since Deferred standing normally is granted only when a student misses that component of the
course requirements (see "Academic Concession", p.39). Thus Deferred standing normally
results in a student writing a deferred examination. For many reasons, it is not to the
advantage of either the student or the department to have such students wait until the summer
following to complete course requirements.
1. The longer a student waits before writing the exam, the more difficult the student may
find recalling the material;
2. Instructors may not be available when summer deferred examinations are written and
so the grade may not be posted until well into the next fall term;
3. Instructors often modify their initial marking scheme when they see the nature of the
responses given by the majority of students. When there is only one (or are only a few)
responses to mark, as is often the case for deferred examinations written in the July-
August period, there is a chance that an ambiguous question could go unchallenged. A
less-than-optimum evaluation of a student's knowledge may result. The value of
comparative evaluation within a group of students is lost;
4. When a term-one course in Winter Session is prerequisite to a term-two course
students who must wait for the summer deferred examination period lose the chance
to complete the two-course package during one Winter Session. Some departments
schedule special make-up examinations early in the second term (first or second week
of January) to enable students with SD to complete the course and so continue into the
next course. These make-up examinations are written by many students and provide
an assessment that is as valid as the missed examination;
5. When a course is offered in both terms of Winter Session a student with SD could
write the final examination in April together with the term-two class. Not only would
that student finish the course earlier but also there would be less chance that the
student would write an examination that turned out to be unfair in any way, certainly
less chance than for a special examination prepared for one or a few students
 Vancouver Senate 12850
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Academic Policy Committee
to write during the summer. This example could be extended to courses offered in
Summer Session as well as Winter Session, with even more opportunities for students
to write regularly scheduled examinations, written by groups of students.
The Proposal is to modify the sections on DEFERRED AND SUPPLEMENTAL
EXAMINATIONS AND STANDINGS to the following (changes in italics):
p. 36 Examinations
Deferred and Supplemental Examinations
A deferred examination is an examination written at a later date, while a supplemental
examination is an examination in addition to the usual examination(s) given for a course.
Students granted Deferred standing by the Dean of the Faculty in which the student is enrolled
may be given the opportunity to complete outstanding course work by writing the next
regularly scheduled examination in the course or a make-up examination if the department
offering the course agrees. Students should see the section of the Calendar in which the
regulations for the Faculty offering the course are detailed (e.g., all students with Deferred
standing in a Science course should consult the Faculty of Science section).
For Winter Session courses, Deferred and Supplemental examinations for students who have
not completed outstanding course work will be held in late July or early August or on another
date to be determined by the department. Applications may be made to Enrolment Services by
June XX, 2003 and must be accompanied by the required fee. Examinations may be written at
the University or arrangements may be made to write off campus with the approval of
Enrolment Services.
For Summer Session courses, Supplemental and Deferred examinations that cannot be written
as a regularly scheduled December examination will be held at the University on one date in
December near the start of the regular examination period or on another date to be
determined by the department. Applications must be made to Enrolment Services by xxxx YY,
2003 and must be accompanied by the required fee.
In special cases a student may be permitted to write examinations at a university outside
British Columbia or at a special centre other than a university if satisfactory arrangements can
be made within Canada. Since permission is contingent on completion of arrangements, only
early applications to write in special centres will be considered.
In the event that a candidate is unable to write an examination, a refund of the required fee
will be considered if the candidate submits an adequate explanation to the Registrar prior to
the scheduled examination period.
p.37 Grading Practices
STANDINGS
Deferred Standing (SD) may be granted by the dean of the Faculty in which the student is
enrolled when a student has a valid reason for not completing course requirements as
scheduled and does not qualify for Aegrotat standing (see "Academic Concession" on p.39).
Students granted Deferred standing in Winter Session courses must complete all outstanding
course requirements by August 23 following. Students granted Deferred
 Vancouver Senate 12851
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Admissions Committee
standing in Summer Session courses must complete all outstanding work by December 25
following. Students granted Deferred standing are responsible for making satisfactory
arrangements with their instructors for completion of outstanding course requirements. If a
student fails to complete the deferred requirements by the dates specified, the Deferred
standing will be replaced with a grade or standing that reflects requirements completed in the
course. Students unable to meet the specified deadlines because of further medical, emotional
or other difficulties must make an additional application for Academic Concession no later
than August 31 for Winter Session courses or December 31 for Summer Session courses
following the original deferral. See "Deferred and Supplemental Examinations", p.36.
Rationale:
The additions give Faculties the right to provide earlier opportunities for completing course
requirements as preferred alternatives to the summer deferred examination period. A second
addition makes a distinction between winter and summer session courses and clarifies the
procedure for deferred Summer Session examinations. A third (in "Standings") clarifies that it
is the student's Dean who grants Deferred standing.
Dr. Tees l        That the proposed changes to the Calendar
Dr. Rosengarten J       statements on "Deferred and Supplemental
Examinations" and "Standings" be approved.
Carried.
Admissions Committee
Dr. Rosengarten presented the reports, as Chair of the Committee.
BACHELOR OF EDUCATION, SECONDARY OPTION WITH HOME ECONOMICS
The following report had been circulated.
Department of Curriculum Studies, Faculty of Education
Admission Requirement Changes for the B.Ed - Secondary Option with Home
Economics
Present Calendar Entry (2001/02 Calendar, p.181; column one)
Web Site: www.educ.ubc.ca/teacher_ed
Home Economics Concentration and Major
For the Home Economics Concentration, students must take 12 to 18 credits of
introductory courses in home economics and/or family studies; 18 senior credits from
the areas of family studies and either foods and nutrition or textiles and clothing, or a
combination of the latter two areas.
For the Home Economics Major, students must take an additional 12 senior credits in
the above.
 Vancouver Senate 12852
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Admissions Committee
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Home Economics Concentration and Major
Applicants normally hold one of the following degrees: a Bachelor of Applied Design,
a Bachelor of Arts in Family Studies, a Bachelor of Home Economics, a Bachelor of
Science in Food, Nutrition and Health with a major in Human Ecology, or a degree
equivalent to one of the first three. Students holding other degrees will also be
considered if they have met the following admission requirements.
Concentration: Applicants must have completed 12 and preferably 18 credits of first-
and second- year level courses in family studies and food studies and/or textiles
studies. In addition, applicants must have completed a minimum of 18 credits at third-
and/or fourth-year level. These 18 credits must include 1) 9 credits in family studies
and 2) 9 credits in food studies or 9 credits in textiles studies or 9 credits in a
combination of food studies and textiles studies.
Major: Applicants must have completed requirements for a concentration and an
additional 12 credits at third- and/or fourth-year level in one of or preferably any
combination of family studies, food studies and textiles studies.
Family studies must include courses in family resource management, family
relationships, and human development. Food studies must include courses in foods
and nutrition. Textiles studies must include courses in textiles, apparel construction
and social/cultural aspects of clothing.
Applicants may at the discretion of the Faculty be required to provide a statement
indicating what they have done in formal and/or informal settings that has
contributed to enhancing their skill levels in apparel construction or food preparation
or both.
Rationale:
The first paragraph will help students enrolling in various degree programs prepare
their course work necessary to the teacher education program. The degree programs
specified above reflect recent changes to the UBC program as well as arrangements
made between the Faculty of Education and Kwantlen University College. This
paragraph will also help make students aware of an option of teaching Home
Economics as their future career path. In general the proposed changes will make the
current requirements clearer to students.
Effective Date: As soon as approved.
Dr. Rosengarten l        That the proposed changes to the Bachelor of
Dr. Fisher i       Education, Secondary Option with Home
Economics be approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12853
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Admissions Committee
DENTISTRY: DELETION OF ADMISSION OF STUDENTS WITH ADVANCED STANDING
The following report had been circulated.
Faculty of Dentistry
Deletion of the "Admission of Students with Advanced Standing" Undergraduate Admissions
category
Present Calendar Entry (page 174, column 1):
Admission of Students with Advanced Standing (delete the entire section)
The committee will consider applicants who are seeking admission to third-year Dentistry and
who are currently enrolled in second year of a North American dental program accredited by
either the Canadian Commission on Dental Accreditation or the American Dental
Association's Commission. Applicants will be considered for transfer only when a vacancy
exists. Applicants
1. must have an overall academic average of 70% or higher;
2. must successfully complete the second-year dental program at an accredited institution;
3. must submit a CAD$200 non-refundable application fee to cover the costs of
evaluating educational documents;
4. must submit references (forms for this purpose are included in the application
materials). One letter of reference must be a letter of good standing from the dean or
designate of the applicant's current dental school;
5. will be required to attend a personal interview at UBC;
6. must contact the Admissions Office at (604)822-3416
begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (604) 822-
3416       end_of_the_skype_highlighting by June 15 to determine if there is a vacancy;
7. must apply by June 30 for the following August.
Students who have been required to withdraw from another dental school for academic or
other reasons are not eligible for admission. A separate three-day orientation prior to the start
of the third year will be required to introduce the student to the UBC clinical system and the
UBC curriculum. A clinical orientation fee of $2,100 will be assessed.
Further information and application forms are available from the Admissions Coordinator,
Faculty of Dentistry, The University of British Columbia, 350-2194 Health Sciences Mall,
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, telephone (604)822-3416, fax (604)822-4532, or through the
Dentistry website www.dentistry.ubc.ca.
Proposed Calendar Entry: Replace with the following as indicated in bold.
Admission of Students with Advanced Standing
The Faculty of Dentistry has no arrangements for considering and/or accepting advanced
standing applicants from other dental schools.
 Vancouver Senate 12854
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Admissions Committee and Curriculum Committee
Rationale:
• this admission option was viable under the old curriculum where the academic year
ran from September through April but not under the current PBL curriculum which
requires that Dentistry students begin classes in mid to late-August and end at the end
of June.
• while available, in actual practice this admission option has not been applied in the last
10 years due to enrollment, curriculum, and timing issues.
• under PBL curriculum, students entering into 3rd year are required to enroll in DENT
420.3 which is a one month course that begins in late May. It would thus be very
difficult if not impossible for an advanced standing candidate to complete their 2nd
year at their home institution and transfer to UBC in time to participate in DENT
420.3.
• Dentistry Admissions would not be able to assess the advanced standing candidate's
grades in time as the Admissions process requires completion of the advanced standing
candidate's academic evaluation process prior to 15 April for entry in May.
Effective Date: 30 November 2001.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That the proposal to delete the "Admission of
Dean Yen J        Students with Advanced Standing"
Undergraduate Admissions Category be
approved.
Carried.
Admissions Committee and Curriculum Committee
Proposals for three new graduate programs had been circulated jointly by the Admissions
and Curriculum Committees.
N.B. Only the admission statements for each of the following three new programs have
been included in the Minutes of Senate. Complete program descriptions appear in the
Curriculum Committee report that was circulated to members of Senate. Copies are
available from the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL, NEAR EASTERN AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES - NEW
GRADUATE PROGRAM
M.A. IN ANCIENT CULTURE, RELIGION, & ETHNICITY IN THE MEDITERRANEAN
AND THE NEAR EAST (ACRE)
Present Calendar Entry: N/A
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Applicants for admission must meet the minimum requirements of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. This program will involve a broad, multidisciplinary approach
 Vancouver Senate 12855
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Admissions Committee and Curriculum Committee
to the Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds. Cross-cultural perspectives will be
encouraged.
To be admitted with full standing applicants must hold a bachelor's degree. This will normally
be in Classics (Latin and Greek), Classical Studies (non-language program), or Near
Eastern/Religious Studies, but could be in a related discipline (e.g. Anthropology, History,
Philosophy, Political Science, etc.).
Well qualified and highly recommended applicants with the equivalent of a Minor (30 credits)
in one of the above areas will be required to complete a further 12 credits during the first year
of graduate study. Undergraduate courses taken to complete the Major do not count for credit
towards the Master's degree.
Students who do not meet admission requirements may, in exceptional circumstances, and
within the limits set down by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, be admitted as qualifying
students until they obtain the necessary prerequisites for full admission.
Applicants must have completed at least 6 credits (or equivalent) in one of the classical
languages prior to admission (minimum grade: B-/68%): GREK 100 (Introductory Classical
Greek) or GREK 125 (New Testament Greek) or LATN 100 (Introductory Latin) or HEBR
305 (Introductory Biblical Hebrew) or ARBC 300 (Introductory Classical Arabic). It is
strongly recommended that applicants have completed two years of language study before
entrance.
Rationale:
The Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies wishes to introduce a new
M.A. in Ancient Culture, Religion and Ethnicity in the Mediterranean and the Near East
(ACRE). Consultations have taken place with the Depts. of Asian Studies and Anthropology
and Sociology and the program has received their approval. The proposed M.A. has also
received the approval of the Govt, of B.C.
This new M.A. will involve a broad, multidisciplinary approach to the Ancient Mediterranean
and Near Eastern worlds. Cross-cultural perspectives will be encouraged and appropriate
graduate courses from other departments in the Faculty of Arts may be incorporated into
student's program.
Details of the program are given in the description. This M.A. will include six new courses,
each of which has been introduced separately. These include CNRS 500 (3), CNRS 501 (3),
CNRS 502 (3-12), CNRS 503 (3-12), CNRS 504 (3-12), and CNRS 505 (3-12). A course
outline has been attached for the first two courses. In the case of the last four courses,
different topics will be studied. A sample course outline for a possible topic has been included
for each of these courses.
Effective Date: September 2002.
Dr. Berger l        That the Master of Arts in Ancient Culture,
Dr. Rosengarten J        Religion, and Ethnicity in the Mediterranean
and Near East (ACRE), and its admission
statement, be approved.
 Vancouver Senate 12856
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Admissions Committee and Curriculum Committee
Carried.
FACULTY OF EDUCATION - NEW GRADUATE PROGRAM
MASTER OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
Present Calendar Entry: N/A
Proposed Calendar Location: 2001/02 Calendar, page 220, in the "Education" entry in
column 3, between the entries for "Master of Arts in Education and the Master of Education"
and "Off-Campus Graduate Work"
Proposed Calendar Entry:
The Master of Educational Technology (MET) is a Faculty of Education joint degree program
offered online in partnership with Tec de Monterrey, a Mexican University that specializes in
online education. It provides students with an opportunity to participate with a culturally
diverse student population.
The MET degree supports a professional development, course-based program (non-thesis)
consisting of a minimum of 30 credits of course work with at least 12 credits of core course
work and 18 credits of electives. Fees are on a per course basis. Students are required to meet
the general requirements for admission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies at UBC.
Technology Based Distributed Learning (TBDL) Certificate program students at UBC may be
eligible to request transfer credits.
Rationale:
The Master of Educational Technology degree is a new designation that is distinct from the
MA and MEd degrees currently offered by the Faculty of Education. A new degree will afford
the Faculty several opportunities: a) our partner institution, Tec de Monterrey, already has a
Master of Educational Technology degree: by creating a MET degree at UBC we can partner
with them under the same degree title, b) the MET degree is a recognized degree found at
many universities and as such has currency in our profession (giving us a stronger marketing
profile), and c) by creating a new degree that is dedicated to a totally online course-based
program in educational technology, we can easily set this program apart from our current
MEd and MA programs that address educational technology through mixed methods and
thesis/project based requirements. Partnering between UBC and Tec de Monterrey also means
a new program with its own fee structure and course delivery. It seems prudent to ensure that
no confusion arises.
Admission to the MET will be through one of two routes. One route is by meeting the usual
Faculty of Graduate Studies criteria for admission to a Master's program. The second route is
by laddering in the credits from a post-graduate certificate program associated with the MET.
In response to this MET laddering proposal, the Faculty of Graduate Studies has recently
developed a new policy allowing certificate students to ladder their certificate credits into a
master's program. This has passed the Graduate Council. The policy and rationale are as
follows.
 Vancouver Senate 12857
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Admissions Committee and Curriculum Committee
"Courses taken for or toward a post-graduate UBC certificate program may be fully
transferable toward affiliated master's programs (i.e. proposed postgraduate Certificate in
Educational Technology and Master of Educational Technology) where:
a) The postgraduate Certificate admissions criteria are the same as master's degree
admission criteria.
b) The postgraduate Certificate offers the same courses that comprise part of the
master's course requirements.
c) The passing grade for the postgraduate Certificate program is the same as for the
Master's program.
d) The courses that comprise the postgraduate Certificate program are 500-level
courses that have been approved (or will be approved) by UBC's Curriculum
Committee, Graduate Council and Senate."
"Rationale:
Closely aligned UBC post-graduate certificate programs that are, by their very design, meant
to ladder toward particular master's programs should have an administratively
straightforward mechanism for the transfer of these courses toward the graduate degree.
Current course transfer regulations are specifically geared toward students transferring in
credits from other universities, or from the bachelor's degree, or from like master's degrees.
The post-graduate certificate is a relatively new offering at UBC and existing regulations on
transfer credit do not extend to (and are not relevant) to UBC postgraduate certificate
programs.
The above model comprises part of the proposal for the new Master of Educational
Technology program (which has a closely related post-graduate certificate program) and is
supported by the Faculty of Graduate Studies as an appropriate model for future graduate
programs that wish to have a post-graduate certificate program laddering arrangement toward
a master's degree program."
The website address for information concerning admission to the MET will be included in the
calendar once the program is approved and the website is created."
Effective Date: May 2002.
Dr. Berger l        That the Master of Educational Technology,
Dean Tierney J        an^ its admission statement, be approved.
In response to a query, Dean Tierney stated that some of the courses comprising this
Master's degree were developed at UBC, some were developed at Tec de Monterrey, and
some were created jointly by the two institutions.
 Vancouver Senate 12858
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Admissions Committee and Curriculum Committee
Dr. Tees, as Chair of the Academic Policy Committee, stated that the Committee generally
reviews inter-university degree proposals, and had found that the proposers of the MET
had satisfactorily addressed the foreseeable issues related to the joint nature of the degree.
The motion was
put and carried.
FACULTY OF EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES
MASTER OF EDUCATION IN ADULT LEARNING AND GLOBAL CHANGE
Present Calendar Entry
N/A
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Master of Education in Adult Learning and Global Change
An intercontinental, web-based, coursework-only professional master's degree focusing on
adult learning within the context of global change. This is a collaborative program involving,
in addition to UBC, Linkoping University (Sweden), University of the Western Cape (South
Africa) and University of Technology, Sydney (Australia). The curriculum covers the forms of
adult learning found in different cultural contexts and the role of learning in understanding
and responding to globalizing forces and their impacts on workplaces, communities,
economies and the environment. Students proceed through the two-year, 30-credit program as
a cohort drawn from the four participating institutions.
Admission and Other Requirements: UBC applicants must meet the admission requirements of
the Faculty of Graduate Studies. They must supply a writing sample, letters of reference and a
letter of intent, and demonstrate English proficiency. When required, the minimum TOEFL
score is 600 (paper based) or 250 (computer based), or the equivalent for other acceptable
tests of English proficiency. Applicants are reminded that reliable and regular e-mail and
internet access are essential in this program.
Details on the program and application procedures can be found at
http://www.edst.educ.ubc.ca/ or by contacting the Graduate Secretary, Department of
Educational Studies, Faculty of Education, 2125 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Tel:
(604) 822-6647, E-mail: grad.edst@ubc.ca.
Rationale:
The need to participate in the global economy, work across cultural boundaries and celebrate
difference makes it imperative that people learn in and about the global context and how to
foster change. Adult learning is at the centre of attempts to foster change and enormous
advantages flow from being able to work within more than one cultural horizon. The primary
aim of this program, then, is to prepare practitioners for the challenges of working in diverse
cultural contexts in which adult learning plays a key role in understanding and responding to
globalizing forces and their impacts on workplaces, communities, economies and the
environment. Because it is web-based, professionally
 Vancouver Senate 12859
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Continuing Studies Committee
-focused and exposes students to faculty and co-learners from throughout the world, the
program will open a new market for graduate study in adult education. The program
complements current offerings-and benefits from the unique strengths-of the four participating
universities.
Effective Date: June 2002
Dr. Berger l        That the Master of Education in Adult
Dr. Fisher i        Learning and Global Change, and its
admission statement, be approved.
Carried.
Continuing Studies Committee
DIPLOMA IN MUSIC PERFORMANCE
N.B. The full text of this report does not appear in the Minutes of Senate. Copies are
available from the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
As Chair of the Committee, Dean Yen presented a proposal to establish a Diploma in
Music Performance. Appended to the proposal was a consultation form indicating
support from the Music Library.
Dean Yen i        That Senate approve the establishment of a
Mr. Brady i        Diploma in Music Performance.
Carried.
Nominating Committee
Dr. Williams presented the reports on behalf of the Nominating Committee.
SENATE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON THE ACADEMIC IMPLICATIONS OF MANDATORY
RETIREMENT AT AGE 65
Dr. Williams made the following comments in introducing the report:
"Will you still need me? Will you still feed me? When I'm 65\
The motion passed at the December 2001 Senate meeting requires Senate to debate the
academic implications of mandatory retirement at age 65. This would appear to contain
two separate but
 Vancouver Senate 12860
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Nominating Committee
related questions: the question of whether retirement should be mandatory at all and if so,
whether 65 is still the appropriate age. The Nominating Committee is required to set up a
committee to 'inform the debate'.
The key concern of the motion relates to the effects of the present policy on the academic
health of UBC in the light of the retirement profile for the next few years. At present,
provisions exist for emeriti to be appointed on a year to year basis, normally as sessional
lecturers, in order that they may contribute to the teaching needs of the university.
Information on the existing teaching contributions of emeriti, together with an assessment
of any perceived impediments to their participation, would provide some guidance as to
their potential to address future needs. It would seem that such a committee should be
broadly based so as to reflect the experiences in different parts of the University and also
in the private sector. Comparative data on practices in other provinces and countries,
together with some evaluation of their consequences, would seem to be essential. Finally
the impact of any proposed changes on the concept of tenure should be considered.
In order to compile the necessary information within the timeframe of the motion, the
committee will require significant administrative support."
Senate Ad-Hoc Committee on the Academic Implications of Mandatory Retirement at
Age 65
Terms of Reference:
To inform the debate on the academic implications of mandatory retirement at age 65 through
the provision of relevant information, including:
1. A survey of the present teaching contributions made by emeriti to the university and
the associated arrangements. To ascertain whether any impediments exist to their
continued participation under present policies.
2. To estimate the future teaching needs of the university as envisioned in the Academic
Plan and to consider whether these are likely to be met under the present pol-
 Vancouver Senate 12861
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Nominating Committee
icies. Reference should also be made to the Senate Report on Teaching Quality and
Effectiveness.
3.   To obtain comparative data on policies in comparable institutions in other provinces
and countries together with an evaluation of their consequences.
Committee Membership
Christina Bekkers (Student Agricultural Sciences)
John Helliwell (Arts)
Carol Jillings (Applied Science)
Robert Lowe (Convocation)
Michael MacEntee (Dentistry)
Gren Patey (Science)
Tony Sheppard (Law)
Richard Tees (Arts)
David Tompkins (Student Graduate Studies)
Dr. Williams l        That Senate approve the terms of reference and
Dr. Rosengarten J        membership of the Senate Ad Hoc Committee
on the Academic Implications of Mandatory
Retirement at Age 65.
In response to a query from Mr. Tompkins, Dr. Williams confirmed that, in accordance
with the directive given to the Nominating Committee, the Ad Hoc Committee would be
required to report back to Senate in May 2002. Dr. Tees commented that the listed terms
of reference could involve many years of work and require significant resources. Vice
President McBride noted that the Ad Hoc Committee was free to add to its membership
and seek resources as it saw fit. He suggested that Walter Sudmant, Director, Planning
and Institutional Research, be added to the Committee. This amendment to the Ad Hoc
Committee membership was accepted.
The motion was
put and carried
as amended.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of February 27,2002
12862
Senate Committee Membership
Senate Committee Membership
The Nominating Committee recommended the following changes to the membership of
Committees of Senate:
ACADEMIC BUILDING NEEDS
Dr. F. Navin replaces Mr. R. Lowe
CONTINUING STUDIES
Ms. M. Friesen to fill a vacancy
LIBRARY
Dr. F. Navin and Mr. R. Hira to fill vacancies
STUDENT AWARDS
Dr. D. Fielding to fill a vacancy
Dr. Williams
Dean Isaacson
That Senate accept the recommendations of the
Nominating Committee concerning Senate
Committee membership.
Carried.
Student Awards Committee
Please see 'Appendix A: New Awards.'
Dr. Thompson presented new awards in the total amount of $95 K per year for UBC
students.
Dr. Thompson
Dr. Hamilton
That the new awards be accepted and
forwarded for approval by the Board of
Governors, and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12863
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDIES IN ECONOMICS (IASE)
N.B. The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Vice President McBride circulated a proposal to establish an Institute for Advanced
Studies in Economics as a joint initiative of the Faculties of Arts and Commerce &
Business Administration.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean pro tem. Martin-      i        Institute for Advanced Studies in Economics.
Matthews
Carried.
DEPARTMENT OF MINING AND MINERAL PROCESS ENGINEERING NAME CHANGE
Vice President McBride    l        That the name of the Department of Mining
Dean Isaacson i        and Mineral Process Engineering be changed
to the Department of Mining Engineering,
effective April 1, 2002.
Carried.
REPORT FROM THE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON THE CREATIVE USE OF LEARNING
TECHNOLOGY (ACCULT)
Please see 'Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology.'
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate endorse the report "Advancing the
Mr. McNulty i        Creative Use of Learning Technology."
Vice President McBride noted that electronic learning technology was growing in
importance in teaching and learning activities. He invited Dr. Guppy, Chair of the Ad
Hoc Committee, to speak to the report.
 Vancouver Senate 12864
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Dr. Guppy stated that one of the core debates taking place was whether technology
enhanced learning, especially considering the multitude of other excellent ways to engage
students. Given the pace of change, however, UBC must participate in the development
and implementation of learning technology (LT) in wise and thoughtful ways. Dr. Guppy
stated that the report recommended a decentralized system in which control resides with
faculty members with some central facilitation. Dr. Guppy highlighted the need for a team
approach, where units such as TAG, the Library, and IT Services would provide core
design and technological services to support faculty members in their teaching. Funding
models would need to change, in that Deans would reallocate additional money to LT
support units. Dr. Guppy urged people to consider what sort of relationship should exist
in the future between the faculties and central service units such as TAG and DE&T.
Should these units eventually be devolved?
As Chair of the Budget Committee, Dr. MacEntee asked whether some group had been
assigned to investigate the budgetary implications of providing appropriate space and
human resources to support the recommendations in the report. He asked whether, by
endorsing the report, Senate was also endorsing the spending of money. Dr. Guppy
replied that Senate would not be endorsing spending money, but would be acknowledging
what was already happening, given that some Faculties were already quite advanced in
terms of LT implementation. Funding allocation decisions would still be made at the
department and Faculty levels. Dr. Guppy confirmed that the Office of the Provost had
committed $120 K in general purpose operating funding for the hiring of a Director for
the Creative Use of Learning Technology, and added that deans were reallocating much
larger amounts of money to learning technology on a regular basis.
Dr. Blake urged caution in the use of language about faculty members "choosing" to use
learning technologies, because the promotion and tenure process did reward those who
did not use LT,
 Vancouver Senate 12865
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
effectively eliminating conscious choices. He urged the Committee to graft onto the report
some projections about workload and other implications for faculty.
Dr. Sjerve spoke in support of the use of LT, adding that individual faculty must be
willing to spend time to make it work, and that more technical staff resources were
needed. He expressed the opinion that a decentralized model would be best, in which
individual departments are responsible for determining how LT is used.
Mr. Affleck expressed some reserve about endorsing such an ambitious plan without
information about actual costs. He also registered concern about the recommendation
(#2) that high priority be assigned to funding LT development through new revenue. Mr.
Affleck stated that the deans should perhaps not give LT top priority over other
competing needs.
Dr. Burt spoke in support of the ideas behind the report, stating that UBC must work to
build a complete framework of resources to support LT. She suggested that faculty
continue to explore, as suggested by the report, innovative uses of learning technology
that did not entail huge costs.
There was some discussion about the possible eventual adoption of a model similar to
Acadia University, where students are required to purchase a computer as a condition of
their registration. Dr. Guppy stated that it was not yet clear whether there was enough
web-based content available to justify asking every student to purchase a computer
package.
The motion to
endorse was put
and carried.
LEARNING COMMITTEE OF SENATE
Vice President McBride stated that one of the primary responsibilities of Senate was to
manage the academic environment, and that perhaps the Senate should examine whether
it had in place
 Vancouver Senate 12866
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
the best Committee structure in order to accomplish this important task. Vice President
McBride suggested that a standing committee on learning might be responsible for high-
level questions such as how to incorporate research and interactive learning into the
student experience, and how to best teach writing skills. He emphasized that such a
committee would not impose certain methods on faculty members, but would instead
become a forum for discussing best practices.
Vice President McBride    l        That the Nominating Committee be asked to
Dr. Berger i        develop a mandate for a "Learning
Committee," to be presented at the May 2002
meeting of Senate.
There was some discussion about whether members of Senate should take more time to
think about the idea of a Learning Committee before referring the matter to the
Nominating Committee, particularly since the proposal was for a standing, rather than an
ad hoc, committee. President Piper stated that a full debate could take place when the
Nominating Committee brought forward its proposed terms of reference.
The motion to
refer to the
Nominating
Committee was
put and carried.
REPORT ON TEACHING AND LEARNING
N.B. The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Vice President McBride had circulated a report written by Dr. Guppy in consultation with
the deans, which outlined recent changes to teaching and learning at UBC. In particular,
the report addressed the issue of student evaluations of courses.
Vice President McBride reported that almost every course was evaluated by students, both
via numerical ranking and commentary. Evaluations were administered by someone other
than the
 Vancouver Senate 12867
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
course instructor, and were provided to the instructor and the department head after the
course examination. In most cases, evaluation summaries were either available to students
for viewing in deans' offices, or they were published by the Alma Mater Society.
Of the thousands of courses offered at UBC, between 30 and 40 courses generally
received unsatisfactory ratings. Evaluations varied by the students' year in their respective
programs, the size of the class, and by whether or not the course was required. Sometimes
the unsatisfactory ratings were the result of inadequate textbooks or physical space. In the
rare case that the instructor him/herself was not teaching effectively, it was the
responsibility of the department head to determine how the situation was to be improved.
Such instructors might be assigned a mentor, or asked to attend a class on instructional
skills. Recent policy changes meant that teaching skills play a larger role in P&T
decisions.
Dr. Pedersen expressed surprise that University of Alberta faculty had received many
more 3-M teaching prizes than had UBC faculty. Vice President McBride surmised that
the University of Alberta had submitted a large number of nominations, and suggested
that deans establish nominating committees (where they do not already exist) to ensure
that good teachers are nominated for this prestigious award.
Dr. Pedersen disagreed with the wording of item #4 under "Unsatisfactory Teaching,"
which stated, "Ensure unsatisfactory teachers are not re-appointed or given tenure as
teachers." Dr. Pedersen suggested that that item be revised to stipulate that poor teachers
should not be granted tenure of any kind.
 Vancouver Senate 12868
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
CHAIR IN PUNJABI LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND SIKH STUDIES
As requested by Dr. Bikkar Singh Lalli at the January 23, 2002 meeting of Senate, Vice
President McBride gave a report on the status of the Chair in Punjabi Language,
Literature and Sikh Studies.
The Chair was established in 1987, with $350 K in funding from the federal government
and a matching amount from the Sikh community, for a total of $700 K. Dr. Harjit S.
Oberoi held the chair from its establishment until 1996, and received a Killam University
Teaching Prize during his tenure as Chair. Dr. Oberoi had also served as a mentor for a
student from the Faculty of Arts who was awarded a Governor General's Silver Medal.
Since $700 K was no longer a sufficient amount to fund a replacement for Dr. Oberoi, the
Department of Asian Studies had opted to use the Chair's funds to appoint a sessional
instructor to teach courses in Punjabi language and literature. Remaining funds were used
to sponsor visiting scholars. Vice President McBride gave some examples of distinguished
Sikh scholars who had visited UBC under the auspices of the Chair.
Dr. Lalli stated that, since the memorandum of agreement for the Chair had not been
circulated, it was difficult for members of Senate to appreciate the problem associated
with the Chair. Dr. Lalli referenced commitments made by the University to fill a chair in
response to first $600 K in funding, and then later $700 K. He added that approximately
$48 K per year is drawn from the Chair for the teaching of Punjabi language and
literature classes. Dr. Lalli urged the University, since Punjabi was the second most-
commonly spoken ethnic language in Canada, to grant it the same status as other
languages taught at UBC. By neglecting to appoint a chair, the University had not fulfilled
its signed duty under the memorandum of agreement.
Dr. Lalli noted that the Sikh community remained willing to raise some additional funds,
and asked whether the University could do the same. He added that these additional
funds should not be necessary, because the initial $700 K was supposed to have been
sufficient to sustain the Chair. Dr. Lalli stated that the
 Vancouver Senate 12869
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Report of the University Librarian
University had the moral obligation to honour the commitment made to the Federation of
Sikh Societies of Canada.
Vice President McBride responded that the objectives of the Chair were being met under
the current arrangement, and pointed out that Dr. Oberoi, who now holds a tenured
faculty position, would not have been hired at UBC without resources from the Chair.
President Piper stated that the amount required to establish a chair had risen to $2.5
million for 2002, and that there was no possibility of sustaining a chair with only $700 K
in funding.
Report of the University Librarian
N.B. The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Ms. Quinlan had circulated, for information, the 2000/2001 Report of the University
Librarian to the Senate. In her remarks, Ms. Quinlan recalled one of her first tours of the
Main Library upon her arrival in 1997. Although her initial understanding was that the
card catalogue had been retained for nostalgic purposes, it became clear that UBC was
actually one of the last research libraries in Canada to convert its card catalogue to
electronic format. Phase I of this conversion was 97% complete at the time of the Senate
meeting.
Ms. Quinlan drew attention to the opening of the Chapman Learning Commons, the gift
of the Dr. H. Colin Slim Stravinsky collection, and a donation in the amount of $1
million from the Sutherland Foundation.
 Vancouver Senate 12870
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Adjournment
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The next regular meeting of
Senate will be held on Wednesday, March 20, 2002.
 Vancouver Senate 12871
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Appendix A: New Awards
Appendix A: New Awards
ARTHRITIS Society Vancouver Community Group James Kwan Scholarship: A $500 scholarship
has been endowed by the Vancouver Community Group of The Arthritis Society, B.C. & Yukon
Division for a graduate or undergraduate student in the School of Rehabilitation Sciences who is
interested in clinical research in Rheumatology. The award is made on the recommendation of the
School of Rehabilitation Sciences and, in the case of a graduate student, in consultation with the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
ASSOCIATION of Administrative and Professional Staff of UBC Bursary: Bursaries totalling
$2,500 are offered by the Association of Administrative and Professional Staff of UBC for
students in any year or faculty who are in need of financial assistance. (First award available
2002/2003 academic year)
ASSOCIATION of Women in Finance Prize: A $500 prize is offered by the Association of Women
in Finance, an organization that encourages and supports women in the financial profession, to an
outstanding undergraduate student completing the third year of the Finance option in the
Bachelor of Commerce program. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration. (First award available 2001/2002 academic year)
David BATESON Prize in Science Education: A $300 prize has been endowed by friends and
faculty in recognition of Dr. David Bateson's contribution to science education. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education to a science education graduate student
presenting a paper at the Canadian Society for the Study of Education's (CSSE) annual meeting.
Preference is given to a doctoral student in the early years of the program who has not attended
the conference before and has no research or project funding. (First award available 2002/2003
academic year)
BISCO Dental Products (Canada) Inc. Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $2,000 are offered by
Bisco Dental Products (Canada) Inc. for students in the D.M.D. program. Scholarships of at least
$1,000 each will be awarded to students entering first, second or third year of the program. The
awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Dentistry. (First award available
2002/2003 academic year)
Dorothy Irene BLEUE Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $1,300 have been endowed through a
bequest by Dorothy Irene Bleue for women students in any faculty or school. (First award
available 2002/2003 academic year)
Dorothy A. CAMERON Memorial Bursary: Bursaries covering one year's tuition for each
recipient have been endowed in memory of Dorothy A. Cameron by her husband, Donald
Cameron, for students in the first year of the M.D. program. (First award available 2002/2003
academic year)
David M.C. CHAN Scholarship in Medicine: Scholarships totalling $600 have been endowed in
honour of Professor David M.C. Chan for students in the M.D. program participating in an
international elective or exchange. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
 Vancouver Senate 12 8 72
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Appendix A: New Awards
Carole T. CORCORAN Memorial Award in Law: A $1,200 award has been endowed in memory
of Carole T. Corcoran (L.L.B. 1990), one of Canada's foremost aboriginal lawyers, by her family,
friends and colleagues. The award is given to a graduating Canadian aboriginal student in the
Faculty of Law with high academic standing. Community involvement and the ability to serve,
work with, and lead both aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadians are considered. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (First award available 2002/2003 academic
year)
Gladys C. CRAWFORD First Nations Bursary: Bursaries totalling $13,000 have been endowed
through a bequest by Gladys Caroline Crawford for First Nations students in any year or faculty.
Wherever possible, funding is distributed to students enrolled in a wide range of First Nations
programs at the University. The awards are made on the recommendation of the First Nations
House of Learning. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
Gladys C. CRAWFORD First Nations Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $13,000 have been
endowed through a bequest by Gladys Caroline Crawford for First Nations students in any year
or faculty. Wherever possible, funding is distributed to students enrolled in a wide range of First
Nations programs at the University. The awards are made on the recommendation of the First
Nations House of Darning and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty
of Graduate Studies. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
DAIRY Farmers of Canada Undergraduate Prize: A $700 prize is offered by the Dairy Farmers of
Canada to a student graduating with a B.Sc. (Food, Nutrition and Health), with a concentration
in either Dietetics or Nutritional Sciences, who is continuing on to an internship or graduate
studies. The prize is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. (First
award available 2001/2002 academic year)
Fred B. DALLA-LANA Memorial Scholarship in Architecture: A $1,000 scholarship has been
endowed by the Dalla-Lana family and DGBK Architects in memory of Fred B. Dalla-Lana for
students in the Master of Architecture and Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture programs.
The scholarship is given to a second-year student who demonstrates exceptional creative skill in
the successive refinement of architectural plans and details. The award is made on the
recommendation of the School of Architecture in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. (First award available 2001/2002 academic year)
Frank EASTHAM Memorial Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $1,250 have been endowed by
colleagues, friends and family in memory of Frank Eastham for student(s) in any year or faculty.
Frank Eastham joined UBC in 1991 and provided distinctive leadership in the area of human
resources. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
Kelly and Diane GIBNEY Bursary in Science: Bursaries totalling $900 have been endowed by
Kelly and Diane Gibney for undergraduate students in the Faculty of Science. (First award
available 2002/2003 academic year)
GRADUATING Class of Medicine 1968 Bursary: Bursaries totalling $900 have been endowed by
the Medicine Class of 1968 for undergraduate students in the M.D. program. (First award
available 2002/2003 academic year)
 Vancouver Senate 12873
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Appendix A: New Awards
Braham G. GRIFFITH Memorial Scholarship in Forest Resources Management: A $1,000
scholarship has been endowed in memory of Dr. Braham G. Griffith by Dr. J. Harry G. Smith.
Professor Griffith pioneered several long-term studies at the UBC Malcolm Knapp Research
Forest, including growth and yields plots and open growth trees. The scholarship is awarded to a
graduate student undertaking research relevant to management of the UBC Malcolm Knapp
Research Forest and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry in consultation
with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
GUICHON Family Award: Awards totalling $550 have been endowed by family, friends and
colleagues in memory of Lawrence Peter Guichon, one of British Columbia's pioneer cattlemen,
who was a recipient of a Doctor of Science degree (honoris causa) from UBC for his life-long
dedication to the enhancement of the cattle industry throughout the grasslands of B.C. The award
is given to an undergraduate or graduate student, with a defined interest in the ecology and
management of the natural grasslands of B.C., who has demonstrated leadership qualities. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. (First award
available 2002/2003 academic year)
A. HATTRICK Bursary in Education: Bursaries totalling $1,000 have been endowed by Andrew
Hattrick in honour of his family for students in the Faculty of Education. (First award available
2002/2003 academic year)
A. HATTRICK Scholarship in Education: A $1,000 scholarship has been endowed by Andrew
Hattrick in honour of his family for students in the Secondary Teacher Education Program. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education. (First award available
2002/2003 academic year)
Ann HAWSON Memorial Prize in Language Education: A $350 prize has been endowed by
friends and family in memory of Ann Hawson (Ph.D.-LLED, 1997), who passed away in 1998,
for a graduate student who has achieved a high standing in Language Education. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education. (First award available 2002/2003
academic year)
Rosa Wai Wai HO Scholarship in Asian Studies: A $1,500 scholarship has been endowed by
family and friends in memory of Rosa Wai Wai Ho for an undergraduate student in Asian Studies.
The scholarship is awarded on the recommendation of the Department of Asian Studies. (First
award available 2002/2003 academic year)
George R. HOWEY Prize in Chemical Engineering: A $350 prize has been endowed by friends
and family in honour of George R. Howey for the student obtaining the highest standing in third
year Chemical Engineering. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of
Chemical Engineering. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
Roy JURE Memorial Bursary in Earth and Ocean Sciences: Bursaries totalling $2,100 have been
endowed in memory of Roy Jure by his children for students in the Department of Earth and
Ocean Sciences. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
 Vancouver Senate 12 8 74
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Appendix A: New Awards
Elizabeth KENDALL Entrance Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $2,400 have been endowed by
Marie Kendall in honour of her sister for students entering the University directly from secondary
school. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
KILLAM-Donald N. Byers Memorial Prize: A $2,500 prize has been endowed in memory of
former Killam Trustee, Donald N. Byers. It is awarded to the highest-ranking Killam, Predoctoral
Fellow in the annual University Graduate Fellowship competition. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies in consultation with the UGF Adjudication
Committee. (First award available 2001/2002 academic year)
Gladys Estella LAIRD Fellowship: Fellowships valued at a full or partial University Graduate
Fellowship level have been endowed through a bequest by Gladys Estella Laird for students in
Chemistry who have demonstrated excellence, both in their course work and in their research.
The fellowships are made on the recommendation of the Department of Chemistry in consultation
with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
Doretta LEE Memorial Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $900 have been endowed in memory of
Doretta Lee for students enrolled in the M.D. program. (First award available 2002/2003
academic year)
John H. McNEILL Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $2,000 have been endowed by alumni and
friends of John H. McNeill, former Dean of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, for
undergraduate and graduate students in the Faculty. The awards are made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. (First award available 2002/2003
academic year)
MEDICINE Class Act CARMS Bursary: Bursaries totalling $5,500 have been endowed by
graduating students from the Faculty of Medicine for fourth-year M.D. students involved in the
CARMS (Canadian Association of Residency Matching System) Program. (First award available
2002/2003 academic year)
Faculty of MEDICINE 50th Anniversary Entrance Bursary: Bursaries totalling $1,200 have been
endowed in honour of the 50th anniversary of the Faculty of Medicine at The University of British
Columbia for students entering the first year of the M.D. program who graduated from a B.C.
secondary school outside of the Greater Vancouver Regional District and the Capital Region
District. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
ODLUM Brown Limited Leadership Award: Awards totalling $1,800 have been endowed by
Odium Brown Limited for students with an interest in finance who are enrolled in the third or
fourth year of a Bachelor of Commerce program. Candidates must have demonstrated leadership,
participated in campus-related extra-curricular activities, and achieved good academic standing.
The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
Oral-B Award in Dentistry: A $1,000 award is offered by Oral-B to a student entering the D.M.D.
program in the Faculty of Dentistry who has an outstanding GPA, has excelled in the interview
process, and has demonstrated leadership in the community. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Dentistry. (First award available 2001/2002 academic year)
 Vancouver Senate 12 8 75
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Appendix A: New Awards
Douglas D. PATERSON Scholarship in Landscape Architecture: A $600 scholarship has been
endowed by Douglas D. Paterson for students enrolled in the Master of Landscape Architecture
program. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First award available 2002/2003 academic
year)
Kurt and Anne PAULUS Memorial Scholarship in Sociology: Scholarships totalling $2,200 have
been endowed in memory of her parents by Ingeborg Paulus for students specializing in Sociology.
The awards are made on the recommendation of the Department of Anthropology and Sociology
and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First
award available 2002/2003 academic year)
Dean of PHARMACEUTICAL Sciences Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $1,550 have been
endowed by alumni and friends of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences for undergraduate
students in the Faculty. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
Gordon and Marion SMITH Prize in Art Education: A $300 prize has been endowed by friends
and faculty in recognition of Gordon Smith's lifetime contribution to art education and the
support given to him by his wife, Marion. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Education to a graduate student who shows great potential as an artist and educator.
(First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
Tracey and Jerome SOH Leadership Award: A $1,000 award is offered by Tracey and Jerome Soh
to an undergraduate student in the Faculty of Applied Science who is majoring in Engineering
Physics. Candidates must have achieved a minimum 75% average in their most recent academic
year and must participate in extra-curricular activities such as intramural sports and Engineering
team projects. Financial circumstances may be taken into account. Students wishing to be
considered should submit a letter to the Director of the Engineering Physics Program no later than
November 30, including details of their extra-curricular activities. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Engineering Physics Program. (First award available 2002/2003 academic
year)
Paul E. THIELE Bursary: Bursaries totalling $300 have been endowed for students with
disabilities in recognition of Paul Thiele's thirty-two years of service to The University of British
Columbia. Paul Thiele, along with his late wife Judith, was instrumental in the establishment of
the Crane Library and Resource Centre, expanding it from a collection of Braille books to an
internationally recognized library and support service for persons requiring print alternatives.
Awards are made on the nomination of the Committee on Awards for Students With Disabilities.
(First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
THORSTEINSSONS Prize in Taxation II: Prizes totalling $1,000 are offered by the law firm of
Thorsteinssons to students in each section of Law 408 who achieve high standing. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (First award available 2001/2002 academic
year)
UNIVERSITY Women's Club of Vancouver Laura Tripp Memorial Scholarship: Scholarships
totalling $1,000 have been endowed by family and friends through the University Women's
 Vancouver Senate 12876
Minutes of February 27,2002	
Appendix A: New Awards
Club of Vancouver Trust Fund for Education in memory of Laura Tripp (1910-1999), a past
president of the University Women's Club of Vancouver and a leader in the development of the
Club at Hycroft. Mrs. A.J. Tripp left rural Manitoba in 1926 to obtain her degree at the
University of Manitoba, later becoming a school principal and president of the B.C. Women's
Hospital Auxiliary. The scholarships are awarded to undergraduate students. (First award
available 2002/2003 academic year)
Larry S. WEILER Memorial Scholarship in Chemistry: A $1,000 scholarship has been endowed
by friends, family and colleagues in memory of Larry S. Weiler for outstanding student(s) studying
synthetic organic chemistry. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of
Chemistry. (First award available 2002/2003 academic year)
George R. YATES Memorial Entrance Bursary: Bursaries totalling $1,500 have been endowed in
memory of George R. Yates (B.A., M.D. - UBC54) for students entering their first year of the
M.D. program who graduated from a B.C. secondary school outside the Greater Vancouver
Regional District and the Capital Regional District. (First award available 2002/2003 academic
year)
Previously-Approved Awards With Changes in Terms:
Award 02803 Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP A.J. McClean Prize in Trusts: The law firm of
Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP donates two prizes of $500 each for students who achieve high
standing in Trusts (Law 451). This award honours the contribution of Dr. A.J. (Bertie) McClean
to the law school and The University of British Columbia as professor, Dean of Law and
Associate Vice-President. The prizes are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law.
How amended? Existing annual award increased in value from $850 to $1,000 and re-named to
honour Dr. A.J. McClean, Professor Emeritus of Law at UBC.
Award 04370 - Man Kuan Scholarship: A $450 scholarship to honour Mr. and Mrs. Man Kuan's
commitment to education has been endowed by their family. It is awarded to a student who has
completed first year in the Faculties of Applied Science (Engineering), Forestry, or Science and is
proceeding to second year in any of these faculties. Preference is given to students who have
demonstrated leadership qualities. The award is made on the recommendation of the three
faculties on a rotating basis, starting with the Faculty of Applied Science in 2002/2003.
How amended? Since students can now enter all three faculties directly from high school, the
donor wants to open this second-year award to students in all three faculties (as opposed to
students from Science alone). This will necessitate setting up the award on SIS as one which
rotates.
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Minutes of February 27,2002	
Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
Committee Membership of ACCULT
Simon Albon: Pharmaceutical Sciences
Tony Bates: Director, Distance Education and Technology
Ted Dodds: AVP IT Services
Neil Guppy: AVP Academic Programs (Chair)
Evan Horrie: AMS
Dayna Lee-Baggley: Graduate Student Society
Kathy Pichora-Fuller: Audiology & Speech Sciences; IHEAR; Faculty Association
Gary Poole: Director, TAG; Faculty of Medicine
Janet Teasdale: Director of Student Development
Martha Whitehead: Head Information Services Division, Library
January 2002
I.      Introduction and Core Principles
E-learning is proliferating in education, business, and society. At UBC learning technology11
(LT) is increasingly central to our core activities. Already we have about 500 courses using LT;
we have LT support units in most faculties; and we have at least 35 professional staff whose
chief duties relate to LT. Most of this development has occurred in the last few years. At this
time, we need a set of concrete actions to position us properly to support current strengths and
to take best advantage of e-learning advances and challenges.
Core Principles
1. Enhance quality student learning - Used properly, LT can contribute to student
learning. In particular, LT can encourage learning that is interactive, self-paced,
collaborative, and problem/project-based. LT can also contribute to other learning
goals, including interdisciplinary/inter-professional, international, and research-linked
learning. In an organization with learning as a core mandate, we need to participate
actively, but wisely, as users of LT.
2. Decentralized initiative and control - The distinctive genius of the university is its
faculty. Curricular content flows from that genius and LT must be used by academic
units and individual faculty members as they believe will best benefit students. Policies
and practices must continue to stress that pedagogy drives LT, not vice versa. It
follows then that faculty members in specific academic units (Faculties, Schools,
Departments, Divisions) must play a lead role in LT decisions and uses.
1 A glossary is provided at the end of this report.
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
3. Central facilitation - Co-ordination among initiatives planned within Faculties and
Faculty LT units is essential. A small, agile, and alert central co-ordinating bodyshould
support the localized activity of colleagues to ensure that resources and knowledge can
be shared effectively. This central service unit ought to be structured as a facilitation
hub, providing virtual and real-time resource supports.
4. Co-ordinated LT and IT - Many units on campus have strong information technology
commitments, including individual Faculties, the library, ITServices, the Registrar's
Office, Continuing Studies, and others. IT has become essential in the learning,
research, and administrative functions of the university. LT must be included as a
central focus in the planning and implementation of the institution's IT initiatives.
77.      Background
i.      Recognizing Successes
UBC has a strong record of innovation in LT. WebCT began at UBC. We have one of the most
advanced Web-based student registration systems in North America. UBC's Distance
Education and Technology unit is internationally renowned. Our rapidly expanding e-library
initiatives and our advances in Web portal utilization establish us as a post-secondary leader in
a wide range of critical LT areas. Through ITServices we are implementing an advanced e-
business strategy to facilitate administrative operations, many of which support learning.
Yet another strength of UBC's learning programs comes in the quality and innovative nature
of curriculum in our twelve Faculties. Most Faculties have an organizational unit devoted to
LT. In LT units we have over 35 professional staff members with expertise in a range of skills
(e.g., web design, graphic design, project management, learning objects). UBC is also
pioneering the use of mixed-mode courses (courses containing comprehensive on-line, virtual,
and/or multi-media components that supplant a portion of normal class meeting time). Finally
UBC has a strong tradition of promoting teaching and learning, including LT, led by the
Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth. These initiatives will help us achieve UBC's
strategic vision, Trek 2000, where we articulate a commitment to "fully integrate information
technology with instruction in all areas."
We need a LT strategy building upon these successes. At the same time we must recognize that
not all our initiatives have been successful and we must ensure we can learn from missteps and
misdirections. Especially as advances in learning technology proliferate, we must continue
experimenting and evaluating.
ii.      Research, Video, and Discussion Paper
In preparing this report the committee relied on each of the following sources of information:
• LT workshops with students, staff, and faculty in each of the twelve Faculties (see
November 2000 preliminary discussion paper for details).
• Three university-wide public meetings with students, staff, and faculty.
• Numerous consultations with educational technology support staff.
• Comments on a video produced for the committee by Telestudios.
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
• Comments on a preliminary discussion paper (November, 2000).
• Presentations to and comments from the UBC Senate and the UBC Board of
Governors.
• Focus groups and discussions with students.
• Reviews of similar discussion documents and policy papers from peer institutions.
• Regular meetings of discussion and debate among the committee.
• Presentations at UBC from experts in the field and visits to peer institutions.
iii.      Why might someone choose to use LT?
Technological advances can support learning in various ways. For example, many uses of the
Web support learning, but not all of these are what we understand by LT. Having course
outlines, reading lists, or lecture/lab notes on the Web is sound pedagogy in many situations,
but this is simply using technology to support learning. In and of itself, this is not creative LT
as we use the term. Similarly having students' register via the Web or use portals to customize
information flow are important as supports for learning. Again, while critically important,
they are not in themselves what we understand as the creative use of LT in direct pedagogy.
Beyond the support of learning, LT ought to be transforming learning. Creatively used, LT
(especially LT characterized by electronic telecommunications and digital imaging) has one or
more of the following benefits:
a. Incorporates visualization, auralization, and/or simulation of learning material.
b. Extends opportunities for, and flexibility in, course participants interacting more,
whether as students with students, students with faculty, or students with teaching/lab
assistants.
c. Promotes the sharing of expertise by allowing our students to benefit from, and
interact with, experts off-site (or benefit from UBC expertise when off the Point Grey
campus - in practica, clinical settings, etc.).
d. Extends the reach of learning for students via enhanced access, almost instantaneously,
to educational resources from around the world (e.g., real time imaging, digitized
archives, today's Statistics Canada data).
e. Allows learners to review detailed learning material at a time, place, and pace that
meets their learning needs.
f. Affords expanded opportunities to represent knowledge, problem-solve, create, and
communicate using an array of multimedia palates.
g. Enhances access for students and reduces the demand on traditional physical
infrastructure as more learning occurs off campus.
h.   Permits greater management of knowledge by students by allowing them to organize
course material and learning resources in flexible ways that work best for them.
LT is not unique in promoting any of these eight features. As such, it is one among many ways
that UBC colleagues will continue teaching and learning. Nevertheless, used creatively, LT can
enhance both the quality and diversity of learning modes. As well, LT will evolve in ways
unanticipated by the eight features noted above and we need to be prepared for these LT
enrichments.
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
III.      General Rationale
i.      Future Scenario: Central Developments in Making LT Easier
Having hosted workshops and meetings across the campus, with faculty, staff, and students,
and having talked with hundreds of colleagues on these issues, we learned a good deal about
where people expect UBC's LT initiatives will be in the future. This future can be summarized
as follows:
1. A significant part of a student's learning at UBC will entail the use of LT (in courses
combining traditional and LT modes, or in fully distance education courses). More
flexibility will occur in the credit value of courses (both greater than and less than the
now fairly standard 3-6), and more course "modules" will be developed. LT will help
in promoting these changes. LT modules, using learning objects designed here and
elsewhere, will play an increasing role in many courses.
2. Many, but not all, faculty members will use LT as part of their teaching. All students
will enter UBC with increasingly sophisticated computing and information literacy
skills, and with expectations about high quality LT as part of their programs. These
students will, like now, also have the IT hardware necessary to benefit from LT.
3. Each Faculty will have in place appropriate support for LT. This will include resource
units with expert staff who can help faculty members develop curriculum, not only at
the module and course level, but also through more integrated LT across ranges of
linked courses. No one standard will fit all Faculties although Faculties will continue
as now to share expertise and experience. Ever greater attention will be paid to
enhancing or developing the LT skills of faculty members.
4. Curriculum will continue to be designed by faculty members, but increasingly
professional staff will contribute to design features of learning objects, courses, and
learning material linked across courses. The complement of professional LT staff will
grow to about one staff person for every twenty faculty members.
5. Academic support units will assist with LT (e.g., TAG, Library, ITServices, DE&T).
Support that is provided centrally or in local units will evolve, with some
Departmental LT-units taking over roles currently filled by Faculty LT-units. There
will be an ebb and flow among initiatives that are at one time centrally provided (e.g.,
distance courses) and at other times more distributed (e.g., LT platforms). Flexibility to
support local initiatives will be important here, while also balancing the advantages of
more co-ordinated approaches (e.g., students being able to "see" all of their courses
via one portal).
6. As the university student population continues to expand, LT will be used more to
address the growing issue of large impersonal lectures. LT will come not to
supplement, but supplant, a portion of the large delivery formats now used, freeing up
more time for smaller group seminars, workshops, laboratories, and other forms of
PBL (both problem and project-based), collaborative, and interactive learning (and
potentially easing demand for large classrooms).
7. Learning plans will incorporate LT more directly. In planning the curriculum, more
attention will be paid both to distance education and mixed mode courses. Various
milestones and benchmarks will begin appearing as academic units thoughtfully
incorporate more LT into the curriculum.
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
8. Information and communication technology will be more widely used across campus
for teaching, research, and administrative purposes. A robust e-strategy will more
seamlessly integrate across these diverse functions making navigation and use easier for
students, staff, and faculty.
9. Just as certain levels of literacy and numeracy are expected of our graduates,
information and communication technology literacy and agility will be expected. These
expectations will continue to vary across Faculties, but increasingly it will be assumed
that professionals will be creative and thoughtful users of information and
communication technology (ICT).
ii.      Moving Forward
We have made substantial progress on many of these developments already. Nevertheless
more needs to be done, especially since we know the possibilities for applying ICT will
continue evolving.
Making it easier for everyone who chooses to use LT must be the key objective. In meeting
this objective, an LT strategy must be inclusive. On the one hand it must not focus only on
elite users, but on the other hand it must not be a mandatory prescription applied to all. An
LT strategy must also foresee appropriate IT integration across campus, but not be holistic in
a manner that precludes choice and diversity in learning. Foremost, the strategy must enhance
learning for students.
A significant change will be the growth of professional staff involved in supporting curriculum
innovation and change. Time will continue to be a scarce commodity for faculty. Increased
support staff will be critical to faculty effectiveness (this staff complement will be important
not only for teaching and curriculum development, but also for research and administrative
support that uses the Web more).
We now have about 35 professional LT staff, in the order of 500 courses using the Web, and
LT units in almost every Faculty. Most of this has occurred recently. Projecting to the near
future, say 2007, we might anticipate changes of the following order of magnitude:
People (FTE's)
Now
Five Years Hence
Undergraduates
26,500
29,500
LT Staff
35
100
Tenure-track Faculty
1850
2100
Our mix of undergraduate student FTE's might look something like the following:
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
Undergraduate Students (FTE's)
Now
Five Years Hence 1
Distance
600
Double
Mixed Mode
500
Quadruple
Classroom Based
25,400
Slight Growth
We need also to determine how colleagues think this might change for graduate students.
TV.      Recommendations with Brief Rationale
UBC's distributed LT model currently has a number of Faculty-based LT-units. Related central
service units on campus (e.g., ITServices, Library system, Distance Education and Technology,
TAG) support these Faculty-based LT-units. We need to further strengthen this distributed LT
model.
The following recommendations are key steps we need to take to move forward, in keeping
with other major universities, to incorporate LT into our curriculum more fully.
As a set our recommendations are designed to further the objective of making it easier for
everyone who chooses to use LT.
i.       Overarching Recommendation:
Following from Trek 2000 and the Academic Plan,
That UBC endorses the creative use of learning technology insofar as it furthers the academic
excellence of courses and programs, and that we are committed to strengthening opportunities
for faculty, staff, and students to benefit from and build upon expertise in this area.
ii.      Individual Recommendations
What should we continue doing?
1. Encouraging and supporting LT initiatives based in Faculties and their units.
UBC has developed into a leading university using a model of decentralized decisionmaking. This model is appropriate for LT as well.
2. Providing central support as needed - WebCT, UNP, e-journals/e-reserves/e-books,
MyUBC
Some co-ordinated activity is beneficial (e.g., offering university-wide workshops).
Some activity is currently best provided centrally (e.g., distance education).
3. Providing student access and support (labs, help desks)
The vast majority of our students report having access to, and comfort in using,
computers. We need to continue providing computer labs, especially for high-end
usage, and providing student support service (e.g., help desks, software tutorials).
Faculties should continue to decide on any information and communication
technology requirements for their students.
4. Adding "smart space" on campus (in classrooms, in study areas, in residence).
An increasing amount of classroom and laboratory space is "wired" and more
residences
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
have internet connections. Wireless ports are also increasingly used. Meeting these
escalating demands must continue.
5. Leaving main LT spending priority decisions with Faculties and their units.
The content and design of the curriculum must be made within Faculties. Setting
priorities about revenue to be devoted to LT ought to rest mainly with those units.
6. Facilitating the continued development of innovative LT (e.g., WebCT, MyUBC).
By a mixture of local initiatives and central support we have developed some powerful
tools to either directly enhance or indirectly support learning. We need to continue
encouraging innovation and development.
7. Educating faculty, staff, and students about LT.
The creative use of LT depends upon ensuring that opportunities are readily available
for colleagues who wish to learn more about the possibilities and potentials of LT.
Much of this currently occurs in Faculties, via the Library, and through TAG. We need
to continue expanding this education. However, most of this work focuses upon
individual skills for specific courses, and we need to pay more attention to where LT
can help faculty and staff in transforming the curriculum and the related learning and
teaching environments.
What should we do differently?
A. Funding:
1. Provide enhanced recurring dollar support to Faculties via Provost for LT
Plans/Implementation.
Offering quality learning incorporating LT will cost money. We need to face this
squarely as a major issue. Early adopters of LT, as strong advocates and impassioned
proponents, worked long hours with little help. This will not work for the larger group
of faculty who understands LT benefits but will require more LT support staff.
2. Give high priority to funding LT development through any appropriate new revenue
flowing to UBC.
Faculties have supported LT development through reallocation (and this should
continue). However, requests for financial support from Deans, other members of
faculty, and LT support staff are mounting. Finding new money for LT is essential,
especially if UBC is to keep pace with developments at other peer institutions (e.g.,
University of Washington, MIT, McGill).
3. Create a LTEF to support LT Plans/Initiatives (perhaps as a distinct part of TLEF).
A significant part of curriculum innovation at UBC has been supported by the TLEF.
This fund has supported a variety of innovative LT initiatives, including LT platforms
(WebCT), individual courses (e.g., HIST 150, Path 327), and suites of courses (e.g.,
Pharmaceutical Sciences' Web-Based Learning Centre). Specifying a portion of this
fund to support LT will simply formalize a current practice and provide an avenue for
short-term financial support to new initiatives.
B. Learning:
4. Increase the pace of smart space renovations and be alert to opportunities to enhance
LT via learning commons, the new University Learning Centre, and other projects.
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
Financial constraints have made it impossible for UBC to renovate old space or build new
space at an optimal rate. LT development will be limited unless adequate learning space is
available, configured and assigned in ways that make best use of newer technologies. New
buildings must incorporate LT opportunities and be savvy about the possibilities of
"wireless" technology.
5. Encourage the development of more Mixed Mode courses at UBC.
As enrolments grow, time constraints on faculty, staff, and students have risen. LT in
Mixed Mode courses can help to alleviate some time pressures and allow greater use of
small group formats. We have two experiments underway in this area (Chemistry, English)
and we need to continue evaluating the potential of this delivery format.
6. Strengthen means for evaluating and assessing LT initiatives.
Recognizing that the evaluation of learning (as opposed to assessing what students know)
is difficult, we nevertheless must devote more time and creative thinking to the evaluation
and assessment of LT. TAG currently has a small one-time budget set aside for this and is
working collaboratively with the Faculty of Education. We also must commit to acting on
the results of such evaluation and assessment.
C. Organization and Governance
7. Hire a Director for the Creative Use of LT.
Working in support of Faculty-based LT units, we need a leader who can work to advance
common issues in LT. This involves co-ordination among units with interests in LT
(DE&T, TAG, ITServices, Library) as well as integration of LT with the overall IT
initiatives of UBC.
8. Create a central facilitation hub (virtual and real).
Efficiently sharing information and communicating actions can be enhanced through a
central hub. This needs to be a resource centre where faculty, staff, and students can find
access to information, to experts, to ideas, and to events related to LT.
9. Create a university-wide LT Action Committee with representation from Faculties, DE&T,
ITServices, Library, and TAG.
FATE (Faculty Alliance for Technology in Education) has developed as this working
group. This group needs to be more formally recognized and integrated into the UBC
administrative structure. This group already focuses upon moving forward with common
interests and this energy and vision needs to be maintained. This committee needs to
ensure information is being shared, duplication of effort is being minimized, and resources
are being used wisely.
10. Integrate LT into a university-wide Information Technology Action Committee.
As IT platforms and applications proliferate, we need an overarching university group to
set strategy about the need (or not) for common standards, for quality assurance, and for
future planning. LT needs to be a part of this larger IT strategy.
D. Recognition of LT
11. Recognize the contributions colleagues make in LT
LT ought to be more explicitly recognized as a major force at UBC. Highlighting the
university's commitment to LT and recognizing the contribution faculty make to quality
LT will help in raising the LT profile.
Significant contributions to university-level learning have been made by several colleagues
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
at UBC. We ought to more explicitly recognize these advances while at the same time
encouraging further innovation in both research and teaching with LT. One way to do
this is by creating new professorships / teaching chairs in LT. Another way to do it is
by providing a Killam teaching and learning award in LT.
12. Increase or incorporate LT into HR, P&T, merit awards.
We need a much better HR career ladder so we can recruit and retain professional staff
in this area. As well, we need LT to be more fully recognized as part of the faculty
promotion and tenure, and merit, process.
13. Develop an explicit intellectual property policy on LT.
We need a clearer set of guidelines about the development of LT and the associated
intellectual property. This policy needs to address the LT contributions of both faculty
and staff.
V.      Conclusions
Our goal has been to recommend concrete actions that can make it easier for colleagues who
wish to use LT, to do so. This has meant less focus on higher level visions, and more attention
to activities that will lead us forward in creatively using LT. The recent experience of UBC and
the feedback we have received from colleagues leads inevitably to the conclusion that
information and computing technology will be increasingly embedded in the fabric our
institution. No doubt this will be uneven across the university and developments often will be
bumpy, but the end result is clear even if the exact contours of the fabric are unpredictable.
We have also been so bold as to suggest what the LT fabric of UBC might look like in the
future. All students will experience LT as part of their studies, with many using it to explore
international and community linkages. Increasingly their experience will include on-line
learning, either solely through distance courses or in mixed mode courses. Faculties will
expand their growing network of LT support units and curricular planning will routinely
include LT initiatives. Individual faculty members will find more support closer to home as the
spread of LT resource staff grows. Finally a growing program of LT-related research will
thrive, with the results being used to refine and revise our LT focus.
Finally, what should we be reflecting on for the future?
1. Ongoing review of the role of central units. The roles of units related to LT need to be
reviewed periodically to see if we have the best organizational alignment for the
promotion of LT (e.g., TAG, DE&T, Telestudios, ITServices, Library).
2. Use new learning materials. Digitized learning materials are being created at UBC and
in many of our peer institutions (e.g., Universitas 21 or APRU partners). We need to be
alert to sharing these materials and using them in our courses (i.e., learning object
catalogues and repositories).
3. Keeping pace with technological change. Wireless communication will become
ubiquitous in the near future and we need to align our initiatives in learning to
optimize its use. As other new forms of information and communication technology
develop, we need a way of responding effectively to their introduction.
4. Prioritize opportunities for inter-institutional partnership. Requests for us to partner
with others in LT initiatives will continue to grow and we need to seize those
opportunities
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Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
which will work the best for our students, staff, and faculty (e.g., the Faculty of
Education's and DE&T Masters in Educational Technology with Tec de Monterrey).
5.   Use more evidence-based evaluations in future planning. The demands for evidence
about the success (or not) of LT initiatives will continue to grow. We will need to
monitor how our strength as a premier research university is aligned with that
demand.
Some Useful References/Resources
Bates, Tony Managing Technological Change: Strategies for College and University Leaders,
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2000.
Brown, J. S. " Growing up digital: how the web changes work, education, and the ways people
learn" Change, 32 (2), 2000, pp. 10-20.
Oblinger, Diana, Carole Barone, and Brian Hawkins Distributed Education and its
Challenges: An Overview, American Council on Education, 2001.
Twigg, Carol "Who owns online courses and course materials? Intellectual property policies
for a new learning environment" Center for Academic Transformation, Troy, New York,
2000.
University of British Columbia "The Creative Use of Learning Technologies" Discussion
Paper, 2000.
University of Toronto " The Report of the Task Force on Technology-Assisted Education,"
(Draft), 2001.
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Glossary:
ACCULT An Ad Hoc Committee on Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology to
advise the Provost and the University about learning technology at UBC.
APRU
Consortium of Asia Pacific Research Universities
DET
Distance Education and Technology in Continuing Studies
FATE
Faculty Alliance for Technology in Education
FTE
Full Time Equivalent
HR
Human Resources
ICT
Information and Communication Technology
Learning New University Darning Centre being developed to upgrade the old Main Library
Centre building and contain space devoted both to library resources and teaching and
learning.
Learning Discrete granules or modules of digitized learning material that can be used and
Objects reused.
Learning
Technology
Mixed Mode
MyUBC
P&T
Newer forms of learning technology characterized especially by electronic
telecommunications and digital imaging (e.g., computer-assisted learning, video-
assisted learning).
Courses containing comprehensive on-line, virtual, and/or multi-media
components that supplant a portion of normal class meeting time.
Portals are like pipelines through which information can be channeled to the
desktop as users wish. The MyUBC portal is operational and is undergoing further
enhancement via ITServices, the Library, and individual Faculties. Although UBC
has been the prime mover behind this initiative, it has been developed in concert
with several other leading North American Universities
Promotion and Tenure
Smart Space      Areas of campus, including classrooms, labs, and study areas, that have
connections to, or make use of digital/electronic networks.
TAG Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth
TLEF
Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund: revenue from 3.5% share of tuition
revenue.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of February 27,2002
12888
Appendix B: Advancing the Creative Use of Learning Technology
Universitas
21
UNP
An international consortium of 18 research intensive universities including
University of Auckland, University of Birmingham, UBC, University of Edinburgh,
University of Freiburg, Fudan University, University of Glasgow, University of Hong
Kong, University of Lund, McGill University, University of Melbourne, University
of Michigan, National University of Singapore, University of New South Wales,
University of Nottingham, Peking University, University of Queensland, University
of Virginia
University Networking Project co-ordinated by ITServices
WebCT A course management system for online learning, with special web-authoring tools
for course development.

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