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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1997-11-12

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 THE   UNIVERSITY    OF   BRITISH    COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF NOVEMBER 12, 1997
Attendance
Present: President M. C. Piper, (Chair), Vice President Academic D. R. Birch, Dean F. S. Abbott, Dr. P.
Adebar, Acting Dean D. R. Atkins, Mr. T. Au Yeung, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dean C. S. Binkley, Dean J. Blom,
Dr. G. W. Bluman, Mr. P. T. Brady, Dr. P. C. Burns, Dr. V. Froese, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Dr. V. Gomel, Mr.
C. L. Gorman, Dean F. Granot, Mr. H. D. Gray, Dr. P. G. Harrison, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. M. R. Ito, Mr.
J. Keng, Dr. S. B. Knight, Mr. A. Kwong, Ms. E. Lai, Ms. G. Lau, Mr. S. Lohachitranont, Mr. R. W. Lowe,
Dr. D. M. Lyster, Dr. D. J. MacDougall, Dr. M. MacEntee, Dr. W. R. McMaster, Mr. W. McMichael, Mr.
S. Mui, Mr. B. Murphy, Dean S. Neuman, Mr. J. Nobbs-Lhiessen, Mr. V. Pacradouni, Mr. R. L. de Pfyffer,
Dr. W. J. Phillips, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon, Dean M. Quayle, Ms. C. Quinlan, Professor J. A. Rice, Dr. H.
B. Richer, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten, Dr. R. W. Schutz, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Ms. N. Sonik,
Mr. A. H. Soroka, Dr. J. R. Lhompson, Dr. M. Lhompson, Dr. S. Lhorne, Mr. A. Lse, Dr. W. Uegama, Dr.
J. Vanderstoep, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dean E. H. K. Yen.
Regrets: Chancellor W. L. Sauder, Dr. I. Benbasat, Professor P. L. Burns, Dean J. Cairns, Mr. A. Chui, Ms.
L. Chui, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Rev. J. Hanrahan, Dr. F. G. Herring, Dr. V. J. Kirkness, Mr. O. C. W. Lau,
Ms. S. Lerchs, Mr. D. K. Leung, Dr. M. Levine, Professor P. L. K. Lin, Mr. L. P. L. Lo, Dr. P. L. Marshall,
Dr. K. May, Dean B. C. McBride, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dr. D. P. Rolfsen, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Mr. D. R.
Verma, Dr. P. A. Vertinsky, Dr. W. C. Wright Jr., Dr. R. A. Yaworsky.
Senate Membership
LT. GOVERNOR APPOINTEE - REAPPOINTMENT
Mr. H. David Gray - reappointed to January 7, 2001
EX-OFFICIO MEMBER
Ms. Catherine Quinlan - University Librarian
Minutes of the previous meeting
Dr. Uegama l        That the minutes of the second regular meeting
Dr. MacEntee J        of Senate for the Session 1997-98, having been
circulated, be taken as read and adopted.
Attention was drawn to page 11725 and the sentence "it was important that the
University make clear to the government that it will take no more than the agreed 4%." It
was agreed that the words "within any one Faculty" be added to the end of that sentence.
The motion, with the above
correction, was put and carried.
11744
 Vancouver Senate 11745
Minutes of November 12,1997
Business arising from the Minutes
Business arising from the Minutes
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS - COMPARISON STATISTICS (P.11723)
Dr. Spencer requested that this item be deferred until the next meeting of Senate.
COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AWARDS (PP.11731-2)
Dr. Bluman, chair of the committee, presented the following report in response to a
motion referred to the committee at the previous meeting concerning the definition of a
full time undergraduate student for scholarship standing.
Senate Motion from October 15, 1997 Senate Meeting: That the definition of a full time
undergraduate student for scholarship standing [and other purposes] be based on the
applicable percentage of 30 credits regardless of year and Faculty."
The Senate Committee on Student Awards reviewed that portion of the motion related to
scholarships at its meeting of October 21, 1997.
The committee concurred with the concerns raised by B. Murphy. The current wording within
regulations which specifies "80% of a full program of study" or "90% of a full program of
study" disadvantages students in programs in which the course load requirements by year
exceed 30 credits.
These include:
Applied Science (35-42 credits)
Agricultural Sciences (30-33 credits)
Forestry (30-37 credits)
Music (30-36 credits)
Pharmaceutical Sciences (33-34 credits)
Rehabilitation Sciences (33-39 credits)
Science Honours program (30-36 credits)
Arts combined Honours program (>30 credits)
In addition, the Committee expressed concern that the current regulations may discourage
some students from registering for courses or programs which are perceived to be more
demanding in order that they qualify for recommended scholarships or retain renewable
scholarships.
The Committee recommends changes to existing Regulations Governing University Awards.
(See 1997/98 Calendar, page 37, columns 1) The intent is to redress previous inequities
affecting students in the specified programs and to permit students greater freedom to register
in programs and courses which they perceive will challenge them without the penalty of losing
eligibility for scholarship.
Recommended changes are as follows:
Regulations Governing University Awards (changes in bold italics)
Regulation #3
An award designated as a scholarship will normally be made only to an undergraduate student
standing in the top 10% of his/her year and faculty, or with an average of 75% or higher.
Prizes or other academic awards which are based on
 Vancouver Senate 11746
Minutes of November 12,1997
Business arising from the Minutes
performance in a specific course require that the student stand in the top 10% of individuals
registered in the course, or obtain an average on 75% or higher for the course in question.
Where scholarships are renewable or include a guarantee of continued support to a student
maintaining "scholarship standing", this shall be interpreted as meaning that an
undergraduate student must successfully complete at least 27 credits with an overall average
of at least 80% (with no failed courses) or stand in the top 10% of his/her year and degree
program.
Regulation #4
Scholarship standing for students taking more than 27 credits will be determined on the basis
of 27 credits to be chosen in a manner most advantageous to the student.
Regulation #7
Holders of undergraduate scholarships normally will be expected to be registered in 24
credits to retain their scholarships. Awards will be made only to those who continue their
studies to the satisfaction of the Awards and Financial Aid Office and may be withheld for
unsatisfactory attendance or progress.
Regulations Governing Prizes, Medals and Awards
Regulation #3
To be eligible for a prize, an undergraduate student, unless otherwise stated, must have
completed a minimum of 27 credits for the year and faculty in which he/she is enrolled. The
standing of students taking more than 27 credits will be determined on the basis of 27 credits
required, chosen in a manner most advantageous to the student.
Dr. Bluman i        That the proposed changes to regulations 3, 4
Dr. Thompson i        an^ 7 of the Regulations Governing
Scholarship and regulation 3 of the
Regulations Governing Prizes, Medals and
Awards, be approved.
Carried.
SENATE MOTION CONCERNING THE TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA (P.11737)
The President informed Senate that a letter had been written to the Minister of Education,
Skills and Training, conveying the motion concerning the Technical University of British
Columbia, exactly as expressed by Senate. Dr. Piper stated that she had also discussed the
matter with the Deputy Minister. In response to a question, the President stated that she
assumed the Minister would be sending a written response.
 Vancouver Senate 11747
Minutes of November 12,1997
Chair's remarks and related questions
LIAISON WITH POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS (P. 11737)
The President invited Dr. Uegama, chair of the Senate Committee on Liaison with Post-
Secondary Institutions, to report on a recommendation made at the previous meeting that
the committee be asked to develop guidelines related to liaison with other members of the
post-secondary system in British Columbia.
Dr. Uegama reported that the committee had met and had agreed to canvas various
groups within the university with regard to whether there are major issues that call for
guidelines. The committee will also survey other universities in addition to those governed
by the University Act, and will canvas other members of the post-secondary system,
particularly the new university colleges, to identify issues that Senate might wish to
consider.
Chair's remarks and related questions
President Piper announced that Dean Barry McBride has been appointed Vice President
Academic and Provost, as of January 1, 1998. The President expressed congratulations to
Dean McBride, as well as thanks and appreciation to those involved in the selection
process.
President Piper informed Senate that she is continuing to visit various units around
campus in accordance with her commitment to meet with all academic and non-academic
units during the next eighteen months. She stated that this was a very exciting and
informative process, and felt very privileged to be able to interact with faculty, staff and
students.
The President noted that during her recent visit to Ottawa, she had meetings with a
variety of people about two major issues; one of these issues being the scholarships for the
Millennium. President Piper noted that she had discussed this initiative with student
 Vancouver Senate 1174 8
Minutes of November 12,1997
Candidates for Degrees
senators, prior to her visit to Ottawa. She welcomed the opportunity to participate in the
structuring of those scholarships, and the opportunity to assist the government in trying
to define exactly how to increase access to post-secondary education in this country.
President Piper said that she also had meetings with Minister Manley, Deputy Minister
Kevin Lynch, other ministers, and people in the Prime Minister's office, about the need
for increased funding to the granting councils, for basic research. She said the meetings
were positive and informative, and that an enormous number of people, including AUCC,
are working very hard to ensure that the next budget will identify and respond to the
pressing need to see increased funding going to the three granting councils.
The President invited members of Senate to attend a forum being held on Monday,
November 17, to discuss corporate sponsorship within the University as well as business
education partnerships.
Candidates for Degrees
Dr. Berger l        That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Prof. Rice i        as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, effective November 1997,
and that the Registrar, in consultation with the
Deans and the Chair of Senate, make any
necessary adjustments.
Carried.
Reports of Committees of Senate
ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE
Theatre, Film and Creative Writing - entrance requirements for new certificate program
Dr. Harrison, chair of the committee, presented the report. The committee recommended
approval of the following entrance requirements for the new certificate program in
Theatre Design and Technology:
 Vancouver Senate 11749
Minutes of November 12,1997
Reports of Committees of Senate
Students applying to the certificate program from high school will have to meet the
University minimum admission requirement which demands an average grade of 67%
over 4 courses including English 12. Competition for admission usually means that
applicants to degree programs actually require a much higher grade average.
Certificate program applicants will not be competing with degree program applicants
for admission. Therefore students who meet the minimum academic requirements but
do not meet the requisite competitive average for admission will still be considered for
the certificate program. Students who do not meet the normal requirements, but have
pursued theatre related activities that have contributed to an intellectual maturity, may
also be accepted on the basis of a Mature Student Application. In all cases, Theatre
faculty will evaluate candidates by means of a diagnostic examination and an
interview. An applicant's resume or portfolio will be of principal importance.
Dr. Harrison i        That the entrance requirements for the new
Mr. Gorman i        certificate program in Theatre Design and
Technology be approved.
Carried.
Pharmacology and Therapeutics - admission requirements for the Co-operative Education
Program
The committee recommended approval of the following admission requirements for the
Co-operative Education Program in Pharmacology:
Admission to the B.Sc. and B.Sc. Co-op program is by application to the Department
in March prior to Year 3. Selection of students will be based on academic performance
and suitability for pharmacological research.
Dr. Harrison i        That the admission requirements for the Co-
Dr. Slonecker i        operative Education Program in Pharmacology
be approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of November 12,1997
11750
Reports of Committees of Senate
New Student Exchange Programs
The committee recommended approval of the following exchange programs:
1.   Reciprocal student exchange agreements
University of Adelaide
Australia
University of Capetown
South Africa
University of Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe
University of Chile
Chile
Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile
Chile
Seoul National University
Korea
ITESM
Mexico
Leiden University
Netherlands
University of Auckland
New Zealand
University of Edinburgh
United Kingdom
University of Sussex
United Kingdom
2.   Faculty-specific Linkages
Instituto Tecnologico Costa Rica (Forestry)
Costa Rica
University of Helsinki (Forestry & Agric.Science)
Finland
University of Gottingen (Forestry)
Germany
University of Hamburg (Forestry)
Germany
Hitotsubashi University (Arts & Commerce)
Japan
University of Canterbury (Forestry)
New Zealand
Agricultural University of Norway (Agr ic. Science)
Norway
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Forestry & Agric.
Science)
Umea & Uppsala, Sweden
University of Aberdeen (Forestry)
United Kingdom
University of Wales (Forestry)
United Kingdom
3.   UBC Faculty-specific Consortium Agreements (to be established within the auspices
of the Tri-lateral Program for North American Mobility in Higher Education)
UBC Faculty of Education Consortium - involving Pennsylvania State University, University of
Southern California, University of Manitoba, El Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados,
La Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes.
UBC Faculty of Commerce and Business Education Consortium - involving Florida International
University, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, University of California-
L.A., Universidad de Guadalajara, Universite Laval, University of Texas at Austin, and University
of Toronto.
Dr. Harrison
Dr. Berger
That the proposed student exchange programs
be approved.
 Vancouver Senate 11751
Minutes of November 12,1997
Student Awards
Mr. de Pfyffer cited an incident in which a Vernon high school exchange student had been
seriously injured by attackers in Lima, Peru, and expressed concern about the safety of
UBC exchange students. Dr. Harrison responded that in addition to investigating the
academic qualifications of potential exchange partners, it was his understanding that the
issue of safety is one that the International Liaison Office takes into consideration.
The motion was
put and carried.
Student Awards
See APPENDIX A
In presenting the report, Dr. Bluman, chair of the committee, drew attention to the Paul
G. Stanwood Prize in English, commending Dr. Stanwood on his generosity.
Dr. Bluman i        That the awards (listed in Appendix A) be
Dr. Thompson J       accepted and forwarded to the Board of
Governors for approval and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
Carried.
Ad Hoc Committee on Advising
See APPENDIX B for full report.
Dr. Rosengarten, chair of the committee, presented the report, which contains the
following recommendations:
RECOMMENDATION A: that Faculties and Schools be encouraged to re-examine
their academic procedures and regulations to determine where these might be revised
and simplified, thereby removing unnecessary burdens on the advising system.
RECOMMENDATION B: that all Schools and Faculties post regular hours for
advising, and that every effort be made to accommodate students throughout the day,
including at the lunch hour.
 Vancouver Senate 11752
Minutes of November 12,1997
Ad Hoc Committee on Advising
RECOMMENDATION C: that Faculty advisers be given appropriate training and
familiarized with all aspects of degree and programme requirements in their own
Faculty, as well as being provided with information about university regulations and
the workings of the Student Information System.
RECOMMENDATION D: that the Faculties and Schools join with Student Services in
the production of a manual for advisers containing basic information concerning
academic requirements and non-academic resources and services.
RECOMMENDATION E: that the Registrar and the Faculties work together to
improve the University Calendar by updating all information and eliminating
redundancies, and by improving the general layout and organization of the Calendar's
contents.
RECOMMENDATION F: that all Schools and Faculties investigate the application of
electronic sources to provide students with immediate and direct access to basic
information about their academic record and course or degree requirements.
RECOMMENDATION G: that Faculty and Departmental advisers be more fully
apprised of the requirements in each others' areas, and that Faculty and Departmental
advisers be encouraged to consult on a regular basis.
RECOMMENDATION H: that the senior advisers in each School and Faculty meet
periodically to discuss advising policies and procedures, to exchange information
about new or changing programmes and requirements, and to coordinate their
advising activities wherever possible.
RECOMMENDATION I: that there be a statement, either in the University Calendar
or in the proposed advisers' manual, reminding students and faculty members of the
need for mutual respect in the advising process.
RECOMMENDATION J: that, in order to enable students to express their views
concerning our advising services, a standardized survey or questionnaire be prepared
by the Registrar or the office of the Vice-President of Student and Academic Services
and circulated to all advising offices, and that students' responses be forwarded to
Deans and Directors.
RECOMMENDATION K: that the Vice-President Academic and the Vice-President
for Student and Academic Services confer periodically to discuss any problems relating
to advising policies and procedures.
RECOMMENDATION L: that all advising offices be provided with information
about the non-academic services available on campus, and that advisers draw
students' attention to these services as needed.
 Vancouver Senate 1175 3
Minutes of November 12,1997
Ad Hoc Committee on Advising
RECOMMENDATION M: that Deans and Directors be asked to report to the Vice-
President Academic the steps they have taken to implement the recommendations of
the Ad Hoc Committee; and that the Vice-President Academic report on this matter to
Senate by January 1999.
RECOMMENDATION N: that the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Advising,
having completed its task, be dissolved.
In speaking to the report, Dr. Rosengarten informed Senate that the committee had sent
questionnaires to seventeen schools and faculties and had received sixteen responses.
Responses indicated fairly consistently that advising from the faculty perspective is often a
very time consuming and thankless task with little or no recognition for the people who
perform this task. It appeared that the majority of students going into an advising office
are well served but that there are inconsistencies, uncertainties and confusions which
might be cleared up by a few fairly straightforward steps: one, there might be at all levels
fuller information provided, both for students and for the faculty engaged in advising;
two, there might be easier access to the information, particularly for students; and three,
there might be better communication among the various branches of the UBC advising
system. Dr. Rosengarten stated that most of the committee's recommendations are
intended to promote these fairly simple goals. Dr. Rosengarten drew particular attention
to recommendation D, which would be a helpful supplement to the Calendar. He also
drew attention to recommendation F, concerning electronic sources, and to
recommendations G, H, and K. The committee felt that it was extremely important that
Faculty Advisors and Departmental Advisors speak to one another, and that advisors
from different Faculties speak to each other in order that everyone knows what is going
on, what the requirements are, what courses may have been introduced, and what
regulations may have been changed. Dr. Rosengarten stressed the importance of advisors
at every level being familiar with the different aspects of the advising system.
 Vancouver Senate 11754
Minutes of November 12,1997
Ad Hoc Committee on Advising
Referring to recommendation L, which concerns non-academic advising, Dr. Rosengarten
said the committee would like to see more coordination between counselling services and
the various faculties, in order to give students more help and better advice.
In conclusion, Dr. Rosengarten referred to a recommendation that came from the AMS
report, that there be an opportunity to provide for feedback; the committee agreed and
recommended that there be a means found of devising a form that would be available in
Faculty offices to allow students to record their experiences and to express their opinions
about the kind of advice they received.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That recommendations A to N of the Ad Hoc
Dr. Harrison i        Committee on Advising, be approved.
In response to a query concerning recommendations A and F, Dr. Rosengarten stated that
any changes would have to be initiated by the Faculties but in terms of the processes the
Registrar would be involved.
A query was raised concerning recommendation J. Dr. Rosengarten responded that the
committee had thought there could be an annual survey, but he saw no reason why it
should not be a continuous process.
Attention was drawn to recommendation L, which does not indicate who will be
responsible for providing information about non-academic services to advising offices. Dr.
Rosengarten responded that the Vice President of Student Services could be asked to take
on this responsibility but that the agencies listed in the report could be asked to ensure
that any printed information they have be sent to all Faculty offices.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of November 12,1997
11755
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Student senator Ms. Neena Sonik commented on the issue of the accountability of
advisors, and suggested that this issue should be addressed further before the committee
was dissolved.
Vice President Birch suggested that the question of whether the Ad Hoc Committee on
Advising, or another committee of Senate, should be asked to look into the accountability
issue, be referred to the Senate Agenda Committee.
In amendment:
Ms. Sonik,
Mr. Brady
That the recommendation to dissolve the
committee be deleted until the question of
which committee should address the
accountability issue is resolved.
Carried.
The motion, as amended, was
put and carried.
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
FACULTY PLANNING
Dean Quayle highlighted various aspects of a document circulated at the meeting
outlining the action plan towards a transformed and evolving UBC Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences.
Student Elections to Governing Bodies
In accordance with the University Act, section 43, that "The Senate shall make and
publish all rules in respect of nominations, elections and voting", the following proposal
concerning rules and regulations for student elections to governing bodies had been
circulated:
 Vancouver Senate 1175 6
Minutes of November 12,1997
Student Elections to Governing Bodies
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 1998 ELECTIONS OF STUDENT SENATORS AND BOARD
OF GOVERNORS REPRESENTATIVES
Rules and Regulations for Student Elections to Governing Bodies. The following
elections are required annually:
Board of Governors (University Act, Section 19 (e))
• "Two full-time students elected from the Student Association"
Senate (University Act, Section 35 (2) (h))
• "a number of full-time students, equal to the number provided in paragraphs (a) to
(f), elected from the Student Association in a manner that ensures that at least one
student from each faculty is elected;"
Following consultation with the AMS, the Registrar makes the following
recommendations to Senate:
• The AMS shall place an advertisement in The Ubyssey announcing the call for
nominations on Tuesday, November 18, 1997 and Tuesday, November 25, 1997,
and an advertisement announcing the close of nominations on Tuesday, January 6,
1998.
• The close of nominations shall be 4:00 pm on Friday, January 9, 1998.
• Announcement of the list of candidates shall be provided by the Registrar's Office
immediately following the close of nominations and shall be publicized by the
AMS Elections Administrator before Friday, January 16, 1998.
• Campaigning may only take place after the All Candidates' Meeting on Friday,
January 9, 1998 at 6:00 pm until Sunday January 18, 1998.
• Voting shall take place from Monday, January 19, 1998 to Friday, January 23,
1998.
• The election shall be held using methods satisfactory to the Registrar. The results
are not official until released by the Registrar, in writing, no earlier than 48 hours
after the close of polls.
• Those elected to the Board of Governors shall take office at the first meeting of the
Board on or after February 1.
• Those elected to Senate shall take office at the first meeting of Senate on or after
April 1.
A copy of the Senate rules and regulations will be given to each candidate for election
by the Registrar's Office when they submit their nominations. Copies are available to
members of the Senate from the Registrar's Office on request.
Dr. Slonecker l        That the recommendations for the 1997/98
Mr. Gorman J        student elections to governing bodies be
approved.
 Vancouver Senate 1175 7
Minutes of November 12,1997
Report on Enrolment 1997-98
In view of problems encountered in last year's student elections to the Board of
Governors, Mr. Pacradouni requested that a meeting of the Senate Elections Committee
be scheduled ahead of time in order to avoid unnecessary delay in resolving issues that
might arise this year.
The motion was
put and carried.
Report on Enrolment 1997-98
Enrolment statistics for 1997-98 had been circulated for information. In response to a
query, the Registrar stated that undergraduate and post-baccalaureate full-time equivalent
enrolment is 4.1% higher than last year.
Dr. Knight made reference to the Ministry of Education mandated enrolment increase of
four percent and the "Winter Session Enrolment" and "Full Time Equivalent Degree
Registrants" documents presented at the meeting, and asked the Registrar to comment on
the actual number of students, or "head count", in the Faculty of Arts. In response to
several questions the Dean of Arts provided information on the program and faculty
adjustments made to accommodate the 6.6 percent enrolment increase.
President's Report on the Vision Statement
The President's draft report on the Vision Statement process was circulated at the
meeting. President Piper stated that this draft will be circulated widely to allow input
from the community on the future of UBC. The President invited comments from
members of Senate on today's challenges, trends in education, and what questions people
should be asked to consider over the next several months. President Piper explained that
the document, when finished, will be a contextual piece that will allow people to begin to
discuss the Vision for UBC. Members of the community will be given until December
 Vancouver Senate 1175 8
Minutes of November 12,1997
Other business
to submit comments. These comments will be taken into consideration in preparing the
first draft of the Vision document, which will then be circulated some time in January,
followed by a campus-wide debate or forum in February or March. A revised Vision
document will be discussed in Senate prior to submission to the Board of Governors.
There was considerable debate of the document during which many suggestions were
offered. In particular, members of Senate expressed the importance of involving people
outside of the University community, such as graduates of UBC as well as the public.
Other business
NOTICE OF MOTION
Mr. Brian Murphy gave notice of the following motion:
That the definitions and uses of 'full-time' and 'part-time' status for undergraduate
students at the University be reviewed to ensure that they are uniform, consistent, and
appropriate for all applicable purposes, and that they are equitable, to the greatest
possible extent, for all students.
Adjournment
The meeting adjourned at 10:00 p.m.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, December 10, 1997.
 Vancouver Senate 1175 9
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix A
Appendix A
AWARDS RECOMMENDED TO SENATE
PMC-Sierra Inc. Founders' Award in Electrical and Computer Engineering-A $1,800
award has been endowed by Kevin Huscroft, a founder of PMC-Sierra, Inc. to a
student in Computer or Electrical Engineering, or in the Electrical option in
Engineering Physics. It is awarded on the basis of academic achievement, leadership,
and entrepreneurship to a student with interest and achievement in communication
system design or integrated circuit design. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Head of Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. (Partial funding
97W Session)
Siegfried Sirius Albrecht SELKE Memorial Bursary-A $300 bursary has been endowed
in memory of Siegfried Sirius Albrecht Selke. The award is offered to a student in
Geological Sciences, with preference given to mature students. (Available 97W
Session)
Paul G. STANWOOD Prize in English-A $300 prize is offered by Professor Paul G.
Stanwood for the best doctoral thesis in English. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Graduate Committee of the Department of English, in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 97W Session)
Martin R. TUPPER Memorial Award in Civil Engineering-A $600 award has been
endowed in memory of Martin R. Tupper by family and friends. The award is offered
to an undergraduate student in Civil Engineering who participates and provides
leadership in intramurals or in the Engineering Undergraduate Society and is made on
the recommendation of the Department of Civil Engineering. (Available 97W Session)
 Vancouver Senate 11760
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
Appendix B
REPORT OF THE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON ADVISING
1. Background to this report
In April 1996 the Alma Mater Society conducted a survey to determine students' views
concerning the range and quality of advising services offered by the Faculties across the
UBC campus. The survey was prompted by expressions of dissatisfaction about current
advising practices; these complaints were given an airing in an informal survey conducted
in February 1996 by Arts student senator Mr. D. Culhane, and repeated in a "Your UBC"
forum organized in March 1996 by Dr. Maria Klawe.
The AMS survey on academic advising took the form of a questionnaire with eleven
questions. The questionnaire was distributed to student residences early in April 1996; the
completed forms were collected and the results tabulated by the AMS University
Commission. The survey elicited responses from approximately 600 students (about 2.4%
of the undergraduate body).
The survey's findings were described in a report sent to the Vice President Academic and
brought before the University Senate in September 1996. Under the title AMS Academic
Advising Survey and dated 14 August 1996, the report drew attention to a number of
concerns:
• a number of students in both Arts and Science felt they had been poorly treated or
badly advised by Faculty advisers;
• many students felt that advisers were neither knowledgeable nor helpful;
• a significant number complained about limited advising office hours;
• students reported difficulties in obtaining information about courses in Faculties
other than their own.
The AMS report concluded with a number of recommendations, including the following:
• students should be better advised about the availability of career guidance
counselling services at UBC;
• more information should be provided about cross-faculty courses;
• the Faculties should review their advising services, especially hours of operation,
the treatment of students, the training and accountability of advisers, and the
opportunity for students to provide feedback.
2. Formation of Ad Hoc Committee
During discussion of the AMS report at the Senate meeting, concerns were raised
regarding the small number of respondents, the time constraints on the survey (it was
conducted during the examination period in April), and the loaded or ambiguous nature
of some of the questions. However, despite the survey's evident imperfections, Senate felt
that it was important to inquire further into the matter of academic advising at UBC to
determine the strengths and weaknesses of the present system, and to find ways of
correcting any deficiencies. An ad hoc committee was formed and instructed to:
 Vancouver Senate 11761
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
1. formulate and recommend to Senate a university-wide policy on academic
advising;
2. review the following items and report its findings to Senate:
a. the rationale for having academic advising in the portfolio of the Vice-
President Academic and Provost as opposed to in [that of] the Vice-
President, Student and Academic Services, and
b. the selection processes and criteria for academic advisers;
3. address the major issues highlighted in the report presented to Senate by the Alma
Mater Society, making any necessary recommendations to Senate; and
4. make any other recommendations the Committee considers advisable arising from
the consideration of the above items.
3. Method of obtaining information
The Committee set out first to identify the advising resources currently available on
campus, in order to determine the range and quality of these services and whether
students' needs are being met. We decided to follow the AMS in limiting our study to
Faculty advising; department practices vary too widely to be easily summarized in a study
of this kind.
The Committee issued its own questionnaire, a copy of which is attached to this report as
Appendix A. Replies were received from almost all faculties and schools; we are grateful
to the colleagues who took the time and trouble to provide the information we sought.
The Committee would also like to thank the Vice-President Academic, the Vice-President
for Student and Academic Affairs, and the Director of the Student Resources Centre for
answering our questions.
4. Current advising policies and practices on campus
The services provided by academic advisers may be divided into two broad categories:
a) approvals: that is, granting (or denying) permission to students seeking admission
to particular courses or programmes; waiving requirements in special
circumstances; making decisions with respect to academic concessions (deferrals or
aegrotat status); making changes to students' programmes;
b) advising: that is, helping students select those courses which will be required to
satisfy degree programmes, or which may be prerequisites for admission to
graduate programmes; assisting students in the selection of appropriate minors;
interpreting faculty regulations governing degree requirements and academic
standing.
Faculty advisers sometimes provide other, "non-academic" services, such as career
counselling. For the most part, however, non-academic advising is dealt with by other
units in the University as described below in section 17.
 Vancouver Senate 11762
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
In its discussion of advising services, members of the Committee agreed that the system is
overburdened by regulations that warrant review. We should urge the Faculties to seek
ways to reduce the massive number of transactions advisers must deal with at present.
The Committee wondered, for example, why students must always obtain Faculty
approval if they wish to drop a course and receive a "W" standing; removal of this
requirement would save a great deal of time for both advisers and students.
RECOMMENDATION A: that Faculties and Schools be encouraged to re-examine their
academic procedures and regulations to determine where these might be revised and
simplified, thereby removing unnecessary burdens on the advising system.
5.   Academic advising in the Faculties
The majority of schools and faculties report that they provide academic advising at
regular, posted hours throughout the year (i.e., for 12 months). Many indicate that
advisers are available from 8:30 a.m. or 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. or later, five days a week.
A few units, such as Music, require students to make an appointment, but most provide
the service on a drop-in, first-come first-served basis. The Faculty of Commerce provides
drop-in advising three afternoons a week; students may also make an appointment to see
an adviser at other times. Some Faculties set up special lectures or workshops to provide
incoming students with basic information about first-year programme requirements; in
the spring of 1996 eight such sessions were organized by Arts, with assistance from the
School and College Liaison Office, and attracted over five hundred students.
Students responding to the AMS survey complained that advising hours were inadequate
in some Faculties, especially in Science, where the advising office closed between 12 noon
and 1:00 p.m. each day. However, the Committee learned that Science has responded to
this concern by changing its hours to accommodate students during their lunch break; the
new hours are Monday-Thursday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Friday 9:00-12:00.
The Faculty of Arts Advising Office is open from 9:30 a.m.-12:00 noon, and from 1:00
pm.-4:00 p.m. daily. Advising is available from 10:00 a.m.-12:00 a.m., and again from
2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.; at other times the office is open to deal with related matters (e.g.,
accepting add-drop forms). This schedule is currently under review. The Committee was
told that some "down time" was necessary to allow for the processing of the massive
number of transactions carried out each day. Members of the Committee recognized the
difficulties posed by large numbers of students requiring assistance; at the same time, they
felt that it was unreasonable to close the advising office just at the time when most
students are free, i.e., at lunchtime.
RECOMMENDATION B: that in both Winter and Summer Sessions all Schools and
Faculties post regular hours for advising, and that every effort be made to accommodate
students throughout the day, including at the lunch hour.
 Vancouver Senate 11763
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
6. Faculty advisers
Typically, a Faculty's advising services are administered by an Assistant or Associate
Dean, aided by a small number of faculty members. Several of the larger Faculties employ
a full-time staff member in their advising offices; several also hire student ("peer")
advisers. Sometimes it would appear that clerical staff are pressed into service as advisers;
however, at no time do they make academic decisions.
In several units, such as the School of Rehabilitation Medicine, students are assigned to a
faculty member who acts as their adviser for the time they are in the programme.
In their responses to our questionnaire, the Schools and Faculties indicated that a good
deal of care is taken in the selection of academic advisers. A few volunteer for the
position; most are nominated by Department Heads. Only faculty members with some
knowledge of Faculty and programme requirements, and who show some interest in
students' welfare, are appointed. The degree of training varies. In some Faculties, advisers
are given extensive preparation and orientation; in others, Faculty advisers learn "on the
job," with back-up from more experienced advisers or professional staff.
A recurring complaint by respondents to the AMS survey was that Faculty advisers did
not always seem to be well-enough informed to answer their questions or deal with their
problems. Allowing for a measure of exaggeration in such complaints, and for some
misunderstanding about a Faculty adviser's role, the fact remains that faculty members
are not always given sufficient preparation for their task; neither informal meetings with
other advisers nor on-the-job training are likely to provide a new adviser with the kind of
broad knowledge required. Faculty advisers need to be intimately acquainted with
programme and degree requirements in their own Faculty, and be able to identify the
appropriate academic choices that will help a student meet his or her professional goals;
they must also have a working knowledge of University regulations and the operation of
the Student Information System. They should have some knowledge of courses and
programmes in other Faculties, and be reasonably well informed about relevant transfer
programmes within the province.
Some Faculties and Schools go to considerable lengths to prepare faculty for their role as
advisers, giving them orientations, workshops, and (with assistance from the Registrar's
office) training on the Student Information System. In a few cases, faculty members who
are seconded to advising duties also receive teaching release, or an honorarium, in
recognition of the importance of this task. In smaller Faculties with slender resources,
advising must be done on a voluntary or ad hoc basis, depending on the goodwill or
availability of faculty members.
RECOMMENDATION C: that Faculty advisers be given appropriate training and
familiarized with all aspects of degree and programme requirements in their own Faculty,
as well as being provided with information about university regulations and the workings
of the Student Information System.
7. Information sources
It was agreed that advisers need to be provided with clear and up-to-date information to
enable them to carry out their duties effectively. The basic advising tool is the University
 Vancouver Senate 11764
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
Calendar: many Schools and Faculties have also developed their own handbooks which
provide both students and faculty members with clear information about programme
requirements. The Committee was especially impressed in this regard by the handbook
prepared by the School of Rehabilitation Sciences.
While much of the information required by advisers is relevant to their particular Faculty,
the Committee believes that all would benefit from the production of a handbook
containing basic information applicable in all Faculties, such as the functions of drop-add
forms and the correct method of completing the forms, the whereabouts and telephone
numbers of all advising offices, the names of senior advisers in every School and Faculty,
the various departments in the Registrar's office, etc. Advisers should also be familiar
with the many non-academic services and resources available to students at UBC (see
section 17 and Recommendation L), and these could be included in a general handbook
of the kind envisaged here.
RECOMMENDATION D: that the Faculties and Schools join with Student Services in
the production of a manual for advisers containing basic information concerning
academic requirements and non-academic resources and services.
8. University Calendar
Many respondents to our survey complained that students make little or no use of the
University Calendar, and are thus unfamiliar with basic requirements. However, the
Committee has some sympathy with students in this regard, insofar as the Calendar is not
a particularly user-friendly instrument. Members agreed that some attention needs to be
paid to its layout and organization, so that information is more easily accessed. Better
indexing and cross-referencing would be helpful too. Where schools and faculties provide
regular advising services, that information should be included in the Calendar and
appropriately indexed.
The Committee also observed that some of the information in the Calendar is redundant,
out of date, or merely confusing. The fault here lies primarily with the Faculties, which
need to work together to revise faulty entries, eliminate redundancies, and update their
entries better to reflect new or changed requirements.
RECOMMENDATION E: that the Registrar and the Faculties work together to make the
University Calendar a more useful instrument by updating all information and eliminating
redundancies, and by improving the general layout and organization of the Calendar's
contents.
9. Electronic advising
In addition to traditional sources of information (brochures, handbooks, etc.), many areas
of the University have turned to electronic means to assist students in their academic
planning. Telereg has taken over most of the business of registration, and we may
confidently expect much of the work of advisers will soon be performed by the computer.
Many Faculties, Schools and departments have already developed web pages, providing
information about programme requirements, courses offered or cancelled, Faculty
deadlines etc. The ease of access is obviously attractive; the advising office in Science, for
example, reports that between 300 and 400 students a month have accessed its web site
 Vancouver Senate 11765
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
since its inception in May 1996. A danger is that, without constant attention and revision, a
web page can rapidly become out of date and thus a source of misinformation; however, as
we become more used to this technology, such problems will be anticipated and dealt with.
Advising offices are also beginning to make more use of e-mail as a means of assisting
students on an individual basis. This is an excellent means of answering students' questions
and suggesting courses or programmes without lengthy delays or office lineups. Answering e-
mail messages is very time-consuming, however, and we should not expect advisers simply to
add this to their other duties. Also, since advisers' time should be spent on the more complex
issues, each Faculty should consider setting up an "FAQ" to address common problems.
Another approach to reduce a student's need to meet personally with an adviser is to increase
the availability of PACE (Programmed Academic Curriculum Evaluation), UBC's degree audit
programme that matches courses taken by a student to programme requirements. The
evaluation provides advisers with an up-to-date summary showing which requirements have
been met and which remain to be fulfilled. The programme also permits the creation of a
"what if?" scenario, showing what impact the selection of different courses might have on a
student's programme. Some Faculties (e.g., Science) already make PACE summaries available
to students. Clearly, providing students with such direct access to their record should enable
them to answer for themselves such questions as "Have I got all the prerequisites? Will this
course count towards my major? Have I met all degree requirements?" PACE could give them
this information directly, and relieve the pressure on advisers. The system does have its
drawbacks, however: Arts has experienced difficulties with PACE, in part because of the great
variety of courses in that Faculty which permits a greater flexibility in students' programmes
than is possible in most other Faculties. Nevertheless, once these problems have been
overcome, degree audit systems like PACE promise to be an invaluable tool for both students
and their advisers.
RECOMMENDATION F: that all Schools and Faculties investigate the application of
electronic sources to provide students with immediate and direct access to basic information
about their academic record and course or degree requirements.
10. Liaison between Faculties and Departments
The AMS survey reflected some unhappiness on the part of students about the failure of
Departmental advisers to provide adequate information concerning Faculty requirements, or
about Faculty advisers who knew relatively little on the subject of particular courses or
programmes within departments. A related complaint was that advisers in one Faculty or
Department rarely seemed to know much about courses offered in another, creating
difficulties for students interested in cross-disciplinary programmes.
Part of the difficulty here is the problem of determining boundaries. In most Faculties, first
and second-year students are advised by Faculty advisers, while third and fourth-year students
are handled by Departmental advisers. However, in many Departments, advisers will limit
themselves to checking only those requirements pertaining to a major or minor; for advice
concerning degree requirements or cross-disciplinary programmes, students will be sent off to
see a Faculty adviser. Given sufficient training and information, shouldn't a Departmental
adviser be able to handle at least the basic issues pertaining to degree requirements beyond a
major? Faculty advisers need to consult with their Departmental
 Vancouver Senate 11766
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
colleagues to clarify the lines of authority. At the very least, Departmental advisers should
be familiar with degree requirements and Faculty regulations, and should be able to refer
students to the appropriate office to receive necessary advice or approval. Similarly,
Faculty advisers should have a working knowledge of the majors offered in their Faculty,
and be able to send students to the appropriate Departmental advisers.
The Advising Office in the Faculty of Arts has recognized the importance of establishing
closer liaison with Departments, and has begun a series of meetings with Departmental
advisers to discuss problems and exchange ideas. This is an example that might usefully
be followed by other Faculties.
RECOMMENDATION G: that Faculty and Departmental advisers be more fully
apprised of the requirements in each others' areas, and that Faculty and Departmental
advisers be encouraged to consult on a regular basis.
11. Inter-faculty liaison
Related to the issue of Faculty/Department liaison is the need for Faculties to
communicate with each other concerning their respective requirements, and to discuss
possible links and connections. Our survey indicated that some Faculties and Schools do
consult with each other, usually at the decanal level, to deal with transfer requests or
admission policies. However, such consultations tend to be irregular and informal, and
have no impact on individual advisers who generally have little to do with programmes or
policies outside their own areas. The Committee agreed that, in addition to developing a
general advising manual of the kind suggested in section 7 above, the Associate Deans
responsible for advising (or their full-time staff advisers) should meet from time to time to
discuss common problems, iron out disagreements and differences, and familiarize
themselves with new or changing regulations in each others' Faculties. The information
gained here could then be passed on to Faculty and Departmental advisers through
updated guides or manuals.
RECOMMENDATION H: that the senior advisers in each School and Faculty meet
periodically to discuss advising policies and procedures, to exchange information about
new or changing programmes and requirements, and to coordinate advising activities
wherever possible.
12. Treatment of students
A significant area of concern in the AMS report is the attitude of Faculty advisers towards
students. According to at least some respondents to the AMS survey, advisers are often
unsympathetic, condescending, or intimidating. Stories about the rudeness encountered by
students are difficult to substantiate; some may be grounded in a student's frustration
rather than in an adviser's unfriendliness, others in misunderstanding about an adviser's
role or degree of authority. Nevertheless, the Committee recognizes that incidents of
rudeness may well have occurred, and that such complaints must not be ignored. Even
where a student may show irritation or impatience, advisers need to show respect and
considerateness. In an institution as large as UBC, students often feel lost or insignificant,
and the treatment received from an adviser may have an impact out of all proportion to
the adviser's intentions. With this in mind, advisers should always seek to respond
sympathetically to students' concerns.
 Vancouver Senate 11767
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
At the same time, students need to behave with respect and decorum towards faculty
members. As long as it is accompanied by an explanation, refusal by an adviser to
approve a programme or a course change should not be treated as a hostile act or as
evidence of unfriendliness. If an adviser refuses to grant programme approval because the
student lacks certain prerequisites or the appropriate standing, the adviser should not be
characterized as "unhelpful." Students should remember that they are bound by the
regulations of their Faculty, and that an adviser rarely has the power to override those
regulations.
RECOMMENDATION I: that there be a statement, either in the University Calendar or
in the proposed advisers' manual, reminding students and faculty members of the need for
mutual respect in the advising process.
13. Feedback from students
Of particular importance is the degree to which students feel that their concerns have
been heard and, where possible, addressed. Aside from complaints about unfriendly
treatment, students may have experienced frustrations caused by all sorts of bureaucratic
breakdowns or excesses. They should be given the opportunity to express their views and
offer suggestions about improving the process; this might be accomplished through the
development of a standardized survey, available in each Faculty and Departmental office
and in the Registrar's office, asking for feedback from students concerning their
experience of the system and their treatment by advisers. There is always the danger that
only dissatisfied students would respond, but this would be preferable to no response at
all. Faculty and Departmental advisers need to know where the problems are, so that they
may be dealt with.
RECOMMENDATION J: that, in order to enable students to express their views
concerning our advising services, a standardized survey or questionnaire be prepared by
the office of the Vice-President of Student and Academic Services and circulated to all
advising offices, and that student's responses be forwarded to Deans and Directors.
14. Centralized advising system
The Committee gave some attention to the question of whether UBC should move away
from the "distributed" advising system employed at present—that is, allowing each faculty
to offer its own advising services—towards a more centralized system of the kind
employed at Simon Fraser University. Under the latter model, many of the tasks currently
performed by Faculty advisers, such as assisting students with course or programme
selection or explaining degree requirements, could be handled by a central advising office
run by a full-time advising staff. Such an office might be operated under the auspices of
the Registrar, or as part of the School and College Liaison Office (which already provides
some academic counselling on an informal and unofficial basis).
While a centralized system might relieve Faculty advisers of some of their burden, we
suspect that a move in this direction would create more problems than solutions. To cope
with a student population the size of UBC's, as well as with the number and complexity
of our academic programmes, would require an increase in funding and personnel that the
 Vancouver Senate 11768
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
University could ill afford. It should be borne in mind that universities with centralized
advising services often have common core programmes for first-year students, greatly
simplifying the process of course selection. Centralized systems are also often built into a
university's academic structure at its inception, as was the case at Simon Fraser University.
For UBC to abandon its current practices in favour of a centralized model at this point in its
history could only be very disruptive and confusing, to say the least. Further, the introduction
of another level of bureaucracy might increase rather than reduce the difficulties encountered
by students, since it is highly unlikely that the Faculties would be ready to surrender complete
authority for academic decisions to a non-academic unit. On these grounds, we would not
recommend a change from the current system of advising by Faculties. If the Faculties can
improve communication with each other and with their departments, the present system may
be made more efficient and serve our students well.
15. Responsibility for advising policies and procedures
In its report to Senate, the AMS asked why the responsibility for advising lies with the Vice-
President Academic rather than with the Vice-president for Student and Academic Services.
Behind the question lies the obvious concern—one voiced at the "Your UBC" forum, as well
as in the AMS report—that a service of major importance to students does not seem to get the
attention or resources from one office that might be more readily obtained from another. The
explanation lies in the fact that advising is primarily to be understood as an academic activity,
falling under the authority of Deans and Directors, who in turn report to the Vice-President
Academic. Furthermore, annual budget allocations to the Faculties, including the resources
for advising, are routed through the office of the Vice-President Academic. The Vice-President
for Student and Academic Services does not have a budget that could be transferred to the
Faculties, and would be unable to provide any assistance to increase advising services.
There would seem to be no reason to move the responsibility for academic advising to the
portfolio of another Vice-President; at the same time, the Vice-President Academic and the
Vice-President for Student and Academic Services should confer periodically to make sure that
any problems in academic advising are being addressed, that the Faculties are applying
appropriate and consistent standards in academic advising, and that complaints by students
are being attended to.
RECOMMENDATION K: that the Vice-President Academic and the Vice-President for
Student and Academic Affairs confer periodically to discuss any problems relating to advising
policies and procedures.
16. Problems identified by advisers
The AMS survey reported complaints by students about the inefficiencies or inadequacies of
the present system of advising. Our own survey asked the question: "We have heard from
students about problems with advising; what are the problems as your advisers see them?"
The most frequently-cited problem was students' failure to familiarize themselves with the
information provided in the University Calendar or in materials made available by a Faculty
or Department. Much of an adviser's time is thus spent going over matters a student should
already know something about. A related concern is that students will often come to an
adviser without having given any thought to their academic goals, and expect the adviser to
make all decisions for them. The Committee agreed that students do bear some responsibility
here, and should prepare themselves appropriately before seeing an adviser.
 Vancouver Senate 11769
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
Administrators responding to the survey also expressed frustration at the heavy demands
upon their time and their staff. Small units like the School of Family and Nutritional Sciences
depend entirely on faculty members, who must add advising to their other duties. Some of the
larger Faculties like Arts and Education employ one or two full-time staff advisers, though
even here faculty members are pressed into service. In most cases there are insufficient
resources to increase the number of advisers or keep longer advising hours. This often results
in long lines of frustrated and unhappy students. One solution is to encourage students to
take advantage of advising services at times other than the first week or two of classes,
something that might be noted in the Calendar or in registration guides. Another is to provide
students with as much printed or on-line information as possible, to reduce their need to
obtain basic information in face-to-face interviews. Along these lines, the Faculty of Arts is
planning to introduce a self-guided graduation check, so that students can see at a glance
whether they are meeting requirements.
17. Non-academic advising
The AMS survey indicated that many students wanted Faculty advisers to provide career
counselling. While advisers should be familiar with the academic requirements for admission
into various professions, their task is to ensure that students are able and qualified to achieve
their academic goals. Career counselling requires a degree of preparation and training that,
outside the professional faculties, few faculty members possess; students should therefore be
alerted to the excellent career counselling service provided throughout the year by the Student
Resources Centre in Brock Hall.
A variety of units on campus assist students with non-academic concerns, including the
following:
School and College Liaison
Career Services
Counselling Services
International Student Services
First Nations House of Learning
Women Students' Office
Awards Office
Equity Office
Student Health Services
Disability Resources
AMS Speakeasy
Student Services Ombudsoffice
AMS Ombudsoffice
Some of these agencies work closely with Faculties and Schools to assist students achieve their
academic goals through the judicious selection of courses or programmes, but their primary
function is to serve students in other ways. Of especial importance is the consulting service
available to students with personal problems; Faculty advisers should be encouraged to refer
students to Counselling Services whenever they become aware that a student may be in
personal distress.
The Committee agreed with the view expressed in the AMS report, that advisers should be
familiar with these and other services available to students on campus, and be ready to direct
students to them as needed. The Director of the Student Resources Centre has
 Vancouver Senate 11770
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
indicated her willingness to work with the Faculties on improving advisers' awareness of
the various agencies on campus. The Centre has already collaborated with the Faculties of
Arts and Science in developing workshops and advising sessions for incoming and first-
year students.
RECOMMENDATION L: that all advising offices be provided with information about
the non-academic services available on campus, and that advisers draw students' attention
to these services as needed.
18. Action following this report
The Committee recognizes that some of the recommendations contained in this report
have already been acted upon by many Schools and Faculties. However, it is our hope
that Deans and Directors will re-examine their advising policies and procedures with a
view to making improvements wherever possible. To encourage such a step, the
Committee asks that Senate be kept informed about changes and improvements to
advising services on campus.
RECOMMENDATION M: that Deans and Directors be asked to report to the Vice-
President Academic the steps they have taken to implement the recommendations of the
Ad Hoc Committee; and that the Vice-President Academic report on this matter to Senate
by January 1999.
RECOMMENDATION N: that the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Advising,
having completed its task, be dissolved.
SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS:
RECOMMENDATION A: that Faculties and Schools be encouraged to reexamine their
academic procedures and regulations to determine where these might be revised and
simplified, thereby removing unnecessary burdens on the advising system.
RECOMMENDATION B: that all Schools and Faculties post regular hours for advising,
and that every effort be made to accommodate students throughout the day, including at
the lunch hour.
RECOMMENDATION C: that Faculty advisers be given appropriate training and
familiarized with all aspects of degree and programme requirements in their own Faculty,
as well as being provided with information about university regulations and the workings
of the Student Information System.
RECOMMENDATION D: that the Faculties and Schools join with Student Services in
the production of a manual for advisers containing basic information concerning
academic requirements and non-academic resources and services.
RECOMMENDATION E: that the Registrar and the Faculties work together to improve
the University Calendar by updating all information and eliminating redundancies, and by
improving the general layout and organization of the Calendar's contents.
 Vancouver Senate 11771
Minutes of November 12,1997
Appendix B
RECOMMENDATION F: that all Schools and Faculties investigate the application of
electronic sources to provide students with immediate and direct access to basic
information about their academic record and course or degree requirements.
RECOMMENDATION G: that Faculty and Departmental advisers be more fully
apprised of the requirements in each others' areas, and that Faculty and Departmental
advisers be encouraged to consult on a regular basis.
RECOMMENDATION H: that the senior advisers in each School and Faculty meet
periodically to discuss advising policies and procedures, to exchange information about
new or changing programmes and requirements, and to coordinate their advising
activities wherever possible.
RECOMMENDATION I: that there be a statement, either in the University Calendar or
in the proposed advisers' manual, reminding students and faculty members of the need for
mutual respect in the advising process.
RECOMMENDATION J: that, in order to enable students to express their views
concerning our advising services, a standardized survey or questionnaire be prepared by
the Registrar or the office of the Vice-President of Student and Academic Services and
circulated to all advising offices, and that students' responses be forwarded to Deans and
Directors.
RECOMMENDATION K: that the Vice-President Academic and the Vice-President for
Student and Academic Services confer periodically to discuss any problems relating to
advising policies and procedures.
RECOMMENDATION L: that all advising offices be provided with information about
the non-academic services available on campus, and that advisers draw students' attention
to these services as needed.
RECOMMENDATION M: that Deans and Directors be asked to report to the Vice-
President Academic the steps they have taken to implement the recommendations of the
Ad Hoc Committee; and that the Vice-President Academic report on this matter to Senate
by January 1999.
RECOMMENDATION N: that the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Advising,
having completed its task, be dissolved.

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