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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1993-05-19

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 10581
May 19, 1993
The Ninth Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British Columbia for
the Session 1992-93 was held on Wednesday, May 19, 1993 at 8:00 p.m. in Room 102,
George F. Curtis Building.
Present: President D. W. Strangway, (Chair), Chancellor L. R. Peterson, Vice-
President D. R. Birch, Mr. S. Alsgard, Mr. D. A. Anderson, Mr. J. A. Banfield, Dean pro
tern. M. A. Boyd, Dr. D. M. Brunette, Dr. D. G. A. Carter, Professor E. A. Carty, Dr. S.
Cherry, Ms. L. Chui, Dr. T. S. Cook, Dr. J. D. Dennison, Mr. W. R Dick, Mr. M. A.
Fuoss, Mr. E. B. Goehring, Dean M. A. Goldberg, Dean J. R. Grace, Dr. S. E. Grace,
Dr. R. D. Guy, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Rev. J. Hanrahan, Mr. A. Janmohamed, Dr.
J. G. T. Kelsey, Mr. G. Kettyle, Mr. H. Leung, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Dr. D. M. Lyster,
Dean M. P. Marchak, Mr. P. R. Marsden, Dean B. C. McBride, Dr. J. A. McLean, Dean
J. H. McNeill, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dean A. Meisen, Dr. A. G. Mitchell, Mr. J. A.
Olynyk, Dr. R. J. Patrick, Ms. B. M. Peterson, Dr. C. Price, Mr. A. A. Raghavji,
Professor R. S. Reid, Dr. P. Resnick, Dean J. F. Richards, Mr. M. M. Ryan, Dr.
G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. R. A. Shearer, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Dean C. L.
Smith, Dr. L. de Sobrino, Dr. L. J. Stan, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Mr. G. A. Thom, Dr. J.
Vanderstoep, Dr. D. A. Wehrung, Dr. R. M. Will, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Mr. E. C. H.
Woo, Ms. N. E. Woo, Mr. C. A. Woods.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from Dr. A. P. Autor,
Dean C. S. Binkley, Professor P. L. Bryden, Dr. R. L. Chase, Mr. N. A. Davidson, Dr.
K. Dawson, Dr. G. W. Eaton, Ms. C. L. Greentree, Dean M. J. Hollenberg, Mr. F. B. N.
Horsburgh, Dr. M. Isaacson, Dr. M. M. Klawe, Dr. H. McDonald, Mr. R. S. McNeal,
Rev. W. J. Phillips, Mr. M. G. Schaper, Mr. A. J. Scow, Ms. S. J. Spence, Dr. R. C.
Tees, Dr. W. Uegama, Dr. J. M. Varah, Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr.
Senate membership
Replacement (University Act, section 35 (5))
Mr. Hugh Leung replaces Mr. Bruce Burgess as student representative of the Faculty of
Dentistry.
Minutes of the previous meeting
Dr. Birch 1 That the minutes of the eighth regular meeting of
Mr. Woo J Senate for the Session 1992-93, having been
circulated, be taken as read and adopted.
Carried
 10582
May 19, 1993
Business arising from the Minutes
Library
Dr. Shearer reminded Senate that at the previous meeting he had raised a question
about the transfer of books to the Lam Library, and asked the University Librarian, Dr.
Patrick, if she would comment on this matter.
In response, Dr. Patrick stated that when the Lam Library was originally
constructed the intention was that the business collection would be moved to the Lam
Library. The Library received a proposal from the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration and although most of the items in the proposal were acceptable it did not
meet the policies and procedures for the establishment of a new branch library on
campus. The policies and procedures require the approval of the Senate Library
Committee, the President and any Deans involved in the proposal. The response of the
Senate Library Committee was to reaffirm the present guidelines and state that it would
be willing to consider a proposal if it were more closely aligned with the guidelines for
a branch library.
Chair's remarks and related questions
Members of Senate
President Strangway expressed thanks and appreciation to Chancellor Peterson and
other members of Senate attending their last meeting. He noted that the longest serving
members were Dr. Dennison - 21 years, Dr. Scudder and Mr. Thom - 15 years, and
Mr. Ryan, Dr. Sobrino, Mr. Sugimoto and Ms. Woo - 9 years.
Teaching Evaluation
President Strangway reminded Senate that one of the recommendations of the Ad
Hoc Committee on Teaching Evaluation was that the Vice President Academic be
 10583
May 19, 1993
Chair's remarks and related questions
Teaching Evaluation (continued)
required to report annually to Senate on issues contained in that report. The President
asked Dr. Birch to present his report.
Dr. Birch explained that Heads, Directors and Deans are required to report annually
on actions taken in response to assessments of teaching that were less than satisfactory,
and that the Academic Vice President is required to provide a summary of those reports
to Senate.
Dr. Birch reported that each of the reports from Deans included a description of the
Faculty's approach to student evaluation of teaching, and each of those reports
indicated that faculty members and other instructors were overwhelmingly evaluated as
excellent, very good or good in the quality of instruction delivered.
The approach taken by each Faculty differed. One faculty indicated that they
scrutinized everyone in the lowest 25% of evaluations received to determine a strategy
for addressing concerns that had arisen. Other Faculties and Department within
Faculties only dealt with those people who were in a category defined as less than
satisfactory. Overall, recognizing that there were a variety of different approaches, the
number defined as less than satisfactory was approximately 30 out of over 2,000
faculty members and other instructors giving instruction to students in 1991-92.
In many of the reports received from Deans, reasons given for teaching that was
less than satisfactory included inexperience, language difficulties, and team teaching
where the instructional team was incompatible. There was a large variation in the
responses of first year classes where some students found the teacher outstanding while
others found the person less than satisfactory. In such cases it was difficult to
determine how to interpret the evaluations.
 10584
May 19, 1993
Chair's remarks and related questions
Teaching Evaluation (continued)
Dr. Birch went on to outline some of the actions taken by Faculties in an attempt to
enhance the quality teaching. In cases where this was not successful, either
reappointment did not take place, tenure was denied, or in some other way the use of
that person as a faculty member giving instruction to students at this university ended.
Dr. Birch stressed, however, that, overall, only a small proportion of teaching was less
than satisfactory.
In conclusion, Dr. Birch stated that teaching evaluation is an important
consideration in the allocation of merit increments, salary reviews, promotion, and the
awarding of teaching prizes, and that the University needs to be very careful about
establishing a developmental and remedial programs where it is called for.
Dr. Kelsey, co-chair of the Committee, thanked Dr. Birch for his report.
Candidates for Degrees
Lists of candidates for degrees, as approved by the various Faculties and Schools, were
made available for inspection by Senate members prior to the meeting.
Dean McBride 1 That the candidates for degrees and diplomas, as
Dean Marchak J approved by the Faculties and Schools, be granted
the degree or diploma for which they were
recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chair of
Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried
Scholarships and Awards
A list of scholarships, medals and prizes awarded to students in the graduating classes
was circulated for information.
 10585
May 19, 1993
Scholarships and Awards   (continued)
Dr. Cook informed Senate that 10 of the 27 winners of awards entered UBC directly
from B.C. high schools, 3 from B.C. colleges or BCIT, 3 from other B.C. universities, 4
from Canadian universities or colleges, and 7 from United States universities or
universities abroad. Dr. Cook noted that the number of award winners who had entered
UBC directly from B.C. high schools was equal to that of the last few years. The number
from B.C. colleges was slightly smaller while the number from other Canadian universities
or colleges was slightly larger. Of the heads of the graduation class, three were major
entrance scholarship winners and four are Wesbrook scholars, which is the major honorary
scholarly assignment at UBC.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Dr. Wehrung, Chair of the Committee, presented the following report which had
been circulated:
"Past reports to Senate by its Budget Committee have restricted their
description of the Committee's activities to the previous year's work. Since
its last report to Senate in April 1992, the Committee has met 19 times to
discuss a wide variety of issues pertaining to the University's operating
budget, and our particular emphasis has been on the impact of budgetary
decisions on academic operations.
This year's report will try to provide a somewhat longer-term view
to help the Senate understand the scope of the Committee's deliberations
and the constraints under which it operates. The views that follow reflect
the collective experience of Committee members who have served on the
Budget Committee, some for as many as six years.
The Role of the Budget Committee
The role of the Budget Committee is stated in the University Act
which gives the Senate the power to "establish a standing committee
to meet with the president and assist him in the preparation of
the university budget" (section 36e). In addition, the University Act
gives the president the duty to "prepare and submit to the board an
annual budget in consultation with the appropriate standing
committee of the senate" (section 59.2).
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
The Role of the Budget Committee   (continued)
This role has been confirmed and amplified in the deliberations of
Senate which state that the terms of reference for the Budget Committee are
"To meet with the President and assist him in the preparation
of the University budget; to make recommendations to the
President and to report to Senate concerning academic planning
and priorities as they relate to the preparation of the University
budget" (Senate minutes p. 6239 and 7721-2).
Summary   of   Committee's   Deliberations   Over   Past   Several
Years
In its role to assist the President in the preparation of the University
budget the Committee has undertaken the following activities over the past
several years:
Revenue Enhancement
The Committee discussed with the President his strategies for
increasing and preserving sources of revenue including deliberations with
the Ministry regarding the Provincial grant. These issues have included
"funded" and "unfunded" students, tuition fee strategy, strategies regarding
user fees, the capital preservation policy for endowed funds, the Green
College proposal, and Provincial "matching funds" for capital projects. The
Committee has been generally supportive of these strategies, but has
continued to provide the advice that the University should not accept new
sources of funding that impose significant additional costs on the operating
budget that are not directly funded unless there is a clear understanding of
how these additional costs will be met. For example, new capital projects
require funds for maintenance, utilities, supervision, furnishings,
equipment, insurance, and security as well as the capital costs of the actual
building. Moreover, significant new building in a single segment of the
campus may require significant upgrading or additions to the infra-structure
in this segment such as providing new power, heat, telecommunications,
sewage, etc. Such new additions can be very costly because increments
have to be made in large amounts even though the new building requires
only a small additional resource.
Comparisons Between Faculty and Non-Faculty Units
Over Time
Consistent with the desires of Senate members, the Committee has
discussed trends over the past several years in the expenditures and
budgeted FTE positions established for support staff in existing and new
central administrative units in comparison with expenditure and positions
provided for academic and support staff in the Faculty units taken as a
whole. Information on this subject has been reported periodically at Senate
meetings.
10586
May 19,1993
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
Comparisons of Budgets Across Faculties
The Committee has reviewed the levels of expenditure across
Faculties with special attention put on the ratio of operating budget per
weighted full-time-equivalent student. Faculties were discussed one at a
time in groups having similar academic perspectives and budgetary
requirements. Discussion focused on appropriate levels for this ratio for
each Faculty, existing and desired trends in student enrolments for
individual Faculties, and plans for any budgetary changes. These reviews
included comparisons of UBC Faculties with data from similar units at other
Canadian universities, and they enabled us to better understand differences
in expenditures across Faculties. The Committee noted that these ratios
ranged from 0.7 of the University's average expenditure per weighted
enrollee to 4.0 times this average.
Review of Selected Individual Faculties, Academic
Service Units, and Administrative Units
Rather than reviewing all the budgetary units within the University
individually, the Committee has focused its efforts on providing a more in-
depth discussion of selected Faculties, academic service units, and
administrative units. During the past two years, polls of Committee
members identified the Faculties of Agricultural Sciences, Dentistry,
Forestry, Graduate Studies, and Medicine as Faculties that could be
examined in these first two rounds as well as the academic service units of
the University Library and Continuing Studies, and the administrative units
of Campus Planning & Development, Community Relations, the
Development Office, and Information Systems Management. A
considerable amount of the Committee's time over the past two years has
been spent on these reviews.
The administrative heads of each of these units were invited to meet
with the Committee to discuss the activities of their units and their budgetary
implications. The purpose of examining particular units is to provide a
greater understanding of the relationship between the activities of the unit
and its funding levels. An extensive list of questions from Committee
members was sent to each administrative head before the meetings. These
questions have included "What sources of funding does your unit have to
support its activities other than the UBC operating budget and how large is
this funding?", "How do your unit's costs compare with those of other
public or private organizations outside the university?", "How well is your
unit funded and staffed relative to similar units at comparable universities?",
"What measures are used to determine the extent to which your unit is
getting maximum value per dollar expended?", "What cost recovery fees
does your unit charge to other units on campus for your unit's services?",
and "How would your unit deal with a cutback of 5%? 10%?"
All of these meetings have already been held with the exception of
the Faculty of Medicine which will occur in mid-May. These meetings
have been valuable to the Committee in understanding aspects of individual
budgetary units that cannot be fully reflected in statistical summaries.
10587
May 19, 1993
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Funding of Infra-structure Costs
The President discussed with the Committee his strategy for funding
the University's infra-structure costs and solicited its views. The
Committee endorsed the President's strategy by recommending that "A
percentage of operating budget increases from "Access funds" and other
sources should be allocated to administrative, library, and other support
services to reflect the additional infra-structure costs incurred."
Strategy for Accommodating Faculty Salary Increases in
Excess of Amounts Budgeted
The University has undergone budget adjustments of $ 3.1 million
during 1992/93 and $ 2.0 million during 1991/92 which resulted from
faculty salary increases in excess of the amounts budgeted. The President
and Vice-President Academic discussed with the Committee their strategy
for dealing with these adjustments. The Committee advised the President
that "to the extent that subsequent budget revisions were required, the
priorities and principles recommended by the Committee to the President
should be used to make changes (both increases and decreases) in the total
budgets allocated to Faculty and non-Faculty units."
Monitoring Actual Versus Budgeted Expenditures
The Committee was not informed that the University faced a deficit
of $2.1 million in its operating budget for 1990/91 until 2 months after the
close of the 1990/91 fiscal year. Although this deficit was a one-time
shortfall which represented less than 1 % of the General Purpose Operating
Budget in 1990/91, the Committee requested that it be kept informed of
these matters in a more timely manner. It went on to pass a motion "That a
comparison of budget with actual performance be provided to the Senate
Budget Committee before the end of the calendar year in each fiscal year."
This comparison was provided belatedly during the 1991/92 year, and at an
appropriate time during the 1992/93 year. With these changes the
Committee is able to play a more active role in assisting the President in
monitoring actual expenditures against budgeted expenditures and
recommending mid-course corrections as appropriate.
University Hiring Freeze - Spring 1993
The Committee was informed of the recent University-wide hiring
freeze after it was put into place. The President's Office subsequently
answered questions about the implementation of the hiring freeze, and
Committee members provided their viewpoints during general discussion.
Other Issues
Over the past several years the Committee has also discussed issues
such as the University's building program, the distribution of funds from
the "Access for All" program, transfer and liaison arrangements between
UBC and the community colleges, tuition fee strategy, enrolment planning
and its link to budget matters, a complete costing of the Ritsumeikan
10588
May 19, 1993
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10589
May 19, 1993
program, the Green College initiative, and the Dupre Report on University
Financing in British Columbia. The Lusztig report on administrative costs
at the 3 major Provincial universities is currently being discussed by the
Committee, and it may be able to make an oral response at the May meeting
of Senate to a question posed about the report at the April meeting of
Senate.
Motions on President's Recommended Operating
Budgets for 1990/91,  1991/92, and 1992/93
Each year the President's Office seeks the advice of the Committee
on various aspects of the upcoming year's operating budget. During the
September through May period this advice is usually sought in veiy general
terms, including discussion of the priorities and principles that should guide
budgetary considerations. More intensive discussions of the budget are
usually held at a series of two or three meetings that are held close together
in June and/or July when the Committee is given the draft operating budget
for comment. The usual time period between when the Committee first sees
the draft operating budget and when it is expected to provide its final advice
is approximately 10 days. The Committee's activities end each year with
the passing of a final motion that communicates its views about the
President's strategy for the upcoming year's operating budget.
Several themes have remained consistent over the past several years
in the advice provided by the Committee:
1. The Committee has recommended that the President ensure funding
be allocated in such a manner so as to maintain the strength and
quality of the University's academic teaching and research
programs.
2. The Committee has reaffirmed on several occasions its view that
budgetary increases, reallocations, and reductions should reflect
priorities across the University's activities and these priorities
should be reflected in differentiated reallocations - both among the
vice-presidents and among the units reporting to each vice-president
rather than across-the-board reallocations.
3. When budget reductions were required, the Committee has
recommended that they be implemented via differentiated cuts that
fall more heavily on administrative units than on Faculties.
Areas pf Significant Progress Oyer Past Smral Years
During the past several years the President's Office has reported
significant progress to the Committee in many areas of the University's
operations. Some of these areas of progress have included:
1. Maintaining lower student/faculty ratio than most major Canadian
universities.
2. Making progress in improving faculty salaries relative to those at
other Canadian universities.
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10590
May 19, 1993
3. Increasing operating budgets for the Faculties and academic service
units in constant dollars over the past 5 years.
4. Constructing new facilities via the "World of Opportunity" campaign
and direct provincial funding.
5. Making progress in attracting new faculty by creating faculty
housing and the faculty mortgage assistance plan.
6. Encouraging faculty renewal through the early retirement program.
(Note that 30% of all faculty have been appointed within the past six
years.)
7. Increasing graduate enrolment between 1988/89 and 1991/92 in
concert with the "Access for All" program.
8. Dramatically increasing the level of support for teaching
assistantships and university graduate fellowships.
9. Major restructuring in some non-Faculty units resulting in cost
savings and productivity increases.
10. Using a portion of tuition fee increases in 1991/92 and subsequent
years to create the President's Teaching and Learning Enhancement
Fund to support innovative projects for teaching and learning and to
increase student financial aid.
11. Developing a predictable tuition fee strategy based on increases in
cost-of-living and other factors.
12. Investing in support units designed to enhance revenue
opportunities.
The Committee concurs that significant progress has been made in
many of these areas.
Need  For Changes  in  Process of  Consultation   with   Budget
Committee
The effectiveness of the Committee is predicated on the assumption
that the President's Office will engage in full and open consultation with the
Committee on all matters of policy and the decisions which follow
concerning the administration of the University's budget. Without such
consultation the Committee is unable to perform its role to its satisfaction.
What are the constraints under which the Committee operates and how
might the consultative process be improved?
The truest test of whether consultation with the Budget Committee is
fulfilling its intended role in the University Act is whether the decisions
brought to the Committee for consultation ever change after the consultation
has occurred. If the answer is in most cases "no", then the consultation is
more apparent than real.
The Committee acknowledges that its advice may have been
influential on some issues that have been brought to it for discussion such
as tuition fee strategy and the impact of capital projects on operating costs.
However, members feel that their advice infrequently changes decisions that
are brought to it for consultation. The Committee understands that delays in
receiving the Provincial grant often leave the administration with very little
time to construct a budget and this often contributes to consultation
occurring after rather than before decisions are made. The Committee also
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10591
May 19, 1993
understands that it is not a full partner with the President's Office in
reaching decisions. Nonetheless, the Committee is uncomfortable with the
limitation that its advice can only influence in a general way the subsequent
year's budgetary decisions which are made significantly after the advice is
given.
The Committee feels that too much of its time is focused on
consideration of the past rather than the future. For example, members feel
that too much of the Committee's time is taken up on retrospective reviews
of past UBC Financial Statements and decisions that have already been
made and too little of its time is spent on discussing budget strategies and
allocations to units before they are firmly committed.
Therefore, the Committee requests that the President seek its advice
before key decisions are made when they are in the formative stages, and
that its advice be sought on future budget strategies and allocations to units
rather than on reviews of decisions that have already been made.
As stated above, the University Act gives the Budget Committee the
role of assisting the President in the preparation of the university
budget. Most of the issues on which the Committee's advice has been
sought have involved the University's General Purpose Operating
Budget which consists primarily of funds from Provincial grants and
tuition fees which totalled about $334 million in 1991/92. Several
budgetary units such as the Development Office, Campus Planning &
Development, and Information Systems Management receive significant
portions of their funding from funds other than the General Purpose
Operating Budget. These sources of funding usually appear as "cost
recoveries" or transfers across funds. The Committee has continual
difficulty seeing the total budgets for such units when it is providing advice
on the relative size of budgets such units should receive. To assist the
President in preparing budgets for all University budgetary units, the
Committee should continue to have access to information about all sources
of revenue, including cost recoveries, available to each budgetary unit, not
just revenue from Provincial grants and tuition.
The Committee feels that the changes suggested above will improve
its ability to carry out its statutory role.
The Resource Challenge Facing the University
All levels of government in Canada and in many other countries are
facing very difficult fiscal environments. Taxpayers may have reached the
limit of their willingness to provide additional monies to support public
services. The internationalization of markets, the move to freer trade, and
increased international competition have forced countries and provinces to
dismantle protective mechanisms which earlier had protected domestic
organizations from some aspects of international competition and provided
revenues which could be used to support public services. The public is
increasingly aware of how persistent financial deficits force an increasing
percentage of scarce public revenues to be spent on servicing the growing
Provincial and federal debt. At the same time, the demands on public
organizations for services such as health care, education (at all levels), and
social services continue to grow.
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10592
May 19, 1993
As a result, many public and private sector organizations in Canada
and elsewhere face very significant pressures to change. These pressures
are now affecting the organizations of higher education in the Province in
general, and UBC in particular. Many of these pressures take the form of
restricted funding for universities and community colleges.
UBC now faces several constraints on its major sources of funding.
First, because of the Province's difficult fiscal situation, grants to
institutions of higher education have been under pressure. The 3% increase
to institutions of higher education in 1993/94 was targeted at the University
of Northern British Columbia and the community colleges rather than the 3
large Provincial Universities. This left UBC with a 0% increase in its
Provincial grant for 1993/94 (President's "Dear Colleague" letter of 16
February 1993). The "Access for AH" program has been the primary focus
for growth at UBC during the past several years. Although the 3 largest
Provincial universities were early beneficiaries of this program, the
University of Northern British Columbia and the community colleges have
been targeted as the principal beneficiaries in the later stages of the program.
Therefore, the "Access for All" program seems unlikely to provide
significant additional funding to UBC without significant increases in the
numbers of students the University is willing to accept. Although the
University must continue to make every effort to make a strong case to the
Provincial Government for an adequate level of funding, the Committee
believes that grants to institutions of higher education are unlikely to grow at
better than the inflation rate and they could go down in absolute dollars until
the Province's debt situation has been alleviated.
Second, factors in today's environment have limited increases in
student tuition fees. For example, the Provincial Government asked the
Board of Governors to observe a moratorium on tuition fee increases for
1991/92. More recently, the Provincial Government announced that tuition
fee increases in excess of 9.75% would result in an equivalent reduction in
the Provincial grant to the University. Even if there were no provincial
influences on tuition fees, there is a limit to what some students can afford
in the current economy. Although the University has adopted a responsible
policy of devoting part of the revenue from fee increases to student aid,
there is a limit to the extent to which higher fees can be depended on for
additional revenue without restricting the access of some qualified but less
affluent students.
Third, a number of changes have occurred regarding the
University's endowment funds. Largely as a result of the World of
Opportunity Campaign, the University's endowments have increased from
$106,641,000 in 1984/85 to $180,686,000 in 1991/92. These funds will
allow the University to carry out a number of new activities, but most of
these new endowments are not available as sources of general revenue. In
addition, the Board of Governors has recently adopted a "capital
preservation policy" to preserve the purchasing power of the endowment
funds. This policy limits payout from endowments to a maximum of 7%
annually in 1993/94 and 6% annually in 1994/95 and subsequent years. In
1992/93 and prior years, units that controlled endowment funds could
spend the entire market payout from endowments, which in some years
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10593
May 19, 1993
exceeded 20% per year. Because of high inflation, this return was
deceptive. Paying it out, and spending it, reduced the real purchasing
power of the endowment, reducing its effectiveness in future years. For
this reason, the Committee has endorsed the capital preservation policy, but
its short-term consequence is that, although the endowment funds have
grown rapidly in recent years, the total payout from endowment funds as a
source of current revenue will not be up significantly from prior years.
The Committee notes that there are some sources of revenue, such
as that from research grants and research contracts, that are expected to
grow. These sources of revenue will continue to fund many critical
activities in the University. However, these sources of revenue are not
normally available to finance general operations direcdy.
As a result of these constraints on its traditional sources of revenue,
the Committee believes that all parts of the University must prepare to live
within more limited means than in the recent past. The challenge we all face
is how to find positive and creative ways to do more with less because this
reflects the fiscal reality faced by all levels of government that there are
fewer dollars available to carry out the public services that are needed. We
must simultaneously use this challenge as an opportunity to perform our
missions more efficiently with fewer resources and to seek alternative
sources of funding for pursuing these missions. The Committee feels
strongly that we should begin planning now for how we are going to deal
with constraints on revenues that could extend into the future, so that we
can avoid the more serious problems that a declaration of financial exigency
would impose on the University if we were unprepared for it. A later
section of this report discusses financial exigency and why we need to avoid
it.
Facing   the   Resource   Challenge   Without   Jeopardizing    the
Academic Mission of the University
In the current fiscal climate the Committee feels that we cannot go on
with "business as usual". We should be planning now to respond to the
possibility of restricted revenues for some years to come. The Committee
believes that such planning must be done under the premise that we protect
the primary academic mission of the University first and foremost. The
University needs to focus on global options for responding to restricted
revenues without simply cutting mdiscriminateiy at all of its components via
across-the-board reductions. The question then becomes "What areas of
activity can sustain reductions in General Purpose Operating Budget or
endowment funding allocations without seriously jeopardizing UBC's
primary mission of creating and disseminating new knowledge?"
The Committee has focused on the following strategies for meeting
this resource challenge:
First, the Committee feels that significant savings are possible
throughout the University by streamlining the management of
administrative, academic, and service units and simplifying organizational
structures and administrative processes. More specifically, these savings
might be achieved in the following ways:
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10594
May 19,1993
1. Reducing the size and cost of management within all units of the
University. Currendy the University has 5 Vice Presidents, 7
Associate Vice Presidents, 12 Deans, 32 Associate Deans, 30
Directors, Heads for 74 academic Departments, administrators for
83 academic Divisions, and many other managers. Changes are
being made throughout public and private sector organizations to
make management more efficient, effective, and less costly. The
Committee recommends that the President, in consultation with an
appropriate committee of Senate, receive independent advice on
effective ways of reducing the size and cost of management in all
units of the University.
2. Restructuring and/or consolidating both among and within Faculties
and Departments into fewer units. Table 1 lists the Faculties along
with data for 1992/93 on their General Purpose Operating Budget,
academic position complement, weighted FTE students, and number
of departments, divisions, schools, centres, and institutes. If
Departments and/or Faculties can be consolidated, there should be
less administrative overhead in the academic organization as a
whole. The Committee recommends that the Senate, in consultation
with the President, appoint an ad hoc or standing committee to
advise the President on restructuring and/or consolidating both
among and within Faculties and Departments into fewer units that
are coherent and have less overhead than at present.
Table 1
Gen. Purpose
Academic
Weighted
Number
Number
Number
Oper. Budget
Position
FTE
of
of
of Centres
Facultv
$ millions
ComDlemenl
Students
DeptfDiv)
Schools
& Inst.
Arts
38.9
518
15,935
20(0)
3
0
Science
33.5
306
14,654
11(0)
0
0
Medicine
29.1
250
7,162
17(54)
2
0
Applied Sci.
16.9
168
6,848
7(0)
3
1
Education
16.6
187
7,272
7(0)
1
3
Commerce
9.2
96
3,242
0(10)
0
0
Agric. Sci.
5.3
49
1.944
5(0)
1
0
Dentistry
4.5
35
889
4(14)
0
0
Grad. Studies
4.4
23
	
0(0)
1
17
Law
4.3
42
1228
0(0)
0
0
Forestry
4.3
41
1,207
3(0)
0
0
Pharm. Sci.
2.6
29
1,034
0(5)
0
0
Second, the Committee has observed that changes in actual student
enrolment levels in Faculties have occurred without necessarily changing
budget allocations. Over time some Faculties have increased enrolment
levels without any apparent increase in their budget allocation. Changes
have occurred in other Faculties that have resulted in reductions in their
enrolment levels without any particular change in their budget allocations.
The Committee understands there are important and legitimate differences in
costs in different Faculties, and to some extent our meetings with Deans of
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10595
May 19, 1993
some of these Faculties have given us better insight into these necessary
differences. However, Committee members feel that student enrolment
levels should be an important factor in determining budget allocations.
The Committee believes that budget allocations should show a direct
relationship with enrolment levels that have been approved by the
President's Office after consultation with the appropriate committees of
Senate. There will not necessarily be a direct relationship between a
Faculty's budget allocation and its actual enrolment level because some
Faculties may choose to enrol more students than for which they receive
budget allocation.
Third, because a very significant percentage (i.e., 73% in 1991/92)
of the General Purpose Operating Budget is administered by the Vice-
President Academic, it is obvious that any significant budget reduction must
be borne, in part, by the academic Faculties. However, because the
University's primary academic mission is teaching and research, the
Committee recommends that all budget cuts should strongly reflect this
priority.
The Committee recognizes that the President has introduced
differentiation in recent budgets both within units that report to each Vice-
President and across Vice-Presidential areas of responsibility. The
Committee believes, however, that this differentiation has not gone nearly
far enough, and it encourages the President to respond with greater
differentiation in the 1993/94 budget and future budgets.
In the judgement of a majority of Committee members, some
administrative units that report to the President, to the Vice-President for
Finance and Administration, and to the Vice-President External Affairs can
sustain significantly heavier percentage reductions in funding than the
Faculties and other units that report to the Vice-President Academic, the
research units that report to the Vice-President Research, and the academic
service units that report to the Vice-President Student and Academic
Services. The functions performed by units such as Community Relations,
the Development Office, and Campus Planning & Development are
important, and these units have contributed significandy to generating new
revenue to the University during the past few years and in carrying out the
University's new building program. However, in a time of restraint the
highest priority has to be to protect functions that directly relate to teaching
and research.
While none of these recommended strategies for budgetary
reductions are as simple or free of consequence as this summary may seem
to indicate, the Committee feels that a proactive approach to the resource
challenge that we all face is necessary to maintain the academic quality of
our teaching and research programs.
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10596
May 19, 1993
Role of Budget Committee in Considerations of Financial
Exigency
In spite of the best efforts of all concerned, or if we fail to
adequately respond to the resource challenge that we face, it is possible that
we might be faced with a situation in which the declaration of financial
exigency must be considered.
Many members of Senate and the University community more
broadly have heard the term "financial exigency", but do not know what it
means. Financial exigency occurs when the Board of Governors has
declared that the University faces a financial deficit that cannot reasonably
be met without
terminating some tenured or tenure-stream employees or not renewing some
tenure-stream employees. Should financial exigency be declared,
employees could be terminated or not renewed in a short period of time
which would be very disruptive both to the individuals directly involved and
to the ongoing activities at the University. Of course, such a declaration
would also mean the imposition of a hiring freeze for all appointments and
no salary increases for all employee groups for several years. Because of
all of the serious consequences associated with the declaration of a state of
financial exigency, we must all do our best to ensure that it never happens.
The Senate Budget Committee plays a significant role in the
determination of financial exigency. The "Agreement on the Termination or
Non-renewal of Faculty Appointments for Financial Exigency" stipulates
that a Cornmittee on Financial Exigency be struck by the President if he
feels that the University faces a financial exigency. This Cornmittee on
Financial Exigency must consist of members of the Senate Budget
Committee, augmented by two members appointed by the Faculty
Association. The Committee on Financial Exigency must within 4 weeks of
its first meeting (after being convened by the President) advise the President
in writing whether in its judgment the University faces a financial exigency.
One of the key questions that this Committee must consider during this very
limited time period in reaching its recommendation is "whether all
reasonable reductions are being made in the areas of the
University's expenditures other than [Faculty Association]
bargaining unit salaries, bearing in mind the primacy of the
University's academic purpose."
By focusing on advanced planning of the type suggested in this
report, the Committee believes that the University has the best chance to
ensure that the onerous consequences regarding financial exigency never
occur.
Summary of Recommendations (1990 to present)
1.        The Committee supports the President's revenue enhancement
strategies, but has continued to provide the advice that the
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10597
May 19, 1993
University should not accept new sources of funding that impose
significant additional costs on the operating budget that are not
directiy funded unless there is a clear understanding of how these
additional costs will be met.
2. The Committee supports the President's view that a percentage of
operating budget increases as provided from the Provincial
Government should be allocated to administrative, library, and other
support services to reflect the additional infra-structure costs
incurred.
3. The Committee reaffirms its view that budgetary increases,
reallocations, and reductions should reflect priorities across the
University's activities and these priorities should be reflected in
differentiated reallocations - both among the vice-presidents and
among the units reporting to each vice-president rather than across-
the-board reallocations.
4. The Committee recommends that the President ensure funding be
allocated in such a manner so as to maintain the strength and quality
of the University's academic teaching and research programs.
5. The Cornmittee requests that the President seek its advice before key
decisions are made when they are in the formative stages, and that
its advice be sought on future budget strategies and allocations to
units rather than on reviews of decisions that have already been
made.
6. To assist the President in preparing budgets for all University
budgetary units, the Committee requests that it have access to
information about all sources of revenue, including cost recoveries,
available to each budgetary unit, not just revenue from Provincial
grants and tuition.
7. Because of constraints on some of the University's significant
traditional sources of revenue, the Committee recommends that all
parts of the University prepare to live within more limited means
than in the recent past. The challenge we all face is how to find
positive and creative ways to do more with less. We must
simultaneously use this challenge as an opportunity to perform our
missions more efficiently with fewer resources and to seek
alternative sources of funding for pursuing these missions.
8. The Committee recommends that the President, in consultation with
an appropriate committee of Senate, receive independent advice on
effective ways of reducing the size and cost of management in all
units of the University.
9. Regarding academic units, the Committee recommends that the
Senate, in consultation with the President, appoint an ad hoc or
standing committee to advise the President on restructuring and/or
consolidating both among and within Faculties and Departments into
fewer units that are coherent and have less overhead than at present.
10. Because a very significant percentage of the General Purpose
Operating Budget is administered by the Vice-President Academic,
it is obvious that any significant budget reduction must be borne, in
part, by the academic Faculties. However, because the University's
primary academic mission is teaching and research, the Committee
recommends that all budget cuts should strongly reflect this priority.
11. The Committee recognizes that the President has introduced
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10598
May 19,1993
differentiation in recent budgets both within units that report to each
Vice-President and across Vice-Presidential areas of responsibility.
The Committee believes, however, that this differentiation has not
gone nearly far enough, and it encourages the President to respond
with greater differentiation in the 1993/94 budget and future
budgets.
12. The majority of Committee members recommend that, to the extent
budget reductions are necessary, they be made on a significantly
greater percentage basis in the units that report to the President,
Vice-President Finance and Administration, and Vice-President
External Affairs than in the units that report to the Vice-President
Academic, Vice-President Research, and Vice-President Student
and Academic Services.
Appendix A of the report
Final Motion on President's Proposed 1992/93 Operating Budget
by Senate Budget Committee - 15 July 1992
The Committee endorses the President's 1992/93 budget strategy with the
following observations:
1. The Committee applauds the President for taking an initial step to
differentiate budgetary reductions across vice-presidential areas, consistent
with its previous advice to the President.
2. Percentage reductions in the salary and benefits base general purpose
operating budget range from a low of 1.5% for the VP Academic to a high
of 2.3% for the VP External Affairs. The Committee agrees with the
direction of these differentiated reductions. Should additional reductions be
necessary, the Committee encourages the President to undertake even
further differentiation than reflected in the current year's targeted reductions.
3. The Committee notes that as the World of Opportunity Campaign winds
down, the activities of the Development and Alumni Offices are being
restructured to reflect a decentralized, though centrally coordinated, model
that draws heavily on the involvement of the Faculties. The Committee
wishes to emphasize the importance of monitoring the level of recurrent
financial contributions to the University to ensure that expenditures in the
Development Office are commensurate with these contributions.
4. The President has recommended a significant reduction in the operating
budget of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and a slightly higher than
average reduction in the operating budget of the Faculty of Forestry. The
Committee further recommends that these two Faculties work within a five
year plan for their operations and that all relevant indicators including
enrolment be monitored closely.
5. In tight of the analysis presented by the VP Academic, it is clear that the
University is underfunded by approximately $10 million annually in terms
of the operations of the Faculty of Medicine. Since there is no short term
solution to this problem, the Committee encourages the President to
continue to press with the provincial government the need for making up
this shortfall.   (The motion was adopted unanimously.)
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Appendix A of the report (continued)
Final Motion on President's Proposed 1991/92 Operating Budget
by Senate Budget Committee
18 September 1991
"The Committee endorses the President's 1991/92 budget strategy with the
following reservations:
1. Reductions should have been differentiated among vice-presidents
and a greater degree of differentiation reflected in the reductions proposed
within each vice-president's portfolio.
2. Reductions proposed among the Faculties should have been made
with greater attention paid to the expenditure dollars per weighted full-time
equivalent ratios.
3. Larger reductions should have been applied to 'administration'
because it is assuming an ever-increasing proportion of the operating
budget."
The motion was adopted by a majority vote.
Final Motion on President's Proposed 1990/91 Operating Budget
by Senate Budget Committee
25 June 1990
"The Senate Budget Committee endorses the President's strategy for
addressing the 1990/91 General Purpose Operating funds budgetary
requirements" with the following observations:
1. For a variety of reasons the "1990/91 actual budget allocations were
not (entirely) consistent with the priorities as identified by the President's
Office during the Committee's deliberations over the preceding year."
2. "The two-year allocation time frame (1990/91 and 1991/92) was
inconsistent with the one-year budget requests submitted by the Deans."
3. "In the future, budget requests and allocations should reflect the
same time horizons."
The motion was adopted unanimously."
10599
May 19,1993
Dr. Wehrung 1       That the report be received.
Dr. Dennison J
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10600
May 19, 1993
In speaking to the report, Dr. Wehrung drew particular attention to a paragraph
under the heading The Resource Challenge Facing the University which points out that
the University's traditional sources of revenues are now being constrained, and stated
that as a result of these constraints, which members fear will continue into the future,
the Cornmittee highly recommends that all parts of the university prepare to live within
more limited means than in the recent past. Dr. Wehrung then noted that the section
headed Facing the Resource Challenge Without Jeopardizing the Academic Mission of
the University offers some proposals for facing the resource challenge and also
summarizes recommendations 8 to 12. He explained that recommendations 8 and 9
were mechanisms for trying to realize what the Committee believes may be significant
savings by streamlining the management of the administrative, academic and service
units and simplifying organizational structures and administrative processes.
Dr. Wehrung stated that the Committee was concerned about the extent to which its
advice has any influence on budgetary decisions in that in some instances consultation
has taken place after decisions have been made rather than when they are in the
formative stages. He cited as an example the recent hiring freeze.
In referring to the section headed Role of Budget Committee in Considerations of
Financial Exigency. Dr. Wehrung stated that the Committee wanted to make it very
clear that declaring a state of financial exigency would mean that the University was at
the stage of laying off tenure stream faculty. It was therefore important to do the type
of planning suggested in the report in order to avoid such a situation.
Dr. Resnick raised a question concerning administrative costs. He stressed that if
the University is faced with the difficult financial circumstances alluded to in the report,
and that Faculties are going to be asked to tighten their belts, it was very important that
the leadership in this regard should come from the administration.
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10601
May 19, 1993
Dr. Resnick also expressed concern that appointments had been made to chairs in
some departments even though there was a hiring freeze. One of particular concern
was in the Faculty of Science at a purportedly high figure. He thought that if this
practice continued it could lead to a two-track university system where a number of
appointments are made at very high salaries out of all proportion to what salaries in the
professorial ranks tend to be. He asked that the Budget Committee monitor that as well
as costs at the adminisffative level.
In conclusion, Dr. Resnick referred to the fact that most of the issues on which the
Committee's advice had been sought involved the University's General Purpose
Operating Budget whereas several budgetary units receive significant portions of their
funding from funds other than the General Purpose Operating Budget. He suggested
that the Budget Committee pay particular attention to these other sources of funds. He
felt that this was perhaps where some of the anomalies or discrepancies in salaries of
administrative heads may be occurring.
In response, Dr. Wehrung referred to recommendation 6 of the report which
specifically says that to assist the President in preparing budgets for all University
budgetary units, the Committee requested that it have access to information about all
sources of revenue, including cost recoveries, available to each budgetary unit, not just
revenue from Provincial grants and tuition which are the General Purpose Operating
Grant. He stated that the information had been forthcoming and that the Committee
was trying to make sure that it had the information for the individual units so that in
assessing a unit's funding level it would have all the information at once.
The motion to receive the report was put and carried.
Dr. Wehrung indicated that he wished to move recommendation 9 of the report.
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10602
May 19, 1993
Dr. Wehrung 1 That Senate, in consultation with the President,
Dr. Dennison J appoint an ad hoc or standing committee to advise
the President on restructuring and/or consolidating
both among and within Faculties and Departments
into fewer units that are coherent and have less
overhead than at present.
Dr. Will asked if the intent was that there would be recommendations would be
made for Deans and Heads to consider, or recommendations to the President's Office to
effect changes in organization.
In response, Dr. Wehrung explained that it was intended that the Nominating
Committee would nominate a number of individuals to serve on a steering committee
that would oversee this process on behalf of Senate. The membership would not
necessarily be restricted to members of Senate. In addition, the Nominating Committee
would consult with the President's Office on the composition of the committee. It was
thought that the President, the Vice President Academic and the Chair of the Budget
Committee should develop some terms of reference for this advisory committee which
would have a licence to seek out alternative ways in which units might be restructured
or consolidated.
In response to a further query by Dr. Will, Dr. Wehrung stated that it was the
intention that the committee would bring recommendations to Senate for consideration
regarding restructuring or consolidation of academic units.
Responding to a query from Dr. Kelsey concerning the time frame in which the
proposed committee would have to operate, Dr. Wehrung stated that the Budget
Committee felt that there was some urgency and he hoped the proposed committee
would be in a position to present a progress report to Senate in the fall.
The motion to establish a committee was put and carried.
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
10603
May 19, 1993
President Strangway observed that although Senate is the body concerned with the
academic health of the university, it was extremely important that it fully support the
non academic members of the community. He noted that recommendation 12 singled
out particular classes of people and he thought Senate ought to be aware of all the
support structures and the incredibly hard working people that make the University
function. The President stated that he was privileged to attend the University Staff 25
Year Club Dinner recently and was most impressed at the marvellous set of people that
help make the university function, and he felt that it was important that Senate go on
record that in implementing the various recommendations of the Committee it was not a
matter of the academics versus the others, which was how it was being interpreted.
Referring to Dr. Resnick's earlier remarks, Dean McBride stated that it was not the
case that the Faculty of Science was able to afford $150,000 salaries for new heads of
departments.
Curriculum Committee (see Appendix 'B')
Dr. Sobrino, Chair of the Committee, presented the report on proposals from the
Faculties of Agricultural Sciences, Applied Science, Arts, Education, Graduate Studies,
Medicine and Science.
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
The Committee recommended approval of proposed restructuring of the
Landscape Architecture Program, subject to minor editorial changes.
Faculty of Applied Science
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Applied Science. Dr. Sobrino noted that the description for ELEC 474
had been shortened.
 10604
May 19, 1993
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
Faculty of Arts
The Cornmittee recommended approval of a proposed new program in Canadian
Studies, subject to a minor editorial change in the description of CDST 450.
The Committee also recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Arts, subject to editorial changes. Dr. Sobrino noted that satisfactory
consultations had taken place concerning Linguistics 316, and that the Department
of Linguistics had agreed to remove Physics 341 from the list of recommended
courses for Linguistics 317.
Faculty of Education
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Education with the exception of a proposal concerning the Written
English Requirements which has been referred to the Senate Admissions
Committee.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
The Committee recommended approval of a Master of Science Program in
Genetic Counselling, subject to review within 3-5 years.
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Graduate Studies with the exception of proposed changes to ELEC 576
which have been withdrawn.
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
School of Community and Regional Planning, subject to a change in description for
Planning 603.  The Committee had suggested that the title of Planning 586 be
 10605
May 19,1993
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee
Faculty of Graduate Studies (continued)
changed from "Gender and Planning" to "Women and Planning" but after
consultation with the School it was agreed that the description be changed to suit the
title, rather than changing the title to suit the description. The Committee had also
requested and received confirmation concerning the availability of library resources.
Faculty of Medicine
The Committee recommended approval of course changes and a revised
calendar statement concerning the B.M.L.Sc English Requirement.
Faculty of Science
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Science, and a proposal for a B.Sc. program in Freshwater Science, to
be offered at Okanagan University College, subject to review within 3-5 years.
Dr. Sobrino       1  That the proposals of the Faculties of Agricultural
Father Hanrahan J   Sciences, Applied Science, Arts, Education,
Graduate Studies, Medicine and Science be
approved.
The President drew attention to the rationale for Planning 560 which notes that
the program is fully funded by an endowment from the Real Estate Foundation.
The President stated that this was incorrect since half of the program is funded by
the provincial government.
The motion was put and carried.
Dr. Sobrino expressed thanks and appreciation to members of the Senate
Curriculum Committee, which he had chaired for the past three years, and drew
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
10606
May 19, 1993
attention to the valuable contributions of both Senate members and Faculty
Curriculum Committee chairs, who are also members of the Committee. Dr.
Sobrino also paid a special tribute to the Assistant Secretary of Senate, Fran
Medley.
Dr. Sobrino took the opportunity to explain to Senate that the Committee's
terms of reference are limited and that it can only look at the proposals of the
Faculties, evaluate them and bring them forward to Senate for approval, sometimes
with recommended changes. Dr. Sobrino suggested that a number of the new
programs approved in the past three years had probably been developed because
funding was available rather than because they were an appropriate mix of
programs for the University to be offering. Since the Committee had neither the
mandate nor the resources to study this matter he wanted to bring to the attention of
Senate the problems that arise because of the piecemeal fashion in which the
Curriculum Committee has to operate.
Dr. Sobrino also expressed concern that many courses were being split into two
one-term courses and that the University therefore appealed to be in the process of
adopting a semester system without its merits ever having been discussed in Senate.
Dr. Resnick proposed a vote of thanks to the retiring chair of the Committee,
Dr. Sobrino, and commented on the enormous amount of work and responsibility
involved in chairing the Senate Curriculum Committee.
Library Committee
Dr. Grace, Chair of the Committee, spoke briefly to the following year end report
which had been circulated for information:
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee (continued)
10607
May 19, 1993
"During the 1992-93 academic year, the Committee, has spent the great
majority of its time wrestling with the proposed cancellation of serials
arising from a short-fall in the Library's Collections budget. A detailed
short-term and long-term proposal for handling cuts was passed at the 9
March 1993 meeting of the Committee and presented to Senate at its 17
March 1993 meeting. That report is not repeated here, but the main points
can be summarized as follows:
1. An anticipated short-fall in the serials portion of the collections budget
will be offset by various measures, including the use of the Library
Stabilization Fund. Any cancellations of serials will be made in
accordance with the guidelines set forth in point 4 of the 17 March 1993
Report.
2. Approval was given to the implementation of a three point budget-
planning process set forth in point 2 of the Report.
3. The Committee will re-examine the situation of the Library Collections
budget at least once a year; it will carefully monitor all developments
and prepare new proposals for managing the Collection as they are
needed.
In addition to its report on serials cancellations, the Committee discussed the
problems faced by library circulation, and at its 6 April 1933 meeting the
Committee passed a new loan policy as part of changes to the circulation
system which are expected to be in place by the end of 1993. The key item
in this system is the introduction of automatic fines on all overdue
materials. The Library has begun to advertise the new circulation system
and is alerting all library users to the new loans policy.
In the course of its deliberations this year, the Committee has considered a
number of important issues relating to Collections Policy, general funding
for the library, consultation procedures for establishing cancellation of
serials, when these are necessary, an increasing trend towards "user fees"
for library services, and negotiations with the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration to move materials into the David Lam Library.
Because of the urgent need to devote primary attention to the serials "crisis"
many of these other issues remain to be discussed in depth by next year's
committee. One of the first tasks facing next year's committee is the
formation of a sub-committee to investigate the parameters of the long-
range problem of escalating costs in scholarly publishing and to consider
ways in which the University and the Library can work to minimize the
impact of these rising costs while still maintaining a strong monographs and
serials collection, which is the raison d'etre of a library.
The Senate Library Committee will continue to monitor closely any
cancellations of serials, the introduction of "user fees" and the overall
funding of the Library, which, for the past three years, this Committee has
sought to increase, either by returning the Library's proportion of the
University's operating budget from its current low of 2.1% to its 2.3% level
in 1987-88, or by implementing the three point formula outlined in our
Report of March 17.
 10608
May 19, 1993
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Cornmittee (continued)
Although this year has been an extremely arduous one, the Senate Library
Committee has learned a great deal about the complexities of the Library
and, it is important to note, the responsibilities of the Committee (as laid out
in the University Act) to the Library, to the Senate and to the academic
community at UBC.
I would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who helped the
Committee in its deliberations and to acknowledge the work of the entire
Cornmittee which has given dedicated service again this year."
Dr. Grace 1 That the report be received.
Ms. Woo J
Referring to Dr. Shearer's question about the transfer of books to the Lam Library,
Dr. Grace explained that the Senate Library Committee had considered a proposal to
move a significant collection from the Main Library into the David Lam Library and to
establish it as a "branch library". The Committee discussed the matter at some length
and decided that it could not endorse the proposal. In this connection, the Committee,
at a recent meeting, unanimously passed the following motion:
1. The Committee affirms the current Senate policy passed in 1982 on
branch libraries and reading rooms;
2. The present proposal for the Lam Library does not conform to this
policy;
3. The Senate Library Committee is prepared to consider a revised
document that is consistent with Senate policy, and would hold a special
meeting to do so as required.
Dr. Grace thanked members of the Senate Library Committee for the
considerable amount of time and effort that they had contributed during a difficult
year.
The motion to receive the report was put and carried.
 Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee (continued)
10609
May 19, 1993
Dean Goldberg noted that it was not the intention when the Lam Library was built
that it would be a branch library. He stated that discussions were taking place between
the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, the Vice President Academic
and the Senate Library Committee and depending on the outcome of those discussions,
books may or may not be moved from the Main Library.
Dr. Grace stated that one of the concerns the Committee had with the proposal was
the question of access, and it was hoped that if a revised document is to be brought
back to the Committee the issue of access will be satisfactorily addressed.
The University Librarian, Dr. Patrick, expressed thanks and appreciation to
members of the Senate Library Committee and to the Chair of the Committee, Dr.
Grace, for her time and advice.
Nominating Committee
Dr. Will, Chair of the Committee, presented the report. The Nominating
Committee nominated the following student to fill vacancies on Senate committees:
Agenda
Mr. H. Leung - replacing Mr. D. A. Dyment
Curriculum
Mr. H. Leung - replacing Ms. C. J. Forsythe
Dr. Will       1        That the recommendations of the Nominating
Dean Meisen J        Committee be approved.
Carried
 10610
May 19, 1993
Reports of Committees of Senate   (continued)
Student Awards
New awards (see Appendix 'A')
Dr. Cook, Chair of the Committee, presented the report. Dr. Cook drew
Senate's attention to the Malcolm F. McGregor Memorial Scholarship, the H. Peter
Oberlander Medal and Prize, and the Wendy Fan Memorial Scholarship.
Dr. Cook    1 That the awards (listed.in Appendix 'A') be
Dr. McLean J accepted and forwarded to the Board of Governors
for approval and that letters of thanks be sent to the
donors.
Carried
Year end report
Dr. Cook presented the following report which had been circulated for
information:
"This report has two parts: 1) a summary of the awards presented to Senate during
the term of the committee from September 1990 to April 1993; and 2) a summary
of issues addressed by the committee.
1. SUMMARY OF AWARDS
The committee met 18 times between September 1990 and April 1993 and
recommended acceptance of 185 awards with a total annual value of approximately
$294,000.
Of the total number of awards, the distribution by category of award is:
Award Type
#
Total value
Range of values
Fellowship
12
$160,500
$9000 -
13,500
Scholarship
69
$ 76,900
$1500 -
9,000
Bursary
52
$ 35,250
$ 900-
1,500
Award
5
$    6,000
$ 100-
1,200
Prize
47
$ 15,150
$ 100-
1,000
Of the total, 10 awards representing about $100,000 annually, arose from campaign
endowments. (This represents about 20% of the total number of campaign
endowments for awards). Additional donor pledges for some of these awards as
well as matching funds from the province are still outstanding. It is expected that
the total annual value of those awards presented to date could approximately double
when pledges and matching funds have been received.
 10611
May 19,1993
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Year end report (continued)
2. SUMMARY OF ISSUES
A. Conditions for Acceptance of Awards
POLICY (Approved by Senate May 23,1990)
It is policy of The University of British Columbia to attract, at both graduate and
undergraduate levels, the best academically qualified students, whatever their
origin. With that objective in mind, it is the primary policy of the University to
encourage donations, whether to individual Faculties or to the University's general
scholarship and bursary funds, that can be used to reward excellence or to support
needy students without restrictions based on non-academic considerations. Such
donations maximize fairness, flexibility and efficiency in the administration of
available funds.
The University is committed to working for true equality of opportunity for all
academically qualified students by enabling them to overcome non-academic
barriers whatever the source. With that goal in mind, it recognizes that, in order to
ensure equitable access to the educational system at all levels, the University is
prepared to take affirmative action by providing financial support for particular
groups such as women, native students, the disabled and other visible minorities,
as well as students from outside the Lower Mainland. In order to maximize
progress towards true equality of opportunity, the University is prepared to accept
and administer donations designed to accomplish such objectives either by
encouraging members of such groups at large to take advantage of a university
education or by increasing their level of participation in particular programs.
The Committee, in its attempt to apply Senate policy to both new and existing
awards, identified several issues. Most important among these were: Nonconforming awards, Affiliation awards and the areas of jurisdiction (including role
and responsibility) of the Awards Office and the Development Office in the
development and processing of new awards.
1. Non-conforming awards are existing awards the terms of which contravene
Senate Policy. The committee addressed two options: 1) to grandfather existing
awards; and 2) to investigate the feasibility of amending the award terms. The latter
option was chosen.
Awards were randomly selected for preliminary review. These included awards
with restrictive provisions related to gender, religious affiliation, country of origin,
geographic region, and school district in which a recipient was previously enrolled.
The intent of the review was to assess, in a preliminary manner, whether it is
feasible to amend award terms for these non-conforming awards. It was
determined that the University could not unilaterally change the terms of the award.
Rather, donors or donor representatives had to be contacted and had to agree to
vary the terms of their agreements with the University.
 10612
May 19, 1993
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student, Awards
Year end report (continued)
Of the 10 awards, examination of the files resulted in the elimination of 5 awards
from further review because the donor or donor contact: 1) was deceased or had
re-located without providing forwarding address; or 2) had disputed legally an
aspect of the university - donor relationship which made re-opening discussion
concerning the award description imprudent, if not impossible. The Development
Office contacted the 5 remaining donors. Only one of the five donors agreed to
amend the terms of the award. The cost of seeking to amend the terms of nonconforming awards is not trivial and can be assessed in terms of the staff time and
the material cost to the Awards and the Development Offices.
There are about 200 non-conforming awards currently listed in the Awards and
Financial Aid Supplement to the Calendar. The Committee has recommended that
the study be enlarged to include all 200 awards and that this be done in conjunction
with the regular annual mailing to donors.
2. Affiliation awards describes a category in which all awards within the
category require a recipient to provide evidence of affiliation with a specified group.
For example, a recipient's parent or grandparent is a member of the armed forces or
is an employee of a specified company; the recipient is a member of a specified
religious denomination; the recipient is of specified racial or ethnic origin. There are
about 160 of these awards. They must be administered using a separate application
process to permit students to specify their affiliation and, in many cases, to provide
supporting documentation. Affiliation awards are costly to administer and, in some
cases, also contravene the Senate policy.
The Committee agreed to accept new awards in this category only if the terms are
consistent with the Senate policy. The committee recommend that: 1) Development
Office staff strongly discourage donors who wish to create affiliation awards; and
2) subsequent Committees on Awards critically scrutinize any affiliation awards
presented. The Committee also supported the concept of analyzing the cost to
administer these awards from the perspective of charging donors for the additional
expense incurred to administer awards within this category.
3. Award development during the term of the Committee, administrative
responsibility to contact donors, to develop awards, to solicit funds, to confirm
funding for existing awards, and substantively to change award terms transferred
from the Awards and Financial Aid Office to the Development Office. Now, the
Development Office, in consultation with the appropriate Faculty or Department,
solicits and negotiates new awards consistent with Senate Policy; prepares award
descriptions and forwards them to the Awards Office. The Director of Awards
confirms that the awards are consistent with Senate Policy, with wording
conventions and that they can be administered before presenting them to the
Committee.
While the Committee is aware that both offices are working to ensure that the
division of responsibility is clearly understood in both departments, it is concerned
that after two years some elements of the transfer remain problematic. In several
instances proposed awards and their descriptions, after many months of
development, have remained inconsistent with Senate policy, with wording
conventions, and/or with Faculty or Department programs of study.
 10613
May 19,1993
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Year end report (continued)
The Committee believes the liaison and cooperation between the two offices would
be enhanced by the involvement of the Director of Awards to assist the
Development Office to plan and to deliver workshops on awards for appropriate
staff members.
B. University Scholarship Program: 150% Rule
This Rule was implemented on a trial basis with the approval of Senate in 1979. Its
intent was equitably to distribute across Faculties the general purpose operating
funds designated to support the University Scholarship Program. After a two year
trial period, the Senate committee on Student Awards recommended that use of the
Rule be discontinued. In January of 1984, the Senate again reviewed use of the
Rule. A motion not to re-introduce its use was put and lost. The Rule has been in
uninterrupted use since 1984.
The implementation of the Rule is complex, labour intensive , difficult to model for
budgetary purposes and may not be achieving its intended purpose. In addition, its
implementation is integral to the assignment of faculty recommended awards and
may unnecessarily delay assignment of University Scholarship Program funds.
It was agreed that the Director should conduct a review of this issue and propose
changes for presentation to the incoming Cornmittee.
C. Canada Student Loan Program: 3% Fee
On behalf of the Director and the staff of the Awards Office, the Committee
expresses its thanks to the the Senate for unanimously endorsing the motion to
communicate to the Secretary of State its strong disagreement with this hastily
imposed and economically regressive fee.
D. Entrance Scholarship Program
The Committee was concerned with the disproportionate number of entrance
scholarships awarded to students entering Science and Applied Science when
compared to those entering Arts. The awarding of the Presidents Outstanding
Student Initiative, the Canada Scholarships, the Norman MacKenzie Alumni
Scholarships, the UBC President's, Chancellor's and National Scholarships and
several other 'named' scholarships of high monetary value were considered.
Further study is indicated before the incoming Committee could make
recommendations to Senate."
In speaking briefly to the report, Dr. Cook stated that one of the issues still to
be resolved is that of non-conforming awards. These are awards that have been
listed in the Calendar for a number of years and do not meet the current Senate
requirements. Dr. Cook stated that although the Committee had wrestled with this
issue for some considerable time it was not yet close to resolution.
 10614
May 19, 1993
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Year end report (continued)
Two other areas of concern outlined in the report which the Committee feels
ought to be re-examined are the 150% rule in the University Scholarship Program,
and the disproportionate number of entrance scholarships awarded to students
entering the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Applied Science compared to
those entering the Faculty of Arts.
Dr. Cook paid tribute to members of the Committee for their untiring efforts
during a rather difficult period.
Dr. Cook     \        That the report be received.
Dr. McBride J
Carried
Faculty of Arts
Credit for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses - change in
Calendar statement
It was stated in the material circulated that the Faculty of Arts had established an ad
hoc Committee on Advanced Credit and Standing to consider the possibility of
changing Faculty policy that grants advanced placement for courses in the Advanced
Placement and International Baccalaureate programs to one that also grants credit in
some cases. There was, however, no general agreement about extending the policy on
a Faculty-wide basis.  Therefore the proposal to allow individual departments and
schools to decide on the appropriateness of advanced credit was accepted by Faculty as
satisfactory policy. Proposals on the maximum allowable transfer credits for advanced
standing and credit will be sent by departments to the Faculty of Arts Curriculum
Committee for approval.
Dean Marchak 1
Dean Goldberg J
That the proposed Calendar deletions be approved.
Carried
 Faculty of Dentistry
Residency requirements for the B.D.Sc. program
10615
May 19, 1993
The following proposed residency requirements for the B.D.Sc. program had been
circulated:
"With the permission of the Faculty, a maximum of 30 credits of acceptable
course work completed at other institutions may be transferred for credit
toward the B.D.Sc. degree."
That the proposed residency requirements for the
Dean Boyd 1 B.D.Sc. program be approved.
Dr. Price    J
Dr. Will drew Senate's attention to a statement in the Calendar under attendance
which states that: "Except where specifically stated otherwise in the regulations of a
particular faculty or school a student may not receive a degree without completing the
equivalent of two winter sessions in attendance at the University, one of which should
be the final year." He stated that the statement had been written with a four year degree
in mind and that a certain interpretation had to be made for those degree programs that
are less than four years but the intent was that at least 50% of the credits for the degree
should be taken at UBC not through transfer of credit. It also suggests that a student
should be at this University in its final year, the point being that if they are going to get
a UBC degree it should have quite a bit of UBC content. Dr. Will explained that
approval of the proposal would allow the possibility of students getting a UBC degree
after having taken only one year at UBC.
In response, Dean Boyd stated that two years ago Senate took a leadership role in
approving this particular program. She explained that it was the only program in
existence in English speaking Canada and that it was in great demand. At the time of its
structure it presented a core which can only be taken at UBC as there is no other
Faculty of Dentistry in the province. This new direction, however, allows access to a
particular group of people, 99.9% of whom are women in the mature student category.
 Faculty of Dentistry
Residency requirements for the B.D.Sc. program (continued)
10616
May 19,1993
Dean Boyd stated that in her opinion, the University should be flexible where
appropriate. Dean Boyd stated that the proposal would not endanger UBC standards
and that it was responsive to the needs of the community.
The motion was put and carried.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposals for the establishment of Chairs
Proposals for the establishment of various Chairs had been circulated.
Dean Grace      1     That Senate recommend to the Board of Governors
Dean Goldberg J     the establishment of two Chairs in each of the
following: Chinese Research, Japanese Research,
Korean Research, South Asian Research, and
South East Asian Research.
In response to a query, the President stated that each of the Chairs was intended to
be a $1 million endowment which is a standard used in the campaign. There was also a
commitment to the matching funds. In most cases the private sector funds had already
been raised and the University was still working on the others.
With regard to library resources, Dean Grace stated that provision had been made
for library resources where required. He stated that clearly the Asian Library is more in
need of resources in some of the five areas than in others, and he expected that in those
areas where there was a shortage of materials it would be a very high priority of the
centres to supplement library materials.
After further discussion the motion was put and carried.
 10617
May 19, 1993
Faculty of Medicine
Proposal to establish the UBC/St. Paul's Hospital Foundation Chair in AIDS Research
Dr. Slonecker 1      That the proposal to establish the.UBC/St. Paul's
Dean McBride J      Hospital Foundation Chair in AIDS Research be
approved.
Carried
Other business
Russian Major
Dr. Sobrino informed Senate that he had received a letter signed by 25 students
asking why admission to the Russian Major had been suspended for the fourth
consecutive year and if this had been done with the approval of Senate.
Dr. Sobrino said that he had responded to the letter stating that the suspension of
admission to the program had not come before either the Senate Curriculum Committee
or the Senate. He also explained that while discontinuance of a program requires
Senate approval under the University Act, it was not clear that suspension of admission
to a program had to be approved by Senate. Dr. Sobrino stated that he had discussed
the situation with the Dean of Arts and asked Dr. Marchak to comment on this matter.
Dean Marchak explained that in 1988-89 there were 51 full-time equivalent
enrolments in the undergraduate program and four graduate enrollees. In 1988-89
three undergraduate degrees were conferred. A total of 13 degrees, both undergraduate
and graduate, were conferred between 1986 and 1989. In the summer of 1990 the
Dean's office was able to identify only five students registered as majors in Russian or
Slavonic Studies, of whom three were in the International Relations program.
Dean Marchak went on to explain the findings of a review cornmittee established in
1989, which, among other things, recommended a series of reforms to the curriculum,
the suspension of the graduate program, and the deletion of the Slavonic Area Studies
Major and courses from the Calendar.
 10618
May 19, 1993
Other business
Russian Major (continued)
In view of the history of the department, the findings of the review committee,
subsequent reports, enrolments, and the failure of the curriculum reform process, Dean
Marchak imposed a suspension on admissions to the Majors program in the summer of
1990. Students already in the program were contacted and were either satisfactorily
transferred to other programs or provided with the means to complete their degrees in
Russian.
On the advice of an advisory committee, and with the help of a world-recognized
expert, the Faculty sought to recruit a coordinator of Russian language training. The
only suitable candidate for the position declined to accept. In order to maintain the
Russian language courses while the search continued, a non-tenure stream lecturer was
appointed for the following two years. However, the Faculty did not feel that was
adequate instruction in Russian to regenerate a Majors program.
The current situation, therefore, is that the department has entered the third year
without a head or a coordinator of the Russian language program. In addition, one of
the remaining six faculty members retired and this person was the main instructor for
Russian language courses. A second person, who was a linguist, took early
retirement, thus leaving the department with only four members, of which only one had
regularly taught introductory and intermediate Russian language. The others are
specialists in literature or other languages.
During the past two years the Faculty has advertised for two instructors but the
search had now been cancelled because the Faculty lacks the financial resources to
employ even one lecturer in the next winter session.
In conclusion, Dean Marchak stated that the Faculty had not recommended the
 Other business
Russian M^jor (continued)
10619
May 19, 1993
cancellation of the Russian Major because it hoped that in the future the resources could
be found to renew the program. However, before reintroducing a major's program in
Russian, the Faculty would invite an external appraiser to advise on the adequacy of the
Russian instruction for majors students. The Faculty will continue to monitor the
situation, and if neither the resources nor other conditions improve the Faculty will
have to consider returning to Senate with a recommendation to cancel the Russian
major.
Landscape Architecture Program
Mr. Olynyk, student senator, noted that the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences had
reduced the number of credits in the Landscape Architecture Program and, on behalf of
the students, expressed appreciation for this decision.
Mr. Olynyk also took the opportunity to thank members of Senate for the time and
effort they expend on behalf of students at UBC.
Financial constraints
In response to comments by Mr. Woo, President Strangway observed that there
was a perception that in Canada a lot of money is spent on education and that we can do
better with the money we get. In fact, Canada is thirteenth of the OECD countries in
terms of the percentage of its gross national product per capita that it spends on a per
student basis. As far as British Columbia versus the rest of Canada is concerned the
figures are even worse. However, he felt that the University had done an immense
amount to address the question of possible financial constraints and was doing
everything it could to preserve a proper balance and also to preserve the integrity of the
programs offered.
 10620
May 19, 1993
Other business  (continued)
Ad hoc Committee on Environment for Teaching
Dr. Hamilton, Chair the Committee, informed Senate that during its deliberations
the Cornmittee had discovered that there are a number of other committees on campus
initiating investigations of their own. The Committee was therefore in the process of
coordinating information and expected to be in a position to present a report at the
September meeting of Senate.
Senate Committees
The President reminded members that they are expected to continue to serve on
Senate Committees until recommendations for the 1993-96 membership have been
presented and approved at the September 15,1993 meeting.
The meeting adjourned at 10.00 p.m. The next regular meeting of Senate will be held
on Wednesday, September 15, 1993.
Secretary
Confirmed
Chair
 10621
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'A'
Awards recommended to Senate
Gordon CASTLEY Scholarship—A $1,200 scholarship has been endowed by Mr. Gordon
Castley. The award is offered to an graduate student in the Department of Counselling
Psychology, in the Faculty of Education and is made on the recommendation of the
Department in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1993/94
Winter Session.)
Robert J. CRAIG Memorial Scholarship—A scholarship of $1,000 has been endowed by
friends and colleagues to honour Robert J. Craig, to recognize his contributions as a
distinguished forester and energetic leader of the Canadian Institute of Forestry as well as
University of B.C. Forestry Alumni Division. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Forestry to a student entering fourth-year,who in addition, displays
unusual initiative, leadership, and perseverance. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
Dr. Verne D. FLATHER Memorial Bursary—A $300 bursary has been endowed by
friends and family in memory of Dr. Verne D. Flather. The bursary is offered to students
in the Faculty of Medicine. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE Scholarship in Pharmacy—A $750 scholarship is offered
through the generosity of Hoffmann-La Roche Limited. The award is made on
recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences to a student completing first
year in the Faculty, who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in the professional
practice courses. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
Bruce H. MCCOLL Memorial Prize—A prize of $500 has been endowed by his friends
and colleagues of the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal of British Columbia to
honour the Honourable Mr. Justice Bruce H. McColl. The prize is given to an
undergraduate achieving excellence in Human Rights Law courses. In the event a course in
this area is not offered, it will be given to a student completing a course in Labour Law or
Administrative Law. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law.
(Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
Malcolm F. MCGREGOR Memorial Scholarship—A $900 scholarship has been endowed
by friends and colleagues in memory of Malcolm F. McGregor, head of the Department of
Classics between 1954 and 1975. The award is offered to a graduate student in Classics
and is made on the recommendation of the Department in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
H. Peter OBERLANDER Medal and Prize—A $1,200 prize accompanied by a medal has
been endowed in honour of H. Peter Oberlander, the founding Director of the School of
Community and Regional Planning and subsequently the founding Director of the Centre
for Human Settlements. The prize is awarded for academic excellence in a Master's
programme in Land Policy, Environmental Conservation, or Urban or Regional Planning
and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1992/93
Winter Session.)
Sandra SHIPLEY Memorial Bursary in Music—A $400 bursary has been endowed by
family and friends of Sandra Shipley, B.A. '64, a Vancouver teacher, musician and longtime member of the Vancouver Bach Choir. The award is offered to an undergraduate
student in the School of Music who is majoring in General Studies. Preference will be
given to a student who is taking the Elementary or Secondary Education Stream to prepare
for a career in music education. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
 10622
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'A'
Awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Joseph TONZETICH Fellowship—A fellowship of $15,000 is offered to honour Dr.
Joseph Tonzetich of the Faculty of Dentistry for his contributions to dental research. The
award is made to a student in the Oral Biology Ph.D. program who shows superior
research ability in the field of Oral Biochemistry or Cell Biology. The award is made on
the recommendation of the Department of Oral Biology in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies and may be shared by two students if appropriate. (Available 1993/94
Winter Session.)
Emily Christina WONG Memorial Bursary—A $300 bursary has been endowed by family
and friends to honour Emily Christina Wong. The award is offered to a student majoring
in Women's Studies in the Faculty of Arts. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
Wendy FAN Memorial Scholarship—A $1,200 scholarship has been endowed by Stephen
Fan in memory of his wife Wendy Fan. The award is offered to a student who is entering
graduate study in either Science, Applied Science, Medicine or Commerce and Business
Administration and who has received his or her undergraduate degree at an institution
outside of North America. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
Stuart OLSON Construction Inc. Scholarship—A $300 scholarship has been endowed by
Stuart Olson Construction Inc. for an undergraduate student in Management Information
Systems. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session.)
Eli and Milica SYEKLOCHA Memorial Scholarship in Slavonic Studies—A $300
scholarship has been endowed by their daughter Delfa Syeklocha to honour Eli and Milica
Syeklocha. The award is offered to a student in the Department of Russian and Slavic
Languages and Literatures on the recommendation of the department. (Available 1993/94
Winter Session.)
MERCK Frosst Pharmacy Doctoral Prize—A prize in the amount of $1,000 is awarded to
the student standing at the head of the graduating class in the Doctor of Pharmacy program,
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science. (Available 1992/93 Winter Session.)
 10623
May 19,1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Restructuring of the Landscape Architecture Program
1. To re-focus the design core in response to changes in the discipline and changes
in the faculty.
2. To help students take better advantage of offerings outside the program.
3. To recognize the diversity of disciplinary foci common to the discipline (from
garden design to landscape management) by providing greater choice in our
electives program.
4. To restructure the sequence of courses so that students with different educational
credentials can be more easily accommodated.
5. To reduce the number of credits required for graduation while still increasing
elective flexibility.
Calendar statement - revised
New courses    LARC 205 (6) Introduction to Landscape Design I
LARC 206 (6) Introduction to Landscape Design II
LARC 221 (3) Landscape Architecture. Nature and Society
LARC 254(1) Professional Practice I
LARC 305 (6) Intermediate Design I
LARC 306 (6) Intermediate Design II
LARC 405 (6) Advanced Landscape Design
LARC 454 (3) Professional Practice II
Changes LARC 199* - change in credits, description
LARC 251 - change in number (formerly 150)
LARC 351 - change in number (formerly 250)
LARC 451 - change in number (formerly 350)
Deletion LARC 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 301, 302, 410, 450
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Electrical Engineering
 New course       ELEC 482 (3) Optical Waveguides and Photonics
Changes ELEC 464 - change title and prerequisite
ELEC 474 - change title, description, prerequisite, hours
ELEC 475 - change title, description and prerequisite
ELEC 478 - change description and prerequisite
Program changes to Fourth Year regular program and Computer Engineering Option
 10624
May 19,1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals (continued)
FACULTY OF ARTS
Canadian Studies
The program permits students to focus on Canada from a variety of disciplinary
perspectives. Enrolment in the program is by application and is limited to 25 in each of
the third and fourth years.
Prerequisites:
1. French 120.   Students intending to meet more than the minimum program
requirement in French are advised to take French 202.
2. Either Economics 100 or Political Science 200.
3. 6 credits of: ANTH 201,220,221; ECON 100 (if not taken under 2) SOCI 100 or
210 (students planning to take SOCI 310 or 410 must take SOCI 100).
Individual courses at the 300 and 400 level may have prerequisites. In planning
their program students must take this into account.
New course CDST 450 (3)  Senior Seminar in Canadian Studies
Arts
Change in Language Requirement
Under Language Requirement change all instances of "... French or a foreign
language ... to read: "... a language other than English ..."
Arts Studies
Change Calendar entry
New ASTU 400 (3-6)d      Interdisciplinary Studies in Arts
ASTU 401 (3-6)d      Distinguished Visitors
Asian Studies
New ASIA 357 (6) The Hindu Religious Tradition - cross-list with RELG 354
Change     RELG 354 - add "Same as ASIA 357
English
Change     ENGL 392 - change in description
Geography
New GEOG 102* (3)    Introduction to Climate and Biogeographv
GEOG 103* (3)    Introduction to Terrestrial Physical Geography
Changes to List A
 10625
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Geography (continued)
Change in program descriptions:
Major - First and Second Years; Notes; Undergraduate courses; Note
Major in Physical Geography
Honours - Climatology
Honours - Geomorphology
Changes
History
ATSC 200*, GEOG 200*, 205*, 207*, 306*, 310*, 315, 317, 330*, 370,
372 - change in prerequisites
GEOG 410-change in title, description
GEOG 423 - change in prerequisite, hours
Change 6-credit courses into two 3-credit courses:
HIST 327 becomes 327, 328
HIST 328 becomes 330, 331
HIST 352 becomes 351, 352
HIST 353 becomes 353, 354
HIST 436 becomes 445,446
Linguistics
Change 6-credit course into two 3-credit courses:
LING 316 becomes LING 316,317
Change program statement:
Major in Speech Sciences - Second, Third and Fourth Years; Note
Honours in Speech Sciences — Third and Fourth Years; Note
Diploma in Applied Linguistics Requirements
Philosophy
Change in number,
120 (formerly 102);
320 (formerly 303);
337 (formerly 313);
310 (formerly 333);
372 (formerly 355);
431 (formerly 400);
419 (formerly 408);
435 (formerly 417);
461 (formerly 424);
462 (formerly 440);
440 (formerly 460);
450 (formerly 490);
and/or title, credits, description, prerequisites, hours
125 (formerly 103)
324 (formerly 305)
349 (formerly 317)
311 (formerly 343)
315 (formerly 363)
429 (formerly 402)
400 (formerly 410).
375 (formerly 418)
490 (formerly 430)
425 (formerly 450)
441 (formerly 470)
485 (formerly 498)
240 (formerly 250); 220 (formerly 302);
322 (formerly 306); 339 (formerly 311);
371 (formerly 323); 390 (formerly 330);
340 (formerly 350); 314 (formerly 353);
312 (formerly 373); 313 (formerly 383);
427 (formerly 405); 433 (formerly 407);
401 (formerly 411); 460 (formerly 414);
451 (formerly 420); 338 (formerly 421);
469 (formerly 434); 434 (formerly 437);
426 (formerly 451); 414 (formerly 453);
452 (formerly 480); 418 (formerly 483).
 10626
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Philosophy  (continued)
Change     PHIL 210 - change in description
New PHIL 230 (3) Moral and Political Philosophy I
PHIL 330 (3) Moral and Political Philosophy II
PHIL 321 (3) Induction and Decision
PHIL 323 (3) Non-Classical Logics
PHIL 410 (3) Topics in Ancient Philosophy
PHIL 412 (3) Topics in Medieval Philosophy
PHIL 416 (3) Topics in Modem Philosophy
PHIL 428 (3) Philosophical Issues in the Foundations of Mathematics
PHIL 432 (3) Ethical Theory
Deletions   PHIL 201, 214, 301, 314, 374, 393, 394, 401, 403, 418, 419, 422, 426,
427, 473
Change program description and requirements -Major and Honours
Changes to Lists A and B
Sociology (Anthropology and Sociology)
Change     SOCI 361 - change in credits
Deletion    SOCI 412
New SOCI 420 (3/6)d   Sociology of the Environment
Women's Studies
New WMST 450 (3/6)d      Directed Studies
Music
Change in program requirements - Courses in Other Faculties or Degree Programs
Change to List A
Change in Major requirements - Major in General Studies: Secondary Education
Stream, Fourth Year
Change in Major in Opera, Fourth Year
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Language Education
New ENED 206 (4-6)d       Language Field Experience
ENED 226 (4) Introduction to Language across the Curriculum
ENED 346 (3) Teaching with Illustrated Materials
Deletion     MLED 408
 10627
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION (continued)
Social and Educational Studies
Deletion     EDST 200, 430
Visual and Performing Arts in Education
Changes    MUED 335, 336 - change credits and hours
MUED 412 - change title, description and prerequisite
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Master of Science in Genetic Counselling
Calendar statement
The Department of Medical Genetics offers a two-year program of advanced study
leading to the M.Sc. degree in Genetic Counselling. This is a master's degree program
without thesis. The program provides a strong academic component focusing on the
fundamental and applied principles of human genetics and in depth clinical experience
necessary for the genetic counsellor. Required courses include MEDG 530, 550, 560
565, 570, 575, 548 and CNPS 362. Students must also successfully complete a
written final comprehensive examination.
Students admitted to the program will normally have an undergraduate degree in
science, including introductory courses in genetics (BIOL 334 or equivalent),
biochemistry and statistics.
Admission requirements
To gain acceptance to the program, a student must show evidence of first class standing
in at least 12 credits and at least upper second class standing in the remaining course
work at the Third and Fourth Year level. Students admitted to the program will
normally have an undergraduate degree in science, including introductory courses in
genetics, biochemistry and statistics or approval of the Director. An interview with the
program's admission committee is required prior to acceptance.
New MEDG 550 Concepts in Clinical Genetics for Genetic Counsellors
MEDG 560 Genetic Counselling Seminar
MEDG 565 Advanced Genetic Counselling Seminar
MEDG 570 Introductory Clinical and Laboratory Rotation
MEDG 575 Advanced Clinical Rotation
Agricultural Economics
New AGEC 548 (0)      Major Essav
Botany
Delete       BOTA 538
 10628
May 19, 1993
APPENDLX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (continued)
Civil Engineering
Change     CIVL 566 - add corequisite
Economics
New ECON 595 (0)      Major Essav
Change     ECON 690 - change grading to P/F
Electrical Engineering
Changes    ELEC 577 -change in title, description, credits
ELEC 593 - change in description
Geological  Sciences
Change     GEOL 500 - change in number, credits, description (formerly 540)
GEOL 509 - change in number, title, description (formerly 530)
GEOL 563 - change in title, description, credits
Library, Archival and Information Studies
New LIBR 640 (3)       Management of Libraries and Archives
(cross-list with ARST 570)
LIBR 654 (3)       Research Methods in Libraries and Archives
(cross-list with ARST 590)
Change     ARST 570 - cross-list with LIBR 640
ARST 590 - cross-list with LB3R 654
Medical Genetics
New MEDG 550 (6) Concepts in Clinical Genetics for Genetic Counsellors
MEDG 560 (1) Genetic Counselling Seminar
MEDG 565 (1) Advanced Genetic Counselling Seminar
MEDG 570 (3) Introductory Clinical and Laboratory Rotation
MEDG 575 (12) Advanced Clinical Rotation
Metals and Materials Engineering
New MMAT 562 (2)     Finite Elements in Heat Transfer
Philosophy
Change in number and credits:
530 (formerly 501); 520 (formerly 502); 510 (formerly 503); 527 (formerly 505);
551 (formerly 506); 525 (formerly 507); 539 (formerly 511); 512 (formerly 513);
560 (formerly 514); 531 (formerly 521); 532 (formerly 540); 533 (formerly 541 A);
534 (formerly 542); 535 (formerly 543); 536 (formerly 544).
Change in number and description: 581 (formerly 530); 599 (formerly 549); 699
(formerly 649).
 10629
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Philosophy   (continued)
New PHIL 514 (3-12)d Earlv Modem Philosophy
PHIL 516 (3-12)d Modem Philosophy
PHIL 518 (3-12)d Twentieth-Centurv Philosophy
PHIL 528 (3-12)d Philosophical Issues in the Foundations of
Mathematics
PHIL 540 (3-12)d Epistemologv
PHIL 550 (3-12)d Metaphysics
Deletions   PHIL 500, 593
Physics
New PHYS 537 (3)      Phvsics of Soft Organic Interfaces
PHYS 538 (3)      Physical Properties of Synthetic and Natural Membrane
Interfaces
Social and Educational Studies
Change     EDST 601 (6/12)c- split into two courses:
EDST 601 (3/6)c
EDST 602 (3/6)c
Change in program
Change designation of the Ph.D. Degree in "Human Learning, Development
and Instruction (HLDI) to Ph.D. degree in "Educational
Psychology and Special Education" (EPSE)
Delete Ed.D. Degree in Educational Psychology and Special Education
Social Work
New SOWK571 (3/6)d      International Social Development
School of Community and Regional Planning
New PLAN 560 (3) Introduction to Real Property Development and
Planning
PLAN 561(3) Seminar in Real Property Development and Planning
PLAN 565 (l-12)d Current Issues in Real Property Development and
planning
PLAN 571(3) Housing Policy qnd Practice in Cities of the
Developing World
PLAN 572 (3) Project and Program Design in Developing Asian
Countries
PLAN 573 (3) Shelter and Services in Developing Countries
PLAN 574 (3) Urban Design in Developing Asian Countries
PLAN 575 (3) International Development Planning Seminar
 10630
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
School of Community and Regional Planning   (continued)
PLAN 579 (3) Microcomputers in Transportation Planning
PLAN 586 (3) Gender and Planning
PLAN 588 (3) Social Aspects of Urban Form
PLAN 589 (3) Influencing the Policy Process
PLAN 592 (3) Urban Restructuring
PLAN 599 (3) Environmental Policy Analysis
PLAN 601 (3) Research Methods Seminar
PLAN 602 (3) Planning Theory Advanced Seminar
PLAN 603 (3) Ph.D. Colloquium
Deletion PLAN 536
Change PLAN 570 - change in number, description (formerly
529)
Changes in numbers:
520 to 581; 521 to 582; 522 to 583; 523 to 584; 524 to 580; 525 to 591; 526
to 590; 527 to 585; 528 to 587; 529 to 570; 530 to 593; 531 to 594; 532 to
595; 533 to 596; 534 to 597; 535 to 598.
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Pathology
Change     PATH 425 - change present credits from 12 to 14
Radiology
RADI465 - change grading from P/F to percentage
Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science - Revised calendar statement (addition
in bold)
English requirement - In order to graduate from the program candidates must have
completed ENGL 100 or six approved credits of first-year English. Courses taken
to satisfy the English requirement will also satisfy 6 credits of Arts
electives. Note: Satisfactory completion of the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) is
prerequisite to all first-year English courses at UBC.
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Atmospheric Science
Change        ATSC 200 - change in prerequisite
 10631
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF SCIENCE  (continued)
Chemistry
Change        CHEM 250* - change in prerequisite
CHEM 402, 405, 406, 412, 413 - change in credits, hours
Geography
Change        GEOG 200*, 205*, 207*, 306*, 330* - change in prerequisite
GEOG 372* - change prerequisite and Faculty designation
New GEOG 102* (3)    Introduction to Climate and Biogeography
GEOG 103* (3)    Introduction to Terrestrial Physical Geography
Changes in programs - First Year - add GEOG 101 requirement:
Major in Physical Geography
Honours Climatology
Honours Geomorphology
Geological  Sciences
Changes      GEOL 200,309 - change in title
Microbiology and Immunology
Change in program
Change program description
Change Requirements for the B.Sc. Degree:
Option A - Major; Option A - Honours
Option B Environmental Microbiology Option - Major
Option B Environmental Microbiology Option - Honours
Oceanography
New OCGY 420 (3)      Introduction to Fisheries Science
Change in programs
Combined Oceanography and Biology Honours
Combined Oceanography and Chemistry Honours
Combined Oceanography and Geology Honours
Combined Oceanography and Geophysics Honours
Combined Oceanography and Physics Honours
Physics
Changes       PHYS 406 - change in description, credits, hours
 10632
May 19, 1993
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF SCIENCE (continued)
Interdepartmental
New program
Calendar statement:
B.Sc. in Freshwater Science
The Division of Mathematics and Science of Okanagan University College offers a B.Sc.
Major Program in Freshwater Science, with the degree being granted through the
University of British Columbia. Because of the relationships between water and nearly
every other aspect of the natural environment, the Freshwater Science Program includes
several fields of study, principally biology, chemistry, geography, geology, hydrology
and climatology. Two courses, FWSC 300 and 400, are designed to synthesize and
integrate knowledge and skills in biology, chemistry and earth sciences, and to apply
critical-thinking skills to complex problems.
The Program provides an understanding of freshwater, its behaviour, origin, distribution
and circulation below, on and above the land, its chemical and physical properties, its
relationship to water quality, the organisms living in water and the health of aquatic
ecosystems, and its interactions with the physical environment. Students will gain a
broad understanding of integrated water resource management and the impacts of human
activities on the resource.
The Freshwater Science Program is not intended as preparation for post-graduate studies
in traditional scientific disciplines without additional qualifying studies. However, it will
prepare students for more applied post-baccalaureate resource management and
environmental programs offered by several other universities, and will provide graduates
with both flexibility and adaptability in choosing careers.
This program is available only at Okanagan University College. For additional program
information, contact the Office of the Dean, Division of Mathematics and Science,
Okanagan University College, North Kelowna Campus, 3333 College Way, Kelowna,
B.C. V1V 1V7.
New BIOL 304 (3) Freshwater Microbiology
CHEM 321 (3) Environmental Chemical Analysis
FWSC 300 (6) Freshwater Science I
FWSC 400 (6) Freshwater Science II
MICB 304 (3) Freshwater Microbiology

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