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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2004-05-19

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 THE UNIVERSITY  OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF MAY 19, 2004
Attendance
Present: Dr. H. J. Rosengarten (Vice Chair), Vice President B. C. McBride, Dr. P. Adebar,
Mr. R. Affleck, Dr. B. Bemmels, Mr. P. T. Brady, Dr. J. Brander, Dr. L. Brinton, Dr. J. F.
Carolan, Dr. B. Crawford, Dr. E. Dean, Dr. J. Dennison, Ms. G. Eom, Dr. D. Fielding,
Ms. M. Friesen, Dean N. Gallini, Principal J. H. V. Gilbert, Ms. T. Gillespie, Dr. D.
Granot, Dean F. Granot, Dr. L. Gunderson, Dr. P. G. Harrison, Associate Vice President
J. Hutton, Dr. R. Irwin, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. R. Kerekes, Dr. S. B. Knight, Dr. B. S.
Lalli, Dr. V. LeMay, Mr. J. Liu, Mr. R. Lowe, Dr. P. L. Marshall, Ms. S. Martz, Mr. W.
B. McNulty, Mr. J. Mistry, Dean D. Muzyka, Dr. D. Paterson, Mr. G. Paton, Dean M.
Quayle, Ms. C. Quinlan, Mr. D. Riendl, Dr. J. Sarra, Dr. C. Shields, Associate Vice
President and Registrar B. J. Silzer, Dean R. Sindelar, Dr. B. Stelck, Dr. D. Steyn, Mr. N.
Taylor, Dr. R. C. Tees, Dr. J. Thompson, Dr. S. Thorne, Dean R. Tierney, Ms. M. Tull,
Mr. D. Verma, Dr. R. Windsor-Liscombe, Dr. R. Yaworsky, Dean E. H. K. Yen, Mr. D.
Yokom
By Invitation: Dr. G. Poole (Director, Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth), Mr. E.
Smith (Elections Officer, Enrolment Services)
Regrets: President M. C. Piper, Chancellor A. McEachern, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dean M. A.
Bobinski, Prof. C. Boyle, Mr. N. Broekhuizen, Dr. M. Cameron, Mr. M. Edgar, Mr. E.
Greathed, Dr. R. Harrison, Dean J. Hepburn, Dr. J. Johnson, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Ms. J. Lo
Ah Kee, Dr. M. MacEntee, Dr. K. MacQueen, Mr. G. Martin, Dr. P. G. Mosca, Dr. B.
Rodrigues, Mr. J. Rogers, Dr. A. Rose, Dean J. Saddler, Mr. C. Ste-Croix, Dean G.
Stuart, Dr. H. van Vuuren, Dr. R. Wilson, Mr. D. Younan, Mr. M. Yung
The Vice Chair called the meeting to order.
Vol. 2003/04 03/04 -143
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-144
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Dr. Tees l        That the minutes of the meeting of April 21,
Principal Gilbert J       2004 be approved as circulated.
Carried.
Nominating Committee Membership
The Registrar had declared two vacancies for student representatives to serve on the
Nominating Committee for the term from May 19, 2004 until March 31, 2005. A
nomination had been received for Mr. Michael Yung.
Principal Gilbert l        That nominations close.
Dr. Crawford J
Carried.
Dr. Rosengarten declared Mr. Yung acclaimed, noting that one vacancy remained.
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
VICE PRESIDENT BARRY C. MCBRIDE
Dr. Rosengarten remarked that the meeting marked Dr. McBride's last Senate meeting as
the Vice President, Academic & Provost. Dr. McBride had served almost continuously on
Senate since 1984 in both elected and ex-officio capacities. Following the completion of
his term as Associate Vice President, Academic & Provost on June 30, he was to begin a
new appointment as Deputy Vice Chancellor of UBC Okanagan. On behalf of Senate, Dr.
Rosengarten thanked Dr. McBride for his leadership and service, and wished him well in
his new position. Members of Senate gave Dr. McBride a round of applause.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-145
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Candidates for Degrees
Candidates for Degrees
Dr. P. G. Harrison i        That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Mr. Taylor i        as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, effective May 2004, and
that the Registrar, in consultation with the
Deans and the Chair of Senate, be empowered
to make any necessary adjustments.
Carried.
Trek 2010 Update
Dr. Rosengarten reminded members of Senate that the deadline for responses to Trek
2010: Green Paper had been extended to May 7th to allow time for UBC Okanagan
constituents to provide their comments. Because comments continued to arrive, the May
7th deadline had been extended once more. Dr. Rosengarten stated that the Green Paper
would likely go to the Board of Governors in July and return to Senate for further
discussion in September.
Academic Policy Committee
Dr. Tees presented the reports, as Chair of the Committee.
EXAMINATION SCHEDULING ISSUES
Note: the full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
The Committee had circulated a report outlining its recent review of UBC examination
scheduling practices. The report contained the following recommendations:
1.   That Senate reaffirm the following minimum provisions for each of Winter
Session Terms 1 and 2 in any given academic year:
a. 60 teaching days;
b. 11 teaching weeks;
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-146
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Academic Policy Committee
c.   3 days between the last day of classes and the first day of examinations.
2. That Enrolment Services be directed to adjust each academic year to provide
more than the minimum three days, i.e., either four or five days, between the
last day of classes and the first day of examinations in each of Winter Session
Terms 1 and 2, where possible.
3. That each academic year be scheduled such that the last day of examinations in
Winter Session Term 1 be no later than December 22nd; and that the last day
of examinations in Winter Session Term 2 be not later than April 30.
Implications
1. The examination schedule may span up to 14 days in some calendar years, an
increase of three days over the current schedule. This longer examination
period will reduce the incidence of conflicts hardships, and clustering.
2. Students would benefit from more than three days between the end of classes
and the beginning of examinations in most Winter Session terms. This
additional preparation time will mitigate the impact of any potential clusters in
an individual student's examination schedule. Setting an end date for each
examination period also ensures a sufficient period of time for marking and
other term-end assessment activities by instructors.
3. Extending the examination schedule requires flexibility with respect to term
start dates. In some calendar years, Term 1 may start prior to Labour Day, but
not before September 1. Term 2 may begin with a partial week immediately
following the New Year's Day statutory holiday.
4. It is important to have both students and instructors involved in the
examination scheduling participate in surveys on their assessment of the cost-
benefit analysis of extending examination periods to reduce such conflicts.
Importantly, in the next few examination periods Enrolment Services will de-
emphasize the front loading of the examination for selected cohorts of students
in 2nd and 3rd year to see what (if any) positive impact on clustering emerges.
Dr. Tees l        That the report be received.
Dr. P. G. Harrison J
Mr. Brady asked why the number of seats for each daytime and evening block had been
set at 3400 and 850 respectively: why not 4000 or 5000 seats? Mr. Silzer replied that the
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-147
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Academic Policy Committee
number of seats used was related to the size of the available venues and arrangement of
students within those venues such that students are not seated too closely together.
The motion to
receive the report
was put and
carried
Dr. Tees l        That Senate accept recommendations #1, #2,
Dr. P. G. Harrison J        and #3-
In response to a question from Mr. Brady about why, under Recommendation #1, the
Committee felt it was necessary to reaffirm minimal provisions, Dr. Tees stated that the
Committee wished to identify that it had reviewed the current practice and recommended
no change.
In response to a question from Dr. Carolan about the minimum number of teaching
weeks, Dr. Tees clarified that the minimum provision was for 11 full teaching weeks, with
partial weeks on each end of the term. Dr. Tees added that he was aware that the Faculty
of Science would prefer 12 full teaching weeks, rather than 11 full and 2 partial weeks
totalling to the same number of teaching days.
In response to a question from Dr. Gunderson about why the maximum evening capacity
had been set at 850 seats, Mr. Silzer stated that Enrolment Services attempted to schedule
most examinations in proximity to standard class meeting times. A suggestion from
Enrolment Services several years earlier that more examinations be scheduled in the
evening had been met with some resistance by faculty. Ms. Eom stated that students
would be in favour of increasing evening seat capacity if that meant more flexibility in the
schedule. Mr. Silzer agreed that it might be beneficial to increase evening capacity.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-148
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Academic Policy Committee
Dr. Knight asked whether the Committee had discussed assessment, including
examinations, for distance education courses, and whether there was any concern about
the increased use of online examinations. Dr. Tees responded that he was aware that there
was an increasing trend toward the use of online examinations. Dr. Tees stated that most
distance education examinations were scheduled in the evening or on Saturdays for the
convenience of students. In response to a further query from Dr. Knight, Mr. Silzer stated
that the University did make use of international venues to administer examinations for
distance education students.
Vice President McBride suggested that the document should reflect that the 3400 daytime
and 850 evening numbers did not reflect true capacity, but rather the number of seats that
Enrolment Services had chosen to release for scheduling.
The motion to
accept
recommendations
#1, #2, and #3
was put and
carried
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM DEFINITION AND APPROVAL CRITERIA
See also 'Appendix A: Cooperative Education Programs'.
Dr. Tees l        That Senate approve the definition and
Dean Quayle J       approval criteria for cooperative education
programs, as recommended by the Academic
Policy Committee.
Referring to Criterion 9(c), Dr. LeMay stated that it would be difficult and expensive to
arrange a site visit during every term, given that students were often dispersed throughout
the province. There was general agreement that the last sentence under Criterion 9 should
be changed from " Specifically, formal feedback mechanisms must include:" to " Specifi-
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-149
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Admissions Committee
cally, formal feedback mechanisms should normally include:" Senators made several other
editorial changes to the report, which are reflected in Appendix A.
The motion was
put and carried
1
Admissions Committee
Dr. Paul G. Harrison presented the reports, on behalf of the Committee.
NEW EXCHANGE PARTNERSHIP WITH GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY (ELLIOT
SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS)
Dr. Harrison presented the proposed new exchange partnership, noting that it would be
exciting for graduate students in political science and international relations to have the
opportunity to study in Washington, DC.
Dr. P. G. Harrison i        That Senate approve the exchange partnership
Dean Granot i        w^ George Washington University, as
recommended by the Admissions Committee.
Carried.
ENROLMENT TARGETS 2004/2005
Note: The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Dr. P. G. Harrison i        That Senate approve the total enrolment
Dean Muzyka J        targets for the 2004/2005 academic year, as
recommended by the Admissions Committee.
Mr. Brady noted that the target total full time equivalent (FTE) undergraduate enrolment
was 28 420, whereas the number of FTE students funded by the provincial government
was 28 076, and asked how the extra students would be funded. Dr. Harrison replied that
the total FTE undergraduate target had recently been adjusted upward to 28 448, which
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-150
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Admissions Committee
was the same number as for 2003/2004. 2004/2005 was to be the second year in a three-
year plan to bring enrolment down to provincially funded levels. Due to a concern about
access to postsecondary education in the province, the University had chosen not to
immediately correct an overenrolment from three years earlier, but instead to reduce the
numbers over the subsequent three years while provincially-funded numbers rose at the
same time. Reducing the overenrolment to funded targets in a single year would have
meant unacceptably high grade point average (GPA) cutoffs for students. For the Faculty
of Science, for example, matching targets to funded numbers for 2004/2005 would have
resulted in a 91 or 92 percent GPA cutoff. Allowing a small overenrolment had resulted
instead in a cutoff of approximately 87 percent. Vice President McBride added that it is
difficult to predict how many students would take up UBC offers of admission, register,
and ultimately remain registered when 2004/2005 enrolment statistics were to be
collected in November 2004. Higher than expected numbers of returning students had
been partially responsible for the overenrolment. The Vice President described recent
predictions about the number of students coming to UBC from high schools as much
better than in previous years, and expressed the hope that the University would continue
to refine such predictions. The Vice President was optimistic that the addition of new
seats at UBC Okanagan in 2005/2006 would result in a reduction in application pressure
on the UBC Vancouver campus.
Dean Tierney spoke in support of the Committee's recommendations, and commended
the Enrolment Management Committee for having been attuned to the need to provide
access for students. He added that a small overenrolment was definitely preferable than
an underenrolment.
Dr. Dennison drew attention to the fact that many high school students enter the BC
college system with the hope of being accepted to university after their second year of
study.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-151
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appeals on Academic Standing Committee
The report showed that the total headcount intake of students from colleges was
decreasing, and Dr. Dennison expressed concern that this reduction might cause anxiety
among prospective college transfer students. Dr. Harrison responded that the largest
reduction was in the first year intake, but that the intake in subsequent years did fluctuate
somewhat. He stated that it had been difficult for Science to fill its existing third year
college transfer seats in recent years, even by lowering the GPA to the University
minimum.
There was a brief discussion about broader based admission (BBA). Dr. Paul Harrison
stated that the Faculty of Science had adopted, on a pilot basis, BBA criteria for
evaluating a small portion of the first year class. The Faculty was in the process of
evaluating whether students with a broader range of GPAs might succeed in the Bachelor
of Science program, and the initial data was promising. Dean Muzyka stated that BBA
criteria were used in evaluating all applicants to the Bachelor of Commerce. Factors
include the ability to take initiative and exercise leadership, as well as general preparation
for an undergraduate business education. The use of a BBA system meant that some
students with very high averages were not admissible, while some good candidates with
lower averages were offered admission. The Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration considered BBA very successful.
The motion was
put and carried
Appeals on Academic Standing Committee
See also Appendix B: Report of the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing.
As Chair of the Committee, Dr. Rosengarten circulated a report on Committee activities
for information. He drew attention to the "general observations" section of the report,
which stated that the Committee was likely to allow a student appeal where there was evi-
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-152
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Budget Committee
dence that the Faculty or Department had been "lax or inconsistent" in applying
academic regulations.
Budget Committee
See also 'Appendix C: 2003/2004 Budget Committee Report.'
As Chair of the Committee, Dr. Adebar circulated a report on Committee activities for
information. He gave an overview of some of the highlights, including:
• Approved tuition increases for 2004/2005 were expected to generate an
additional $23.7 million in revenue for the University; much of this revenue
was targeted for specific uses, including student financial assistance.
• The University was to balance its budget for 2004/2005, although funding for
any new initiatives would need to be derived from reallocation within Vice
Presidential porfolios.
• The Committee had provided input to the budget planning process, and was in
general support of the 2004/2005 University budget.
Mr. Affleck drew attention to the "Tuition Consultation" section of the report, noting
that 25 to 30% of the costs of a UBC education were drawn from student tuition funds,
compared to an average of 33% among the G10 (ten large research intensive Canadian
universities).
Continuing Studies Committee
NEW CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
As Chair of the Committee, Ms. Friesen circulated information about three new certificate
programs (more information available at the following URLs):
1. Certificate in Advanced English Language Teaching
http://www.eli.ubc.ca/programs.htm#teach
2. Certificate in Aboriginal Health Care Administration
http://www.cstudies.ubc.ca/ahcap/
3. Certificate in International Development
http://cic.cstudies.ubc.ca/CID/
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-153
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Curriculum Committee
Curriculum Committee
See also 'Appendix D: Curriculum Proposals.'
Dr. Marshall presented the curriculum proposals for approval, as Chair of the
Committee.
FACULTY OF ARTS
Dr. Marshall l        That Senate approve the curriculum proposals
Dr. Tees J       from the Faculty of Arts.
Mr. Brady pointed out that the rationale for several new courses was to reflect the
research interests of newly hired faculty members. He asked how these new courses would
be of benefit to students. Dr. Marshall responded that Faculties took economic factors
into consideration before offering new courses, and that students are often excited to
work with a faculty member in the faculty member's area of interest. Dean Gallini added
that most faculty were recruited to teach in a specific area, and that the development of
the new courses was part of that overall recruitment plan. Furthermore, the Faculty of
Arts had recently deleted a significant number of old courses as part of an overall
curriculum review.
The motion was
put and carried
~\
FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Dr. Marshall recalled that Senate had approved a major program change for the B.Sc.
(Pharm.) two years earlier. The most recent set of changes represented the third year of
the revised program, and included 13 new courses. As the previous courses were to be
deleted, there would be no net increase in the number of courses offered by the Faculty.
Dr. Marshall l        That Senate approve the proposed curriculum
Dean Sindelar J        changes from the Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 19,2004
03/04 -154
Elections Committee
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Dr. Marshall announced that, at the request of the Faculty, the proposal for the new
course SWFS 624: Program Evaluation in Family Studies and Social Work had been
withdrawn.
Dr. Marshall
Dean Granot
That Senate approve the curriculum proposals
from the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
In response to a question from Dr. Dennison, Dean Granot stated that many, but not all,
graduate programs required a course in statistics. Dr. Dennison commented that it seemed
unnecessary for so many programs to offer their own statistics courses.
The motion was
put and carried
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Dr. Marshall
Dr. P. G. Harrison
That Senate approve the curriculum proposals
from the Faculty of Science.
Carried.
Elections Committee
Dr. Yaworsky presented the reports, on behalf of the Committee.
RESULTS OF ELECTION OF ONE STUDENT TO THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Note: The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
The Committee circulated for information a report on a recent dispute arising from the
election of a student representative to the Board of Governors in January 2004. The AMS
Elections Administrator had expressed concern about the validity of the election because
of alleged breaches of confidentiality with respect to voting tallies during the election.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-155
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Elections Committee
After hearing submissions from multiple parties, the Committee had determined that the
election had been conducted in good faith and that the alleged irregularity — the
disclosure of interim voting tallies to some individuals — had not materially affected the
result.
The Committee suggested that Senate might wish to review the clarity of the procedures
governing the election of students to the Board of Governors and the interaction between
the Senate rules and the AMS Code of Procedures.
In response to a question from Mr. Brady, Dr. Yaworsky confirmed that, while AMS
policies applied to AMS elections, Senate regulations applied to the Senate and Board of
Governors elections.
STUDENT ELECTIONS TO GOVERNING BODIES: ADJUSTMENTS TO REGULATIONS
The Committee had circulated a proposal to amend the Senate Rules for Student Elections
to Governing Bodies. The full text of the document is available at
http://students.ubc.ca/senate/pub/minute98-99/0499/049910.htm#1025745.The
proposed change was as follows:
That Rule 6(d) of the Senate Rules for Student Elections to Governing Bodies be amended to
add the text in bold face below.
6 (d) Those elected to Senate take office at the first meeting of the Senate on or after April
1, except for the student representative from the Faculty of Education, who will take office
at the first meeting of Senate on or after September 30.
Rationale
The current term of office for all student senators is from April 1 to March 31 of the following
year. The Education Students Association has indicated that September would be a much more
reasonable time to elect Education student representatives. Education students in the
Secondary stream are in the middle of their practica in March. Education students in the
Elementary stream begin their practica in mid-March. The spring is not a convenient time for
these students to participate in elections.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-156
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Library Committee
Dr. Yaworsky indicated that the Committee had consulted with the Senate Student
Caucus before making the recommendation to approve the change. The Senate Student
Caucus had agreed to work with the Nominating Committee to maintain the year-round
appointment of student representatives to the Committees of Senate.
Dr. Yaworsky l        That Senate accept the recommendation of the
Dean Granot i       Elections Committee with respect to the Senate
Rules for Student Elections to Governing
Bodies.
Carried.
Library Committee
Dean Isaacson assumed the Chair so that Dr. Rosengarten could present the report on
behalf of the Library Committee.
LIBRARY COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES 2003/2004
See also 'Appendix E: Tibrary Committee Activities 2003/2004'.
Dr. Rosengarten presented the report, with particular emphasis on the motion contained
therein. The motion had been drafted in response to concerns that, as the University
allocated more resources to research activity, there was a proportional increase in
demands on the Library. The Library was unable to meet the increased demand due to
lack of funding. The Committee recognized that federal funding of the Indirect Costs of
Research was critical if UBC was to remain competitive. The share of this Indirect Costs
of Research funding allocated to the Library, however, had decreased from 5.2% in
2002/2003 to 3.8% in 2003/2004. In contrast, libraries at other universities had seen an
increase in their respect-
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-157
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Library Committee
tive percentage allocations in 2003/2004. The Library Committee was anxious to ensure
that the University administration demonstrate a commitment to maintaining the Library.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That the Senate Budget Committee be asked to
Mr. Brady i       meet with the University Administration to
discuss increases in the allocation of Indirect
Costs of Research funding to the University
Tibrary, to enable the Tibrary to meet the
increased demands upon its collections and
services; and that the Committee inform Senate
of the outcome of these discussions.
Discussion
Dean Granot stated that, although she agreed with the Committee with respect to the
importance of the Library, she did not support the separation of the issue of funding for
the Library from all other budgetary priorities. Dean Granot cited support for postdoctoral fellows as another area where UBC had fallen behind other universities, and
remarked that the Budget Committee and University Administration should consider all
priorities together, rather than one at a time. Dean Muzyka agreed, stating that
considering one element of funding at a time would constitute a "slippery slope." In
response, Dr. Rosengarten emphasized the centrality of the Library as a University
priority.
Dr. Tees noted that the motion directed the Budget Committee to meet with members of
the University Administration, and pointed out that several senior administrators were
already members of the Budget Committee. He suggested that the phrase "to meet with
the University Administration" be deleted from the motion. Dr. Brander stated that it
would also be necessary to communicate with administrators not appointed to the Budget
Committee.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-158
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Library Committee
In response to a query from Mr. Affleck, Vice President McBride stated that the decision
to allocate Indirect Costs of Research funding was made by the Board of Governors, upon
recommendation from the President, and following consultation with the Vice Presidents,
the Committee of Deans, and members of the executive. Allocation priorities for
2003/2004 had been thoroughly debated and the Board had been faced with a large
number of difficult decisions. Vice President McBride added that he was dubious about
the percentage allocations cited in the Library Committee's report; a more complete
picture would include a correlation to adjustments made to General Purpose Operating
(GPO) funding. Dean Granot agreed, stating that an allocation of Indirect Costs funding
might be offset by a simultaneous decrease in other funding sources, including GPO
funding.
Dr. Knight expressed the opinion that this was an appropriate issue for the Senate, and
expressed his support for referring the matter to the Budget Committee for further action.
Dr. Windsor-Liscombe suggested that the University should make a formal statement
about the importance of the Library in making Indirect Costs allocation decisions.
Vice President McBride disagreed with the idea that support for the Library had declined
in recent years, pointing out the ongoing construction of the Irving K. Barber Learning
Centre as one example of a strong commitment to build and maintain the Library. Ms.
Quinlan emphasized that the Library appreciated current levels of support, but
encouraged Senate to refer the matter to the Budget Committee for further exploration.
Ms. Quinlan remarked that, as research activity increased, there was an expectation that
the Library's collection would grow at a corresponding rate. The collection, however, had
not grown in proportion to recent increases in depth and breadth of research activity. Dr.
Windsor-Liscombe stated that it was important to consider the need for additional
professional librarians, as well as facilities to house the collection.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-159
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Nominating Committee
In response to a suggestion from Mr. Taylor that the motion be amended to delete specific
reference to Indirect Costs of Research funding, Dr. Rosengarten expressed a preference
for leaving the motion as it stood, because considering the allocation of one specific
funding source allowed comparisons between Canadian universities.
In amendment.
Mr. Taylor l        That the motion be amended to delete the
Dean Muzyka i       phrase "the allocation of Indirect Costs of
Research".
Several members of Senate spoke in support of the amendment, stating that the amended
motion would allow the Budget Committee to sponsor a broad discussion about funding
for the Library, without restricting the focus to any one funding source.
The motion to
amend was put
and carried.
The amended
motion was put
and carried.
Nominating Committee
ADJUSTMENTS TO SENATE COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Principal Gilbert had circulated the following recommendations, as Chair of the
Committee.
1.  The Nominating Committee recommends that Senate approve the following
revision to the membership of the Admissions Committee:
Add Dr. Paul Mosca to fill a vacancy created when the Lieutenant Governor in
Council appointments were discontinued.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -160
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Nominating Committee
2.  The Nominating Committee recommends that Senate approve the nominations of
student senators to the following Committees of Senate:
a) Academic Building Needs:
Matthew Edgar and Jitesh Mistry
b) Academic Policy:
Gina Eom and Sarah Martz
c) Admissions:
Greg Paton and Marnee Tull
d) Agenda:
Nathan Taylor and Mike Yung
e) Appeals on Academic Standing:
Jack Liu, Jitesh Mistry and Nathan Taylor
f) Budget:
Matthew Edgar and Greg Paton
g) Continuing Studies:
Gary Martin (and vacancy)
h)  Curriculum:
Matthew Edgar, Gina Eom, Torill Gillespie, and Jackie Liu
i)   Elections:
Marnee Tull
j)    Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions:
David Riendl
k)  Library:
Gina Eom, Torill Gillespie and David Riendl
1)   Student Appeals on Academic Discipline:
Gary Martin, Jitesh Mistry and Marnee Tull
m) Student Awards:
Sarah Martz and Daniel Yokom
n)  Teaching and Learning:
David Riendl, Nathan Taylor and Daniel Yokom
o)  Tributes:
Gary Martin and Mike Yung
Principal Gilbert l        That Senate approve Recommendation #1.
Dr. Paterson J
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-161
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee
Principal Gilbert l        That Senate approve Recommendations #2 (a)
Dr. Tees J        through #2(o).
Carried.
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee
See also' Appendix F: Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee'.
Dr. Bemmels presented for information the annual report on Committee activities, which
included commentary about the Committee's mandate and a brief summary of each case.
Student Awards Committee
See also 'Appendix G: New Awards'.
As Chair of the Committee, Dr. Thompson presented the new awards for approval.
Dr. Thompson i        That Senate accept the awards as listed and
Dean Granot i       forward them to the Board of Governors for
approval, and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried.
Teaching and Learning Committee
INTERPROFESSIONAL SCHOLAR INITIATIVE
Note: The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
As Chair of the Committee, Dr. Paul G. Harrison presented the proposal to establish an
Interprofessional Scholar Initiative (IPSI), which would be administered by the College of
Health Disciplines in Terms 1 and 2 of the academic year. A cohort of 30 students in their
final year of entry-to-practice degree programs would be selected from the 15
participating programs in the College of Health Disciplines. The value of the IPSI was
described as follows:
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-162
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Tributes Committee
1. Students engaged in the Initiative will share their experiences with student
colleagues and thus inspire a broader interest in interprofessional education and
patient-centred collaborative experience.
2. Students who experience the additional interprofessional learning opportunities
afforded by the IPSI will be well prepared for their clinical experiences in
practice education.
3. Students who are more experienced in interprofessional teamwork will be
viewed positively as potential future employees as increasing attention is paid
to collaborative practice in the workplace.
Students who were to successfully complete this Initiative would be recognized on their
transcripts by the term 'College of Health Disciplines Interprofessional Scholar.'
Dr. P. G. Harrison i        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dr. Tees i        Interprofessional Scholar Initiative.
Dr. Harrison stated that the Committee was particularly pleased to present this proposal
because this type of interdisciplinary, non-credit proposal had not easily found a vhome'
among Senate Committees in the past. The Initiative would allow students in diverse
health disciplines to learn together in representative teams, and to graduate with a greater
breadth of experience.
The motion was
put and carried
Tributes Committee
CANDIDATES FOR EMERITUS STATUS
Mr. Verma presented the candidates for emeritus status, on behalf of the Committee.
Mr. Verma l        That Senate accept the recommendations of the
Vice President McBride    i        Tributes Committee with respect to emeritus
status.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-163
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic & Provost
Reports from the Vice President, Academic & Provost
INSTITUTE FOR THE SCHOLARSHIP OF TEACHING AND LEARNING
Note: The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
The Vice President had circulated a proposal to establish an Institute for the Scholarship
of Teaching and Learning. The Vision Statement for the new Institute was as follows:
The Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning will support research and
reflection on teaching and learning with the aim to inform and enhance practice,
locally and internationally. It will be responsive to the needs of UBC's teaching and
learning community, and it will advocate for an effective reciprocity between research
and practice.
Vice President McBride stated that the developers of the proposal, namely Dr. Gary Poole
and Dr. Lee Gass, had consulted broadly with members of the UBC community.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Principal Gilbert J       Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and
Teaming.
The Vice President spoke in support of this timely and innovative initiative that promoted
reflection and analysis with respect to teaching and learning. These activities were
particularly important considering the increased emphasis on teaching as a criterion for
promotion and tenure decisions. In an environment where the funding of public
institutions was lagging behind growing needs, educators would need to create a learning
environment that could support a higher student-faculty ratio.
Discussion
Dean Muzyka noted that the Institute was to be funded in the short term by the Teaching
and Learning Enhancement Fund; long term funding was to be provided through
fundraising and grants, although some General Purpose Operating Funds would also be
required. He suggested that the motion to approve the Institute be amended to include a
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -164
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic & Provost
'sunset clause' that would see the Institute close after a given number of years if
appropriate funding could not be secured. Vice President McBride agreed that the
Institute should be reviewed five years following its establishment. Dean Tierney spoke in
support of the Institute, stating that the most effective institutions are those that reflect on
their own practice. Dean Tierney saw the addition of a sunset clause, however, as
counterproductive and problematic. Dr. Tees expressed support for the Institute, and
agreed that regular review was essential. Dean Muzyka pointed out that Faculties already
reflected on their pedagogical approaches, and that this kind of activity would not be
confined to the new Institute. He stressed the need for a review focusing on the Institute's
ability to secure ongoing resources. Dean Gallini expressed support for the Institute,
stating that she was hopeful that it would work closely with Faculties; she also supported
the idea of a future review.
Dr. Paul G. Harrison, referring to Vice President McBride's statement that the proposal
had been subjected to widespread consultation, expressed disappointment that the
Teaching and Learning Committee had not been included in the consultation, and that the
Committee had only heard indirectly about the proposal before it came to Senate.
In response to a query from Dr. Paul G. Harrison, Dr. Poole stated that the new Institute
would have a parallel relationship with the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth
(TAG), with each unit complementing the activities of the other.
In response to a query from Dr. Knight, Vice President McBride stated that the Director
of the Institute would report to the Associate Vice President, Academic Programs within
the portfolio of the Vice President, Academic and Provost.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -165
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic & Provost
Upon recommendation of Mr. Brady, the Senate acquiesced to the following amendment
to the motion without a vote (new text in bold face):
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Principal Gilbert J       Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and
Teaming, and that the Vice President,
Academic & Provost be directed to report
annually to Senate on the activities and
operations of the Institute.
The amended
motion was put
and carried.
TRANSFER OF PROFESSIONAL GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Note: The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
The Vice President had circulated the following proposal for information and discussion.
The proposal had been endorsed by the Academic Policy Committee, and the Vice
President stated that it would be placed on a fall 2004 Senate meeting agenda as an
approval item.
Proposal
That disciplinary Faculties have the opportunity to assume administrative responsibility for
degree programs designated by the Provost as professional graduate programs; that the
programs listed in the addendum be transferred from the Faculty of Graduate Studies (FoGS)
to the disciplinary Faculties as noted; and that any new programs designated by the Provost as
professional graduate programs may choose to follow this option.
The Provost will undertake a review of the proposed initiative in due course following
consultation with students, staff and faculty.
The "programs listed in the addendum" and their disciplinary Faculties were as follows:
Doctor of Pharmacy: Pharmaceutical Sciences
Master of Engineering: Applied Science
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -166
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic & Provost
The following degree programs had already been transferred from the Faculty of
Graduate Studies to the disciplinary Faculty shown.
Master of Business Administration: Commerce & Business Administration
Master of Management: Commerce & Business Administration
Discussion
Dr. Tees confirmed that the Academic Policy Committee had endorsed the proposal after
its authors had included several important changes. It was important to the Committee,
for example, to clarify how programs would come to be designated as "professional" and
how professional programs would come to be administered by their disciplinary Faculties.
The Committee also felt that it was essential that disciplinary Faculties fully understand
the extent of their responsibilities for transferred programs.
Mr. Taylor spoke against the proposal, adding that the Graduate Student Society was also
opposed. Concerns and questions included:
• More Faculties might choose this option; how was the University to decide
which programs should be transferred?
• The proposal might weaken the relationship between disciplinary Faculties and
FoGS.
• Since applications for NSERC and SSHRC funding were currently ranked by
FoGS, how would students in professional programs access this and other types
of funding?
• It was uncertain as to whether the proposal complied with the University Act.
Dean Muzyka stated that it was the disciplinary Faculty associated with a professional
program, rather than FoGS, that was held accountable to accrediting and professional
bodies. He noted that research programs offered by the Faculty of Commerce & Business
Administration were still administered by FoGS. In the case of the Master of Business
Administration (MBA), however, the work performed by FoGS had appeared redundant.
The transfer of the MBA had not affected student access to appropriate funding.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -167
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic & Provost
Extension of Meeting Time
Dr. Tees l        That the meeting time be extended by one half
Mr. Paton J        hour, until 10:00 p.m.
Carried.
TRANSFER OF PROFESSIONAL GRADUATE PROGRAMS DISCUSSION, CONTINUED
Dean Sindelar emphasized that disciplinary Faculties would be offered the opportunity to
assume responsibility for professional programs, but that no program would be
transferred against the express wishes of the disciplinary Faculty. With respect to the
Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm. D.), he stated that approximately half of North American
Pharm. D. programs were administered by their disciplinary Faculties. The Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences had consulted about the proposal to transfer the program with
students and faculty, who proved to be in strong support. The Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences already performed the recruiting and admissions functions for the Pharm. D.,
with FoGS evaluating applicants a second time. It was possible that, in future, UBC would
choose to follow several other Canadian universities by modifying the Pharm. D. to
become the sole entry-to-practice degree for pharmacists. Dean Sindelar emphasized that
there was no doubt that the Ph.D. offered in Pharmaceutical Sciences, as a research
degree, should reside within FoGS.
Vice President McBride stated that programs designated as professional might have
differential tuition fees, but they were also primarily course based with no thesis
requirement. Although an excellent case could be made for the involvement of FoGS in
Ph.D. programs, it had become questionable whether FoGS was adding value to programs
for which the disciplinary Faculties already performed recruitment, selection, advising,
and assessment activities. Vice President McBride added that there was also an argument
to be made in favour of transferring all master's degrees, including the Master of Science
and
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-168
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic & Provost
the Master of Arts, to their disciplinary Faculties, though the current report did not
propose that course of action.
Dean Granot explained that FoGS did not recommend admission of students to programs,
but ensured that Faculties were adhering to Senate standards in admitting students.
Processing time was typically less than two days. Dean Granot also expressed concern
that students in professional programs would lose their eligibility for federal funding
programs, such as NSERC. Dean Isaacson clarified that students in the Master of
Engineering program do not typically seek funding from federal granting councils.
In response to Mr. Taylor's concern about the number of programs possibly leaving
FoGS, Dr. Tees suggested that many professional programs would likely choose to stay,
although the disciplinary Faculties of the four programs listed in the addendum seemed
fully prepared to assume administrative responsibility.
Dr. Bemmels noted that the Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration had added a
half time staff person to manage the additional work involved in administering the Master
of Business Administration and Master of Management; he was uncertain whether it
would make sense, for staffing reasons, to transfer smaller programs to their disciplinary
Faculties.
ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, ACADEMIC PROGRAMS NEIL GUPPY
Vice President McBride recognized Dr. Neil Guppy, who had served as the Associate Vice
President, Academic Programs for the previous five year term ending on June 30. Dr.
McBride thanked Dr. Guppy for his tremendous contributions to the learning
environment and his emphasis on the interests of students. Members of Senate applauded
in appreciation.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -169
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Reports from the Associate Vice President, Enrolment Services & Registrar
Reports from the Associate Vice President, Enrolment Services & Registrar
TRIENNIAL ELECTIONS TO GOVERNING BODIES
Note: The full text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Mr. Silzer had circulated the proposed regulations for the 2004/2005 triennial election of
representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate. The proposal was brought in
accordance with Section 43 of the University Act, which states that "...Senate must make
and publish all rules necessary and consistent with this Act in respect of nominations,
elections and voting." The elections were:
1. Board of Governors
a. one non-faculty employee
b. two faculty members
2. Senate
a. Chancellor
b. 11 members of the Convocation
c. 10 faculty members at-large
d. Two faculty members from each of the 12 Faculties
e. One representative of the professional librarians
Mr. Silzer noted that the regulations reflected a recent change to the University Act that
broadened voter eligibility to include part time faculty and part time students.
Mr. Taylor l        That Senate approve the amended regulations
Dean Isaacson J       for ^e triennial election of representatives to
the Board of Governors and the Senate.
In response to a query from Dean Isaacson, Mr. Smith confirmed that the elections would
be conducted using a combination of Web-based and paper ballots. Mr. Smith confirmed
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-170
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Report from the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
that paper ballots remained necessary because some alumni did not have access to a
computer for voting purposes.
The motion was
put and carried
1
Report from the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
ORAL REPORT ON FACULTY RE-BRANDING
Dean Quayle gave a brief overview of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences' ongoing review
of its vision, mission, and Faculty name. One name under consideration was "Faculty of
Environmental and Food Sciences," and the Faculty had undertaken extensive
consultation with respect to this proposed name change. The Dean was hopeful that
consultation would be complete by late summer and that the Faculty would be prepared
to present a new name to Senate for approval in September 2004.
Other Business
AD HOC COMMITTEE TO REVIEW THE SENATE
On behalf of the Ad Hoc Committee to Review the Senate, Dr. Brander announced that
the Committee had prepared a questionnaire for members of Senate. He stated that the
questionnaire would be available within the month and asked that members of Senate
participate.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The following regular
meeting of the Senate was scheduled for 7:00 p.m. on September 22, 2004.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -171
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix A: Cooperative Education Programs
Appendix A: Cooperative Education Programs
GUIDELINES FOR CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT UBC
Co-operative Education Programs at the University of British Columbia have expanded
tremendously over the past ten years. The number of student work terms has increased from
under 300 in 1993 to over 2000 in year 2003.
Until 2001, all Co-op programs in the province of British Columbia had to meet strict
guidelines, set by the Co-operative Education Fund of British Columbia (CEFBC), under the
guidance of the Ministry of Advanced Education and Technology. In 2001 the provincial
government dissolved CEFBC, thus allowing individual educational institutions to establish
their own Co-op guidelines.
To facilitate the growth of Co-op at UBC, to help establish new Co-op programs, and to
ensure that both existing and new programs meet the highest educational standards that
recognize the needs of students, employers and faculty, the UBC Co-op Council (comprising of
Associate VP Academic Programs, representatives of each Faculty that has a Co-op program
and an AMS representative) has drafted a set of Co-op guidelines.
These guidelines, primarily based upon the previous CEFBC guidelines, are similar to the ones
practiced by the other universities in British Columbia. CEFBC approved programs are offered
in the Faculties of Applied Science, Arts, Commerce and Business Administration, Forestry
and Science. The Faculty of Education is in the process of developing a Co-op program under
these guidelines.
Definition
Co-operative Education is a partnership between students, employers and The University of
British Columbia. As an educational process, co-operative education formally integrates a
student's academic studies with paid, approved, career-related work experience in
participating employer organizations.
An Undergraduate Co-op Program has more than one period of full-time work experience
integrated with academic studies. The number of work terms required is set by individual
Faculties with no less than three (3) full-time work terms or a minimum of 30% of the total
number of academic terms required to graduate with a Co-op designation (over a normal four
year degree).
A Graduate Co-op Program has at least one full-time work experience integrated with
academic studies. The total number of work terms must normally be a minimum of 25% of
the total number of academic terms.
 Vancouver Senate 0 3/04 -172
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix A: Cooperative Education Programs
Recognized Co-op programs at UBC must meet the following criteria:
Approval Criteria
1. The Co-op program as defined above is an integral component of the educational
program, and must be approved by the UBC Senate;
2. Programs must be identified in the UBC calendar with graduation requirements
specified;
3. Programs must provide pre-employment training sessions for students prior to the
initial work term;
4. Programs must state procedures, standards and appropriate behavior for student work
term(s);
5. The needs of employers should be taken into account in designing the work/academic
sequence. Programs with more than one work term must not schedule all of the work
terms in the summer months;
6. While on a Co-op work term students must enrol in a full time UBC Co-op course.
7. The total length of a work term must be a minimum of 13 weeks (or approximately
455 hours);
8. Students are to engage in productive, supervised work, not be merely observers, and
are to be paid at competitive rates for their work;
9. Formal feedback and evaluation mechanisms must be established between the three
parties involved - students, employers and UBC Co-op Programs. The work experience
should complement the curriculum content. Specifically, formal feedback mechanisms
should normally include:
a. Approval of positions by the UBC Co-op Programs as suitable learning
environments, whether the positions are found by the Co-op Program or by
students;
b. Supervision and evaluation of student performance by employers and
discussion of the evaluations with both the students and the UBC Co-op
Programs and Faculty Advisors;
c. Site visits arranged by the UBC Co-op Programs, normally conducted once per
work term, to review student performance and progress. These site visits
should include discussions with both students and employers;
d. Students are required to complete written and/or oral presentations at the end
of each work term;
10. Work terms completed at any approved post secondary co-op program may be
transferable to UBC:
a. The transferability is based on the work term(s) having been successfully
completed and given credit by the institution of origin (i.e. noted on transcript);
b. The granting of transfer is given by UBC accepting the student using the
regular transfer credit process;
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -173
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix A: Cooperative Education Programs
c. The acceptance of a student for transfer from another institution having a coop program does not guarantee acceptance into the co-op program at UBC;
d. UBC may still require that the transfer student complete additional work terms
as part of his/her new program of study.
At UBC a council of Co-op Directors, with one student member and a member from the
Provost's Office, co-ordinates co-operative education activity.
Note: The Calendar entry that appeared in the report is not included in the Minutes.
Copies are available from the Assistant Registrar, Senate & Curriculum Services.
 Vancouver Senate 0 3/04 -174
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix B: Report of the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing
Appendix B: Report of the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing
REPORT TO SENATE ON ACTIVITIES, MAY 2003-MAY 2004
May 19, 2004
The Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing hears appeals by students against
decisions of Faculties on matters related to a student's academic standing. The Committee may
allow an appeal if it believes "that the decision has been arrived at through improper or unfair
procedures, and that as a result a wrong decision on the merits has or may have been arrived
at" (UBC Calendar 2003-04, p.36). The Committee has no jurisdiction where the sole
question raised in an appeal turns on the Faculty's exercise of academic judgment. The
decision of the Committee is final.
Since May 2003, the Committee has received 10 appeals, of which four were allowed, two
were dismissed, three were not pursued by the appellants, and one was withdrawn.
Appeals Allowed
The Committee allowed an appeal by an appellant who had been awarded a grade of 0 in a
400-level course because of evidence of plagiarism in a paper. The Committee found for the
appellant because the Faculty did not follow published procedures and exceeded its authority
in determining the penalty to be applied.
The Committee allowed an appeal by a student assigned a failing grade in a course, on the
grounds that the department had acted inconsistently and erratically in applying the marking
scheme published in the course syllabus at the beginning of the year.
A student appealed from a Faculty's decision to require his withdrawal from a graduate
program. The Faculty had argued that language difficulties, differences with supervisors, and
delays in the thesis proposal warranted the student's withdrawal; without challenging the
Faculty's view of these matters, the Committee found that the Faculty had erred in its
procedures for supervising, mentoring, and examining the student, and required that the
student be permitted to continue in the program.
A student was required to withdraw on the grounds of poor academic performance. The
student appealed, claiming to have been given unclear and inconsistent directions, and
ultimately to have been denied the right to take course supplementals. The Committee did not
challenge the Faculty's assessment of the appellant's performance, but agreed with the
appellant that the Faculty had not acted fairly or consistently in the application of its pub-
 Vancouver Senate 0 3/04 -175
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix B: Report of the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing
lished criteria for continuation and promotion. The Faculty was directed to permit the student
to take the necessary supplemental examinations.
Appeals Disallowed
A student argued that the failing grade assigned in a course was unfair and arbitrarily arrived
at; the Committee disagreed and found that the department concerned had acted fairly and
conscientiously in arriving at the final grade.
The Committee found against a student who had appealed the Faculty's requirement to
withdraw because of poor performance. The student maintained that in arriving at its
decision, the Faculty had failed to give due consideration to the student's personal (family)
difficulties. The Committee found that, on the contrary, the Faculty had taken every
reasonable step to assist the student, had not violated due procedure, and had treated the
student fairly.
General Observations
The Committee notes that departments are sometimes rather lax or inconsistent in the
application of the rules and regulations governing such matters as disciplinary procedures,
grading systems, and supervision of students. Though a department or Faculty may strive to
provide a just assessment of a student's standing, any carelessness or error in the process may
lead to unfairness, or the appearance of unfairness, and give the student reasonable grounds
for appeal. The Committee would urge on faculty members the importance of following due
process in all matters relating to student assessment in essays, quizzes, and examinations. This
includes maintaining scrupulous records of course requirements, grade schemes, and student
performance. Faculties and departments should also be familiar with the University's
published regulations governing requirements for continuation or graduation and for appeal
of academic decisions, and should draw these regulations to the attention of students.
For the Committee,
Respectfully submitted,
Herbert Rosengarten
Chair
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-176
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix C: 2003/2004 Budget Committee Report
Appendix C: 2003/2004 Budget Committee Report
The mandate of the Senate Budget Committee (SBC) is (i) to meet with the President and assist
in the preparation of the University budget, and (ii) to provide advice and report to Senate on
academic planning and priorities as they relate to the preparation of the budget. It is tradition
for the SBC to present an annual report to Senate during the May meeting.
The following are highlights of the main topics discussed this past year:
UBC ENDOWMENT FUND
At the request of the SBC, Byron Braley, AVP Treasury presented a report on UBC's
Endowment Fund, which had a significant reduction in market value in the previous two
years. Investment returns are used primarily to support teaching and research and to provide
student support. Braley reported that UBC's investment return had been considerably better
than some Canadian universities, and about equal to the average for all Canadian universities.
Effective April 1st 2004, UBC has reduced the spending rate on endowment funds to 5.0% to
ensure capital preservation. The recent outlook is positive: the year-to-date investment return
for 8 months ending Nov. 03 was about 10%, and the market value of the fund had increased
to $650 million by Fall 2003.
ANCILLARY BUDGETS
The SBC annually reviews the operating budgets and business plans of UBC's ancillaries (listed
here by responsible VP). VP Academic: Applied Research & Evaluation Services, Green
College, IT Services, Media Group, St. John's College. VP Students: Athletics & Recreation,
Housing & Conferences. VP Administration & Finance: Plant Operations, Utilities,
Bookstore, Food Services, Parking.
TUITION CONSULTATION
The SBC met with the President and VP Students to discuss the Tuition Proposal in Feb. and
March of this year. Principles that were discussed include: (1) The proportion of institutional
education costs covered by tuition should be in the range of 25 to 30%. Currently, the average
of the G10 (ten large research intensive) universities is 33%; Quebec universities typically have
less than average (about 20 to 30% tuition for in-province students), and Ontario universities
typical have more than average (about 40 to 50% tuition). (2) Setting of tuition at UBC
should be informed by tuition levels at peer institutions who compete for students, faculty and
staff. In 2003/04, UBC tuition (excluding fees) for a domestic undergraduate student in
Arts/Science was $3460, which is 95% of the comparable tuition at the University of Victoria,
93% of SFU, 83% of Toronto,
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-177
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix C: 2003/2004 Budget Committee Report
McGill, Queens, and 80% of Alberta. UBC tuition for a Research Master's degree student was
$3200 in 2003/04, which is 106% of Alberta, 87% of SFU, 78% of Victoria, 77% of McGill,
62% of Queens, and 59% of Toronto. (3) According to UBC Policy 72, bursary support will
be provided to domestic students with eligible unmet need. The total bursary awarded in
2003/04 increased 72% from the previous year to $11.0 million ($5.4 M undergraduate,
$4.6M to Post-baccalaureate, $1.0M graduate students).
The tuition proposal that was reviewed by the SBC and approved by the Board of Governors
(BOG) in March is as follows: effective May 1, 2004, a 16% increase in base tuition for
undergraduate programs, except Commerce years 2-4 (28%), and Pharmacy new in 2004
(20%). A 16% increase in base tuition for graduate programs. No increase in tuition for
international graduate students in research-based programs; but the tuition scholarship for
these students will be reduced so that the net tuition is equal to the domestic student tuition.
The tuition for professional graduate programs will increase between 0% (for programs that
have reached full cost recovery) and 16%. A 2.5% increase in international undergraduate
tuition for 2004/05 was approved by BOG in Sept. 2003, and a 15% increase in the tuition
for Post-baccalaureate programs in Dentistry and Medicine ($14,000 per year for students
new in 2004/05) was approved by BOG in Jan. 2003.
BUDGET PLANNING FRAMEWORK
One of the main topics of discussion at SBC meetings this year was the draft Budget Planning
Framework, which will start to inform budget allocations and reallocations. Early versions
had only university wide average numbers, while a recent version included numbers by
Faculty, VP portfolio, and other groupings. The main elements of the framework are the GPO
annualized budget, endowment earnings, research funding (for Faculties), FTE undergraduate
students (excluding ISI), FTE graduate students (excluding ISI), FTE faculty (including
Sessional Instructors), FTE staff, student-to-faculty ratio, staff-to-faculty ratio, undergraduate-
to-graduate ratio, GPO and endowment funding per student, and research funding per faculty
JOINT BUDGET SUBMISSION
According to a three-year funding letter received two years ago, the provincial government
intended to reduce operating grants of all BC universities by $19 million in fiscal year
2004/05. UBC's share of this reduction was $10M. In addition, the provincial government was
expecting the BC universities to provide about 1800 new student positions. The BC
universities prepared a joint budget submission to the provincial government entitled Towards
A Higher Learning Investment (dated Oct. 03) that requested government reverse the plan to
reduce operating grants in 2004/05 and take a partnership role in
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -178
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix C: 2003/2004 Budget Committee Report
addressing the additional $16 million gap for the new students places. In addition, the report
recommended that the province develop a plan to meet increased student demand over the
next decade, continue to provide matching funds for CFI, provide resources to increase
graduate student positions, and increase funding for university-industry programs.
2004/05 UBC BUDGET
The total revenues to the University of British Columbia in 2004/05 will be about $1.5 billion.
The various funds that make up this total are the General Purpose Operating (GPO),
Sponsored Research, Specific Purpose, Ancillaries, and Capital. Of these, GPO is the only fund
in which there is considerable discretion over spending. In 2004/05, the GPO fund will be
about $525 million. About $347 million is from the provincial government grant, and $146
million is from tuition fees. The remainder is federal funding, investment income and other
revenue.
Budget discussions with the Senate Budget Committee have been predominantly in terms of
incremental changes to GPO. In January 2004, the university was predicting a potential GPO
budget shortfall for 2004/05 of about $32 million prior to any faculty salary settlement.
However, the provincial government did reverse the plan to reduce the operating grants of the
BC universities in 2004/05, and UBC's grant was not reduced by $10 million. In addition, the
province provided UBC with a $3.7 million larger than anticipated grant (although $0.25
million of this is required for additional commitments for increased FTEs in targeted areas),
and $9 million additional one-time funding for 2003/04. The university used this one-time
money to prepay one-time expenses that would otherwise have to be paid in 2004/05.
The tuition increases that were approved for 2004/05 are expected to generate an additional
$23.7 million in revenues for the university: base tuition increase ($18.0 million), above-the-
base (differential) tuition increases ($3.7 million), increase in the Medical program tuition
($2.0 million). The delay of the Master's degree tuition increase from May to Sept will reduce
the revenue by about $0.5 million. The university is also expecting a $2 M increase in
investment income this year.
The increased expenses associated the government's New Era promises (Medical School
expansion, DTO) is $8.1 million. A certain portion of the tuition increase is targeted for
specific use: $3.5 million of the tuition revenue will be used for student financial support, and
$3.1 million will be used for teaching and learning enhancements for the students paying
above-the-base tuition increases including the Medical program.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-179
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix C: 2003/2004 Budget Committee Report
The largest financial obligations are for increased salary and benefit costs. The increased staff
salary and benefits will cost $6.4 million, while the faculty salary increases (effective July 1)
will cost $4.9 million in 2003/04, and there will need to be an additional increase in next
year's budget to annualize the cost of the increases. The central portion of the cost to
annualize the Ph.D. tuition waiver that began last year is $1.6 million. Utilities are expected to
cost an additional $1.6 million, and there is a $0.2 million increase in the cost of insurance.
The university is planning to use the unanticipated grant funding ($3.45 million) on a onetime basis to reduce central debt, rather than make new investments. Funding for any new
priorities will need to come from reallocations within each Vice President's portfolio.
COMMENTARY
The SBC provided input to the President and the administration throughout the budget
planning process, including the development of the underlying principles. The SBC generally
endorses the 2004/05 Budget; and particularly commends the President and the administration
for their role in persuading the provincial government to reverse the plan to reduce the
university's operating grant in 2004/05, and to provide additional funding to allow the
university to meet its New Era commitments and address other immediate priorities.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 19,2004
03/04-180
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposals
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
New courses
ARTH 442
VISA 470, 471
KORN412
CLST 314, 315, 333, 334, 351
CNRS 316, 370
GREK 325
NEST 303, 304, 310
RELG 308, 313
ENGL 309, 312, 328
FNST 401
FREN 429
HIST 200, 252, 355, 356, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377,
378, 429, 454, 465, 481, 483, 484, 485
PHIL 334
SOCI 369
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
New Courses
New Programs
NURS 505
EOSC 543, 546, 562
SWFS 601, 621, 623, 624, 654
RHSC 581, 583, 587, 589
Ph.D. in Social Work and Family Studies
Master of Rehabilitation Sciences (M.R.Sc.)
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-181
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposals
New Specialization Human Computer Interaction (HCI): coordinated by the
Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre (MAGIC)
FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Program Changes B.Sc. (Pharm.): 3rd year
New Courses PHAR 400, 401, 430, 435, 441, 442, 451, 452, 461, 462,
471, 472, 498
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Course Change CHEM 205: prerequisites
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -182
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix E: Library Committee Activities 2003/2004
Appendix E: Library Committee Activities 2003/2004
THE IRVING K. BARBER LEARNING CENTRE
At each meeting, the Librarian provides the Committee with an IKBLC update, and keeps us
informed about changes to building plans and costs, and about consultations with Faculty
Library Committees and Library staff concerning the building's uses. The project is moving
forward on schedule, and the builders have already begun work on the largest portion of the
new North Wing, the Automated Retrieval System (ARS). Much thought is going into the
selection of books to be held in this section, and the Assistant University Librarian for
Collections and Technical Services, working with the Faculty Library Advisory Committees,
has invited faculty members across the University to advise her on this matter. There is
undoubtedly keen interest in the ARS: the Faculty of Arts recently conducted an online survey
and received over 230 responses. The Committee will be following this aspect of the new
building's facilities very closely, to ensure that technology serves as a handmaiden to
scholarship, not as an obstacle.
Meanwhile, on behalf of the whole University community, the Committee wishes to express its
thanks to all members of the Library staff for continuing to provide excellent service despite
the difficulties caused by the construction.
UBC RECORDS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
At its March meeting, the Committee heard a presentation from Chris Hives, the University
Archivist, on the lamentable state of records management at UBC. Despite the existence of
policies that recognize the importance of preserving institutional records, the UBC Archives
have neither the space nor the personnel necessary to properly store and manage a growing
mass of materials, materials that need to be preserved for legal, historical, and cultural
reasons. The Committee was shown photographs of the appalling condition of the building in
which many of our records must be kept for lack of appropriate space. The Committee also
learned that record keeping varies immensely around the campus: some departments send all
their documents, regardless of value, to the University Archives; others send none.
The Archivist spoke of an urgent need to increase the staff in his department to be able to
attend to these problems. Presently our Archives employ two full-time professional archivists;
this may be compared to four FTE's at Simon Fraser University, and five at Calgary and
Toronto. The Committee agreed that Archives must be given a high priority, and will be
writing to the Vice Presidents, whose collective responsibility it is to implement the rel-
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-183
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix E: Library Committee Activities 2003/2004
evant policies, to urge that funding be found as soon as possible for the creation of an
additional position in the University Archives.
NEW INTEGRATED LIBRARY SYSTEM
In November the Committee met with Mr. Brian Owen, Manager of Library Systems, who
described the new Endeavor software that will sustain a new system to support all of the
Library's primary activities (cataloguing, acquisitions, circulation, and the online public access
catalogue). A related system, EnCompass, will provide enhanced access to the Library's
collection of electronic information resources. The implementation of Endeavor and
EnCompass will enhance a user's search and browsing capabilities, allowing for broader
searches across a number of databases and operating much faster than the present system. The
new system, costing almost $1.5 million, comes into play at the beginning of May 2004.
INDIRECT COSTS OF RESEARCH
By far the most frequently-discussed topic on our agenda this year has been the funding
allocated to the Library from the Indirect Costs of Research (ICR) program introduced three
years ago by the federal government. Under this program, the government provides
universities with a subsidy in support of research, to enable institutions to meet the growing
indirect costs incurred by expanding research programs. The size of the grant is calculated as
25% of the three-year average of the tri-council research grants generated by the institution.
Since its implementation, increases to the Library's acquisitions budget have been funded
largely from this program. In 2002-3, the Library received $720,000, or 5.2% of the total ICR
funds allocated to UBC; in 2003-4, the Library's share fell to $600,000, or 3.8%. These are
one-time additions to the base acquisitions budget, which has grown by an annual average of
around 3.3% since 2001. This amount covers only a small percentage of the average annual
price increases faced by the Library.
While we acknowledge that the University has sought to help the Library meet inflationary
costs, the allocations from the ICR fund are simply not growing in proportion to researchers'
needs. The table attached to this report shows that UBC's share of federally-distributed funds
in the ICR program has risen over the past two years, a reflection of our growing success in
the competition for research dollars; yet as the table also shows, the allocation to the Library
has fallen both in percentage and in real dollars. It is evident from the table that our Library is
not faring as well as many of its institutional peers: for
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -184
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix E: Library Committee Activities 2003/2004
2003-04, the average percentage of indirect cost funds allocated by the listed institutions to
their libraries is over 8%, more than double the percentage allocated at UBC.
This is giving rise to much concern among researchers right across the University. At its
January meeting the Senate Library Committee heard directly from Dr. Muriel Harris
(Associate Professor, Department of Medical Genetics and Chair of the Life Sciences Library
Advisory Committee) and Dr. Fabio Rossi (Assistant Professor, Department of Medical
Genetics and Canada Research Chair in Regenerative Medicine) concerning the impact of the
Library's collections and services on their research.
Drs. Harris and Rossi noted that the introduction of additional funds through the ICR
program has enabled the Library to make some improvements in its research collections, but
expressed real concern at possible reductions or slowdowns in the provision of essential
resources. They maintained that there is a strong relationship between a high quality library
and high quality research. Without a first-class library it is difficult to attract and retain top-
ranking researchers. Both were emphatic that the funds must be provided to support further
collection development and increase access to the latest electronic resources.
Earlier this year and on behalf of the UBC Life Sciences Library Advisory Committee, Dr.
Harris wrote to President Piper:
All of us involved in research in the Life Sciences at UBC make extensive use of the
Library's resources. Much of this use is "invisible" because it is done directly on-line from
our offices....There is a direct relationship between the high quality of the Library and the
high quality of the research work being done at UBC. We are also aware that the high
quality of the UBC Library is a strong drawing card in attracting top-notch research
scientists to UBC. We know that there are competing demands for these dollars, but we
feel strongly that maintenance of a first-rate Library is at least as important to first-rate
research as are the other research-related facilities and services at UBC. Therefore, as
representatives of the research users of the Life Sciences Libraries at UBC, we request
strongly that the needs of the Library be given high priority in allocation of future funds
received by the University for "indirect costs of research."
Similar concerns were expressed in a letter to President Piper by Dr. Michael Blades, Chair of
the UBC Faculties of Science and Applied Science Library Advisory Committee:
Most of us would argue that, next to our own research tools, the Library is the most
valuable research resource on campus. Starting this year, in order to provide continuing
access to on-line e-journals, the Library must cover Canadian National Site Licensing
Project costs, on the order of $1,000,000 from within its operating budget. The 2003/04
Library budget allows the Library to continue
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -185
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix E: Library Committee Activities 2003/2004
with our current subscription content but the level of monograph allocations will drop to
92% of last year's total. This situation does not correlate with the University's growth in
research, new programs of study, and the recruitment of new faculty, in particular the
Canada Research Chair initiative.
Dr. Ira Nadel, Chair of the Arts Faculty Library Advisory Committee, wrote to the University
Librarian on behalf of that Committee to lament the decreasing support for the Library from
the Indirect Cost of Research funding:
The ability to provide collection and service needs for our expanding research
requirements, not only in the Faculty of Arts but across the campus, is fundamental to the
Library and its purpose at a major research university like UBC. We deplore the current
reduction in support (an appalling 3.8%, down 27% from the previous year) in the
strongest possible manner and urge the restoration if not increase in funds. No unit on the
campus is more central to the Faculty of Arts than the Library and we must see that it
receives the basic funding it deserves.
Linking these three letters is the writers' belief that a strong and well-funded library is central
to the whole research enterprise at UBC, and that success in scholarship is highly dependent
upon library support, regardless of discipline.
As planning for 2004/05 ICR allocations begins, it is imperative that full consideration be
given to the role the Library plays in supporting UBC's research programs, and that the
increasing importance of research at this university be reflected in an appropriate allocation of
ICR funds to the Library.
Accordingly, the Senate Library Committee asks that Senate approve the following motion:
That the Senate Budget Committee be asked to meet with the University Administration to
discuss increases in the allocation of Indirect Costs of Research funding to the University
Library, to enable the Library to meet the increased demands upon its collections and
services; and that the Committee inform Senate of the outcome of these discussions.
For the Committee,
respectfully submitted,
Herbert Rosengarten
Chair
May 2004
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 19,2004
03/04-186
Appendix E: Library Committee Activities 2003/2004
2002/03 Indirect Cost Support for Library by University
1 University
ICR rec'd by University
ICR allocated to Library
Library % 1
Toronto
$22,276,173
N/A
N/A
UBC
$13,757,785
$720,000
5.2%
Alberta
$11,899,271
$800,000
7%
Montreal
$10,247,638
$1,100,000
11%
Calgary
$7,318,918
$212,500
3%
McMaster
$7,255,502
$1,000,000
14%
Western Ontario
$7,248,173
$4,910,000
68%
Queen's
$6,155,806
$600,000
10%
Dalhousie
$5,289,130
$1,300,000
25%
Simon Fraser
$4,399,899
$85,000
2%
Saskatchewan
$4,244,720
$50,000
1%
Average % Received by Library 14.62%
Average % Received by Library (excluding Western Ontario)        8.7%
2003/04 Indirect Cost Support for Library by University
1 University
ICR rec'd by University
ICR allocated to Library
Library % 1
Toronto
N/A
N/A
N/A
UBC
$15,716,083
$600,000
3.8%
Alberta
$13,100,000
$850,000
6.5%
Montreal
$11,828,477
$1,100,000
9.3%
Calgary
$8,300,000
$212,500
2.6%
McMaster
$10,300,000
$1,000,000
9.7%
Western Ontario
$8,131,506
$1,270,000
15.6%
Queen's
$6,200,000
$600,000
9.7%
Dalhousie
$5,500,000
$600,000
10.9%
Simon Fraser
$4,964,632
$100,000
2%
Saskatchewan
$4,400,000
$350,000
8%
Average % Received by Library
8.8%
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-187
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix F: Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee
Appendix F: Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee
REPORT TO SENATE 2003-2004
Members of the Committee: Dr. Brian Bemmels, Professor Christine Boyle (chair), Ms.
Jordana Greenblatt, Mr. Robert Lowe, Dr. Michael MacEntee, Dr. Ann Rose, Dr. Carolyn
Shields, Dr. Sally Thorne, Mr. Des. R. Verma, Mr. Mike Yung, Mr. Christopher J.
Zappavigna.
The Senate Committee on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline is a standing committee of
Senate established under section 37(l)(v) of the University Act, R.S.B.C.1996, c.468
(consolidated as of 21 March 2003). The committee is a "standing committee of final appeal
for students in matters of academic discipline". Under section 61(1) of the Act the "president
has power to suspend a student and to deal summarily with any matter of student discipline."
Under section 61(2), the President "must promptly report the action to the standing committee
established under s.37(l)(v) with a statement of his or her reasons." Under section 61(3), the
"action of the president is final and subject in all cases to an appeal to the Senate."
The University Calendar for 2003/2004 on pages 37-38 contains information about
"Student Discipline". It describes certain offences, listing 13 of them, and cautions students
that "misconduct...includes, but is not limited to" these 13 offences. It notes that the President
has established the President's Advisory Committee on Student Discipline (hereafter Advisory
Committee) to advise the President on measures to be taken on matters of student discipline.
" An alleged instance of student misconduct deemed serious enough for action by the President
shall be referred to this Committee unless otherwise directed by the President." With respect
to faculty procedures, the Calendar notes that a "student suspected or apprehended in the
commitment of an offence shall be notified within a reasonable period of time of intention to
report the alleged offence to the department head, dean, or other appropriate person. The
student shall also be given the opportunity to explain the incident and, if he or she requests, to
meet with the department head, dean, or other appropriate person, before the alleged offence
is reported to the President." The Calendar further notes that a student has the right to appeal
the decision of the President to the Senate Committee on Academic Discipline.
The Policy Handbook of the University (http://www.policy.ubc.ca/policy69.htm) provides in
part:
Academic Misconduct
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-188
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix F: Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee
When a member of faculty suspects that misconduct has occurred, he/she shall investigate
it immediately. If satisfied that the misconduct did occur, he/she shall notify the student at
once that he plans to report the incident, and he/she shall then report it immediately to the
department head, or to the appropriate person in the faculty, who in turn shall notify the
dean of that faculty or designate without delay. If after thorough investigation, during
which the student shall be given an opportunity to explain the incident, the misconduct
has been established, the academic aspects of the matter may be dealt with, and
appropriate academic action taken by the department or faculty concerned.
When the misconduct consists of cheating as described above, zero credit or some other
mark may be assigned by the faculty for the examination or test in which the cheating
occurred.
When the misconduct consists of plagiarism as described above, zero credit or some other
mark may be assigned by the faculty for the plagiarized submission.
The action thus taken shall be reported immediately to the President's Advisory
Committee on Student Discipline by the dean of the faculty in which the misconduct
occurred, together with a complete description of the evidence upon which the faculty
action was based.
During the period from April 2003 to April 2004, the Senate Committee heard 12 appeals
involving 14 students disciplined by the President on the recommendation of her Advisory
Committee. The offences, the disciplinary action taken by the President, the nature of the
appeals, and the decision of the Standing Committee, were as follows:
1. April 2003
The student altered answers on a midterm examination and returned the examination
to the instructor requesting that it be re-graded. Discipline imposed: a mark of zero in
the course, 12 month suspension, and entry of disciplinary action on transcript with a
right to apply for removal of notation after two years from graduation (hereafter
"notation on transcript"). Appeal with respect to the severity of the disciplinary action
and that the non-disclosure of the recommendations of the Advisory Committee to the
President hampered the right of appeal and resulted in inadequate reasons for the
disciplinary actions taken. Appeal dismissed.
2. June 2003
The student was disciplined for collaborating with another student on lab reports and
altering answers on a midterm examination and returning the examination to the
instructor for re-grading. Discipline imposed: a mark of zero in the course, 12 month
suspension, and notation on transcript. Appeal with respect to the non-disclosure of
the recommendations of the Advisory Committee and that the Advisory Committee
was in error in its findings. Appeal allowed (on the basis of insufficient reasons to meet
the statutory obligation to give reasons in s.61 of the University Act).
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-189
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix F: Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee
3. June 2003
The student submitted a forged enrolment letter in support of an application for
employment at the university. Discipline imposed: 8 month suspension and notation
on transcript. Appeal with respect to inaccuracies in the Advisory Committee
recommendations and with respect to the severity of the discipline. Appeal dismissed.
4. June 2003
The student had access to notes left in a washroom that was accessible from the
examination room constituting possession of unauthorized material in an examination.
Discipline imposed: a mark of zero in the course and a letter of reprimand. Appeal
with respect to the severity of the disciplinary action and that the student did not use
the notes after finding them in the washroom. Appeal dismissed.
5. June 2003
The student was disciplined for plagiarizing a lab assignment and submitting a
fraudulent output in the same course. Discipline imposed: a mark of zero in the course,
8 months suspension, and notation on transcript. Appeal with respect to an
unreasonable delay in providing reasons, the allegation of plagiarism was not proved,
insufficient notice was given regarding the second matter, all evidence was not
considered and the severity of the disciplinary action. Appeal allowed (on the basis of
delay in disclosure of the Advisory Committee recommendations and notice
insufficient to give a fair opportunity to respond).
6. June 2003
Two students were disciplined for working together beyond the point that they were
allowed to collaborate on a lab. Discipline imposed: marks of zero in the course, 4
month suspensions, and notation on transcripts. Appeal with respect to delay in
receiving recommendations of Advisory Committee, and lack of reasons for the
decision of the President. Appeals allowed (on the basis of insufficient reasons).
7. August 2003
Two students collaborated during a midterm examination. Discipline imposed: marks
of zero in the course, 8 months suspensions, and notation on transcripts. Appeal with
respect to the Advisory Committee erring in its findings and the severity of the
discipline imposed. Appeals dismissed.
8. November 2003
The student used unauthorized material during a final examination. Discipline
imposed: mark of zero in the course, 12 month suspension, and notation on transcript.
Appeal on basis of lack of reasons provided by the President and non-disclosure of
recommendations of the Advisory Committee, which had recommended leniency in
this case. Appeal allowed in that suspension reduced to 6 months.
9. November 2003
The student plagiarized substantially from a number of websites. Discipline imposed:
mark of zero in the course, 8-month suspension, and notation on transcript. Appeal
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-190
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix F: Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee
with respect to the presence of a witness at the meeting of the President's Advisory
Council, lack of reasons by the President for the decision and non-disclosure of
recommendations and reasoning of the Advisory Committee. Appeal dismissed.
10. March 2004
The student committed an academic misconduct by self-marking of examination in red
ink prior to handing examination to invigilator. Discipline imposed: mark of zero in
the course, 12-month suspension, and notation on transcript. Appeal with respect to
the presence of a witness at the Advisory Committee hearing and of that witness being
allowed to question the student and others, lack of reasons by the President for the
decision and non-disclosure of recommendations and reasoning of the Advisory
Committee. Appeal dismissed.
11. April 2004
Unauthorized material was used during a final examination. Discipline imposed: mark
of zero in the course, 8-month suspension, and notation on transcript. Appeal on the
basis that events since the initial hearing increased severity of discipline imposed.
Appeal dismissed.
12. April 2004
The student used unauthorized material during a midterm examination. Discipline
imposed: mark of zero in the course, 12-month suspension, and notation on transcript.
Appeal with respect to the severity of discipline imposed. Appeal dismissed.
In the last report, the Committee noted that it had embarked on a review of its jurisdiction
and that Mr. Hubert Lai of the Office of the University Counsel, had undertaken to review all
university procedures and policies with respect to student discipline and to share that
information with the Standing Committee. That information has not yet been received.
However, the Terms of Reference of the Ad Hoc Committee to Review the Senate, include
"Jurisprudence. To provide advice regarding Senate's role in the context of administrative
justice, e.g. its statutory jurisdiction in discipline appeals."
The Chair wishes to thank the members of the Committee for their hard work over this
academic year.
Respectfully submitted,
Christine Boyle
Professor of Law
Chair of the Senate Committee on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-191
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix G: New Awards
Appendix G: New Awards
APOTEX Inc. Award in Pharmaceutical Sciences: Awards totalling $750 have been endowed by
Apotex Inc. to assist with the expenses for undergraduate student(s) to attend the annual British
Columbia Pharmacy Conference. Consideration is given to students with good academic standing
who demonstrate leadership skills, involvement in student affairs, and commitment to community
service. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.
(First awards available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
Richard Edward BECK Prize: A $500 prize has been endowed by his family in honour of Dr.
Richard E. Beck for an outstanding contribution to clinical teaching by a senior
resident/subspecialty resident in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Beck was hired in 1953 as the
first clinical teaching fellow in the Department at the time the first graduating class was doing
their clinical clerkship. He was a member of the clinical teaching faculty until his retirement. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Department of Medicine. (First award available for
the 2003/2004 academic year)
Howard BITTNER Bursary in Dentistry: Bursaries totalling $5,000 are offered by Dr. Howard
Bittner to students in the first year of the D.M.D. Program. Dr. Bittner is a local endodontist and
UBC Faculty of Dentistry alumnus. (First awards available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
BORDEN Ladner Gervais Research Fellowship: Two fellowships of $10,000 each are offered by
the national law firm, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP, to promote excellence in legal scholarship. The
awards are offered on the basis of academic excellence to students completing the first year of the
LL.B. Program, or an LL.B. combined program, to support participation in Faculty research
projects during the summer months. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Law. (First awards available for the 2003/2004 academic year)
Herschel H. BOYDSTON, Jr. Memorial Bursary in Forestry: A $1,000 bursary is offered to
forestry students in memory of Herschel H. Boydston, Jr. by his family to honour his
contributions to forestry and his dedication to education. Herschel was an avid outdoorsman and
fly fisherman and a true believer in the balance between nature and development. He believed that
education was the key to our future and supported this belief by working with all levels of
students and business leaders. The family is continuing Herschel's legacy with this bursary. (First
award available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
BROCK Family Award: Awards totalling $500 have been endowed by the Brock Family and their
friends for students graduating with a Masters in Archival Studies from the
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -192
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix G: New Awards
School of Library, Archival and Information Studies who demonstrate leadership in planning,
implementing and promoting the preservation, organization and effective use of society's recorded
information and ideas. The awards are made on the recommendation of the School. (First award
available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
ENGINEERS' Club Bursary: Bursaries totalling $1,000 have been endowed by the Engineers'
Club for students in the first or second year of an engineering program in the Faculty of Applied
Science. (First awards available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
Jack EVANS Prize in Accounting: A $350 prize has been endowed through a bequest by Jack
Evans for students in the Accounting Option of the Bachelor of Commerce Program The award is
made on the recommendation of the Sauder School of Business. (First award available for the
2004/2005 academic year)
FARRIS Entrance Scholarship: A $1,000 scholarship is offered by Farris to a student who has
worked in the business sector since completing undergraduate studies and has subsequently
returned to university to pursue a legal education. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Law. (First award available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
FARRIS Scholarship in Law: A $1,000 scholarship is offered by Farris to a student entering third
year Law who has achieved high academic standing and has demonstrated leadership through
activities in the law school. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law.
(First award available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
Cortland HULTBERG Memorial Scholarship: Scholarships totalling $650 have been endowed by
family, friends, colleagues and students in memory of Cortland Hultberg, who dedicated his life to
music. Professor Hultberg taught at UBC for 34 years and had a special talent for engaging and
encouraging students. The awards are offered to undergraduate students studying Music, with
preference given to choral singing or composition. The awards are made on the recommendation
of the School of Music. (First awards available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
Roger KEAY Farm Management Scholarship: Several scholarships of a minimum of $1,000 each
have been endowed by the Farm Business Challenges Advisory Committee in memory of Roger
Keay for third or fourth year students with a demonstrated interest in agri-business or a related
aspect of food and resource economics. The Farm Business Challenges Committee regularly
hosted a very successful conference called " Farm Business Challenges" for the agricultural
industry and has created this endowment as a legacy of that event and of Roger Keay's
contributions to farm business management. The award
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-193
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix G: New Awards
is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. (First awards available for
the 2004/2005 academic year)
Peter LOEFFLER Memorial Prize: A $300 prize has been endowed by family, friends, colleagues
and students in memory of Peter Loeffler, who dedicated his life to theatre. The award is offered
to an undergraduate student majoring in Theatre. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Department of Theatre, Film and Creative Writing. (First award available for the 2004/2005
academic year)
Otello P. NOCENTE Memorial Award in Theatre: A $1,500 award is offered by Daniel Nocente
in memory of his father for a student studying theatre who has demonstrated exceptional talent.
The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of Theatre, Film and Creative
Writing and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. (First award available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
Robert F. OSBORNE Memorial Award in Human Kinetics: A $4,000 award has been endowed in
memory of Dr. Robert F. Osborne's outstanding service as coach, teacher and administrator
during his 33 years as a faculty member at UBC, 27 of them as Director of the School of Physical
Education and Recreation. The award is available to undergraduate students entering the final
year of the Bachelor of Human Kinetics degree who have exhibited excellence in academics,
athletics, and service in sport and recreation. The award is made on the recommendation of the
School of Human Kinetics. (First award available for the 2003/2004 academic year)
Teresa TENISCI Memorial Prize: A $300 prize has been established by her husband and endowed
by family and friends in memory of Teresa Tenisci (1952-1999) (B.Sc.1974), a long-serving
member of the University's management and professional staff. The prize is awarded on the
recommendation of the Department of Theatre, Film and Creative Writing to a third or fourth
year undergraduate student demonstrating exceptional achievement in the Creative Writing
Program. (First award available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
Bonnie Colleen THURSTON Memorial Bursary: Bursaries totalling $1,000 have been endowed
by Samuel and Ruth Thurston in memory of their daughter, Dr. Bonnie Thurston, who dedicated
her life to the study of Philosophy. Dr. Thurston completed her Ph.D. at UBC and her postdoctoral work at Stanford University, and lectured extensively across Canada. The awards are
offered to undergraduate students studying Philosophy. (First awards available for the 2004/2005
academic year)
Robert A. TIPPLE Scholarship in Music: Scholarships totalling $1,250 have been endowed
through a bequest by Robert A. Tipple for students in the School of Music who
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -194
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix G: New Awards
are specializing in Composition, with preference (when possible) to students whose studies have a
particular emphasis on musical composition for the film industry. The awards are made on the
recommendation of the School of Music and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation
with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First awards available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
Dean and Mary TOYE Bursary: Bursaries totalling $1,000 have been endowed by Dean M. Toye
(B.Sc. 1962) and his wife, Mary, for undergraduate and graduate students in the Department of
Chemistry. (First awards available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
Brahm WIESMAN Memorial Scholarship in Community and Regional Planning: A $1,000
scholarship has been endowed by Mrs. Madge Wiesman, and augmented by colleagues, in
memory of her husband, Professor Brahm Wiesman, who was the Director of UBC's School of
Community and Regional Planning for many years. The award is offered to students in the School
for travel abroad to carry out research under the auspices of a university exchange program, with
preference to students travelling to China or Southeast Asia. The award is made on the
recommendation of the School. (First award available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
WOMEN in Technology Teacher Education Prize: Prizes totalling $625 have been endowed by
UBC alumni and friends to provide academic recognition and support for female students
majoring in technology studies within the Teacher Education Program, Faculty of Education. The
prize was established to encourage an increase in the number of female technology teachers within
the B.C. school system. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education,
with preference to women who have achieved academic excellence as well as career success in the
technology field. (First award available for the 2004/2005 academic year)
ZOE Prize in Fine Arts: A $500 prize is offered by Robert Wilson to an undergraduate student in
the Department of Art History and Visual Art, with preference to students continuing on to a
Master of Fine Arts Program. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department.
(First award available for the 2003/2004 academic year)
PREVIOUSLY-APPROVED AWARDS WITH CHANGES IN TERMS OR FUNDING SOURCE
Award 01332 - John C. and Anne J. CLARK Scholarship in U.S. Studies (revised wording):
Scholarships totalling $2,600 have been endowed by John C. and Anne J. Clark for undergraduate
students entering the third or fourth year in the United States Studies Program. The awards are
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Arts.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04 -195
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix G: New Awards
How amended? - This new endowed scholarship was originally approved by the UBC Senate on
December 17, 2003 as the "John C. Clark Scholarship in U.S. Studies". The donor belatedly
decided that he wanted his wife's name included in the title and description and so revised Terms
of Reference have been drawn up for approval. The terms of the award remain unchanged.
Award 06330 - Millie and Ralph DRABINSKY Graduate Scholarship in Medicine (revised
wording): A $750 scholarship has been endowed by family and friends in honour of Ralph and
Millie Drabinsky's fiftieth wedding anniversary. The award is offered to a masters or doctoral
student, whose supervisor has a primary appointment in the Faculty of Medicine, undertaking
research into the etiology or treatment of Alzheimer's or related neurodegenerative diseases of the
central nervous system. No individual will receive support from this fund for more than two
consecutive years. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
How amended? - To accommodate a more interdisciplinary approach to Alzheimer's research, the
donors have agreed to substitute the words "to a masters or doctoral student, whose supervisor
has a primary appointment in the Faculty of Medicine" for the previous wording: "to a masters or
doctoral student in the Faculty of Medicine".
Award 00797 - GUICHON Family Award (revised wording): Awards totalling $730 have been
endowed by family, friends and colleagues in memory of Lawrence Peter Guichon, one of British
Columbia's pioneer cattlemen, who was a recipient of a Doctor of Science degree (honoris causa)
from UBC for his life-long dedication to the enhancement of the cattle industry throughout the
grasslands of B.C. The award is given to an undergraduate or graduate student with demonstrated
leadership qualities who has a defined interest in ecology, sustainability of extensive animal
production agriculture, and management of natural grasslands. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences.
How amended? - To accommodate curriculum changes in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, the
donor has agreed to re-word the penultimate sentence of the description to somewhat broaden the
award terms.
Award 06331 - Rafe MAIR Prize in Journalism (revised wording): A $1,000 prize has been
endowed by The Jim Pattison Broadcast Group in honour of Rafe Mair. It is awarded to the
student in the graduating class of the Master of Journalism Program who has produced the best
published work of public service journalism during the degree program. The award is made on the
recommendation of the School of Journalism.
 Vancouver Senate 03/04-196
Minutes of May 19,2004	
Appendix G: New Awards
How amended? - This award was formerly funded on an annual basis by CKNW which withdrew
its support when Mr. Mair left their employ. The prize has now been endowed in perpetuity by
The Jim Pattison Broadcast Group. The terms of the award remain unchanged.
Award 06328 - Tim and Ann O'RIORDAN Fellowship (revised wording): A $16,000 fellowship
has been endowed by Tim and Ann O'Riordan and The University of British Columbia for a
doctoral student involved in research into or the study of sustainable development. Recipients
must be Resident or Non-Resident Members of Green College. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
How amended? With the donors' support, the award is now made on the sole recommendation of
the Faculty of Graduate Studies rather than in consultation with the Green College admission
committee in order to streamline the adjudication process.
Award 02510 - Women's Canadian Club of Vancouver Scholarship in Food, Nutrition and
Health (revised wording): A $375 scholarship has been endowed by the Women's Canadian Club
of Vancouver for a student entering the fourth year of the Bachelor of Science (Food, Nutrition &
Health) Program, based on the recipient's general proficiency in the work of the third year of the
program. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences.
How amended? The description has been modified to recognize the melding of the School of
Family and Nutritional Sciences into the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and changes in the
credential name.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 19,2004
03/04-197
Appendix H: Candidates for Emeritus Status
Appendix H: Candidates for Emeritus Status
FACULTY MEMBERS ELIGIBLE FOR EMERITUS STATUS ~ JUNE 30, 2004
1 Last Name
First Name
Faculty/Department
Full title                       1
Retirements
-June 30, 2004
Acorn
Sonia
School of Nursing
Professor
Bellward
Gail D.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Professor
Cameron
Eugene C.
Nephrology Division
Associate Professor
Carre
Frank Alex
School of Human Kinetics
Associate Professor
Christensen
Carole
Pigler
Social Work & Family Studies
Professor
Davies
Michael S
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Professor
Dixon
Glen
Thomas
Curriculum Studies
Associate Professor
Hamilton
Stanley W.
The Sauder School of Business
Professor
Hannam
Alan G.
Oral Health Sciences
Professor
Harding
Phillip E
Classical, Near Eastern & Religious St.
Professor
Henning
Hartmut
Cardiology Division
Associate Professor
Hewat
Roberta J
W
School of Nursing
Associate Professor
Kraus
AlanD
The Sauder School of Business
Professor
Lavkulich
Leslie M
Faculties of Agricultural Sciences and
Graduate Studies
Professor
Manning
Glenville
Department of Anesthesia
Clinical Associate
Professor
Maurice
William L
Psychiatry
Associate Professor
Nearing
Joseph
Health Care & Epidemiology
Clinical Assistant
Professor
Nelems
Bill
Surgery
Professor
Oloman
Colin Wm
Chemical & Biological Engineering
Professor
Scheffer
JohnR
Chemistry
Professor
Slakov
Roy
Psychiatry
Clinical Associate
Professor
Slaymaker
H. Olav
Geography
Professor
Takashima
Ken-Ichi
Asian Studies
Professor
Tsang
Ian
Medicine
Clinical Professor
Watkinson
A. Paul
Chemical & Biological Engineering
Professor
Yeung
Moira
Mowa
Respiratory Medicine Division
Professor
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 19,2004
03/04-198
Appendix H: Candidates for Emeritus Status
Last Name     First Name    Faculty/Department
Early Termination Agreements -June 30, 2004
Full title
Blake
Donald E
Political Science
Professor
Dunn
Patrick J
Humanities & Social Science Division
General Librarian
Matson
Richard G
Anthropology & Sociology
Professor
Ziemba
William
Faculty of Commerce & Business
Administration
Professor
1 Last Name
First Name
Faculty/Department
Full title
Resignations reaching age
65 before June 30, 2004
Bates
Anthony
Program Director

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