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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2003-03-19

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 THE UNIVERSITY  OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF MARCH 19, 2003
Attendance
Present: President M. C. Piper (Chair), Chancellor A. McEachern, Vice President B. C. McBride,
Dr. P. Adebar, Mr. R. Affleck, Mr. O. Alasaly, Dr. B. Bemmels, Dean J. Blom, Mr. P. T. Burns,
Dean J. A. Cairns, Dr. M. A. Cameron, Dr. J. Carolan, Dr. D. Cherchas, Dr. B. Crawford, Dr. J.
Dennison, Mr. C. Eaton, Dr. D. Fielding, Ms. M. Friesen, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Dr. D. Granot, Dr.
L. Gunderson, Dr. P. G. Harrison, Dr. R. Harrison, Dr. J. Hepburn, Ms. J. Hutton, Dr. J.
Johnson, Mr. D. Jones, Ms. J. Lau, Dr. V. LeMay, Ms. C. Lenis, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Dr. P. L.
Marshall, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dr. D. Paterson, Ms. C. Quinlan, Mr. J. Rogers, Dr. A. Rose, Dr.
H. J. Rosengarten, Dean J. N. Saddler, Mr. B. J. Silzer, Dean R. Sindelar, Mr. C. Ste-Croix, Dr. B.
Stelck, Dr. R. C. Tees, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dr. S. Thorne, Mr. D. Tompkins, Ms. G. Tsai, Mr. D.
Verma, Dean pro tem. L. Whitehead, Dr. R. Wilson, Dr. R. Windsor-Liscombe, Dean E. H. K.
Yen, Mr. M. Yung, Mr. C. Zappavigna.
Regrets: Ms. C. Bekkers, Prof. C. Boyle, Mr. P. T. Brady, Dr. J. Brander, Dr. L. Brinton, Dean N.
Gallini, Dean F. Granot, Mr. E. Greathed, Mr. R. Hira, Dr. R. Irwin, Dean M. Isaacson, Mr. P.
Kahlon, Dr. S. B. Knight, Dr. B. S. Lalli, Mr. M. Litchfield, Mr. G. Lloyd, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Ms. Y.
Lu, Dr. M. MacEntee, Dr. K. MacQueen, Dean D. Muzyka, Dr. P. Potter, Dean M. Quayle, Dr.
B. Rodrigues, Dr. C. Shields, Mr. B. Simpson, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Ms. L. Sparrow, Dean R.
Tierney, Dr. H. J. J. van Vuuren, Dr. M. Vessey, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky, Ms. S. Yim.
Senate Membership
DECLARATION OF VACANCY
One student representative from the Faculty of Forestry.
REPLACEMENT
Mr. Christopher Eaton replaced Ms. Michelle Hassen as student representative of the
Faculty of Arts.
Vol. 2002/03 13054
 Vancouver Senate 13055
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Dr. Tees l        That the minutes of the meeting of January 22,
Dr. Rosengarten J       2003 be approved as circulated.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
BUDGET AND CURRICULUM COMMITTEES: BRDG COURSE APPROVAL (PP. 13039-40)
In January 2003, a proposal to approve new courses BRDG 500, 501, 590, 600, 601 and
690 had been postponed, pending a report from the Budget Committee on the budgetary
implications of these new courses and the related "CIHR/MSHRF Strategic Training
Program to Bridge Public Health, Engineering and Policy Research" (hereinafter "Bridge
Program") superstructure. Dr. Adebar and Dr. Marshall had re-circulated the course
proposals and made a joint oral report, as respective Chairs of the Budget and Curriculum
Committees.
Dr. Adebar recalled that, at the January meeting of Senate, Vice President McBride had
asked whether the Curriculum Committee had explored the budgetary implications of the
Bridge Program, and Dr. Marshall had replied in the negative, explaining that the
Curriculum Committee did not consider budgetary review to fall within its mandate. After
discussion between the Budget and Curriculum Committees, it was agreed that there
should be a role for the Curriculum Committee in verifying that budgetary concerns had
been resolved before forwarding curriculum proposals to Senate for approval. Under the
new arrangement, proposing Deans could sign off on proposals with minimal or neutral
budgetary impact, whereas large-scale or potentially costly proposals would be forwarded
to the Vice President, Academic and Provost for budgetary approval prior to inclusion on
a Senate agenda.
Dr. Adebar clarified the nature of the Bridge Program as a graduate scholarship program,
as opposed to an academic or degree program. Bridge Program scholars would be
admitted into an
 Vancouver Senate 13056
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
existing UBC academic program, and they would be required to take two additional
graduate courses and complete an internship as part of their programs. Two safeguard
mechanisms had been incorporated into the Bridge Program: firstly, funds had been set
aside for hiring sessional instructors if none of the approximately 25 faculty members
involved with the Program were available to teach a given BRDG course; and secondly,
the School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene had agreed to take overarching
responsibility for the Bridge Program, including for ensuring that the courses were offered
as required.
Dr. Marshall l        That the six proposed new BRDG courses be
Dr. Adebar J       approved as circulated.
Carried.
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
FEDERAL BUDGET
The President recalled that the federal budget for 2003/2004 had been announced in
January 2003. The budget was described as "very significant" for Canadian universities,
and included a landmark commitment for ongoing funding for the indirect costs of
research. Although the target of 40% of research funding for indirect costs had not yet
been reached, the President was pleased to report an initial investment of $225 million;
she expressed optimism that the federal government's commitment in this area would
continue to grow. Canada's three major granting councils had received a funding injection
in the amount of $125 million. The Canada Graduate Scholarships program had been
established with an annual budget of $105 million in support of 2,000 master's and 2,000
Ph.D. students at Canadian universities. The Canada Foundation for Innovation had
received $500 million for hospital infrastructure, and the President was hopeful that
British Columbian hospitals would be able to attract 10% of those funds. Genome
Canada had received an additional $75 million.
 Vancouver Senate 13057
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Admissions Committee
STUDENT SENATORS
The President acknowledged and welcomed some student senators-elect, who were
visiting Senate prior to taking office on April 1. Many of the current student senators
were to complete their terms on Senate on March 31; the President thanked them for their
time, energy, expertise and interest in service to the Senate, and presented certificates to
the following departing senators.
Omar Alasaly: 2002 - 2003
Christina Bekkers: 2001 - 2003
Adam Campbell: 2001 - 2003
Michelle Hassen: 2000 - 2003
Derek Jones: 2002 - 2003
Paul Kahlon: 2002 - 2003
Jennifer Lau: 2002 - 2003
Christine Lenis: 2002 - 2003
Michael Litchfield: 2002 - 2003
Grayson Lloyd: 2001 - 2003
Yvette Lu: 2000 - 2001 and 2002 - 2003
David Tompkins: 1999 - 2003
Gina Tsai: 2001 - 2003
Scarlett Yim: 2002 - 2003
Michael Yung: 2002 - 2003
Admissions Committee
Dr. Rosengarten presented the reports, as Chair of the Committee.
CELPIP AND THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT
Note: The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
A report that proposed that UBC begin accepting the Canadian English Language
Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP) test for admission as part of the English Language
Proficiency
 Vancouver Senate 13058
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Admissions Committee
Requirement had been circulated. Dr. Rosengarten noted that Applied Research and
Evaluation Services (ARES) at UBC had developed the CELPIP suite of tests. The
Admissions Committee had discussed the possible use of CELPIP as an admissions test for
several years before finally granting its approval. Dr. Rosengarten described the CELPIP
as very similar to the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) with respect to marking,
standards, and security, and stated that Admissions Committee viewed it as fully meeting
the needs and expectations of the University.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That the CELPIP be added to the list of
Dr. P. G. Harrison J        approved tests of English Language
Proficiency for admission to the University.
In response to a query from Dr. Johnson, Dr. Rosengarten stated that he did not know
exactly how much students would be charged to write the test; he was optimistic that
CELPIP would be accessible to students via frequent offerings.
The Committee's second proposal was that Senate recognize the similarities between the
CELPIT-A portion of CELPIP and the LPI by not requiring students to write both tests.
Those students who present the CELPIP for admission, and who have achieved a level 5
or 6 on the essay portion of the CELPIT-A would not be required to take the LPI prior to
registration in first-year English Courses. Dr. Rosengarten pointed out that the
Committee had consulted with the English Department on this matter.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That the achievement of a score of not less
Dr. P. G. Harrison i        than 5 on the essay section of CELPIT-A be
added to the list of exemptions from the LPI
Requirement for First-year English.
Both motions
were put and
carried.
 Vancouver Senate 13059
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Admissions Committee
TERM-BASED ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
Please see also 'Appendix A: Term-based Academic Performance Evaluation.'
Dr. Rosengarten presented a proposal that the University begin evaluating student
performance at the end of each term, rather than at the end of each academic year. With
the number of students in part-time and cooperative education programs increasing, it
had become necessary to evaluate more frequently in order to provide students with clear
and regular information about their academic standing. The final three pages of the report
were intended as an example of the proposed changes only, and were not presented for
approval at that time. If the proposal were to be approved, each of the Faculties would be
required to update their Calendar entries to reflect a term-based model.
Dr. Rosengarten remarked that he was hopeful that term-based evaluations would soon
be conducted electronically, thereby reducing the amount of work for academic advisors.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That student academic performance
Dr. P. G. Harrison J        evaluations be conducted at the end of each
academic term, and that the associated
Calendar entry (on p. 2 of the proposal) be
approved.
Dr. Paul Harrison pointed out that term-based evaluation could only be implemented if
Enrolment Services were able to successfully automate the process. Mr. Silzer stated that
Enrolment Services had been involved in discussions about systems improvements in this
area, and that Enrolment Services was committed to providing the necessary support for
electronic evaluation.
The motion was
put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate 13060
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Admissions Committee
FORESTRY: ACADEMIC PROBATION
The following proposal had been circulated.
Academic Performance Continuation Requirement for B.S.F. Degree Students on Academic
Probation
Present Calendar Entry:
None.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Students registered in first year that attain a Winter Session average of at least 55.00% but less
60.00% may, at the discretion of the Adjudication, Advancement and Scholarship Committee,
be placed on Academic Probation. Students registered in subsequent years that attain a Winter
Session average of at least 50.00% but less 55.00% may, at the discretion of the Adjudication,
Advancement and Scholarship Committee, be placed on Academic Probation. Students
assigned Academic Probation in one session will be removed from Academic Probation if, in a
following Winter Session, they pass all courses and attain an average of at least 60% on a
minimum of 24 credits.
Rationale:
Currently, students registered in first year must achieve an overall average grade of at least
60% or be required to withdraw from the Faculty for at least one year. In subsequent years,
students who do not achieve an overall average of 55% will be required to withdraw from the
Faculty for at least one year. The Faculty of Forestry has been granting Academic Probation
on an ad hoc basis in the past. Implementing an Academic Probation policy for the B.S.F.
degree formalizes current practices and provides the option of allowing students the
opportunity to continue their studies. It also formalizes continuation requirements for those
students placed on Academic Probation, which has not existed in the past.
This policy specifically refers to the minimum sessional average required in a winter session, as
opposed to policy No.4 (page 233 col a) which notes that the passing mark in an individual
course in the Faculty of Forestry is 50.0%.
Effective Date:.September 1, 2003.
Dr. Rosengarten stated that this Calendar entry served to explain academic probation
policies in the Faculty, and formalized current practice.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That the Calendar statement from the Faculty
Dr. Marshall i        of Forestry on academic probation be
approved.
In response to a question from Dr. Carolan, Dr. Marshall agreed that the approval of
term-based evaluation a few minutes earlier affected the proposed Calendar entry. Dr.
Marshall stated that
 Vancouver Senate 13061
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Admissions Committee
Forestry would be required to amend its Calendar entries on advancement to reflect the
new policy, as would every other Faculty.
The motion was
put and carried.
 I
FORESTRY: LPI, DEGREE CONTINUATION AND ADVANCEMENT
The following proposal had been circulated.
Academic Regulation covering LPI Exam and degree continuation and advancement policy for
the Bachelor of Science in Forestry (BSF), Bachelor of Science (Forestry), Bachelor of Science
(Natural Resources Conservation) and Bachelor of Science (Wood Products Processing)
undergraduate degrees.
Present Calendar Entry: None
Proposed Calendar Entry:
(page 233, column b) (to be added to the end of the list as item #9)
9. Students who have not achieved an LPI score of 5 or 6 prior to completing 30 credits of
Forestry-eligible courses taken at UBC, will normally be required to withdraw from the
Faculty of Forestry. See Exemptions under Language Proficiency Index Requirements for First-
Year English in the section on Undergraduate Admission.
Rationale:
A formal Academic Regulation that covers degree advancement requirements for all Faculty of
Forestry undergraduate degrees will encourage students to complete the LPI exam in a timely
manner in order to meet the English requirements of each respective degree prior to the start
of second year. The Faculty of Forestry is one of the few faculties on campus without such a
policy. This policy creates a fairly standard LPI requirement across all undergraduate
programs at UB C.
In order to fairly accommodate both college transfer and high school students, the proposed
policy allows for all students, regardless of basis of admission, to register for up to 30 credits
of Forestry-eligible courses at UBC. An LPI score of 5 or 6 must be earned prior to the
completion of said credits.
Effective Date: September 1, 2003.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That Senate approve the proposed Calendar
Dr. Crawford J        entry from the Faculty of Forestry on the
Language Proficiency Index.
In response to a query from Dr. Gunderson, Dr. Rosengarten confirmed that the proposed
Calendar entry would need to be revised at a later date to include mention of the CELPIT-
A.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 13062
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Admissions Committee
MEDICINE: MD PROGRAM EXPANSION
The following report had been circulated for information.
MD Program Expansion
Please be advised that the Admissions Committee has considered and approved in principle a
proposal from the Faculty of Medicine to expand the MD program as outlined in the
description below. The description is for information only at this time. Any resultant changes
to admissions policy and/or any Calendar entries will be brought to Senate for approval at a
later date.
Faculty of Medicine, Admissions
The UBC Faculty of Medicine is planning an expansion to the MD undergraduate program in
collaboration with the University of Northern British Columbia in Prince George and the
University of Victoria to create a distributed program. The anticipated expansion in 2004 is to
an entry class size of 200, with 24 students each in the Northern Medical Program and the
Island Medical Program and an additional 24 students in the Vancouver/Mainland Medical
Program. Because of this planned expansion, the current admissions process is undergoing
change. There will be no change in the prerequisite and academic requirements. The interview
process is likely to be changed to a panel interview with three members, including a clinician,
an academic and a community member. The admissions process is likely to incorporate a new
evaluation process to determine the degree to which an applicant will "fit" into a rural context
of medical education.
For further information, continue to check for updates at www.med.ubc.ca.
Dr. Rosengarten stated that the Committee had met with Dr. Vera Frinton of the Faculty
of Medicine, who had outlined the principal changes involved in expanding the medical
school. The Admissions Committee had formally endorsed the changes, with the
recognition that some of the details were yet to be finalized and that Calendar entries
would be drafted and approved at a later date.
One of the pending changes to admissions was the introduction of a special "rural index,"
which would serve to identify students from rural areas, while not necessarily serving as
an advantage. Prof. Burns expressed interest in learning more about the rural index,
particularly with respect to how it could be pertinent but not advantageous. Dr.
Rosengarten agreed to provide more information on this topic when specific policy
changes were brought forward for approval.
 Vancouver Senate 13063
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Agenda Committee
Agenda Committee
SENATE COMMITTEE CHAIRS MEETING SUMMARY: ORAL REPORT
Dr. Gilbert briefed members of Senate about a February meeting of Chairs of all standing
committees of the Senate. Following suggestions by several senators that the Senate
schedule time for philosophical debate on issues of broad interest and become generally
more proactive, the Agenda Committee had convened the meeting of all Committee
Chairs to discuss the best use of Senate's time.
There was general consensus among the Chairs that Senate debate was most vigorous and
useful when it was associated with a requirement to respond to a matter at hand, and that
debate unrelated to a particular action item seemed unproductive. Much of the discussion
about specific topics should, in the opinion of Committee Chairs, continue to take place
first at the Department, Faculty, and committee levels before reaching Senate for
information or approval, such that the issues are considered and the appropriate people
consulted prior to the item appearing on a Senate agenda.
Dr. Gilbert cited the example of a request several years earlier by the School of Nursing to
become a faculty. The Academic Policy Committee had investigated the issues and
conducted consultation that informed the subsequent Senate debate. Senate Committee
Chairs were hopeful that the practice of referring issues to Committees prior to placing
them for discussion or approval by Senate would continue. Dr. Gilbert pointed out that
either the Agenda Committee or the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services
could be called upon to assist in matching issues to appropriate Committees of Senate.
Committee Chairs identified the following issues for possible future discussion:
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of March 19,2003
13064
Curriculum Committee
• The changing role of the Library, particularly in light of the proliferation of
electronic resources and the construction of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.
• The governance and academic value of non-thesis graduate programs.
• The jurisdiction of the Senate Committee on Student Appeals on Academic
Discipline.
• The UBC Learning Exchange, community service learning in general and global
citizenship.
Dr. Gilbert stated that the Committee Chairs planned to meet biannually in future.
Curriculum Committee
Please see also 'Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary.'
Dr. Marshall presented the reports, as Chair of the Committee.
FACULTY OF ARTS
Dr. Marshall
Dr. Tees
That the proposed nine new courses from the
Faculty of Arts be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF LAW
Dr. Marshall drew attention to the fact that Chancellor Allan McEachern had agreed to
supervise the delivery of a new course entitled "Advanced Trial Advocacy."
Dr. Marshall
Dean Blom
That the curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Law be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Dr. Marshall
Dean Saddler
That the curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Forestry be approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 13065
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Curriculum Committee
SCHOOL OF NURSING
Dr. Marshall l        That the curriculum reports from the School of
Dr. Tees i       Nursing be approved.
Dr. Carolan pointed out that the vector for NURS 432, (2-10-12) seemed odd, given the
allocation of only six credits for the course. Dr. Thorne stated that she would check into
the contact hours for the course, adding that she believed that the correct vector was more
likely 2-0-12.
The motion was
put and carried.
GRADUATE STUDIES
Master of Management
Dr. Marshall stated that this new program, offered by the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration under the auspices of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, would
resemble a Master of Business Administration (MBA), albeit with a narrower
management focus.
Dr. Marshall l        That the proposed new Master of Management
Dr. Bemmels i        and associated new courses be approved.
Mr. Tompkins asked whether the new program would reside solely within the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration, and if so, whether Master of Management (MM)
students would be considered students of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. He had
recently been surprised to learn that administrative responsibility for the MBA program
had been transferred from the Faculty of Graduate Studies to the Faculty of Commerce,
and asked why this significant change had not first come to Senate for approval. Dean
Granot confirmed that responsibility for MBA admissions and student services had been
transferred to the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration for a trial period of
three years; at the end of the trial period, the Dean expected that a recommendation
would come to Senate for approval. Vice President McBride stated that he believed both
MBA and MM students to be students of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, even
 Vancouver Senate 13066
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Curriculum Committee
though Commerce was managing admissions and the dean of the Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration would read the names of graduates at convocation. In
response to a further question from Mr. Tompkins, Vice President McBride stated that he
believed that MBA and MM students were eligible to receive University Graduate
Fellowships.
In response to a question from Dr. Carolan, Dr. Bemmels stated that the proposed 1.5-
credit course modules were reflective of current practice in the MBA program.
There was some discussion about the name of the degree. Dr. Bemmels stated that the
Faculty had also considered naming the degree a "Master of Business" or a "Master of
Commerce," but that the "Master of Management" was more commonly understood.
The motion was
put and carried.
Arts Graduate Cooperative Education Program
Dr. Marshall presented three new cooperative education courses for approval, noting that
these courses would be taken in addition to the required courses for Master's degree
programs.
Dr. Marshall l        That the proposed Arts Graduate Cooperative
Dr. Tees J       Education Program and related courses be
approved.
In response to a question from Mr. Ste-Croix, Dr. Marshall confirmed that participation
in the cooperative education program, which was optional, would undoubtedly extend
time to degree completion. Tuition fees were to be determined similarly to existing
cooperative education courses. Students were to have some flexibility regarding the
number of cooperative work placements sought.
The motion was
put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate 13067
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Student Awards Committee
Miscellaneous Courses and Specialization
Dr. Marshall l        That the remaining graduate curriculum
Dean Granot J        proposals be approved.
Carried.
Student Awards Committee
Please see also 'Appendix C: New Awards.'
Dr. Thompson presented the new awards for approval, stating that they represented more
than $34 000 in annual funding for students.
Dr. Thompson i        That the list of awards be accepted and
Dean Granot J       forwarded to the Board of Governors for
approval, and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried.
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
ENROLMENT TARGETS FOR 2003 - 2004
Note: the full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate and Curriculum Services.
Vice President McBride stated that the Admissions Committee had reviewed the proposed
enrolment figures and had approved them in principle. Dr. Rosengarten added that the
Admissions Committee had voiced some concern about the endemic problem of steadily
increasing the number of students admitted to UBC, particularly in light of already-
overcrowded classes.
Vice President McBride reminded members of Senate that managing enrolment was a
complicated process. The only control mechanism was intake into first, second, and third
years, while the return rate of admitted students was variable and beyond the University's
control. He invited
 Vancouver Senate 13068
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Ms. Sham Pendleton, Associate Director, Planning and Institutional Research (PAIR), to
give a presentation on the enrolment planning cycle.
Ms. Pendleton gave an overview of the enrolment management process, stating that the
cycle customarily began with a "snapshot" of enrolment statistics taken from the Student
Information System (SIS) on November 1: a date chosen to follow the majority of course
add and drop activity. For 2002/2003, the University planned to enroll 621 full time
equivalent (FTE) students over the funded model, but ended the year over-enrolled by an
estimated 1586 FTE's. The variance was related to an unanticipated increase in summer
enrolment, and the recrediting of a large number of courses in the Faculty of Science, in
addition to a variety of other small incremental changes.
Following the capture of data from the SIS, PAIR then built a forecast model for the
following year for each program, with the goal of matching enrolment to funded levels as
closely as possible. To control intake, an initial grade point average for admission was set
at this stage in the process. PAIR submitted the forecast model to the Committee of Deans
and the Enrolment Management Committee for discussion and approval, and then the
Admissions Committee and Senate reviewed the final targets for approval.
Discussion
In response to a question, Ms. Pendleton stated that college transfer applications were
expected to increase for 2003/2004. More accurate data was to be captured following the
March 31 application deadline. Dr. Dennison expressed apprehension about the planned
decrease in college transfer admissions relative to high school admissions, particularly in
light of the increase in applications. Ms. Pendleton stated that adjustments had been made
to college transfer enrolment targets in order to balance a significant first year over-
enrolment the previous year.
 Vancouver Senate 13069
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Dr. Tees was pleased to note that the two-year plan featured a reduction in the number of
unfunded undergraduate students. Although he understood why it was better to be over-
than under-enrolled, he stated that the extra students represented real costs with respect
to teaching, advising, etc. Vice President McBride agreed that enrolment management was
a delicate balancing act; while the University did not wish to turn away large numbers of
qualified students, it could not sanction even larger over-enrolments. It was agreed that
the University should continue to make this problem apparent to the provincial
government.
With respect to the Ontario "double cohort," Ms. Pendleton confirmed that UBC was
experiencing an increase in applications from Ontario, but that the increase had not been
in such a large order to be of concern. Mr. Tompkins stated that, because Ontario
universities would experience increased application pressure, many of the British
Columbian students who would normally go to Ontario would not be successful in
finding a place there.
In response to a question from Mr. Affleck, Vice President McBride stated that it would
be very difficult to increase the number of admissions into the MD program for
2003/2004 because the program was so expensive to deliver. He referred to the earlier
report on the planned expansion of the medical school for 2004.
Dr. Windsor-Liscombe encouraged the University to reexamine the current thinking about
GPA's as indicators of student success. He noted that, although GPA's for admission had
increased significantly in the past several years, he had not noticed a correlation in the
caliber of students admitted. Vice President McBride disagreed, stating that lower preadmission GPA's resulted in a much higher first-year failure rate in the Faculty of Science,
and expressing the opinion that first-year students appeared to be better qualified in
recent years.
 Vancouver Senate 13070
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Dr. Adebar agreed that the number of unfunded students constituted a burden for the
University. He asked whether a waitlist system for admission might alleviate some of the
over-enrolment. Mr. Silzer stated that the practice of placing qualified students "on
hold," rather than immediately offering them admission, served this purpose. Due to
spikes in first year enrolment in previous cycles, one solution would be to decrease
enrolment even more significantly while the over-enrolment moved through the system.
Mr. Silzer stated that most Faculties, however, would find the resultant high GPA's
unacceptable. He added that, for such a large university, an over-enrolment of one
percent was not unreasonable.
Dr. Gilbert acknowledged the tremendous job done by PAIR and the Enrolment
Management Committee, stating that the projections and explanations had been
presented in a much clearer fashion than in previous years. President Piper stated that,
although there were still challenges ahead, Ms. Pendleton, PAIR, and the enrolment
management team had made huge strides forward.
Vice President McBride    l        That the 2003/2004 academic year enrolment
Dr. Tees i        intake targets be approved.
Carried.
iCAPTURE CENTRE IN THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Vice President McBride circulated a proposal to approve the establishment of the
iCapture Centre, an exciting initiative seeking innovative solutions to heart, lung, and
blood vessel disease.
 Vancouver Senate 13071
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
The new Centre was to replace the Vancouver Vascular Biology Research Centre and the
Respiratory Disease Centre.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Cairns i        iCapture Centre in the Faculty of Medicine,
and the disestablishment of the Vancouver
Vascular Biology Research Centre and the
Respiratory Disease Centre in the Faculty of
Medicine.
Carried.
DRAFT ACADEMIC VISION OF THE GREAT NORTHERN WAY CAMPUS
Note: The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Vice President McBride had circulated a draft vision for the Great Northern Way
Campus, which had been prepared by the Great Northern Way Academic Committee
(made up of representatives from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design, the BC
Institute of Technology, Simon Fraser University, and UBC). Those institutions' respective
presidents had reviewed the draft. Following discussion at the March meetings of Senate
and the Board of Governors, as well as consultation with the academic, business, and arts
communities, Vice President McBride was hopeful that more detailed academic and
business plans would be presented to Senate for approval by May 2003.
The Vice President gave an overview of the 6.6-hectare campus location in the False
Creek flats. The objective was to build a unique and collaborative centre of excellence on
the site. He acknowledged that some of the draft vision was very general, stating that
more detail would be available as the vision developed. The academic focus was to be on
high-technology, multi-disciplinary, inter-institutional programming. Subject areas were
to include new media, the entertainment arts, architectural design, applied business,
environmental technology, and
 Vancouver Senate 13072
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
bioinformatics. Although the nature of specific credentials was yet to be articulated,
offerings were to be diverse, ranging from single courses to certificates, diplomas, and
degrees. The curriculum was envisioned as problem-, team-, and project-based. E-learning
possibilities were being considered. Research programs were to be collaborative as well,
involving academics, industry, government, and the arts.
Dr. Cherchas asked whether academic program development would be driven by the four
institutions together, or each of them independently. Vice President McBride responded
that it was his hope that the planning would take place in a collaborative fashion. He
confirmed that some of the credentials might be jointly offered by two or more
institutions.
Dr. Windsor-Liscombe suggested that some external funding might be sought in support
of looking at collaborative programming, and that an organization like the Canadian
Mortgage and Housing Corporation might sponsor an international design competition
for the new campus.
Dr. Tees pointed out that, although teleconferencing and highspeed connectivity would
enhance interaction between UBC campuses, the success of GNW would also require
movement of people between campuses. He urged the proposers to consider
transportation ideas and the related financial implications.
Dr. McBride thanked members of Senate for their comments and requested that they feel
free to forward any additional ideas to his office.
IMPACT OF JOB ACTION: ORAL REPORT
Vice President McBride gave an update on the operations of a committee that had been
meeting weekly to consider academic issues related to CUPE job action. Committee
members included student senators, the Associate Vice President, Academic Programs,
several deans, the Chair of
 Vancouver Senate 13073
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Adjournment
the Academic Policy Committee, and the Vice President, Students. One key issue for
discussion had been how to best communicate strike information to students, faculty and
staff. The Vice President acknowledged the work done by Dr. Guppy in drafting helpful
documentation.
The Vice President was optimistic that, if there were to be no additional job action,
students would be able to complete their term on time. The Faculty of Arts, among other
Faculties, had expressed concern about delivering the minimum necessary instruction by
term end, but barring further disruption, there was general consensus that it could be
done. If job action continued to disrupt classes, the committee had agreed to discuss
alternative exam scheduling possibilities.
Mr. Tompkins lodged the complaint that the Office of the Vice President, Academic
website displayed policy language that had not been approved by Senate. He stated that
students were confused, and wished clarification about what exactly was required of
them. He also requested that students be advised to appeal decisions related to their
academic standing and job action to the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic
Standing.
There was some discussion about the time period during which students were required to
inform their respective deans of a decision not to cross picket lines, and ensuring that
consistent messages were given to students.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The next regular meeting of
Senate was scheduled for April 16, 2003.
 Vancouver Senate 13074
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix A: Term-based Academic Performance Evaluation
Appendix A: Term-based Academic Performance Evaluation
INTRODUCTION
Each Faculty at UBC currently uses an academic performance evaluation scheme to review
each student's academic performance at the end of every winter session, although
different terms such as "Advancement" and "Unsatisfactory Performance" may be used.
The Faculty of Science has also approved a policy for evaluating students at the end of the
summer session. A student who does not pass the academic performance evaluation,
typically because the student's average over the session is below some threshold value, is
required to discontinue from his or her Faculty for a year or, if the student has failed a
second academic performance evaluation, to withdraw from the University. A session-
based academic performance evaluation scheme has worked well over the years so long as
most students studied full-time over each winter session until they graduated. The odd
exceptions were dealt with on an individual basis.
However, the number of exceptions has risen recently for a variety of reasons: more
students are studying part-time, there is an increase in the number of courses taken during
the summer session and some students are spending one term of the winter session on a
co-operative education work-term. Continuing the practice of handling these exceptional
cases on an individual basis has a number of disadvantages: students are unsure of their
status until a decision has been made, faculty and staff have to spend considerable time
handling these individual cases and there is greater room for inconsistencies between the
outcomes of the evaluations for different students.
A possible solution to this problem is to replace the current academic performance
evaluation scheme with a scheme whereby academic performance is evaluated three times
per year: at the end of each term of the winter session and at the end of the summer
session. The following proposal outlines a term-based academic performance evaluation
scheme. The guidelines that were followed in developing this proposal included that:
• the results of applying the proposal should be the same as the current session-based
academic performance evaluation scheme for the majority of students taking a full
course load over the winter session,
• the scheme should be easy to describe to and easy to be comprehended by students,
• the scheme should be consistent across the University but be flexible so that it
could be adapted to the needs of individual Faculties and
• the evaluations should be performed with no, or only limited, manual intervention
in order to minimize the work of the staff and faculty of the University.
 Vancouver Senate 13075
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix A: Term-based Academic Performance Evaluation
PROPOSED CALENDAR STATEMENT
The Calendar will need to be amended in the general University Academic Regulations
section and in each Faculty's section on ACADEMIC REGULATIONS.
The following two sections will appear in the general University ACADEMIC
REGULATIONS section (2001/02 Calendar, Page 38, Column 1) preceding Advancement
Regulations. In addition, the existing section on ADVANCEMENT REGULATIONS
must be modified.
Academic Standing
There are three levels of academic standing:
• In Good Standing,
• On Academic Probation and
• Failed.
All students on initial entry to the University are In Good Standing. The academic
standing of a student may change to On Academic Probation or Failed as the result of
academic performance evaluations, as described below.
A student On Academic Probation may have restrictions placed on his or her registration
as described in each Faculty's section on ACADEMIC STANDING. A student who had
been required to discontinue his or her studies and later successfully appealed for
readmission will be placed On Academic Probation.
A student who receives an academic standing of Failed will be required to discontinue his
or her studies for 12 months. Normally, the student will be required to discontinue his or
her studies starting immediately. However, a student registered in and attending one or
more courses will be permitted to complete those courses if the determination of an
academic standing of Failed is only made after the last date for withdrawal without a
"W" being recorded on the transcript.
A student appealing to be permitted to continue his or her studies immediately despite
having received an academic standing of Failed may not register for or attend courses
while awaiting the results of the appeal, except as noted above. Therefore, a student On
Academic Probation should maintain contact his or her faculty advisor in case any
circumstances arise that might adversely affect academic performance.
Academic Performance Evaluations
The following description of the academic performance evaluation process applies to
students in all Faculties not having separate regulations. Academic performance evalu-
 Vancouver Senate 13076
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix A: Term-based Academic Performance Evaluation
ation also does not address the issue of academic progress toward a particular degree or
promotion from one year level to the next.
Academic performance evaluations are performed for each student up to three times per
year: at the end of each term of the winter session and at the end of the summer session.
No evaluation is performed if a student has taken no credit courses since the last
evaluation, or if the number of credits taken is less than some minimum number specified
by the Faculty in which the student is registered. Otherwise, the total number of credits
attempted since the last academic performance evaluation, the fraction of those credits
that were passed and the credit-weighted average are computed. Those three quantities,
plus the current academic standing of the student, are used to determine the new academic
standing of the student according to a table. (Refer to each Faculty's section on
ACADEMIC STANDING for the appropriate table.)
Courses are only included in an academic performance evaluation once a final grade has
been assigned. For example, courses for which a deferred examination has been granted
will be considered within the academic performance evaluation for the period in which
the deferred examination is written.
Advancement Regulations
Items 4 must be deleted. That item specifies that only those courses that are applicable
toward a student's degree will be included in the calculations of the academic
performance evaluation. In fact, that regulation is routinely ignored and all courses
attempted are considered toward an academic performance decision because it is very
time-consuming to determine which courses are not applicable toward a student's degree.
Each Faculty must also amend its Calendar entry to complement the new sections in the
general University ACADEMIC REGULATIONS. The following example is for the
Faculty of Applied Science.
The following sections will replace the ADVANCEMENT section (2001/02 Calendar,
pagel05, Column 1).
Academic Standing
An academic performance evaluation will be performed on each student at the end of each
term of the winter session and at the end of the summer session as described under
Academic Performance Evaluations (page 38). No academic performance evaluation is
conducted on a student who has taken 3 or fewer credits, excluding co-operative
education work terms, since the last academic performance evaluation. The following
tables determine the academic standing of a student following an academic
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of March 19,2003
13077
Appendix A: Term-based Academic Performance Evaluation
performance evaluation based on the current academic standing, the credited-weighted
average (AVG) and the percentage of the credits passed (CP).
Table 1: Academic Standing
(> 3 and <=12 credits attempted)
Current Academic
Standing
Academic Performance
New Academic
Standing
In Good Standing
AVG >= 50% and CP >=
50%
In Good Standing
AVG <= 50% or CP <= 50%
On Academic Probation
On Academic Probation
AVG >=65% and CP = 100%
In Good Standing
AVG <= 50% or CP <= 50%
Failed
otherwise
On Academic Probation
Table 2: Academic Standing
(>12 credits attempted)
Current Academic
Standing
Academic Performance
New Academic
Standing
In Good Standing
AVG >= 55% and CP >=
65%
In Good Standing
AVG <= 55% or CP <= 65%
On Academic Probation
On Academic Probation
AVG >= 60% and CP =
100%
In Good Standing
AVG <= 55% or CP <= 65%
Failed
otherwise
On Academic Probation
A student who is On Academic Probation is restricted to taking no more than 15 credits
in either term of the winter session or no more than 12 credits during the summer session
as applicable. That student must also meet with the appropriate undergraduate student
advisor within the first two weeks of the start of each term of the winter session and
within the first two weeks of the summer session if the student is registered in any
academic courses at that time.
A student who receives an academic standing of On Academic Probation for three
consecutive academic progress evaluations will be required to discontinue from the
Faculty for at least 12 months.
(There are also a number of other minor changes that would need to be made to the
Faculty of Applied Science section of the Calendar that have been omitted because they
are incidental to this example.)
 Vancouver Senate 13078
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix A: Term-based Academic Performance Evaluation
COMMENTARY
This proposal has been prepared as a University-wide change in the process for academic
performance evaluations for two reasons:
• The University-wide change will maintain consistency across the University, which
is more fair to the students and makes it easier for them to understand the
consequences of any academic outcome.
• Academic performance evaluations are carried out, at least in the majority of cases,
by Enrollment Services. A consistent approach to academic evaluations allows that
service to be developed and supported more efficiently.
The proposal has a great deal of flexibility built into the overall structure so that
individual Faculties can adapt this approach to their own particular circumstances. Areas
of flexibility include:
• the range of the number of credits attempted for each different table,
• the averages and percentages of credits passed for each change in academic
standing,
• the addition of other factors such as successful completion of specific courses to
the tables and
• the number of consecutive times a student could remain On Academic Probation
before being required to discontinue.
The main difference, of course, between the way academic performance evaluations are
currently performed and this proposal is the frequency of the evaluations, which has been
increased from once to three times per year. The change in frequency is good for students
because those who are performing poorly will receive a formal warning, in the form of an
academic standing of On Academic Probation before being asked to discontinue their
studies. This approach would also be more fair to students because it would account for
partial course loads, non-academic winter terms and courses taken during the summer
session.
If no change were made to the way in which academic performance evaluations were
performed, then there would be an increase in the workload for those who perform the
evaluations. However, changes in the way evaluations are performed and the integral role
of Enrollment Services in developing the evaluation approach will allow a greater amount
of the work to be done without manual intervention.
The use of different tables for determining academic standing depending on the number of
credits attempted allows the rules to be adjusted for the course load. For instance, there is
likely to be a wider variation in the average grade if fewer credits have been attempted.
The previous tables for the Faculty of Applied Science reflect that fact
 Vancouver Senate 13079
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix A: Term-based Academic Performance Evaluation
by making it more difficult for a student to change his or her academic standing if only a
limited number of courses were taken. The minimum average to change from On
Academic Probation to In Good Standing is higher while the maximum average to change
to Failed has been lowered if the student is only taking a few credits compared with a full
course load. In the extreme in which only one course is taken, the results of that course
are carried over until the next academic performance evaluation.
The current regulations, in some cases, mix the ideas of academic performance evaluation
and of academic progression toward a degree goal. This proposal separates the two ideas,
making continued participation at the University dependent solely on academic
performance on all courses taken, whether those courses are applicable to the student's
declared degree goal or not. It may be necessary for some Faculties to also rewrite their
Calendar entries concerning academic progression if currently the same regulations cover
both subjects. For instance, the Faculty of Applied Science enforces a timeline for passing
the Faculty's English language requirements by restricting the level of courses for which a
student may register until the English language requirements have been met. The
alternative would have been to have required the student to withdraw from the Faculty if
the timeline were not met, an approach that would have mixed the ideas of academic
performance evaluation and academic progress toward a degree.
The proposed scheme also removes one potential roadblock if the University should
choose to switch to a semester-based registration approach from the current session-based
approach.
 Vancouver Senate 13080
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE: SCHOOL OF NURSING
NURS 416, 421, 432
FACULTY OF ARTS
GERM 319
ECON 221, 226, 255, 335
GEOG 353
HIST 429, 487
PHIL 464
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
FRST 352
WOOD 288
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Master of Management: new program
BAFI 522
BAIT 515, 516, 521, 523, 525, 527
Master of Arts Cooperative Education Option: new program option
ASTU 501, 502, 503
APSC 541
CNPS 566
GEOG 511
HIST 585
LLED 574
PETE 585
Joint M.Ed, in Curriculum Studies and Educational Administration and Leadership:
new specialization
Institute of Asian Research
IAR 506, 507
Institute for European Studies
IEST 505, 531
 Vancouver Senate 13081
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
BRDG 500, 501, 590, 600, 601, 690
School of Social Work
SOWK 526
FACULTY OF LAW
LAW 335, 472
 Vancouver Senate 13082
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix C: New Awards
Appendix C: New Awards
Barbara BLUMAN Memorial Prize in Dispute Resolution: Prizes totalling $300 have been
endowed by friends and colleagues in memory of Barbara Bluman (L.L.B. 1975) for students in
the Faculty of Law who have achieved high standing in dispute resolution. The awards are made
on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (First awards available for the 2002/2003
academic year.)
Evert BOXTART Memorial Award in Physical Therapy: A $1,000 award has been endowed in
memory of Evert Boxtart by his family for students in the Physical Therapy program. The award
is made on the recommendation of the School of Rehabilitation Sciences to a student who has
completed his or her clinical education with distinction and has demonstrated initiative and
compassion through volunteer activities in the community. (First award available for the
2003/2004 academic year.)
Sarah BRABYN Memorial Service Award: A $1,000 service award has been endowed in memory
of Sarah Brabyn, who was at the time of her passing in 2002 a student in her final year of study in
the Occupational Therapy Program at UBC. The award is offered to a student in Occupational
Therapy who has good academic standing, especially in the area of biomechanical occupational
therapy, and has demonstrated the qualities exemplified by Sarah: leadership, community
involvement, and a strong collegial spirit. The award is made on the recommendation of the
School of Rehabilitation Sciences. (First award available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
COMMERCE Undergraduate Society Bursary: Bursaries totalling $5,000 are offered by the
Commerce Undergraduate Society of UBC for undergraduate students in the Bachelor of
Commerce Program. (First awards available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
Christina Lim HUCKVALE Memorial Award: A $2,500 award has been endowed by family and
friends in memory of Christina Lim Huckvale, a student in Metals and Materials Engineering at
The University of British Columbia who died in a hiking accident in 2002. The award is made on
the recommendation of the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering, with preference to
an undergraduate female engineering student in third or fourth year. In addition to having high
academic standing, the recipient should share Christina's passion for life and learning as well as
her involvement in extra-curricular and volunteer activities. (First award available for the
2003/2004 academic year.)
LANGUAGE and Literacy Education Prize: A $275 prize has been endowed by alumni and
friends of the Department of Language and Literacy for a new masters or doctoral student in the
Faculty of Education who is focusing on English as a second language. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Department of Language and Literacy. (First award available for the
2003/2004 academic year.)
Perry T. LESLIE Prize in Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing: A $500 prize is offered in
honour of Perry T. Leslie by his family, friends and colleagues to students in the Master of
Education or Master of Arts Programs in Special Education who are specializing in education of
the deaf and hard of hearing. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Education, Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education. (First
award available for the 2002/2003 academic year.)
 Vancouver Senate 13083
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix C: New Awards
Joyce A. McRAE Memorial Bursary in Education: A $300 bursary has been endowed by family,
colleagues and friends in memory of Joyce A. McRae for a student in the Bachelor of Education
(Elementary) Program. Joyce A. McRae, born on a farm in Agassiz, B.C., was a world traveler
and a Faculty of Education professor who began her teaching career in one-room schools and
shared her love of education with the many student teachers at UBC. (First award available for the
2003/2004 academic year.)
MEAKIN Family Award: A $2,500 award has been endowed by the Meakin families in
recognition of family involvement in real estate since 1912. The award is offered to an
undergraduate student in Urban Land Economics with good academic standing who has
demonstrated strong leadership skills through extra-curricular activities. The award is made on
the recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration. (First award
available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
Janet and Ernest MIDDLETON Memorial Bursary: Bursaries totalling $6,800 have been endowed
through a bequest by Janet Ross Middleton for students in the second year or higher of the
Master of Architecture or Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture Programs. (First awards
available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
Hy and Lee SCHECHTER Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $2,200 have been endowed in
honour of Hy and Lee Schechter for students entering the final year of graduate studies in the
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology who combine academic excellence with
contributions to the University and to improvements in health in communities. The award is made
on the recommendation of the Department of Health Care and Epidemiology. (First awards
available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
Gordon SELMAN Award: A $275 award has been endowed in honour of the contribution of
UBC Professor Gordon Selman. The award is made on the recommendation of the Adult and
Higher Education Faculty members of the Department of Educational Studies to students enrolled
in or graduating from the Adult Education Graduate Program who have made a contribution to
the understanding of the social or historical foundations of adult education in Canada. (First
award available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
J. Harry G. SMITH Award in Forest Resources Management: Awards totalling $5,000 have been
endowed by Gilbert Smith Forest Products Ltd. of Barriere, B.C. in memory of Dr. J. Harry G.
Smith, a professor at the UBC Faculty of Forestry for forty years who made major contributions
to growth and yield research. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Forestry to undergraduate students transferring into third year from another college or university
or to students entering fourth year of the Forest Resources Management Program. Criteria for
selection include good academic standing, leadership and participation in outdoor activities.
Preference is given to students who have graduated from B.C. secondary schools outside the
Greater Vancouver Regional District or the Capital Region District and are Canadian citizens or
Permanent Residents. (First awards available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
J. Harry G. SMITH Scholarship in Forest Resources Management: A $5,000 scholarship has been
endowed by Gilbert Smith Forest Products Ltd. of Barriere, B.C. in memory of Dr. J. Harry G.
Smith, a professor at the UBC Faculty of Forestry for forty years who made major contributions
to growth and
 Vancouver Senate 13084
Minutes of March 19,2003	
Appendix C: New Awards
yield research. The scholarship is awarded to a graduate student undertaking research relevant to
growth and yield at a UBC research forest or in forested areas in the interior. In the event that
there is no qualified graduate student, the scholarship may shared equally between two
undergraduate students in the Forest Resources Management or Forest Operations Programs.
Preference is given to Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents. The scholarships are made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation
with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First award available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
Daniel ULINDER Scholarship: A $1,000 scholarship has been endowed by friends and colleagues
of Dan Ulinder in recognition of his promotion of real estate education and his pre-eminent role in
developing marketing models for condominiums in Canada. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration to students studying
real estate or marketing in the Faculty. (First award available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
John WORRALL "Tree Enthusiast" Prize: Prizes totalling $500 have been endowed by colleagues,
friends and students in recognition of the outstanding contribution of John Worrall to teaching,
student well-being, and the field of forest botany during his thirty-five years with the Faculty of
Forestry. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry to students who
have achieved high standing in Forest Plant Biology and have a demonstrated interest in that field.
(First awards available for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
PREVIOUSLY-APPROVED AWARDS WITH CHANGES IN TERMS:
Award 01726 - AURUM Ceramic Laboratories Bursary: A $1,000 bursary is offered by the
Aurum Ceramic Dental Laboratories Ltd. to a third year dental student. (Change in effect for the
2003/2004 academic year.)
How amended: This award has been changed from a scholarship to a bursary and increased from
$400 to $1000.
Award 01773 - CERUM Ortho Organizers Bursary - A $1000 bursary is offered by Cerum Ortho
Organizers for a dental student completing orthodontics courses in the third or fourth year.
(Change in effect for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
How amended: The donor is changing this award from a prize to a bursary and has increased the
amount from $400 to $1000. All third and fourth year dentistry students cover orthodontics
within their prescribed course work.
Award 08343 - Barrie and Diana Carol MARTIN Bursary in Commerce: Bursaries totalling $925
have been endowed by Barrie Martin for undergraduate students in the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration. (Change in effect for the 2003/2004 academic year.)
How amended: This bursary was originally established at UBC as an annually-funded award. The
donor has now endowed the bursary.

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