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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1995-05-17

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 THE   UNIVERSITY    OF   BRITISH    COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF MAY 17, 1995
Attendance
Present: President D. W. Strangway (Chair), Dr. R. M. Will (Vice-Chair), Vice-President D. R. Birch, Mr. S.
Arnold, Dr. D. R. Atkins, Dr. A. P. Autor, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dr. A. E. Boardman, Mr. J. Boritz, Dr. D. G. A.
Carter, Ms. L. Chui, Dr. D. H. Cohen, Dr. T. S. Cook, Dr. M. G. R. Coope, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Mr. E. B.
Goehring, Dean M. A. Goldberg, Dr. J. Gosline, Dean J. R. Grace, Dr. S. E. Grace, Mr. H. D. Gray, Rev. J.
Hanrahan, Dean M. J. Hollenberg, Dr. M. Isaacson, Dr. J. G. T. Kelsey, Dr. S. B. Knight, Mr. T. Lau, Mr.
H. Leung, Mr. C. Lim, Professor P. L. K. Lin, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Mr. W. Maas, Dr. D.
J. MacDougall, Dr. M. MacEntee, Dean B. C. McBride, Dean J. H. McNeill, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dean M.
P. Marchak, Dean A. Meisen, Mr. R. L. de Pfyffer, Mr. L. Presley, Mrs. M. Price, Dr. D. J. Randall,
Professor R. S. Reid, Professor J. A. Rice, Dean J. F. Richards, Dr. R. A. Shearer, Dean N. Sheehan, Mr. D.
Shu, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Dean C. L. Smith, Dr. J. R. Lhompson, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Mr. D. R. Verma, Dr.
E. W. Whittaker, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr., Dean E. H. K. Yen.
Regrets: Chancellor R. H. Lee, Dr. S. Avramidis, Mr. J. A. Banfield, Dr. J. Barman, Dean C. S. Binkley, Mr.
P. L. Brady, Dr. D. M. Brunette, Mr. D. Khan, Professor V. J. Kirkness, Ms. L. Lam, Mr. A. Lau, Dr. M.
Levine, Dr. D. M. Lyster, Dr. R. L. A. MacGillivray, Mr. A. Oberman, Dr. R. J. Patrick, Dr. W. J. Phillips,
Professor M. Quayle, Dr. H. B. Richer, Dr. A. J. Sinclair, Ms. C. A. Soong, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. L. J.
Stan, Dr. S. Lhorne, Dr. W. Uegama, Mr. E. C. H. Woo.
Senate membership
REPLACEMENT
The Chair reported that Ms. Linda Lam replaces Mr. Steven Tam, as student
representative of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration.
Minutes of the previous meeting
It was noted that a corrected version of Appendix A (pp.11094-11099) and Appendix B
(pp.11100a-l 1100b), which had been omitted, were distributed at the meeting.
It was moved l        That the amended minutes of the seventh
and seconded i       regular meeting of Senate for the Session 1995-
95, having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 11102
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Business arising from the minutes
Business arising from the minutes
NOTICE OF MOTION
Mr. Maas gave the following notice of motion.
"In light of the substantial academic and social impacts of tuition fee increases likely
needed to maintain university funding at appropriate levels, that Senate establish an ad
hoc committee to examine the academic and social implications and make
recommendations."
Chair's remarks and related questions
The Chair reported that the Faculty Association and the University had negotiated salary
settlements for 1994/95 and 1995196 and faculty would soon be asked to vote on the
issue.
Candidates for Degrees
Dean McBride l        That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Mr. Verma J       as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with Deans and the Chair of
Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried.
Scholarships and Awards
A list of scholarships, medals and prizes awarded to students in the graduating classes was
circulated for information. Dr. Cook informed Senate that more heads of the graduating
class had come to UBC directly from British Columbia universities, colleges and high
schools than in the past. For the first time, all four Governor General Medal winners
entered UBC from British Columbia high schools. Of the twenty-nine heads of graduating
class, fifteen came directly from high schools; thirteen from British Columbia
 Vancouver Senate 11103
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Senate Nominating Committee Membership
public schools, one from a BC independennt school and one from an international
independent school. Six entered UBC from a BC college and one from a Canadian college.
Three entered UBC from British Columbia universities and four from other Canadian
Universities. The Governor General Silver medal winner in Science and the head of the
Occupational Therapy degree group came to UBC with entrance scholarships. Dr. Cook
noted that the heads of the graduating class in the Faculties of Law and Arts are
Wesbrook scholars.
Senate Nominating Committee Membership
In accordance with established procedures, student vacancies on the Nominating
Committee were declared.
Members were informed that a call for nominations to fill these vacancies would be sent
to all members of Senate, and that nominations would remain open until the September
1995 Senate meeting. If more than two nominations are received an election will be held
at the September meeting.
Reports of Committees of Senate
SENATE ACADEMIC POLICY COMMITTEE
Dr. Williams, Chair of the committee, presented the following recommendations which
had been circulated.
Recommendations
1.  In considering how Senate committees operate, the Senate Academic Policy
Committee agrees that the independence of committees from any faculty,
department or other campus unit should be a principle of their functioning,
that theoretically any Senator should be able to Chair a Senate committee, and
that the
 Vancouver Senate 11104
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
2. work of committees frequently requires both material and personnel support. It
is therefore recommended:
a.   That the University make available to each committee of Senate
appropriate resources and support.
3. In considering how the academic governance of the University is vested in
Senate, the Senate Academic Policy Committee agrees that the record of Senate
and its committees form part of the history of the University; and that the
business of Senate is of interest and concern to a broad constituency including
faculty, students, alumni and the public. It is therefore recommended:
a. That the record of Senate be made available for wide distribution in a
variety of formats such as View UBC, UBC Reports and the Alumni
Chronicle.
b. That the Secretary of Senate be asked to coordinate the maintenance of
Senate committee records as appropriate.
Dr. Williams noted that the Academic Policy Committee recommendations arise from an
earlier proposal that Senate establish a Ways and Means Committee. This proposal was
referred to the Academic Policy Committee which in turn referred it to a sub-committee
chaired by Dr. Gilbert. Some of the recommendations are a result of the sub-committee's
report. It is not proposed that a Ways and Means Committee of Senate be established,
however, the recommendations should achieve similar objectives. The recommendations
address committee support as well as the preservation of the record of Senate and its
committees, ensuring where appropriate, its dissemination.
Dr. Williams l        That recommendation #1 be approved.
Dr. Gilbert J
 Vancouver Senate 11105
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Williams stated that the term "appropriate resources and support" refers to a wide
diversity of committees of Senate whose requirements are considerably different.
Committees chaired by persons without secretarial support provided within a department
may require research support or other forms of secretarial backing. It is anticipated that
the appropriateness and level of support would be worked out with each committee Chair
and the Registrar's office.
The motion was
put and carried.
Dr. Williams stated that the deliberations and conclusions of all Senate committees are
not noted in the minutes of Senate as a matter of record. The approval of this motion will
ensure the appropriate maintenance of Senate committee records through the Registrar's
office for posterity.
Dr. Williams l        That recommendation # 2 be approved.
Dr. McBride J
The motion was
put and carried.
1
J
SENATE ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE
Dr. Will, Chair of the committee, presented the following proposal for changes in the
method of calculating admission grade point average for Elementary Teacher Education
Programs in the Faculty of Education.
Proposed Calendar Entry: (Changes in italics)
Effective September 1996, pre-admission studies for applicants to both programs must
include:
1)  Six credits of English Literature and composition (or UBC Arts One or
equivalent)
 Vancouver Senate 11106
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
2) At least 3 (preferably 6) credits in a laboratory science, in mathematics (not
statistics), and in social studies (history or geography). Laboratory science
courses are normally selected from the life sciences, chemistry, physical
geography, geology, astronomy, or physics.
3) Six credits of Canadian Studies.
4) 18 credits at the senior level (normally courses numbered 300 or higher) in one
subject area included in the BC elementary school curriculum (art, drama,
language arts [English and French], mathematics, music, physical education,
science, and social studies).
5) An overall average of 65% on the six credits of English literature and
composition, 3 credits of laboratory science, mathematics, and history or
geography, as well as the 18 senior level credits in a subject area included in the
BC elementary school curriculum.
Rationale:
The proposal changes the basis for calculating admission averages for
applicants applying to the elementary teacher education programs to give a
more balanced appraisal of the pre-admission studies regarded as important for
teaching in elementary schools. The proposal also changes the credit
requirement for Canadian Studies in accordance with the requirement of the
British Columbia College of Teachers.
Dr. Will noted that 6 credits will be required instead of 3, which is in accordance with the
requirements of the BC College of Teachers. Previously the average for admission
purposes was calculated as an overall average based on the best 60 credits the students
presented. Now the average will be based on 27 specified credits, and since these credits
are specified for calculating the average, this will make the applications more comparable.
Since the specified subjects are in teaching areas or areas related to the Elementary
program, it also can be viewed as a raising of standards.
 Vancouver Senate 11107
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Will l        That the proposed Faculty of Education
Dr. Berger i        changes be approved.
Carried.
SENATE BUDGET COMMITTEE
Dr. Isaacson presented the following report which had been circulated.
Since its last report to Senate in May 1994, the Senate Budget Committee has met 14
times to discuss a wide variety of issues. In its role of assisting the President in the
preparation of the University budget, the Committee has undertaken the following
activities over the past year:
Senior Administrative Structure and Responsibilities
On June 15, 1994, the Committee unanimously passed the following motion:
"The Senate Budget Committee recommends to the President that the University
undertake a comprehensive examination of the organizational structure and
responsibilities of its senior administration. The President would be responsible for
this endeavor and would report widely to the university community."
Final Motion of the President's Proposed 1994/95 Operating Budget
On July 8, 1994, the Committee unanimously passed the following motion which was
published in the 1994/95 Budget and Planning Narrative:
"The Committee endorses the President's 1994/95 budget strategy with the following
observations:
1. In the present fiscal climate, the Committee endorses zero net salary increases
for all employee groups.
2. The Committee supports the principle of performance related step and career
advancement increases for all employee groups even though these awards are
scaled back from current levels and even though they require across-the board
cut backs in salary levels to maintain the zero net salary increase.
 Vancouver Senate 11108
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
3. In view of the significant role of graduate students to the changing society, the
Committee is concerned with the growing number of such students for whom
the province has not purchased spaces via the provincial operating grant. The
Committee encourages the President to seek funding for these students both
through increased levels of provincial operating support and through increased
tuition fees in selected graduate programs.
4. The Committee believes that periodic evaluation of the value received from
non-recurring funds associated with specific programs is an important
principle. For example, expenditures related to the Teaching and Learning
Enhancement Fund are becoming significant. This coming year, the Committee
will be reviewing how effectively these funds have been utilized to date.
5. Consideration of the funding and allocations to the Faculties of Arts and
Science has stimulated the Committee to undertake further study of the funding
of those faculties in the light of their core functions and their diversity.
6. A greater level of comparability in the data and format in the individual Faculty
narratives would greatly facilitate the deliberations of the Committee. This
issue will be examined by the Committee in the context of the Operating
Budget 1995196 priorities and processes."
Identification and Priorities of Issues for Committee Deliberations
In September 1994, the Committee identified and considered 13 possible issues for its
deliberations over the year. The 4 issues which it considered to be the highest priority
were as follows:
• Ancillary Units: to develop an improved understanding of such units, including
their attributes and performance indicators, and to consider possible mechanisms
which would best serve the University with respect to their costs and level of
service.
• Faculties of Arts and Science: to examine these Faculties in order to gain a greater
understanding of their activities that relate to the preparation of the University
budget.
• Budget and Planning Narrative: to recommend a greater level of comparability in
the data and format in the individual Faculty narratives.
 Vancouver Senate 11109
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
•    Teaching-Related Expenditures: to review the effectiveness of expenditures relating
to the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund and other teaching-related
expenditures.
The Committee has considered the first three of these issues, but is yet to deal with the
fourth one concerning teaching-related expenditures. With respect to the latter issue,
the Committee has requested related information from the Provost and has just
received his report to the Board of Governors on the establishment and development
of the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund, including projected revenue and
committed allocations for 1995196.
Budget Guidelines and Budget and Planning Narrative
The Committee suggested a number of changes which were incorporated into the
document Budget Guidelines (previously Budget Principles and Process). This
document plays an important part in the preparation of the University's annual
budget. A significant change this year is that, in addition to the General Purpose
Operating Fund, the document now addresses the various other funds of the
University, including Special Purpose Funds, Sponsored Research Funds, Ancillary
Enterprise Funds and Capital Funds; and that organizational units are now expected
to indicate income and expenses relating to all these funds. The Committee also
suggested a number of changes with respect to the format of the Budget and Planning
Narrative.
Tuition Policy
The committee suggested a number of revisions to the October 1994 draft of the
document Towards a Tuition Policy, and the March 1995 draft of the document UBC
Tuition Policy. These suggestions were directed to a clarification of the principles of
the proposed policy, and to changes to the content and format of the supporting
statements that are made. On April 19, 1995, the Committee unanimously passed the
following motion:
"The Committee supports the principles of the March 1995 draft of the UBC
Tuition Policy under consideration, and encourages the University Administration
to develop more fully those aspects of the policy relating to student aid."
Faculties of Arts and Science
The Committee met separately with the Deans of Arts and Science with respect to
examining the activities of these two faculties. These faculties were identified in the
July 1994 motion of the Committee as
 Vancouver Senate 11110
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
warranting particular attention this year in the light of their core functions and their
diversity. The purpose of examining particular units is to obtain a greater
understanding of the resources allocated to them, their priorities, activities and
expenditures - in order to provide better-informed assistance to the President on the
preparation of the University budget. A list of questions from Committee members
was sent to each Dean before each meeting. The presentations and related discussions
have been very valuable to the Committee. The Committee was particularly impressed
with both Faculties' achievements in reforming curriculum, enhancing learning
technology, and implementing organizational change to achieve fiscal efficiencies. The
Committee's view is that means should be found to give these and other faculties
financial incentives to achieve continuing gains in effectiveness and efficiency. The
high cost of faculty renewal, brought to the Committee's attention by the Dean of
Science, may well have similar implications in other faculties.
Centralized Units
The Committee has considered briefly the report Centralization and Decentralization
which was accepted by Senate in January 1995. Recommendation 4 of the report
states:
"That the Senate Budget Committee be requested to study those centralized units
which enjoy full or partial monopoly status on the campus, particularly ancillary
units, and to bring recommendations to Senate and to the President not later than
the December 1995 meeting of Senate, on a mechanism to ensure that each such
unit defines its service in relation to the academic community's needs, provides that
service to a standard which meets or exceeds that found in the competitive
marketplace, and justifies its operating costs and scale of charges in relation to the
fair market value found in the Greater Vancouver area."
A sub-committee will consider this issue over the next few months and report back to
the Committee.
Ancillary Units
The Committee has engaged in extensive deliberations on the issue of ancillary units.
A list of questions from Committee members was sent to the three Vice-Presidents
responsible for ancillary units, the Committee held discussions with these Vice-
Presidents, and it examined various materials relating to the units. The Committee
then provided
 Vancouver Senate 11111
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
the President with a set of suggestions relating to the operation of ancillary units.
These suggestions have echoed recommendations 1, 2, 3 and 7 of the report
Centralization and Decentralization (which pertain to the mandate, performance
assessment, review, and devolution of functions of service units); and the Committee
has urged that there be explicit statements of those services which must be
monopolistic.
Committee Reports to Senate
An important component of the Committee's work takes place each year shortly after
its annual report to Senate in May, and relates to an assessment of the President's
annual budget strategy. Because of this timing, the Committee agreed that it would
report on this particular matter to Senate early each fall.
Committee Quorum
At a meeting of the Committee on December 7, 1994, the Committee established by
motion that its quorum be six voting members, including ex-officio members. This
recommendation was sent to the Senate Nominating Committee.
Dr. Isaacson i        That the report be accepted.
Dr. Kelsey J
Carried.
CONTINUING STUDIES
The following proposal for a Diploma Program in Management of Aquaculture Systems
had been circulated:
Credential to be awarded:
Diploma in Management of Aquaculture Systems will be granted by the University of
British Columbia (UBC). The diploma parchment will indicate that the program is in
conjunction with Malaspina University-College.
 Vancouver Senate 11112
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Units offering the program:
The Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, UBC and the Faculty of Science and Technology,
Malaspina University-College.
Need for the program:
Aquaculture, or the production of fish, shellfish and aquatic plants, is relatively new to
B.C. Fish farming in B.C. has increased in value from $1.1 million in 1983 to over
$100 million today. About 200 farms grow salmon or trout, 400 produce oysters or
clams. The production of other species - mussels, scallops, abalone, and marine plants
- has also increased rapidly. The result is an expansion of jobs in aquaculture
production, hatcheries, processing, marketing, service industries and government.
Rationale for the program:
The rationale for the program stems from three underlying principles:
1. Life long learning is necessary to maintain competency on the job. People with
Bachelor's degrees want the opportunity to obtain specific job skills and people
who have been working for a number of years want the opportunity to upgrade
their skills and knowledge.
2. British Columbia has a comparative advantage for education and training in
aquaculture relative to the rest of North America.
3. It is advantageous for institutions of higher learning to share resources and
build on areas of relative strength. This results in academic programs which are
stronger, more relevant, and more cost effective.
Purpose of the program:
The purpose of this program is to allow Canadian and foreign public or private
personnel to fill gaps in their previous training and experience in aquaculture, and
obtain relevant job skills. Many people working in aquaculture have had training and
experience in the technical/scientific aspects, or the economics/management aspects,
but rarely both. Biologists find themselves in management positions, while managers
 Vancouver Senate 11113
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
with commerce and business administration backgrounds desire more technical
understanding. Malaspina University-College and UBC have strong, but different,
aquaculture programs. Students in this diploma program will draw from the relative
strengths and areas of uniqueness at each of these institutions.
Admission requirements:
Successful applicants require either:
1. a Bachelor's degree in an area relevant for the management of aquaculture
systems;
or
2. a minimum of two years relevant post-secondary education plus at least three
years relevant work experience in aquaculture.
Students will be selected on the basis of grades in previous post-secondary
education programs, extra-curricular activities, work experience, and reasons
for wanting to enrol in the program. Students will apply to the Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences, UBC, where admission evaluation and selection will be
carried out. Admitted students will be assigned a student number and given an
eligibility to register by the UBC Registrar's Office.
For applicants whose native language is not English, proficiency in English will
need to be demonstrated at the time of application by submitting the score on
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A TOEFL score of 550 or
greater is required.
Program requirements:
The program requires a minimum of 30 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits from
UBC. Credit for university courses at Malaspina will transfer directly to UBC. Credit
for technical courses at Malaspina will transfer to UBC as "Diploma Credit Courses".
The UBC Registrar will maintain a transcript of records.
Credits
Aquaculture Field Trip
AGSC 3XX (UBC) / AQUA 3XXX (Malaspina)
3
Malaspina courses
12 or 15
UBC courses
15 or 12
TOTAL
30
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Program schedule:
11114
August The aquaculture field trip course, AGSC 3XX/AQUA
3XX, will be offered each August, provided at least five
students are enrolled.1 The course will be given jointly by
UBC and Malaspina University-College, with the
assistance of other partners. It will be cross listed and
open to UBC and Malaspina students not enrolled in the
diploma program.
September - Students will take a term of courses at Malaspina
December University-College. Courses will be selected from the list
in Appendix A.
January - April
May
Students will take a term of courses at UBC. Courses will
be selected from the list in Appendix B.
Students are expected to have diverse educational
backgrounds and experience. Hence, the program is
designed to provide considerable flexibility. The specific
mix of courses is to be determined by each student and
their faculty advisor from predetermined lists of
appropriate courses. Both Malaspina University-College
and UBC will assign a faculty advisor for each student.
Congregation ceremony at UBC for conferring of
diploma.
Program flexibility:
The program is designed to be as flexible as possible. For example: (a) a student who
has already completed aquaculture courses at Malaspina, or the equivalent, could
meet the entire course work requirement by spending two semesters at UBC; (b) a
student who could only attend classes during the winter/spring period could attend
Term 2 at Malaspina one year and Term 2 at UBC the next year; (c) a student could
spend one term in residence at Malaspina and complete UBC
1 If the course is not offered, or if a student has previous working experience in BC aquaculture, AQUA
271L/272L or 371/372 (Field Practicum) can be substituted for it.
 Vancouver Senate 11115
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
courses via distance education; (d) students could enrol on a part-time or full-time
basis.
Funding:
This program will operate on a full cost recovery basis, involving tuition plus a
program fee. Tuition will be the regular per credit fee plus regular student fees at
Malaspina and UBC. The program fee will be jointly determined by the Dean of
Science and Technology (Malaspina) and the Dean of Agricultural Sciences (UBC).
The program makes use of existing courses and facilities at both institutions. The only
new course is the Aquaculture Field Trip, which will be funded from the program fee.
Proposed Calendar Statement
a. On page 36 (95196 Calendar)
Add:
Diploma in Management of Aquaculture Systems
b. On page 93 (95196 Calendar)
Add:
DIPLOMA IN MANAGEMENT OF AQUACULTURE SYSTEMS
The Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, UBC in conjunction with the Faculty of Science
and Technology, Malaspina University-College, offers a Diploma in Management of
Aquaculture Systems. The program allows Canadian and foreign public or private
personnel to fill gaps in their previous training and experience in aquaculture, and
obtain relevant job skills.
Admission requirements
Admission to the Diploma Program requires either:
1. a Bachelor's degree in an area relevant for the management of aquaculture
systems;
or
2. a minimum of two years relevant post secondary education plus at least three
years relevant work experience in aquaculture.
 Vancouver Senate 11116
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Students are selected on the basis of grades in previous post-secondary education
programs, extra-curricular activities, work experience, and reasons for wanting to
enrol in the program. Students apply to the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, UBC,
where admission evaluation and selection will be carried out. Admitted students are
assigned a student number and given an eligibility to register by the UBC Registrar's
Office.
For applicants whose native language is not English, proficiency in English needs to be
demonstrated at the time of application by submitting the score on the Test of English
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A TOEFL score of 550 or greater is required.
Program requirements
The program requires a minimum of 30 credits, with a minimum of 15 credits from
UBC. Credit for university courses at Malaspina University-College transfers directly
to UBC. Credit for technical courses at Malaspina University-College transfers to UBC
as "Diploma Credit Courses". The UBC Registrar maintains a transcript of records.
[the following appendix is not included in the Calendar entry]
Appendix A: Relevant Malaspina University-College Courses
AQUA 132T
Aquatic Habitats (3)
AQUA 142T
Fisheries Engineering I (3)
AQUA 2XX
Aquatic Plant Biologv and Culture (3) Note: Students who take BIOL
429 at UBC cannot receive credit for AQUA 2XX
AQUA
211T/212T
Trout Culture (3)
AQUA 222**
Invertebrate Zoology and Culture (3)
AQUA 231 *
Warm Water Fish Culture (3)
AQUA 251
Materials and Methods (3)
AQUA 25IT
Fisheries Engineering II (3)
AQUA 252T
Fisheries Engineering III (3)
AQUA
271T/272T or
AQUA 371/372
Field Practicum (3)
AQUA 327
Fish Husbandry (3) Note: Students who take ANSC 480 at UBC
cannot receive credit for AQUA 327.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995
11117
Reports of Committees of Senate
AQUA
341
Fish Health (3) Note: Students who take ANSC 581 at UBC cannot receive
credit for AQUA 341.
AQUA
391
Husbandry Project (3)
AQUA
392
Husbandry Project (3)
AQUA
3XX
Aquaculture Field Trip (3) (same as AGSC 3XX at UBC)
BIOL 302
Biometrics (3)
BIOL 315
Parasitology (3)
BIOL 321
Lake and Stream Ecosvstems (3) Note: Students cannot receive credit for
both BIOL 321 and FISH 281/132
BIOL 322
Coastal and Estuarine Ecosystems (3)
BIOL 324
Biology of Fishes (3) Note: Students who take BIOL 426 at UBC cannot
receive credit for BIOL 324.
BIOL
325*
Invertebrate Zoologv (3) Note: Cannot be taken with AOUA 222.
FISH
132T
Aquatics Habitat (3)
FISH 211
Salmonid Life History (3)
FISH
232T
Resource Ecology (3)
FISH
281T
Fisheries Field Techniques (3)
(*) Courses normally offered in the spring, but can be offered in the fall, if there is
sufficient registration.
(* *) Normally of two semesters in length, but could be offered as a one semester
course if demand warranted it.
Appendix B: Relevant UBC Courses
Distance Ed.
Options
Science Based Courses
AGSC 213    Genetics in Agriculture (3)
AGSC Aquaculture Field Trip (3) (same as AQUA 3XX at
3XX Malaspina
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995
11118
Reports of Committees of Senate
Distance Ed. Options
Science Based Courses
AGSC 410
Issues and Problems in Food Production Systems (3)
Yes
ANSC 258
Introduction to Animal Food Production Systems (3)
ANSC 303
Introduction to Feed Technology (3)
ANSC 313
Principles of Animal Breeding (3)
ANSC 322
Fundamentals of Animal Nutrition (3)
ANSC 430
Directed Studies (2-6)
Yes
ANSC 480
Intensive Fish Production (3)
Yes
ANSC 481
Fish Nutrition (3)
ANSC 482
Fish Breeding in Aquaculture (3)
ANSC 580
Advanced Topics in Fish Culture (3)
Yes
ANSC 581
Fish Diseases (3)
BIOL 326
Biology of Invertebrates (3)
BIOL 426
Biology of Fishes (3)
BIOL 429
Algal Aquaculture (3)
Yes
FOOD 258
Exploring our Food (3)
Yes
FOOD 259
Introduction to Food Systems (3)
FOOD 301
Food Chemistry (3)
FOOD 303
Quality Control, Standards & Evaluation (3)
Yes
FOOD 308
Principles of Food Process Science 1(3)
FOOD 405
Seafood Process Science (3)
HUNU 301
Consumer Aspects of Food (3)
MICB 307
Food and Industrial Microbiology (3)
MICB 309
Food Microbiology (with lab) (3)
MICB 417
Introduction to Applied Microbiology (3)
PLNT 321
Biometrics (3)
PLNT 540
Plant Molecular Biology Laboratory (3)
SOIL 313
Soil Physics (3)
SOIL 433
Soil and Water Conservation (3)
SOIL 435
Soil Contamination and Remediation (3)
SOIL 517
Land and Resource Evaluation (3)
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,199i
11119
Reports of Committees (
3F Senate
Distance Ed.
Options        Management/Economics Based Courses
Note that ECON 100 -
courses.
Principles of Economic.
; (6) or the equivalent is a prerequisite to all of these
Yes
AGEC 201
Farm and Business Management I (3)
Yes
AGEC 258
Introduction to Agricultural Economics (3)
AGEC 295
Managerial Economics (3)
AGEC 302
Farm and Business Management II (3)
AGEC 306
Agricultural Market Organization (3)
AGEC 340
International Development (3)
AGEC 361
Linear Programming in Agriculture (3)
AGEC 374
Land Economics (3)
AGEC 407
Agricultural Market Prices (3)
AGEC 420
Agricultural Policy (3)
AGEC 430
Directed Studies (2-6)
Dr. Vanderstoep
Dean Goldberg
That Senate approve the proposed Diploma
Program in Management of Aquaculture
Systems.
Dr. Vanderstoep, Chair of the committee, spoke briefly to the report, which had been
circulated for information, noting the uniqueness of a UBC Diploma program involving
two post-secondary educational institutions. Extensive consultation had taken place, both
within and outside the University, with a strong indication of support for the program
from the client community.
The motion was
put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995
11120
Reports of Committees of Senate
NOMINATING COMMITTEE
Student Membership on Senate Committees
The following report of students nominated to fill vacancies on Senate committees had
been distributed.
Academic Building Needs:
Mr. Sam Arnold
Mr. David Khan
Academic Policy:
Mr. Sam Arnold
Mr. David Shu
Admissions:
Mr. Chris Lim
Mr. Trevor Presley
Agenda:
Mr. Tim Lau
vacancy
Appeals on Academic Standing:
Mr. James Boritz
Mr. Brian Goehring
Mr. Tim Lau
Budget:
Mr. Brian Goehring
Mr. Hugh Leung
Continuing Studies:
Mr. Tim Lau
Mr. Willem Maas
Curriculum:
Mr. Andrew Lau
vacancy
vacancy
vacancy
Elections:
Mr. Emile Woo
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions.
Mr. Chris Lim
Library:
Mr. Jim Boritz
Ms. Lica Chui
Mr. Hugh Leung
replacing Mr. J. A. King
replacing Mr. K. R. MacLaren
replacing Ms. S. Chan
replacing Ms. S. Y. Dawood
continuing member
Mr. A. A. Raghavji
replacing Ms. S. Y. Dawood
replacing Mr. B. B. Telford
replacing Mr. J. A. King
continuing member
replacing Mr. D. B. Preikshot
continuing member
replacing Mr. E. C. H. Woo
replacing Mr. K. A. Douglas
replacing Mr. A. G. Heys
replacing Mr. K. A. Douglas
replacing Mr. K. R. MacLaren
replacing Mr. D. B. Preikshot
replacing Mr. S. C. S. Tam
replacing Mr. J. A. King
replacing Ms. L. Chui
continuing member
replacing Mr. A. G Heys
continuing member
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995
11121
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating:
Ms. Linda Lam
Mr. Emile Woo
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline:
replacing Mr. A. A. Raghavji
continuing member
Mr. James Boritz
Mr. Hugh Leung
Mr. Chris Lim
continuing member
continuing member
continuing member
Student Awards:
Ms. Linda Lam
Mr. David Shu
Tributes:
Ms. Lica Chui
Mr. Brian Goehring
University Organization:
Ms. Lica Chui
Mr. David Khan
Review Teaching Evaluation:
Mr. Andrew Lau
Mr. Trevor Presley
Dr. Williams, Chair of the Senate Nominating Committee, reported that Ms. Linda Lam
and Mr. Emile Woo had been nominated to fill two student vacancies. There were no
further nominations.
replacing Mr. P. G. Chan
replacing Mr. B. B. Telford
replacing Mr. H. H. F. Leung
continuing member
continuing member
replacing Mr. K. A. Douglas
replacing Ms. S. Chan
Mr. S. C. S. Tam
Dr. Williams
Dr. Kelsey
That nominations be closed.
Carried.
Dr. Williams
Mr. Maas
That Senate approve the student nominations
for Senate Committees.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995
11122
Reports of Committees of Senate
Quorums for Senate Committees
The following recommended quorums of the Senate committees had been circulated.
Committee
Elected
Membership
Ex-officio
Membership
Recommended Quorum
Academic Building Needs
8
4
6 voting
Academic Policy
13
4
9 voting
Admissions
9
7
5 voting
Agenda
7
3
3 voting
Academic Standing
11
3
5 voting
Budget
12
4
6 voting
Continuing Studies
12
7
8 voting
Curriculum
13
16
8 voting
Elections
4
3
No recommendation
Liaison with Post-
Secondary Inst.
10
4
7 voting
Library
13
6
Simple majority of
elected members
Nominating
10
3
7 voting
Student Appeals on
Academic Discipline
11
2
6 voting
Student Awards
10
4
4 voting
Tributes
13
4
12 voting
Ad Hoc on University
Organization
11
6
8 voting
Ad Hoc to Review
Teaching Evaluation
7
3
No recommendation
Dr. Williams informed Senate that Roberts Rules of Order would apply for the two
committees for which there are no recommendations. The term "voting" was used
because each committee agrees which are the voting members. The only exception is the
Library Committee, with a simple majority of the elected members.
 Vancouver Senate 11123
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Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Williams l        The Nominating Committee recommends
Dr. Will J        adoption of the quorums as put forward by the
various Senate Committees.
Speaking on behalf of the students, Mr. Lim expressed concern over the low quorums set
for the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing and the Senate Admissions
Committee. Recognizing the problem that exists in acquiring a quorum during the
summer, Mr. Lim emphasized that it is the responsibility of committee members to make
themselves available. Mr. Lim requested that consideration be given to scheduling the
appeal committee meetings at times convenient for students who work during the
summer.
Referring to the Senate Admissions Committee, Dr. Will stated that while a quorum of 5
is not difficult to obtain in the winter, it is problematic in July and August. Although
reference to a quorum could not be found in previous minutes, the committee had been
operating for years on the assumption that the quorum was 5.
Dr. MacDougall referred to the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing
noting that one of the main concerns of the committee is to dispose of the appeals
promptly as frequently a student's future rests on the decision. He stated that it is often
difficult to obtain a quorum of 5 and it would be even more difficult if that figure was
raised. The Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing quorum of 5 had been
set out in the rules and procedures when the committee was established.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995
11124
Reports of Committees of Senate
In amendment,
Mr. Lim
Seconded
That the quorum for the Senate Committee on
Appeals on Academic Standing be amended to
6 voting members rather than the current 5.
Further discussion ensued over the difficulties that would be encountered if the quorum
was raised to 6 voting members.
The motion, as amended, was put
and defeated.
The original motion was put and
carried.
MEMBERSHIP OF AD HOC COMMITTEE ON WITHDRAWAL FOR UNSATISFACTORY
CONDUCT
Dr. Williams stated that at its meeting of April 19, 1995 Senate agreed to the
establishment of an Ad Hoc Committee on Withdrawal for Unsatisfactory Conduct. The
following proposed membership of the Ad Hoc Committee had been circulated:
Dr. D. R. Atkins
Mr. J. Boritz
Dean C. L. Smith
Dr. L. J. Stan
Dr. E. W. Whittaker
Dr. Williams
Dr. Marchak
That the membership of the Ad Hoc
Committee on Withdrawal for Unsatisfactory
Conduct be approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 11125
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
TRIBUTES COMMITTEE
The President informed Senate that there would not be a report at the present time.
AD HOC COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATION
Dr. Shearer, Chair of the committee, presented the following report, which had been
circulated:
Third Report
The Process of Institutional Reform - April 1995
I. THE COMMITTEE AND ITS MANDATE
The committee was established following a May 1993 resolution of Senate with terms
of reference:
To examine and report on the administrative structure for the delivery of academic
programs of the University and where appropriate recommend changes, with a
view to improving efficiency and academic effectiveness, consistent with the
pursuit of the University's goals and objectives and its Mission statement.
In creating the committee Senate was responding to a recommendation of the Senate
Budget Committee.
The terms of reference are broad and general. Senate did not give the committee a
detailed list of specific institutional issues to be studied and reported upon. The issues
that the committee explored are of the committee's own choosing.
This is the committee's third report. In Section II we review the work of the committee
since it was established, including a summary of the main recommendations and the
actions that have been taken on those recommendations. In Section III we discuss
contemporary pressures for institutional reorganization at the University and the
issues that arise in attempting to design and implement reform in an institution that
has a tradition of a substantial degree of autonomy of departments and
 Vancouver Senate 11126
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Reports of Committees of Senate
faculties. Two aspects of the committee's original agenda remain incomplete. With the
discussion of Section III as background, in Section IV we discuss the reasons for not
completing this work, make some recommendations and respectfully request that the
committee be discharged.
The recommendations in this report are summarized in Appendix A. The membership
of the committee has changed somewhat in the two years of its existence. Those who
have served on the committee, and the present membership, are listed in Appendix B.
For information, the recommendations of the first and second reports are listed in
Appendices C and D.
II. REVIEW OF THE COMMITTEE'S WORK
To date the committee has submitted two reports.
A. FIRST REPORT (MAY 1994)
The first report made three major recommendations: that there be a minimum size for
academic departments; that certain University and Senate procedures be simplified;
and that a task force be established to study and make recommendations on the
organization of studies in natural resources at the University. The text of these
recommendations, as amended and approved by Senate, are attached as Appendix C.
One of the recommendations (# 7) called for action by the Senate Curriculum
Committee. A report from the Curriculum Committee was received by Senate at its
November 1994 meeting, and proposed new curriculum revision procedures were
approved. The other recommendations requested actions to be taken by the senior
administration. In the case of matters that clearly fall within the mandate of Senate,
the senior administration was asked to report back to Senate (by January 1995 with
respect to the organization of studies in natural resources and December 1995 with
respect to department size). With respect to items not clearly within the mandate of
Senate, the recommendation was a request that the reforms be considered.
The committee recommends:
 Vancouver Senate 11127
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Recommendation 1
That Senate request a written report from the Vice President Academic and
Provost at the September 1995 meeting of Senate on the administration's response
to recommendation 6 of the First Report concerning administrative stipends and
administrative leave graduated by department size.
Recommendation 2
That Senate request a written report from the President at the September 1995
meeting of Senate on the administration's response to recommendation 9 of the
First Report concerning the constitution of the Senior Appointments Committee.
Recommendation 3:
That Senate request a written progress report from the Vice President Academic
and Provost at the September 1995 meeting of Senate on the administration's
response to recommendations 10-13 of the First Report concerning the
administrative organization for programs in natural resources.
B. SECOND REPORT (JANUARY 1995)
The committee's second report was concerned with issues related to the centralization
and decentralization of decision making and delivery of support services to academic
units, faculty members and students. The central concerns were to increase the
sensitivity of the delivery of services to students, faculty and academic units, to
enhance the flexibility of the University in adapting to its stringent financial
circumstances and a rapidly changing technological environment, and to review the
institutional arrangements governing centralized service units that have monopoly
power. Most of the recommendations were suggestions to the President (the matters in
question are beyond the direct mandate of Senate), but the Senate Budget Committee
was requested to study the issue of service units with monopoly power and to report
to Senate by December 1995.
The recommendations of the Second Report, as amended and approved by Senate, are
attached to this report as Appendix C. This report, with amendments, was approved
at the Senate meeting of January 1995. It
 Vancouver Senate 11128
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Reports of Committees of Senate
is perhaps too early to expect a response from the senior administration. However, it
is reasonable to expect such a response by early in the fall of 1995.
The committee recommends:
Recommendation 4
That Senate request a written progress report from the President at the September
1995 meeting of Senate on the administration's response to the recommendations
of the Second Report concerning centralized services (Recommendations 1, 2 and
3), the control of working conditions (Recommendation 5) and the resource
aspects of changes in the level of centralization of services (Recommendation 7).
This, our Third Report, has a different character and purpose than did the first two
reports.
When the committee began its work, the first task was to decide on the questions to be
studied and the order in which they would be considered. The questions addressed in
the first two reports were at or near the top of the list of priorities. Two other
questions that were relatively high on the priority list are the role of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies and the administrative organization of studies in human health. As
we continued our deliberations yet another question assumed importance, the number
of faculties in the University and the rationale for wide discrepancies in the sizes of
faculties. We discuss our consideration of the Faculty of Graduate Studies next;
questions relating to studies in human health and faculty size are viewed as unfinished
business and discussed in Section 4.
C. FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
The Faculty of Graduate Studies at UBC has complex responsibilities that affect
virtually all parts of the University. These include not only oversight and some
important administrative responsibilities for all graduate programs, but also "budget
faculty" responsibilities for the School of Community and Regional Planning, for
several institutes and centres and specialized graduate programs and for Green
College. The faculty also plays a primary, at times catalytic, role in the development
and administration of graduate interdisciplinary programs and research at UBC. The
Dean and Associate Deans of Graduate Studies also play
 Vancouver Senate 11129
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
important advisory roles in many decision-making processes within the University, in
the broader academic and scientific communities in Canada and internationally, and
in government.
The matter before the committee was whether the organization of the University
should include a Faculty of Graduate Studies and if so how broad the scope of its
activities should be. Conceptually, the various functions could be performed in other
ways, by other academic and administrative units, and different administrative
arrangements exist at some other universities in North America. The questions raised
included: would a different organization enhance or impair the academic effectiveness
of graduate programs? increase or reduce administrative costs? enhance or impair the
capacity of the University to innovate and to adapt to and study complex changes in
society and technology?
While a review of the role of the Faculty of Graduate Studies ranked relatively high on
the committee's early list of priorities, there was a division on the committee about the
importance of studying this question. The committee met with the Dean of Graduate
Studies and following this discussion decided not to pursue additional consultations or
to consider the matter further. The committee makes no recommendations.
III. THE PROCESS OF INSTITUTIONAL REFORM
The work of the committee and the difficulties that we have encountered in pursuing
all of the important questions on our preliminary agenda have heightened our
awareness of the delicate problem of effecting institutional reform in a university of
the size, complexity and academic stature of UBC. We are particularly concerned
about the appropriate role of Senate and its committees in this process. Our concern
with the question of process is further heightened by our perception of the urgency of
reform.
A. THE CONTEXT OF INSTITUTIONAL REFORM
UBC has an enviable reputation for distinguished scholarly and applied research, high
standards in graduate, professional and undergraduate education and dedicated public
service. This reputation has not been achieved by accident. Excellence in teaching,
research and public service rests on the quality, imagination, initiative and dedication
of
 Vancouver Senate 11130
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
individual faculty members who are supported in their pursuit and dissemination of
knowledge by institutional protection of their academic freedom. To achieve and
maintain a high degree of excellence in teaching, research and public service a
university provides a substantial degree of autonomy to individual faculty members
and to basic academic units (departments, schools, institutes, faculties, etc.,) in
designing, developing and pursuing programs of research and teaching.
UBC has a long tradition of providing a great deal of independence to faculties and
departments, while maintaining university-wide oversight of academic performance
(through periodic reviews of departments and faculties, Faculty of Graduate Studies'
monitoring of graduate programs, and departmental, faculty and university reviews of
individual faculty members for tenure, promotion and merit salary awards). This
structure of university governance has served us well and has contributed in no small
measure to the development of the University as a distinguished centre for teaching,
research and public service. It is important to society that the University's standards of
performance not be impaired through ill-considered institutional reforms.
At the same time, it is important to recognize that important aspects of the world in
which the University functions are changing and changing dramatically. First and most
pressing is a change in the financial environment. The pressure of financial constraints
is obvious to all concerned and we believe that it would be naive to assume that these
constraints will be relaxed in the foreseeable future. It is important that we seek
financial savings — small and large — in all possible ways that do not impair the
quality and integrity of our strong academic programs and our capacity to innovate.
As part of this, we must seek savings from the rationalization of our administrative
structure at all levels.
Associated with intensified financial constraints are increasing external demands for
"accountability" and responsiveness to changing social priorities. In considering these
pressures we must not forget that while we are an autonomous "private" corporation,
we are also a provincial university with all that implies for service to the society of the
province. One of the objectives of administrative reform should be to design effective
and economical methods of responding sensitively to the changing needs and
preferences of the community to which we belong.
 Vancouver Senate 11131
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Reports of Committees of Senate
Equally profound is the acceleration of technical change affecting both the style and
cost of research and methods of instruction and the increased emphasis on multi-
disciplinary and inter-disciplinary teaching and research in both academic and
professional fields. Methods must be found to facilitate the sharing of expensive
research facilities when practical and to adapt to the pressures and opportunities of
technological change and interdisciplinarity. There are many important examples of
such adaptation at UBC. Reform of our administrative structure should be designed to
enhance such activities.
There have also been important changes in the provincial network of post-secondary
educational institutions: some colleges have degree programs, a new university has
been established, and a new technical institution is planned. In part this expansion of
the post-secondary education system intensifies the competition for the restricted
budget for post-secondary education; in part it provides new options for students and
new possibilities for inter-institutional specialization and cooperation. These are
developments that must be taken into consideration in planning institutional changes
at UBC. Opportunities exist for cooperating with other provincial institutions in order
to minimize unnecessary duplication while enhancing UBC's distinctive role within the
provincial higher education system.
It is the considered opinion of the committee that these emerging realities make urgent
the consideration of institutional reorganization at UBC. We have made a number of
recommendations in our two previous reports for the reform of administrative
arrangements in the University. Some of these involve major changes; some relatively
minor. There are undoubtedly many other changes that would facilitate the transition
of the University to the 21st century. Institutional reform will be an ongoing process.
An important question is the role of Senate in this process.
B. THE ROLE OF SENATE IN INSTITUTIONAL REFORM
As we have already noted, the committee has been unable to complete its study of all
of the items on its preliminary agenda let alone all of the issues that could have been
considered. The task assigned to the committee proved to be too large, well beyond
the time and energy that committee members could devote to it. Given our assessment
of the importance of institutional reform, this is a serious concern.
 Vancouver Senate 11132
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
With this in mind, we are led to consider fundamental questions about the process of
institutional reform. How should large scale administrative reorganization be pursued
in an institution with important traditions of autonomy for basic academic units? In
such a context does institutional change have to be consensual? If so, consent at what
level and by whom (individuals? departments? faculties? Senate?) and for what kinds
of changes?
The principle that institutional change must be consensual makes the process of
institutional reform slow and difficult. There is a natural tendency to protect the
familiar administrative structures with which we have become comfortable; and there
is a natural tendency in evaluating proposed reorganizations to minimize the benefits
and emphasize the perceived problems with alternatives. At a minimum, determined
opposition from departments or faculties that goes beyond careful consideration of the
implications for research and academic programs may seriously distort or prevent
desirable reorganizations. The danger inherent in a requirement of consensus is
institutional inertia — perhaps institutional paralysis — manifest as an unwillingness to
give rational consideration to alternative administrative structures.
On the other hand, there are acute dangers in centralized decision making that forces
change on academic units. It is not obvious that the senior administration will
understand and give appropriate weight to all of the complex and subtle issues that
can arise in changing the administrative arrangements for departments, schools,
institutes and faculties. It is important that institutional reform not impair the
academic freedom and creativity of faculty members in designing, developing and
pursuing programs of research and teaching. It is also important that there be a
substantial degree of acceptance of institutional changes to avoid disruptions to
teaching and research. A substantial degree of compatibility and harmony among
colleagues is important for a productive academic environment and is in the best
interests of students.
It is important to find a process of institutional reform that avoids the twin perils of
institutional paralysis and unproductive disruption. This suggests an important role
for Senate as a largely elected, broadly representative academic governance body.
However, our experience suggests that there are difficulties in Senate's fulfilling this
role.
 Vancouver Senate 11133
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Reports of Committees of Senate
As the body responsible for academic governance, Senate has a legislated responsibility
to make recommendations to the Board of Governors on "the establishment or
discontinuance of any faculty, department, course of study, ...(etc.)...," and on
anything "considered advisable for promoting the interests of the university." How
should Senate carry out this mandate?
There are two opposing principles:
• Senate should receive proposals from faculties and the administration, and after
appropriate consultation, careful review and deliberation make recommendations.
• Senate should initiate proposals and after appropriate consultation, careful review
and deliberation make recommendations.
In most of its business, Senate is guided by the first principle. It acts primarily as a
forum for review, reaction and recommendation. In establishing the Ad Hoc
Committee on University Organization, however, Senate acted on the second
principle. It sought to take the initiative in administrative reorganization within the
University. We can find no reason why initiation of institutional change by Senate is
inappropriate. The experience of the committee, however, suggests that there are
severe limits to what is feasible.
The issues before a committee like this one are fundamental, yet very broad,
potentially affecting the working environments for many faculty members and the
programs of many students. The analysis of such a committee should not be
superficial. However, there are at least two obstacles to careful review of the broad-
ranging issues of institutional reform by a Senate Committee. On the one hand is the
lack of adequate research, secretarial and administrative support. While the Office of
Budget and Planning is very helpful in supplying important information, the
requirements of such a committee go well beyond the assistance that this office is able
to provide. On the other hand, any Senate committee is comprised of faculty, student
and convocation senators each of whom has other demanding responsibilities. The
time and energy required for appropriate wide-spread consultation, analysis and
deliberation on a broad range of major administrative reorganizations is well beyond
what can reasonably be expected of a committee of "part-timers."
 Vancouver Senate 11134
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Reports of Committees of Senate
Moreover, such a committee can only be effective in its activities if it is perceived to
have the support and backing of the senior administration of the University — if it is a
body whose findings will be taken seriously by all concerned. That is not to say that
the senior administration must give the committee a blank cheque to make proposals
which, if approved by Senate, will necessarily be supported by the administration in
recommendations to the Board of Governors. To do so would be a dereliction of its
responsibilities. The point is that the conceptualization, investigation, analysis and
implementation of administrative reforms requires close cooperation between Senate
and the senior administration of the University, and should be seen to involve such
cooperation.
A broadly based Senate committee can be an important participant in the early stages
of administrative reform, identifying possible consolidations and reorganizations. But
it is unlikely to have the comprehensive perspective on such institutional problems and
possibilities that is possessed by the senior administration. The detailed investigation
of possible institutional reorganizations should be undertaken by specialized task
forces, so constituted as to include people with appropriate specialized knowledge as
well as senior members of the University community with a broad understanding of
the functioning of the University and an appreciation of the relevance of structural
change for diverse parts of the University. A task force might include senators, but not
be restricted to senators. It might also include specialists from outside the University
when this seems appropriate. The constitution of a task force should be in the hands
of the President or Vice President Academic and Provost, but with reasonable
consultation with the Senate Nominating Committee. Any such task force should have
appropriate staff support and, as necessary, the financial resources to obtain relevant
information and expert testimony. The report of any such task force should go to
Senate as well as the President, for review and recommendation, before going to the
Board of Governors for decisions and, if appropriate, implementation.
When such a task force is created, the primary role of Senate should be that of a
forum for the receipt of proposals, their careful review and the formation of
recommendations to the Board of Governors. It is in this
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Reports of Committees of Senate
spirit that the committee makes recommendations on the two items, the study of
which we have been unable to complete.
IV. UNFINISHED BUSINESS
For reasons set out in the previous section of this report, the committee has been
unable to conclude its studies of the appropriate administrative structure for studies in
human health and disparities in the sizes of faculties.
A. PROGRAMS IN HUMAN HEALTH
The Faculty of Medicine is by a considerable margin the largest, most complex and
powerful of the various units engaged in the study of human health at UBC. There are
separate and (in terms of full-time equivalent faculty members and full-time equivalent
students) very small Faculties of Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences. In addition,
there are a number of schools, departments and programs that in varying degrees are
involved in teaching, research and professional activity in human health. These units
are located in other faculties, including in the case of Nursing a faculty whose primary
academic activities are remote (but not entirely divorced) from the study of human
health. The Office of the Health Sciences Coordinator and the Health Sciences
Coordinating Committee provide forums for the consideration of issues of mutual
interest to the academic units involved in the study of human health, for the
promotion of interdisciplinary research and teaching, and for the creation and
management of some shared services.
From the outset the committee has been concerned that this fragmented organization
of programs in human health may not be optimal for the training of health
professionals for the 21st century, particularly with the increasing emphasis on
community-based interdisciplinary decision-making and treatment teams. We
considered this an important question. However, in our preliminary consultations we
were told by many that the organization of health sciences at UBC is not a problem
and that feasible reorganizations would not result in financial savings and would not
improve academic effectiveness. Considerable emphasis was placed on the role of the
Coordinator of Health Sciences in promoting interdisciplinary cooperation.
The committee is not convinced by these assertions. We are concerned that relatively
informal coordinating procedures through the Health
 Vancouver Senate 11136
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Reports of Committees of Senate
Sciences Coordinator and the Health Sciences Coordinating Committee may not be
the most effective long term solution to the ongoing problems of coordination,
integration, cooperation and change. While reason and goodwill can accomplish
much, the Office and the Committee lack the independent financial resources and the
institutionalized "clout" that may be necessary to persuade faculties, schools and
departments to make adjustments in programs and administrative arrangements. In
any case, the status and organizational home of the School of Nursing is a question
that should be addressed in the near future.
The committee is of the opinion that the administrative organization of studies in
human health is an important question that should be carefully explored. However, it
is also a very large and complex question. The committee is well aware that
apparently simple answers can contain deadly traps. After some preliminary
investigations, it became apparent that a thorough analysis is well beyond the time
and energy that the committee members have available.
We are concerned, however, that the question not be dropped. We therefore
recommend:
Recommendation 5
That the Vice-President Academic and Provost be requested to establish by
September 1995 a task force, with appropriate staff support and financial
resources, to examine the administrative organization of studies in human health at
the University of British Columbia and to make recommendations, as appropriate,
to the Vice-President Academic and Provost and to Senate by December 1996.
B. FACULTY SIZE
The number and wide disparity of sizes of faculties are matters of concern to the
committee. We suspect that there are cost implications from unnecessary duplication
of administrative officers, offices, services and small enrollment courses, and we are
concerned that the existence of so many faculties creates or reinforces unnecessary
barriers for students in designing their programs. On another level, we are also
concerned about the significant imbalances in representation of different disciplines in
central university forums (Senate; Committee of Deans). Some of these issues were
considered in the first report of the
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committee, and they were discussed more fully in the April 1993 report of the Senate
Academic Policy Committee on " Guidelines for the Establishment of a Faculty,"
which was attached as an appendix to the first report of this committee.
We have been told that in the Committee of Deans decisions are not necessarily taken
by formal votes. We have also been told that what is important is the cogency of the
arguments advanced and that voiced opinions are implicitly weighed by the size of the
faculty involved. Nonetheless, we persist in thinking that the number of voices with a
related message or perspective can have an important effect on the outcome of
deliberations. It has been suggested that the proportion of "science based" vs. "arts
based" voices is important in this regard, and possibly the proportion of
"professional" vs. "academic" voices. In Senate, of course, formal votes are taken so
imbalances in representation can be directly translated into decisions (although, it
should be noted that there is a tendency for the "at large" representatives to be elected
from the large faculties, partially offsetting the relatively heavy representation from
small faculties). The representation of faculties on Senate is prescribed in the
University Act.
Questions related to the number and relative sizes of faculties intersect with other
issues considered by the committee and by Senate, including the administrative
organization of studies in natural resources and human health. We presume that the
academic, administrative, and financial implications of faculty size and the broader
implications of fragmentation into separate faculties will be given due consideration
by the task force that Senate has requested be created to examine the administrative
organization of studies in natural resources and, if our recommendation 5 is accepted,
by the task force on administrative organization of studies in human health. However,
these issues have broader ramifications which should be given careful consideration.
Therefore the committee recommends:
Recommendation 6
That the Vice-President Academic and Provost be requested to establish by
September 1995 a task force, with appropriate staff support and financial
resources, to consider the number and relative sizes of faculties in the University of
British Columbia and to make recommendations, as appropriate, to the Vice-
President Academic and Provost and to Senate no later than December 1996.
 Vancouver Senate 11138
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In our first report, the committee considered the question of administrative stipends
and administrative leave provisions for heads of departments of widely disparate sizes.
Our recommendation that these stipends and leave provisions be graduated depending
on department size was approved by Senate, for consideration by the President. Given
wide disparities in the size and complexity of faculties the committee is also concerned
about University policy that provides the same administrative stipend and
administrative leave for all Deans. We do not regard this as appropriate.
The committee recommends
Recommendation 7
That Senate request the Vice-President Academic and Provost to reconsider the
policy on administrative stipends and administrative leave for Deans with the
objective of having administrative stipends and administrative leave provisions that
are graduated according to the size and complexity of the faculty
V. CONCLUDING NOTE
The committee has found its work over almost two years to be intensely interesting.
Part of the interest has been in the alternation of exhilaration and frustration, of
action and impasse. In a number of areas we consider that we have played a useful
catalytic role in the development of people's thinking about change in the way our
university is organized. We also consider, however, that, for the reasons sketched in
this report, we have reached a point beyond which our committee is no longer the
most useful instrument for dealing with the issues which the university faces. Our
preceding recommendations urge the continuation of productive thinking about
change. Our final recommendation, consistent with ad hoc nature of the committees,
is:
Recommendation 8.
That the committee be discharged.
 Vancouver Senate 11139
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Reports of Committees of Senate
APPENDIX A
SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS
IN THE THIRD REPORT
Recommendation 1
That Senate request a written report from the Vice President Academic and
Provost at the September 1995 meeting of Senate on the administration's response
to recommendation 6 of the First Report concerning administrative stipends and
administrative leave graduated by department size.
Recommendation 2
That Senate request a written report from the President at the September 1995
meeting of Senate on the administration's response to recommendation 9 of the
First Report concerning the constitution of the Senior Appointments Committee.
Recommendation 3:
That Senate request a written progress report from the Vice President Academic
and Provost at the September 1995 meeting of Senate on the administration's
response to recommendations 10-13 of the First Report concerning the
administrative organization for programs in natural resources.
Recommendation 4
That Senate request a written progress report from the President at the September
1995 meeting of Senate on the administration's response to the recommendations
of the Second Report concerning centralized services (Recommendations 1, 2 and
3), the control of working conditions (Recommendation 5) and the resource
aspects of changes in the level of centralization of services (Recommendation 7).
Recommendation 5.
That the Vice-President Academic and Provost be requested to establish by
September 1995 a task force, with appropriate staff support and financial
resources, to examine the administrative
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organization of studies in human health at the University of British Columbia and
to make recommendations, as appropriate, to the Vice-President Academic and
Provost and to Senate by December 1996.
Recommendation 6
That the Vice-President Academic and Provost be requested to establish by
September 1995 a task force, with appropriate staff support and financial
resources, to consider the number and relative sizes of faculties in the University of
British Columbia and to make recommendations, as appropriate, to the Vice-
President Academic and Provost and to Senate no later than December 1996
Recommendation 7
That Senate request the Vice-President Academic and Provost to reconsider the
policy on administrative stipends and administrative leave for Deans with the
objective of having administrative stipends and administrative leave provisions that
are graduated according to the size and complexity of the faculty.
Recommendation 8.
That the committee be discharged.
APPENDIX B
MEMBERSHIP OF THE SENATE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON
UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATION.
A. Current Members
•
D. R. Birch                      •
M. I. MacEntee
•
D. G. A. Carter               •
R. T. A.MacGillivray
•
L. Chui R.                       •
D. J. Randall
•
K. Douglas                      •
A. Shearer (Chair)
•
S. E. Grace                      •
S. Thorne
•
M. Isaacson                     •
W. A. Wehrung
•
J. G. T. Kelsey
D. Ll. Williams
B. Previous Members (not currently serving)
•
G. W. Eaton
B. Horner
•
C.L. Greentree                •
R. Tees
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C. Ex Officio Members Who Did Not Participate in the Deliberations of the
Committee
R.H. Lee (Chancellor •    D.W. Strangway (President)
R.A. Spencer (Registrar)
APPENDIX C
RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE FIRST REPORT
(as amended and approved by Senate at its meeting of May 18, 1994)
With respect to department size:
1. Senate establish a minimum size for departments, schools and divisions that
have department-like responsibilities.
2. The minimum size for departments, schools and divisions be 15 full-time
faculty members in the department.
3. Deans be asked to arrange for consolidations of relevant departments, schools
and divisions to conform with the minimum size and to report regularly to the
Vice President Academic and Provost on progress. The Vice President Academic
and Provost be asked to report to Senate on the results of these
reconfigurations by December 1995.
4. Exceptions to the minimum size should be rare, be permitted only on the basis
of special circumstances which must be made explicit.
5. All exceptions to the minimum size approved by the Vice President Academic
and Provost, be reported to Senate.
6. Provisions for administrative stipends and administrative leave for department
heads be graduated depending on department size.
With respect to University and Senate procedures:
7. The Senate Curriculum Committee be instructed to study the process of
curriculum revision and to bring recommendations to the Senate not later than
November 1994 for the simplification of the process.
8. As guidelines, the Senate Curriculum Committee be invited to
a.   Establish a broad category of minor changes that can be made by
departments, schools or non-departmentalized faculties
 Vancouver Senate 11142
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without further consultation except notification of the appropriate
curriculum review officer (who might be the Chair of the Senate
Curriculum Committee), who will be responsible for ensuring that the
change is indeed "minor" and that no other academic program is likely
to be adversely affected. This category might include, at a minimum,
changes in course numbers, course names, prerequisite requirements and
editorial changes in course descriptions.
b. Establish a narrow category of major changes that require consultation
and full review by faculties and the Senate. This category might include
new programs, new courses, deletion of courses and changes that affect
requirements for student programs in other departments.
c. Consider the possibility that proposals for major changes in graduate
courses and programs go directly to the Faculty of Graduate Studies
from departments, schools and non-departmentalized faculties for full
review before being sent to Senate for review and approval.
9. Senate ask the President to review the constitution of the Senior Appointments
Committee, with a view to removing Deans from that committee and with a
view to strengthening its ability to represent high university-wide standards of
excellence and objectivity.
With respect to teaching and research in natural resources:
10. Senate endorse the idea of a reconfiguration of some existing faculties and
other academic units to develop and intensify the University's commitment to
teaching and research relating to natural resources and the natural
environment.
11. The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to establish a task force to
develop plans for the achievement of this end.
12.The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to submit a progress report
to Senate no later than January 1995.
13.The task force proposed in Recommendation 11 above be asked to consider the
proposed merger of the departments of Geography
 Vancouver Senate 11143
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Reports of Committees of Senate
and Soil Science in the context of their deliberations on the reconfiguration of
teaching and research on natural resources.
APPENDIX D
RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE SECOND REPORT,
CENTRALIZATION AND DECENTRALIZATION
(as amended and approved by Senate at its meeting January 18, 1995. )
4.1 Centralized Services: Cost Minimization and Responsiveness
Recommendation 1. That Senate request the President to ensure that the mandates
of all centralized service units explicitly recognize the twin needs of cost
minimization and responsiveness to academic departments and other users.
Recommendation 2. That Senate request the President to require all centralized
service units have a formal mechanism for regularly assessing their performance,
including the extent to which they are satisfying the legitimate needs of academic
departments, individual faculty members and students. In some cases this may be
achieved with an advisory committee, but other mechanisms may be appropriate in
other cases. Whatever the format, consultation with appropriate parts of the
academic community should be required. The nature of the mechanism and
changes in it should be reported to the Senate Budget Committee for review and
comment, and the substance of evaluations and responses to them should be
included in the unit's section of the annual Budget and Planning Narrative.
Recommendation 3. That Senate request the President to require periodic reviews
of all centralized units with a view not only to minimizing costs but also to
enhancing responsiveness with which services are provided to the academic
departments, individual faculty members and students, and that a summary and a
copy of the recommendations of each review together with the administrators'
responses to them (excluding confidential personnel material) be sent to the Senate
Budget Committee.
 Vancouver Senate 11144
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4.2 Monopolistic Services and Charges
Recommendation 4. That the Senate Budget Committee be requested to study
those centralized units which enjoy full or partial monopoly status on the campus,
particularly ancillary units, and to bring recommendations to Senate and to the
President not later than the December 1995 meeting of Senate, on a mechanism to
ensure that each such unit defines its service in relation to the academic
community's needs, provides that service to a standard which meets or exceeds
that found in the competitive marketplace, and justifies its operating costs and
scale of charges in relation to the fair market value found in the Greater Vancouver
area.
4.3 Control of Working Conditions
Recommendation 5. That Senate recommend to the President and the employee
groups that they jointly undertake a serious review of the contract provisions
which are the basis for regulating work and working conditions at the University,
and that this review focus on the need to provide for the improved administrative
efficiency of academic units and for a degree of flexibility which permits
innovation and timely response to change in academic units with the goal of
serving the University's academic needs in the best possible way.
4.4 Intermediate Levels of Centralization
Recommendation 6. That deans (i) move some administrative functions from the
department level to the faculty level if this would improve administrative efficiency;
and (ii) where there is no faculty-level provision of functions which need to be
performed in several departments, the deans request heads to consider the
possibility of pooling resources and operating shared services.
4.5 Resource Aspects of Centralization Level Changes
Recommendation 7. That administrators who intend to devolve any function to
other units ensure (i) that the proposal be assessed, in consultation with the units
affected, for its impact on the academic work of those units; and (ii) that any such
devolution be
 Vancouver Senate 11145
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accompanied where necessary by a budget transfer sufficient to offset its effect on
the units' academic functioning.
Dr. Shearer thanked the members of the committee on behalf of the Senate for their hard
work, stressing the fact that "the members have done most of the work."
Dr. Shearer spoke briefly to the report stating that much of it is concerned with the
process for institutional reform.
Dr. Shearer l        That recommendations 1,2,3 and 4 be
Dr. Carter J        adopted.
Carried.
Dr. Shearer reiterated points made in the report stressing the importance of institutional
reorganization and that the increasing emphasis the province is placing on community-
based health teams perhaps should be reflected at UBC. The committee, however, did not
have the time, resources or technical expertise to explore the issue of human health
properly.
Dr. Shearer l        That recommendation 5 be adopted.
Dr. MacEntee i
Dean Hollenberg indicated that he was of two minds regarding the motion and he agreed
that the Coordinator of Health Sciences is not yet a strong cohesive force working to
integrate fully the Health Sciences and that it should be examined, but thought it would
be wise to wait for a couple of years before instituting the task force in order to allow
some of the uncertainty to settle down. Concern over the teaching units in the Health
Sciences hospitals given the major
 Vancouver Senate 11146
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hospital reorganization now under way, the development of the new curriculum in
medicine, uncertainty in the research organizations and searches for new Deans while the
Health Sciences are in a state of flux were noted as some of the reasons for delaying the
implementation of a task force.
Dean Meisen agreed that this was an important issue, but would like to see a general
examination, one not limited to the items of concern mentioned by Dr. Hollenberg. Dean
Meisen suggested that the Vice President Academic and Provost be requested to define
clearly the terms of reference of this committee and to lay out a reporting schedule which
would result in a preliminary report. Based on the preliminary report, a decision could be
made on whether a further detailed report would be valuable.
Dean Yen stated that if we were to leap into this right now the committee would be
chasing a moving target. He felt it would be wise to wait until the dust has settled and the
government and the public policy on health care is in order before embarking on a task of
this magnitude.
Dr. Carter's feeling was that the university should be proactive in addressing the
inevitable changes in health care. He felt is important that we look concurrently with the
externally imposed changes and how we can best react to them within the university.
Dr. Birch expressed concern that the argument suggesting the university wait until the
dust settles in the public sector does not reflect accurately the present situation. He stated
that the university is very much an integral part of public
 Vancouver Senate 11147
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policy debate and has "a set of dynamic responses that are taking place and are reflected
in curricular revision, in pedagogical revision, and in collaboration across faculties and
schools."
The motion was
put and carried.
Dr. Shearer stated that the issue of wide disparities in the sizes of faculties had been raised
in the first report but was one which the committee was unable to resolve. The issues of
cost implications and/or "economies of scale" had been considered. There was also
concern over inequitable representation of different parts of the University in forums such
as Senate and the Committee of Deans. Representation on the Senate is straightforward as
it is specified in the University Act.
Dr. Shearer l        That the Vice-President Academic and Provost
Dr. Carter i        ^e requested to establish by September 1995 a
task force, with appropriate staff support and
financial resources, to consider the number and
relative sizes of faculties in the University of
British Columbia and to make
recommendations, as appropriate, to the Vice-
President Academic and Provost and to Senate
no later than December 1996.
It was pointed out that almost 30 years ago a similar motion resulted in a visionary report
titled "The President's Report on the Reorganization of the University" which
recommended changing the organization of the faculties and departments as they existed
at that time.
The motion was
put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Shearer
Dr. Carter
11148
That Senate request the Vice-President
Academic and Provost to reconsider the policy
on administrative stipends and administrative
leave for Deans with the objective of having
administrative stipends and administrative
leave provisions that are graduated according
to the size and complexity of the faculty.
The motion was
put and carried.
Dr. Shearer
Dr. Slonecker
That the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on
University Organization be discharged.
Dean Marchak pointed out that the Faculty of Arts had taken the committee's first report
very seriously. The ongoing process of trying to meet the recommendations has had a
profound impact on the faculty; it has not been easy for anyone and has involved "far
reaching discussions, a lot of anger, and a lot of frustration." Dean Marchak expressed
concern that Senate has not been fully aware of the gravity of the motions that it has
passed in terms of the impact. She also observed that support mechanisms for those who
are required to implement those decisions should be provided. Deans of large faculties
with departments were faced with a particularly complex task. Before the committee is
disbanded, consideration should be given to creating a process of decision-making that
fully engages the university in the debate so that the issues are known and public, and
don't come out of the blue from the Senate, the Deans or from the Vice Presidents and
President.
 Vancouver Senate 11149
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Faculty of Arts
Dr. Birch expressed thanks and appreciation to the Committee for their hard work.
The motion was
put and carried.
Faculty of Arts
ASSESSMENT OF GRAMMAR AND SYNTAX IN STUDENT WRITING
At a meeting of the Faculty of Arts held on February 21, 1995 the following motion was
approved:
"That in all courses taught in English in the Faculty of Arts, students' written work be
evaluated in part on grammatical and syntactical correctness."
Rationale:
It is the obligation of the Faculty of Arts to ensure that its students are able to write
grammatical English sentences. The writing of English cannot be the sole responsibility
of the English Department. Unless the level of accomplishment achieved in first year
English is reinforced by the continued demand that students write correct English
sentences, the ability of some students to do so can and will deteriorate. It is assumed
that errors in composition, as distinct from grammar and syntax, are already included
in the assessment of essays. Errors such as lack of agreement, wrong tenses, mixed
constructions, and faulty references work against the implicit contract between writer
and reader that the writer will minimize such potential obstacles to ease reading and
comprehensibility. Finally, it does the reputation of the Faculty harm if its graduates
are unable to write proper English sentences.
Dean Marchak stated that the Faculty of Arts was concerned with how issues are phrased
as well as with their content." Students should be writing essays and should be evaluated
on the basis of their communication skills in all courses in
 Vancouver Senate 11150
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Faculty of Arts
the Faculty of Arts which are taught in the English language. This would not be imposed
on courses which are taught in other languages or courses with no essay component.
Students in other faculties also would be affected, but only in Arts courses. Other faculties
are encouraged to take similar measures. Dean Marchak emphasized that completion of
first year English is insufficient for sustaining communication skills.
Dean Marchak l        That in all courses taught in the English
Dr. Coop e J        language in the Faculty of Arts, student's'
written work be evaluated in part on
grammatical and syntactical correctness.
Dr. Kelsey's opinion was that if we are taking the evaluation of teaching seriously, there
should be a connection between what is taught and what is evaluated. Not all courses
taught in English in the Faculty of Arts aim to teach grammar and syntax. His preference
would be to see a statement of an expectation that in these courses grammar and syntax
would be correct
Dr. Will spoke in support of the motion, but anticipated that there would be operational
problems. Noting that one of the ways to improve the writing of students is to have the
students write a lot of essays and that the number of courses with written work today is
much smaller than five years ago, he suggested that a motion be made to increase the
number of courses requiring written work. Dr. Will noted that some universities in
Ontario require students to take a certain number of courses with an essay component.
This has the effect of encouraging the number of courses requiring essays. In Dr. Will's
opinion, the motion does not require Senate approval.
 Vancouver Senate 11151
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Faculty of Graduate Studies
Dr. Carter strongly endorsed the motion but was concerned that it is restricted to the
Faculty of Arts. While wanting to encourage other faculties requiring written expression
to consider both content and grammar as part of the assessment process, he recognized
the significant resource implications.
Dr. Shearer urged the Faculty of Arts to give this issue more consideration. He drew
attention to the practice of some students, for whom English is not their mother tongue,
to either seek editorial assistance with their papers or face the possibility of failing, despite
making a very good effort in writing a large essay.
Dean Marchak stated that this issue had been debated at length and that one of the major
reasons for putting this motion forward was to provide support to teachers of philosophy,
anthropology, classics, etc., who are faced with students who maintain that marks cannot
be deducted for grammatical errors because the subject is not English.
Following further
discussion, the motion
was put and carried.
I 1 I
Faculty of Graduate Studies
PROPOSED CALENDAR CHANGES - DOCTORAL RESIDENCY
Dean Grace presented the the following proposed Calendar changes which had been
circulated.
Recommendation
The Committee recommends that the present regulations governing doctoral residency
be changed so as to:
 Vancouver Senate 11152
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Faculty of Graduate Studies
a) replace the requirement for two years of residency on campus (three for those
without a Master's degree) with a normal expectation of two years of full time
study, and
b) make it possible for departments to make program regulations different from
the norm,
c) a re-ordering of the clauses in section B of page 222 of the Calendar to make a
more logical sequence than is presently found there.
One change to the Policy and Procedures Manual is also proposed.
Rationale
Residency requirements as presently stated are defined in terms of three elements.
These are (a) a minimum time (three academic years, or two for people admitted with
a Master's degree), (b) full time status, and (c) location ("at the University").
The nature of scholarship has changed very much in many fields over the last few
decades. The revolution in information transfer, the advent of computing facilities and
the ease of travel have had marked effects on the nature and definition of a university.
While the university continues primarily to be thought of as being the UBC campus, it
can no longer be defined solely as being in a specific place. The graduate programs
within the university show great diversity and this diversity is to be encouraged. It
includes the blurring of former distinctions between "study" and "work" in some
fields.
A situation has evolved where one of the university's means of trying to ensure the
best possible quality of graduate education (i.e., the requiring of residency) is (a) no
longer fully in tune with the legitimate diversity in the modern world of scholarship,
and (b) unenforceable at the institutional level. While it is useful to state a normal
expectation for full time study on campus, it is necessary now to recognize that there
may be legitimate departures from that norm and to allow different decisions about
student programming to be made at the level of the academic unit which is best able
both to judge the most appropriate form of "residency" and to enforce its observation.
 Vancouver Senate 11153
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Faculty of Graduate Studies
The proposed new calendar entry is as follows:
B) Program of Study
1. The work of each candidate will be supervised by a Candidate's Committee
consisting of not fewer than three members; these may include faculty members
from a department other than that in which the candidate is writing the thesis.
Changes may be made to the membership of the Candidate's Committee subject
to the approval of the major department and the Dean of the faculty of
Graduate Studies.
2. Upon registration, the student will consult the Candidate's Committee to
develop a program of studies, which is then reviewed and approved by the
department concerned. The program of studies will consist of seminars,
directed readings, consultations, and such formal courses as may be deemed
essential for the fulfilment of the requirements for the degree. Some
departments require competence in languages other than English. The
department in which the student intends to write the thesis shall determine the
number of such languages and the level of competence necessary in each. A
major part of the candidate's work will consist of a thesis embodying the
results of original research.
3. Changes in the program of study may be required during the study period;
these must be reviewed and approved by the Candidate's Committee, the major
department and the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
4. The progress of all students working for the Ph.D., D.M.A. and Ed.D. degrees
will be reviewed from time to time and at least once a year in the spring by the
department concerned and by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. A
candidate may be required to withdraw if progress has not been satisfactory as
shown by course work, the comprehensive examination, progress on the thesis,
or other requirements of the Department or the faculty of Graduate Studies.
5. Students normally will be Admitted to Candidacy when they have completed all
required course work, and passed the comprehensive examination and their
research supervisor has certified that their thesis proposal has been approved.
 Vancouver Senate 11154
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Faculty of Graduate Studies
6. It is normally expected that students admitted with a Bachelor's degree will
spend at least three sessions (each of uninterrupted duration of at least eight
months) in full time study at the University. For students admitted with a
Master's degree, this expectation is for a minimum of two sessions in full time
study at the University. Departments, with the approval of the Dean of
Graduate Studies, may make different regulations concerning the duration,
sequencing and location of full time study.
7. Duration of Program
a. Students must maintain continuous registration throughout all years
until graduation by keeping up with fee payments.
b. If the degree is not awarded within a period of six years from initial
registration, the student's candidacy will be terminated and the student
will be required to withdraw from the program. Extension of candidacy
will be granted under exceptional circumstances.
c. For provisions regarding on-leave status, see "Graduate Student Status"
in this section.
p.222, col. 3 - p. 223, col. 1
Graduate Student Status
1) Full-time Graduate Student, paragraph 3
Under special circumstances a full-time student may be required to conduct
research at some location away from this campus.
delete paragraph 4
2) Part-Time Graduate Student . . .(clause continues unchanged)
Dean Grace spoke briefly to the proposal drawing attention to paragraph 6 which
comprises the core of the changes.
Dean Grace l        That the proposed Calendar changes in the
Dr. Kelsey i        Doctoral Residency, Faculty of Graduate
Studies, be approved.
Carried.
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Faculty of Graduate Studies
RENAMING OF CENTRE FOR SOUTH ASIAN RESEARCH, UNDER THE INSTITUTE OF
ASIAN RESEARCH, TO THE CENTRE FOR INDIA AND SOUTH ASIA RESEARCH
A letter from Dr. Mark Fruin, Institute of Asian Research and Dr. John Wood, Chair,
Centre for South Asian Research, recommending the re-naming of the Centre had been
circulated.
Dean Grace l        That the Centre for South Asian Research,
Dr. Boardman i       under the Institute of Asian Research, be re
named the Centre for India and South Asia
Research.
Carried.
AMALGAMATION OF WESTWATER RESEARCH CENTRE AND GRADUATE PROGRAM
IN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
The following report from Dean Grace to Graduate Council had been circulated.
Discussions have been in progress for about two years regarding possible mergers of
Faculty of Graduate Studies units involved with subjects broadly related to the
environment and natural resources. These discussions have reached a point where we
wish to combine the Westwater Research Centre and the Resource Management and
Environmental Studies Graduate Program.
Effective July 1, 1995, it is proposed that the two units be merged, with a single
Director and a single operatiang budget. The existing graduate program (approved in
1993) will continue to operate under the name Resource Management and
Environmental Studies, and all students registered in that program will continue. For
the time being, the overall unit will be called Resource Management and
Environmental Studies. The Westwater name will continue to be used informally for
attracting grants and contracts because of the reputation achieved by the Westwater
Research Centre since it was founded in 1971. Arrangements with the Forest
Economics Policy Analysis (FEPA) Research Unit will continue unchanged.
 Vancouver Senate 11156
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Triennial Elections of Representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
Over the next few months, those involved will finalize arrangements for integration of
resources, (including physical amalgamation), a common advisory committee and
other details. These details will be reported to the Graduate Council in the Fall.
Discussions will also continue regarding closer integration with other units in this area
and other possible amalgamations.
Dean Grace l        That the Amalgamation of Westwater
Dean Goldberg i        Research Centre and Graduate Program in
Resource Management and Environmental
Studies be approved.
Dean Grace stated that the Westwater Research Centre, in existence for approximately 25
years, has six associated faculty members. Its primary work has been related to water but
it has also been involved with other resources. The Resource Management and
Environmental Studies program does not include any FTE faculty members, but it is a
viable program drawing on faculty from various units. The Westwater faculty already
give a course under the Resource Management and Environmental Studies banner.
The motion was
put and carried.
Triennial Elections of Representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
The Registrar presented the following proposal which had been circulated:
The University Act, Section 42, states that "... Senate shall make and publish all rules
necessary and not inconsistent with this Act in respect of nominations, elections and
voting ..."
For the 1995196 Triennial Elections, the Registrar proposes to change from a mailed
ballot system to a telephone ballot system using voice-response technology.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Triennial Elections of Representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
11157
If time permits and security considerations can be addressed, we would like to also
allow the option of voting via the Internet.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS:
i.      The Registrar shall conduct the elections.
ii.      Each candidate shall be nominated in writing, the nomination to be signed by
seven persons entitled to vote in the election of the Board of Governors and by
the nominee indicating willingness to run for election, and the nominations
shall be sent to the Registrar.
iii. Each nominee shall be requested to supply a brief curriculum vitae and be
permitted to include a further statement of up to 150 words which will be
circulated with the ballot information.
iv.      The elections shall be conducted by either phone-in ballot or mailed ballot. The
balloting system will be designed to permit computer tabulation of the election
results.
v.      The election schedule shall be as follows:-
Faculty (two to be elected)
Call for nominations    Monday, September 11, 1995
Close of nominations   Monday, October 2, 1995
Last day of voting        Friday, November 3, 1995
Non-Faculty full-time Employees (one to be elected)
Call for nominations    Monday, October 16, 1995
Close of nominations   Monday, November 6, 1995
Last day of voting        Friday, December 8, 1995
SENATE
Election of Chancellor and (eleven) Convocation Members of Senate:
i.      The Registrar shall conduct the elections.
ii.      All nominations of candidates for the office of chancellor shall be signed by
seven persons entitled to vote in the election.
iii.      All nominations for membership in the Senate shall be signed by three persons
entitled to vote in the election.
 Vancouver Senate 11158
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Triennial Elections of Representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
iv.      All nominations for election of candidates for the office of chancellor and for
membership in Senate shall require the signature of the nominee indicating
willingness to run for election.
v.      "The registrar shall forthwith send a written notice of nomination to each
person nominated as a candidate for the office of chancellor and to each person
nominated as a candidate for membership in the Senate, with a request that the
candidate forward to the registrar information respecting his degrees, the dates
thereof, his occupation, offices held by him at a university or in any other
organization, his other professional or business interests and his publications."
(University Act, Section 14 (3)).
The registrar shall circulate only the information specified in the University
Act.
vi.      The election of convocation members will be scheduled and regulated as
follows:
a. this election shall include the election of a chancellor;
b. the notice of the election and call for nominations shall be made in the
fall Chronicle to be published in August 1995;
c. the close of nominations for chancellor and for convocation membership
in the Senate shall be 4.00 p.m. on Monday, October 30, 1995.
d. the biographical information on the candidates and voting instructions
shall be circulated with the winter Chronicle to be published in
November 1995.
e. the last day of voting shall be Thursday, February 29, 1996.
vii.      In the event that after the close of nominations but before the election date it is
found that a nominee for the office of chancellor could not serve if elected, the
registrar shall be authorized, if so instructed by the Chairman of Senate, to
delay the election and issue another call for nominations.
viii.      The balloting system shall be designed to permit computer tabulation of the
election results.
 Vancouver Senate 11159
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Triennial Elections of Representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
ix.      The results of the election, in accordance with Section 16 of the University Act,
will be reported to the Senate at its next regular meeting, March 20, 1996.
x.      Replacement procedures for Convocation representatives to Senate -
replacements will be appointed on the basis of the recommendation of the
remaining Convocation representatives to Senate.
(Approved by Senate, April 21, 1976)
Election of Faculty members at-Large (Ten to be elected)
i.      The Registrar shall conduct the election.
ii.      Each candidate shall be nominated in writing, the nominations to be signed by
three faculty members (see definition of faculty members under General
Provisions: Eligibility).
iii.      The election schedule shall be as follows:
Call for nominations: Wednesday, January 10, 1996
Close of nominations: Wednesday, January 31, 1996
Last day of voting: Friday, March 8, 1996
iv.      Replacement procedures - "a vacancy in this category shall be filled by a
candidate in the ... election of members at-Large. Where no candidate is willing
or able to serve as a replacement, a special election to fill that vacancy will be
held."
"the Registrar shall invite the candidate who received the highest number of
votes in the ... general election ... to fill the vacancy. If that candidate declines
... the candidate with the next highest number of votes shall be invited to fill
the vacancy, and so on, until a willing candidate is found."
"An individual who has vacated a position as a representative of the faculty
members at-large is not thereby disqualified from filling a vacancy in
accordance with the above procedures."
(Approved by Senate, May 25, 1977)
Elections of Faculty Members from Individual Faculties (Two from each Faculty)
Individual Faculties will make their own decisions on the procedures and timing of the
election of their two representatives to serve on Senate on the understanding that all
elections be completed by February 29, 1996. Such elections may be held at Faculty
meetings subject to the
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Triennial Elections of Representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
11160
terms of the University Act (i.e. those participating in the elections must be faculty
members as defined in the "General Provisions" section of this submission under the
heading Eligibility, on Page 4).
With the election period for Faculty representatives to the Board of Governors ending
Friday, November 3, 1995, and the election period for Faculty Members at-Large to
Senate ending Friday, March 8, 1996,1 suggest the following schedule for individual
faculties. This schedule would enable any eligible faculty members who wished to do
so to run as a candidate in all of the elections involving Faculty Members at-Large.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Call for nominations    Friday, October 6, 1995
Close of nominations   Friday, October 27, 1995
Last day of voting        Friday, December 8, 1995
Other faculties requiring an election by ballot
Call for nominations    Friday, November 17, 1995
Close of nominations   Friday, December 8, 1995
Last day of voting        Friday, January 26, 1996
Replacement procedures - Nomination and election shall be conducted in accordance
with established Faculty procedures. Where such established procedures do not exist
then nominations shall be called for either before or on the floor of a meeting of the
Faculty concerned and voting shall be either by show of hands or by balloting at the
meeting. It was agreed that the Registrar's office would not be involved.
(Approved by Senate, April 21, 1976)
Faculties who want to have runners-up used as replacements in the event of a vacancy
during the three-year term will be asked to advise the Registrar so that this may be
stated clearly on the call for nominations.
Faculties will be asked to advise the Registrar of their decisions.
Election of a representative of the full-time Professional Librarians:
i.      The Registrar shall conduct the election.
ii.      Each candidate shall be nominated in writing, the nominations to be signed by
three professional librarians employed by the University who have been
employed in that capacity for a
 Vancouver Senate 11161
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Triennial Elections of Representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
iii.      period of four months or longer, and by the nominee indicating willingness to
run for election.
iv.      The election schedule shall be as follows:-
Call for nominations: Tuesday, January 9, 1996
Close of nominations: Tuesday, January 30, 1996
Last day of voting: Thursday, February 29, 1996
GENERAL PROVISIONS
Eligibility
Faculty members eligible to participate in the elections of representatives to serve on
the Board of Governors and the Senate shall be only those persons who, at the time
the nominations are called, hold full-time Board appointments (which they have held
for four months or longer) at the ranks of lecturer, instructor, assistant professor,
associate professor or professor.
Any faculty member who has been granted leave extending for more than six months
from the time at which Senate membership would commence (September 1, 1996) or
who is on disability leave at the close of nominations shall not be eligible to stand for
election to Senate.
(Approved by Senate, November 18, 1981)
Nominations
In some elections the Registrar publishes the names of the nominators in the
information provided to electors. Where more signatures than are required are
submitted in support of a particular candidate, the Registrar will publish only the
minimum number of names required. Only one nomination will be accepted for each
candidate in any one election.
Results
Results will be counted and tabulated by computer program.
Terms of office (three years)
Unless otherwise determined by the Board of Governors, the Chancellor shall take
office on June 25, 1996 and the installation ceremony will take place on Friday, May
31,1996.
All other members of the Board of Governors will take office on February 1, 1996.
 Vancouver Senate 11162
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Other Business
All other members of Senate will take office on September 1, 1996.
Leaves of absence
The position of an elected faculty member shall be declared vacant by the Secretary of
Senate when he has received notice that the member has resigned, or that the member
is going on leave for a period of more than six months, or that the member has been
granted disability leave.
(Approved by Senate, November 18, 1981)
Any elected member of Senate may be granted leave of absence for up to five
consecutive ordinary meetings of Senate. Any absence without leave for more than five
consecutive ordinary meetings of Senate shall result in a declaration of vacancy by the
Secretary of Senate.
(Approved by Senate, November 18, 1981)
Dr. Goldberg l        That the following proposals be adopted:
Dr. Berger J        a)   To change the 1995/96 Triennial Elections
from a mailed ballot system to a telephone
ballot system using voice-response
technology
b) If time permits and security conditions can
be addressed, to allow the option of voting
via the Internet.
Carried.
Other Business
TEACHING EVALUATIONS/FREEDOM OF INFORMATION & PROTECTION OF
PRIVACY ACT
Dr. Will advised that when the Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching Evaluation reported to
Senate in May of last year one of the recommendations was that departments and
faculties be urged to publish the results of the evaluations. Dr. Will's understanding was
that the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act had placed some
constraints on possible implementation of this
 Vancouver Senate 11163
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Other Business
motion. Dr. Will wondered what might be done, if anything, to try to minimize the
impact of this Act on the intent of that motion.
Dr. Gosline replied that the Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching Evaluation is preparing a
report which it hopes will be submitted to Senate in the fall. The committee realizes that
the privacy section of the Freedom of Information Act has an impact on the release of
student evaluation information. The committee will attempt to suggest to Senate, in the
form of recommendations, some mechanisms that can be discussed and possibly
implemented to assist the appropriate release of information that is consistent with the
Act.
Dr. Birch informed Senate that he had consulted on this subject and it seems that under
the protection of privacy we are constrained from acting unreasonably in the release of
the protected information. In his opinion, the release of teaching evaluations without
placing a constraint of requiring a sign off or approval of the individual faculty member is
entirely within the spirit and intent of the Act.
During further discussion on different interpretations of the Act it was pointed out that
Associate Vice President, Dr. McClean, had been consulted on this issue and his opinion
was that until a case is actually brought to the Commissioner of Privacy, on the basis of a
complaint, it is unlikely that a decision will be made.
Ms. Chui stated that it would be appreciated if courses listed in the Calendar could
include the names of the instructors as students often use the teaching evaluations to assist
in their choice of courses.
 Vancouver Senate 11164
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Other Business
It was pointed out that often the instructors are not known at the time of the Calendar
publication, however, the registration guide includes the names of all instructors known
at the time of publication. Course outlines, written by and containing the names of
instructors, usually may be obtained directly from the individual departments.
The Registrar suggested that the freedom of information section of the Act was equally as
applicable as the privacy section in this debate. He stated that the Registrar's office
intends to make as much information as possible available to students on line through
View UBC and as time progresses, through other internet communications. Presently the
publication deadlines are such that instructors are not assigned and in many cases sections
are not established at the time of publication.
Mr. Maas informed Senate that the Faculty of Science donates its teaching evaluations to
the Science Undergraduate Society. He questioned the legal basis for requiring professors
to sign a waiver.
Dr. Birch replied that Senate had not endorsed the Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching
Evaluation's recommendation that releasing teaching evaluations be mandatory, but that
there are a number of Faculties which do make them available. The Act does not
automatically require the university to obtain waivers from individual faculty members.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,1995
11165
Report of the Tributes Committee (in camera)
Report of the Tributes Committee (in camera)
EMERITUS FACULTY
Dean McBride, Chair of the committee, presented the following list of people to be
invited to accept emeritus faculty status.
Dr. Boye Ahlborn
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Dr. Charles P. Anderson
Associate Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies
Mrs. Ingrida Brenzinger
Senior Instructor Emerita of Linguistics
Dr. Sydney J. Butler
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Language Education
Dr. H. Alan C. Cairns
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Dr. Tali A. Conine
Professor Emerita of Rehabilitation Sciences
Dr. B. Leroi Daniels
Professor Emeritus of Educational Studies
Dr. George W. Eaton
Professor Emeritus of Plant Science
Dr. Sidney B. Effer
Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Dr. John A. Gaitanakis
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Architecture
Dr. Edward G. Hauptmann
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Dr. Robert G. Hindmarch
Professor Emeritus of Human Kinetics
Dr. Klaus Hoechsmann
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Dr. Peter Lusztig
Dean Emeritus of Commerce and Business Administration
Dr. W. Robert Morford
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Dr. Mervyn D. Olson
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Ms. Marcie Powell
Program Director Emerita of Continuing Studies
Dr. W. Robin Ridington
Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Sociology
Dr. Sally M. Rogow
Professor Emerita of Educational Psychology and Special Education
Dr. Sun Shik Shim
Professor Emeritus of Orthopaedics
Mr. Joseph C. Smith
Professor Emeritus of Law
Mr. John P. Stewart
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Philosophy
Dr. Vincent P. Sweeney
Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Dean McBride
Dr. Randall
}
That the recommendations of the Tributes
Committee concerning emeritus status be
approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 11166
Minutes of May 17,1995	
Adjournment
HONORARY L.L.B. DEGREES
Dean McBride l        That the Senate approve the granting of
Dean Smith i        honorary degrees to lawyers who qualified for
practice in BC prior to the establishment of the
UBC Faculty of Law.
Dean McBride informed Senate that the Faculty of Law is celebrating its 50th Anniversary
this year and as part of that celebration they would like to recognize those individuals
who received their legal education in the Province of British Columbia prior to the
existence of the UBC Faculty of Law. These individuals do not possess an LL.B. or its
equivalent, but became Barristers or Solicitors in the Province of British Columbia,
members of the Law Society of British Columbia and have remained in good standing
throughout the time of their practice, are still living and there are no other impediments
that might stand in the way. Those people so honoured will be asked to come forward
during the Faculty of Law's 50th Anniversary celebration in the fall.
Dean Smith elaborated stating that following investigation and solicitation of
nominations the Faculty of Law had recommended to the Tributes Committee that
approximately 20 candidates be awarded honorary LL.B.'s. Following a review by Dean
McBride, the Tributes Committee recommended a group of some of the most
distinguished senior members of the legal profession in the province. A special ceremony
has been planned for October 13, 1995.
The motion was
put and carried.
Adjournment
There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 10:20 p.m.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September 20, 1995.
 Vancouver Senate 11167
Minutes of May 17,1995
Confirmed
Secretary
Chair

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