Open Collections

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1999-10-13

Item Metadata

Download

Media
senmin-1.0390234.pdf
Metadata
JSON: senmin-1.0390234.json
JSON-LD: senmin-1.0390234-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): senmin-1.0390234-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: senmin-1.0390234-rdf.json
Turtle: senmin-1.0390234-turtle.txt
N-Triples: senmin-1.0390234-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: senmin-1.0390234-source.json
Full Text
senmin-1.0390234-fulltext.txt
Citation
senmin-1.0390234.ris

Full Text

 The University  of  British  Columbia
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF OCTOBER 13, 1999
Attendance
Present: President M. C. Piper (Chair), A/Vice-President D. R. Atkins, Dean F. S. Abbott, Dr. P.
Adebar, Mr. R. Affleck, Dr. R. W. Blake, Dean J. Blom, Mr. P. T. Brady, Mr. P. T. Burns, Dean J.
A. Cairns, Ms. E. J. Caskey, Mr. A. Chui, Ms. J. Dennie, Dr. D. Fisher, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Dr.
R. Goldman-Segall, Dr. D. Granot, Mr. H. D. Gray, Mr. E. Greathed, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. A.
G. Hannam, Dr. P. E. Harding, Dr. J. Helliwell, Ms. L. Hewalo, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. C.
Jillings, Dr. D. D. Kitts, Dean M. Klawe, Mr. J. Kondopulos, Dr. B. S. Lalli, Dr. V. Lemay, Ms. P.
Liu, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Dr. M. MacEntee, Mr. S. MacLachlan, Dr. P. L. Marshall, A/Dean J. A.
McLean, Dr. W. R. McMaster, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Ms. L. Morton, Dean D. Muzyka, Dr. P. N.
Nemetz, Mr. V. Pacradouni, Dr. G. N. Patey, Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Dr. J. Perry, Mr. G. Podersky-
Cannon, Mr. H. Poon, Dr. V. Raoul, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten, Dr. K. Schonert-Reichl, Dean N.
Sheehan, Prof. A. F. Sheppard, Dr. D. Sjerve, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Ms. K. Sonik, Dr. R. Tees, Mr.
D. Tompkins, Mr. J. Tsui, Dean pro tem. A. Tully, Dr. W. Uegama, Mr. D. R. Verma, Dr. D. Ll.
Williams, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky, Dean E. H. K. Yen.
Regrets: Dr. W. L. Sauder (Chancellor), Dr. B. C. McBride, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dr. H. M. Burt, Ms.
J. DeLucry, Mr. E. Fidler, Rev. T. J. Hanrahan, Dr. S. B. Knight, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Dr. D. M.
Lyster, Dr. W. J. Phillips, Dean M. Quayle, Ms. C. Quinlan, Dr. C. Shields, Mr. J. E. Sookero,
Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr.
Senate Membership
DECLARATION OF VACANCIES (UNIVERSITY ACT, SECTION 36 (6))
1. Prof. Paul T. K. Lin, appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council;
2. Mr. Adrian Mitchell, student representative of the Faculty of Science.
Vol. 1999/2000 12195
 Vancouver Senate 12196
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
REPLACEMENTS
1. Dr. Ricki Goldman-Segall replaces Dr.Victor Froese as faculty representative of
the Faculty of Education;
2. Ms. Lillian Morton replaces Mr. Michael Edwards as student representative of
the Faculty of Education.
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Mr. Podersky-Cannon, referring to page 12182 of the Minutes of the Meeting of
September 15, 1999 (Senate Committee Membership), noted that Dr. Williams had also
stated that nominations for the four vacant positions for representatives to the affiliated
colleges would be brought to the October meeting of Senate. Dr. Williams confirmed that
he had indeed stated that this would be the case, and that the Committee was remiss. He
explained that, although there was a shortage of volunteers for these positions, the
Committee would endeavour to bring forward nominations as soon as possible.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That the minutes of the Meeting of September
Dr. Tees J        ^ 1999 be adopted as circulated.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
POSITION OF STUDENTS IN CASE OF A STRIKE (PP. 12187-8)
Please see 'Appendix A: Policies on the Position of Students in Case of a Strike'
At the September 15, 1999 meeting of Senate, Mr. Tompkins had asked whether Senate
had previously approved a policy regarding the impact on students of a possible strike. In
response, the Registrar circulated two excerpts from the Minutes of Senate, which include
relevant policies and discussion.
 Vancouver Senate 12197
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Business Arising from the Minutes
STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF COPYRIGHT IN THE
DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT
Dr. Rosengarten presented the report on behalf of the Library Committee. He reminded
members of Senate that the Library Committee had given the following notice of motion
on May 19, 1999:
The Senate Library Committee recommends that the Statement of Principles for the
Management of Copyright in the Digital Environment, developed by the Canadian
Association of Research Libraries, be supported by the University of British
Columbia.
The text of the Statement was circulated at the meeting.
[Note: Statement not included in the minutes. Printed copies may be obtained from the
Manager, Secretariat Services.]
Dr. Rosengarten stated that the Statement had been prepared by the Canadian
Association of Research Libraries (CARL) in support of a campaign to persuade the
federal government to maintain an appropriate balance between the claims of copyright
holders and the need for access for information by people involved in study, teaching and
research. The Library Committee reviewed the Statement, and strongly supports its
position.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That the Senate of the University of British
Dr. Gilbert i        Columbia endorse the Statement of Principles
for the Management of Copyright in the
Digital Environment, as developed by the
Canadian Association of Research Libraries.
Speaking to the motion, Dr. Rosengarten stated that in recent years, copyright legislation
had tipped the balance in favour of the rights of copyright holders, making it increasingly
difficult and expensive to gain access to works protected by copyright, even with recent
legislation that granted certain exceptions under the general rubric of Tair dealing.'
Difficulties have been compounded by the expansion of information in a digital
environment. Librarians and scholars have become concerned that the owners of
protected databases will restrict access to those who can
 Vancouver Senate 12198
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
afford to pay. This Statement of Principles represents an attempt to persuade government
to apply to digitized materials the same Tair dealing' principles that apply to printed
information.
Mr. Pacradouni, referring to Principle 6, vRoyalty-Free Access to Government
Information', asked why the Statement's scope appears to be restricted to federal
government materials. Mr. Burns pointed out that the abridged summary of the Statement
dated May 1999 drew no distinction between federal and provincial materials.
In response to a query from Mr. Podersky-Cannon, Dr. Rosengarten confirmed that
CARL recognizes that copyright holders have a right to receive royalties, but supports free
access to information that might otherwise be restricted.
The motion was
put and carried.
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
ACTING VICE-PRESIDENT, ACADEMIC AND PROVOST
The President announced with regret that Dr. Barry C. McBride, Vice-President Academic
and Provost had taken a leave of absence due to health reasons, and wished Dr. McBride
a speedy recovery on behalf of members of Senate. Dr. Derek R. Atkins had agreed to
serve as Acting Vice-President during Dr. McBride's absence. The President thanked Dr.
Atkins for agreeing to serve in this capacity.
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGS
The President invited all members of Senate to attend either or both upcoming Annual
General Meetings, scheduled on October 14 and October 19, 1999. The first meeting was
to be held at the Waterfront Hotel, while the second was to take place at the Chan Centre
for the Performing Arts.
 Vancouver Senate 12199
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
President Piper also encouraged members of Senate to invite colleagues, students and
others to attend.
THRONE SPEECH FUNDING ANNOUNCEMENT
The President stated that the federal government had announced its support for a
program entitled v21st Century Research Chairs for Research Excellence.' President Piper
described this announcement as very good news for research universities across Canada,
and for UBC in particular. The federal government intends to introduce 1200 new chairs
over the next three years. Funding for these chairs will be dispersed through the 3 major
granting councils, and the total cost will be approximately $180 million over three years.
There is the potential to increase the number of chairs to 2000 over five years. This
ongoing funding will support outstanding scholars in all disciplines, including those in the
social sciences and humanities.
Although the implementation strategy was still to be worked out, the federal
government's commitment to 1200 positions had been confirmed. The President urged the
UBC community to think about how the University should position itself to take
advantage of this very significant new development.
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
DRAFT ACADEMIC PLAN
[Note: full text of the Draft Academic Plan not included in the Minutes. Please see
h ttp-.llwww. o Idadm.ubc. ca/apac/]
The President introduced the Draft Academic Plan by inviting members of Senate to
participate in a thorough discussion of the document. President Piper suggested that
motions for specific revisions to the document would not be accepted at that point in
time. The intent was to seek the
 Vancouver Senate 12200
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
advice of Senate in advance of presenting the document for adoption at a later date.
President Piper then invited Acting Vice-President Atkins to comment further on the
Draft.
Dr. Atkins stated that, although it was regrettable that Dr. McBride was unable to be
present, he will still have a chance to listen to advice of Senate by reviewing the notes
from the discussion.
The Academic Plan Advisory Committee (APAC), which consisted of 38 members, had
circulated a preliminary draft document entitled Towards an Academic Plan.' This first
document had been presented to Senate by APAC chair Dr. Michael Goldberg. 60
meetings on and off campus ensued and APAC received over 300 written submissions.
Consultations continued when the Draft was presented at a Town Hall Meeting recently
held at the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts. Dr. Atkins reminded members of Senate
that the document remained in draft form, and APAC members were still open to
receiving input.
Dr. Atkins described the Academic Plan as a "child' of Trek 2000. The Plan will therefore
inherit the properties, values and context of the Trek 2000 document. The authors of the
Plan had chosen a heavily decentralized planning process. In an effort to provide some
flexibility, the document was vague about what constitutes an academic unit: be it a
faculty, department or some other kind of structure. APAC had requested clarification
from Senate on this issue.
Unit-based academic plans should document weaknesses as well as strengths. For
example, conditions in teaching and research facilities are currently far below what they
should be. Classrooms are overcrowded, and connectivity is obviously an issue. Support
for faculty members in teaching and research is inadequate. Any effective plan must
address these issues in order to identify what needs to be done to rectify the weaknesses
before moving on.
 Vancouver Senate 12201
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
One problem inherent to decentralized planning is that everyone may be heading in
different directions. The Academic Plan will provide a sense that we are all heading in
roughly the same compass direction. Dr. Atkins stated that it would not be helpful to
have everyone heading to different points of the compass.
Given that the Draft Academic Plan contains 108 bullets, there will always be a place
where someone will disagree. The Plan is not intended to be directive; instead, the bullets
are intended as guidelines for what units might consider including in their own academic
plans. The authors have chosen their language carefully: words like "advocates,1
"supports,1 or "proposes' are used in place of "we will,' "we must,' or "we should.'
A critical part of the planning process is to see the whole rather than just the parts. Trek
2000 has generated an enormous amount of activity. For example, some of the ideas in
Trek 2000 have resulted in an avalanche of proposals for startling, wonderful new
programs which build on the tremendous tradition of the University, as well as innovative
programs. One problem with the Academic Plan involves incrementalism: if its ideas are
examined one at a time, one may begin to focus on the hill immediately ahead rather than
on the whole landscape. A second problem with incrementalism is that the first applicant
may get the funding. It is hoped that we can find some way to assess what kinds of
competing proposals may exist, so that decision-making bodies can determine how a
particular proposal fits in with demands that UBC is facing on the whole.
There has been concern expressed about the Academic Opportunities Fund, particularly
about the concept of taxing units. APAC would like to hear from Senate on this issue, and
the Committee is open to considering alternate suggestions.
 Vancouver Senate 12202
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
The development of an Academic Plan was listed as the first item under the "People'
section of Trek 2000. Dr. Atkins noted that implementing such a Plan will be expensive.
Other parts of the Trek 2000 vision will also incur large costs. Another example is the
recruitment and retention of outstanding faculty, particularly considering the retirement
bulge facing UBC in coming years. For many reasons, the next decade is going to be an
expensive period. Difficulties in this area will be eased somewhat by the funding
announcement in the Speech from the Throne, and Dr. Atkins added as a point of interest
that President Piper had played an important role in initiating this new program. The
Academic Plan, and the approximately $3 to $5 million required for its implementation
would be considered among other priorities of the Trek 2000 program as funds become
available.
Dr. Atkins introduced three APAC members in attendance, including Dr. Richard Cavell.
Members of Senate were invited to speak to the Draft Academic Plan and made the
following comments.
Dr. MacEntee asked why UBC needs a Plan at all. He stated that he would not quite agree
that it would not be healthy for the University to be heading in all directions of the
compass, because he believed that UBC is an effective university because it does so. In
response to Dr. Atkins' comment that UBC needs an integrated approach to assist in
prioritizing demands, he stated that there is already a structure in place that has worked
for a very long time and has put UBC in a very good position.
Dr. MacEntee noted that the Plan states that it is not a detailed blueprint to be imposed
on all units, but that the Plan also advocates rewarding existing programs which advance
the goals of the Plan. The idea that funding would be administered through a committee
proposed by the Fac-
 Vancouver Senate 12203
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
ulties but selected by the Provost has made many people on campus very uneasy. He
stated that the Plan fell far short of addressing the needs of a very diverse community, and
would put UBC at risk for centralizing in a way that may not indeed suit us for the next
century.
Dean Klawe, addressing the need for a Plan, reminded members of Senate that recurring
budget cuts have had very serious consequences on campus, including in the Faculty of
Science. Educational and research programs, as well as the morale of faculty, staff and
students have all been negatively affected. Individual departments are attempting to cope
with budget cuts in rational ways, while doing the least possible damage to things that
they value, i.e. educational and research programs. Measures include asking faculty
members to teach more and to accommodate more students in each class. Even while
trying to coordinate cutbacks within the Faculty, the actions of a given department may
have adverse effects on other departments or Faculties. This problem is difficult to
manage without a coherent framework. Such a framework would be useful in times of
fiscal restraint, but also in times of renewed resources. Having a Plan would not mean
that everyone does the same things or has the same style, but would mean that UBC has
identified some common goals.
Dr. Patey stated that the Plan is not transparent, even on the third or fourth reading. He
pointed out its contrast with reality: although everyone is in favour of faculty retention
and renewal, departing faculty members are not being replaced. He gave the example of
the Department of Chemistry, where although 4 faculty members left the Department last
year, only one replacement has been appointed. He expressed the opinion that a Plan
which does not address funding cannot be credible. Faculty members are encouraged to
support experiential learning, and indeed experiments are a major part of science, but
laboratories are facing cuts. Teaching assistantships, a mainstay of a graduate education,
are being reduced for financial reasons at the same time when UBC is working to attract
more graduate students. He suggested that some recognition of
 Vancouver Senate 12204
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
this reality appear in the Plan. The Plan contains a fundamental tension. It states that we
want to offer programs which are more labour intensive, while also enhancing research
efforts. This can only be accomplished in two ways: full time faculty will teach more or
we will need to hire a large number of sessional instructors.
Dr. Patey, referring to the Plan's apparent overemphasis on interdisciplinarity and
breadth, pointed out that depth, rather than breadth, is the most crucial factor in the
physical sciences, where advances are made in areas that may be considered very narrow.
He also stated that it was unclear what was meant by "differential roles for faculty.' With
regard to the Academic Opportunities Fund, Dr. Patey added that most units are not in a
position to be taxed, as all funds are currently being used to simply maintain core
programs. Dr. Patey added that the Academic Opportunities Fund would be more
appealing if there were evident a commitment on behalf of the central administration to
seek new funds, and to apply this principle to new funds.
Mr. Greathed noted that the Plan mentions alumni on Page 1 among the people to be
kept in the foreground of all planning activities. He noted that there is no mention of
alumni in other parts of the Plan, however, and suggested that this should be added, e.g.
Section 5, Page 9. He also asked how the term "broader communities to which we are
responsible' should be interpreted. Are the authors of the Plan referring to Vancouver, the
Lower Mainland, Southern British Columbia, or the Province of British Columbia? He
stated that his recent experience has shown that the residents of Point Grey and the
University Endowment Lands are angry about the actions and attitudes of UBC. He
suggested that the Plan should focus more on these broader communities.
Dr. Fisher, referring to the focus on links with the broader community, stated the opinion
that it would be a mistake to substitute service to our immediate communities in place of
UBC's tradi-
 Vancouver Senate 12205
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
tional purpose as a national research university that serves Canada, and to some extent
other nations particularly those around Pacific Rim. The most important goal would be
the sharing of knowledge through the world wide knowledge network, as this would
contribute to the common good in the broadest sense.
Speaking to the section on governance, Dr. Fisher stated that transparency and collegiality
should be emphasized as operating principles within the Plan. According to the
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the four main forms
of organization of higher education institutions are: collegial, political, bureaucratic and
market. All institutions incorporate elements of all of these forms in varying degrees. The
document, as it stands, pushes UBC further toward the political, bureaucratic, and market
end of the spectrum. He suggested that UBC look for ways to return to its collegial roots.
He noted that the draft could further centralize authority in the President's Office,
creating quasi-markets where units would be forced to compete against each other for
scarce resources.
Addressing the section on the learning environment, Dr. Fisher stated that traditional
ways of organizing universities have not led to life-long learning. He suggested that
perhaps a better balance should be struck between interdisciplinary and disciplinary
learning.
Dr. Fisher agreed that the library is the central research resource for the entire university.
He suggested that UBC focus on the goal of "reviewing library funding concerning space,
operations and acquisitions' rather than dissipating our efforts. He referred to a 1997/98
survey of 111 North American research universities conducted by the Association of
Research Libraries. The survey showed that the University of Toronto had risen from 6th
position to 4th position among the 111
 Vancouver Senate 12206
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
institutions over the past five years; in comparison, UBC had fallen from 25th position to
35th position.
Dr. Fisher requested that sentences be used rather than point form, and that priorities be
ordered rather than presented in long lists. The Plan should set priorities above all else. It
should also contain clear and parsimonious writing.
Referring to the Academic Opportunities Fund, Dr. Fisher stated that it appeared that this
proposed decision making process would bypass current decision making bodies, and
expressed the opinion that decisions essential to UBC's academic future should be handled
by the Senate.
Dr. Sjerve stated that, although he couldn't see the reason for a Plan at first, he has come
to understand that a Plan may be a way to manage coming changes. He agreed with Dean
Klawe, in that a Plan might assist Faculties in making decisions. He stated that the
proposed Academic Opportunities fund would create a divisive environment, but added
that this arrangement would be perfectly acceptable if it were applied to new funding
only. Dr. Sjerve asked that the Academic Policy Committee be given the opportunity for a
second reading of the Academic Plan at some point in the process.
Dr. Pedersen spoke in favour of the Academic Plan, but with some qualifications. He
stated that he had been quite disturbed recently about the amount of invective about the
Academic Plan among his colleagues in the Faculty of Science as well as elsewhere on
campus. People appear to be frustrated in that they are speaking out in ways that debase
the quality of discourse on this campus. He stated that it is incumbent on all of us to
point out that UBC stands for a higher level of discourse.
 Vancouver Senate 12207
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Dr. Pedersen stated that the Academic Plan contains many good ideas, but fails two in
areas. The first problem is the lack of an articulate preamble to establish what a university
is and what it hopes to become. He stated that Dean Tully had written a marvellously
constructed response to this issue, and urged members of Senate to seek a copy. The
second problem concerns the Academic Opportunities Fund. He described the Fund as a
good idea in principle, but flawed in process. Taxing each unit on an annual basis would
create an enormous amount of work for heads of units and resulting committees, who
would be forced to justify their needs. He spoke in support of the principle of
reallocation, but expressed the need to find a different mechanism and suggested that new
money would be required. As new funding becomes available, it should be awarded to
centres of excellence and positions of strength rather than dissipated throughout all units.
Commenting on the pace of the approval process for the Academic Plan, Dr. Pedersen
stated that there had been active discussion on campus in the past few weeks, and that it
was only recently that the discussion had galvanized. He urged the senior administration
to consider allowing extra time for the discussion to come to its full convergence. Because
people are feeling under pressure to get their comments in prior to the deadline, they may
not be responding as cautiously and thoughtfully as they might otherwise do.
Dr. Tees stated that he would support an Academic Plan, and agreed that UBC needs a
Plan. He added that some revisions would improve the current draft. For example, the
Plan would benefit from a preamble in which we lay out what is special about UBC. He
also stated that the Plan should focus on how to generate more resources, and how to use
resources we have. He agreed with previous speakers in that the source for funds through
the Academic Opportunities Fund should not be a tax on poor departments, but should
instead be derived from new money.
 Vancouver Senate 12208
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Mr. Burns stated that he agreed with previous speakers, particularly regarding the need
for a preamble. He stated that he would support a plan fairly closely based on the Draft,
subject to some modifications. He expressed an uneasy feeling, however, about certain
features in the Draft. He agreed that the section on governance would inevitably mean
greater centralization of authority in the central administration. To illustrate, he referred
to the suggestion to reduce the number and size of committees. Faculty members may
complain about the amount committee work to be done. When one considers the
essentially democratic ideals of a university, however, what other way is there of ensuring
that everyone has an opportunity to be heard? If the number and size of committees were
reduced, representation by students and younger faculty members would be eliminated,
leaving department heads and their allies to make decisions. He expressed the opinion
that this would not be the proper way to manage a university where so many diverse
interests exist.
Mr. Burns expressed a concern with respect to the following statement about governance:
"where possible, policies and regulations should focus on outcome rather than process.'
He stated that this approach would ignore factors that are important to a university in a
qualitative and moral sense. This statement would suggest that we consider consultation
and equity to be problematic. When read in conjunction with the section on the Academic
Opportunities Fund, the process could appear to be unfair.
Mr. Burns made several suggestions about the format of the Draft Academic Plan,
including that the bullets be replaced by sentences, and that awkward terminology be
reviewed by an academic rather than a professional editor. He stated that his annoyance
with the language had deflected his interest in the subject.
 Vancouver Senate 12209
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Dean pro tem. Tully clarified that the above-mentioned statement by the Faculty of Arts
was not intended to be critical in a negative way of the Academic Plan; the intention was
to be positive. The statement does contain several criticisms of the Draft Academic Plan,
which the Faculty of Arts hopes will be taken into consideration. Speaking to why he was
in support of a plan, Dean pro tem. Tully stated that the Faculty has also been negatively
affected by budget cuts over the last 15 years. Faculty positions have been reduced by
approximately 100 since the early 1980's. Faculty turnover has been considerable, and a
large number of people are due to retire over the next 7 or 8 years. Given these
demographic and budgetary factors, the Faculty would like to find some way of rationally
approaching what it chooses to do and how its members choose to see themselves. Arts is
one of the Faculties that already has an Academic Plan, which was approved in May
1999. The Arts plan reflects some of the issues raised in the broader UBC Academic Plan.
Dean pro tem. Tully stated that he saw the discussion about the Academic Plan as an
invitation to be constructive, as an invitation to liberate one's imagination, and as an
invitation to redefine the University. The generation of academics that shaped UBC in the
1950's and 1960's see change as declension from the model they know best, and this
notion has been reinforced by constant budgetary pressure since the early 1980's.
While still speaking in support of an Academic Plan, Dean pro tem. Tully expressed some
ambivalence about the Academic Opportunities Fund and how it was conceived to
operate. He could understand the apparent tension about centralization, but added that it
would be naive to assume that budgetary decisions made in the past have somehow been
transparent while decisions in the future would be centralized. He expressed the opinion
that past decisions have been made in closets and according to irrational formulas.
 Vancouver Senate 12210
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Dean pro tem. Tully stated that he looked forward to the possibilities created by the
Academic Plan. Although he could not speak for all members of the Faculty of Arts, he
stated that there is a sense of support there, as well as the feeling that some intelligent
changes should be made.
Dr. Blake referred to the suggestion of differentiated roles for faculty members, pointing
out that to some people this implies an imposition of circumstance. There could be
created a research stream of people, as well as a teaching concentration, and perhaps an
opportunity for someone to declare their own focus.
Dr. Blake requested that the authors of the Draft Academic Plan include a more specific
reference to graduate students, particularly with reference to their role in the interface
between research and undergraduate teaching. He stated that he would also like to see
some thought given to how resources or training could change the nature of the graduate
student experience at UBC.
Dean Sheehan stated that the discussion about the Academic Plan had been the most
interesting debate before Senate in her 13 years as a member. If nothing else, this
discussion has caught everyone's imagination and allowed us to listen to one another
about a Plan that has been in process for many months. Many parts of the University
have become engaged, and all sorts of interesting ideas have emerged. Whether these new
ideas fit with the Academic Plan or not, we have liberated ourselves to do things that we
have not felt free to do before. If nothing else, this discussion has created a spirit of
movement. Dean Sheehan added that, although the final Academic Plan may not be
exactly like the Draft, we are well on our way.
Mr. Sheppard stated that he intended to consider the worst case scenario, and interpret
this document in the worst possible light. The Draft Academic Plan could lead to the
'dumbing down' of academic standards on campus and a worsening of conditions for
faculty. The document may
 Vancouver Senate 12211
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
undermine the autonomy of the University, and reduce its role in the post-secondary
educational sector in the Province of British Columbia. He expressed concern about the
term "partner employment policies.' Without knowing exactly what this term meant, he
stated that he would assume that it would entail marching faculty off to work in industry
and recouping the money for the University. Faculty members could possibly be pressed
into this type of service against their wishes. The concept of differentiated roles of faculty
was also of concern. Mr. Sheppard stated that the role of faculty has included teaching,
research and service. The addition of community interaction could be problematic,
because the necessary time would be time formerly devoted to teaching and research. Such
a policy would therefore diminish the role of teaching and research.
Speaking to the section on experiential learning, Mr. Sheppard suggested that giving
credit for prior life experience, rather than prior learning, was questionable. He also
stated that reducing the total number of courses offered would cause him concern, as
diversity and the expansion of knowledge would be necessarily discouraged. The idea that
the level of student financial support become proportional to annual scholarly success
could mean the abolition of bursaries for students in need. Offering greater rights of
transfer for students from other institutions into UBC may lead to college instructors
being able to set UBC's standards and UBC must therefore clearly indicate that it has the
right to decide what credit will be granted to students entering UBC.
Mr. Sheppard stated the opinion that the discussion of information technology and its
potential to influence learning was woefully inadequate, especially because it neglected to
address the work load effect of technology. He stated that the opportunity to send e-mail
to professors outside of class times has led to a deterioration in the quality of classroom
discussions. Although he admitted that information technology has advantages, he stated
that its problems should also be discussed in the Academic Plan.
 Vancouver Senate 12212
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
With all due respect to its proposers, Mr. Sheppard spoke against the creation of a
separate entity of a weekend college, because it could suggest a deterioration of the
standards of the University. He added that he was also very concerned about the status of
the humanities and social sciences on campus. He stated that most of the points under
Section 3 have little relevance to the humanities and social sciences, and that the final
document should contain greater emphasis on these areas. Mr. Sheppard stated that the
creation of community associate teaching and research appointments would suggest the
dumbing down of faculty standards.
Mr. Sheppard, referring to the statements in the Draft Academic Plan about maintaining a
presence in the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD), reminded members of
Senate that the institution is entitled 'The University of British Columbia' rather than 'The
University of the GVRD.' He stated that he shares the concern about the community that
we're supposed to be addressing. Given the value of the internationalization of knowledge
as a valuable vision, it would not be appropriate to create a boundary around the GVRD
and ignore the larger community.
Mr. Sheppard, referring to the proposed "fast track' mechanism for approving curriculum
changes, asked how a program in which students were enrolled could be stopped if it
were to fail a rigorous review. He stated that the proposed reduction in the number and
size of committees implies a reduced role for faculty and professional administrators in
the governance of the University, and that this would be deplorable. He expressed his
support instead for a more collegial and consultative model of university governance.
He stated that there was a contradiction in the proposal that cost recovery for UBC highspeed network connectivity and other 'common good' information technology services be
re-consid-
 Vancouver Senate 12213
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
ered. He stated that if something is for the common good, then the idea of cost reduction
should not apply, and these services should be otherwise funded.
Dr. Gilbert stated that the development of an Academic Plan represented a unique
opportunity for the University. The discussion has resulted in an incredibly democratic
exchange of views, no matter how one may feel about the document. Speaking to the need
for a Plan, he stated that this exercise was last completed in 1967, when 12 men were
appointed to write a plan for the University: surely there are things that we would like to
change since 1967. He added that the 1967 report was a good one and that it made some
very interesting observations about the Computer Centre, and about decentralizing the
library. Members of the community, however, were not asked for their opinions before
the report was published. Instead of proceeding the same way this time, we have afforded
ourselves this very intellectually enriching experience. He agreed with Dean pro tem.
Tully's comments regarding a generation of academics who might believe that the perfect
university existed at some time in the past, and that it should be recreated. This is not the
case. We are reinventing something incredibly important through the Academic Plan. Dr.
Gilbert stated that it would be impossible to agree with everything in the Academic Plan,
but that he would vote for its next incarnation.
Mr. MacLachlan noted that the only place where undergraduate students are mentioned
is in the section on the Learning Environment. As all sections of the Academic Plan will
greatly impact the education of undergraduate students, he urged members of the
Committee to consider an increased focus on the role of undergraduate students. He
expressed the opinion that the section on Page 5 that begins with the statement that
"research and teaching are tightly linked in a research university' should be strengthened
by the addition of the statement that undergraduate students are encouraged to
participate in original research projects with faculty members. He fur-
 Vancouver Senate 12214
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
ther suggested the addition of a statement under 'Learning Environment' to deal with
academic outcomes.
Mr. Gray expressed the opinion that the most important part of the Academic Plan would
be the planning process itself. Because plans generally do not turn out as one might
expect, we should not be driven or led by the resulting document, nor should we allocate
a great deal of resources to implementation. He stated that the Senate is supposed to be
charged with the academic life of the community, and that this work is too important to
be left to others. He stated that he would guard jealously the committee work done within
the Senate, and that those not prepared to participate should not stand for election or
appointment to the Senate.
Dr. Lalli commented that the quality of the students coming from the high schools has a
direct effect on the quality of students that graduate from UBC, and asked whether there
was a plan in place to improve the standards for students entering UBC. He also pointed
out that the Draft Academic Plan contained no mention of equity in hiring, and asked
whether there was already such a policy in place.
President Piper thanked members of Senate for sharing their views in what she described
as a very informative, useful, and thought provoking discussion.
In response to a query from Dr. MacEntee, President Piper confirmed that it was not
definite that the Academic Plan would be returned to Senate for approval at its November
1999 meeting. The Academic Plan Advisory Committee was to decide how much time
they would need to integrate the input from Senate and will advise when they are ready to
bring the revision back to Senate for approval. Dr. Atkins confirmed that the process may
be extended.
 Vancouver Senate 12215
Minutes of October 13,1999	
From the Board of Governors
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations: subject, where
applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented without formal
reference to the President, and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new
programs be asked to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
i.      Affiliation of Carey Theological College (pp. 12172 - 74);
ii.      Establishment of the Centre for International Study of Contemporary Records
and Archives (pp. 12186).
Tributes Committee
MEMORIAL MINUTE FOR WILLIAM KAYE LAMB
Dr. Slonecker presented the following memorial minute on behalf of the Committee:
William Kaye Lamb, 1904-1999
W. Kaye Lamb, UBC's second University Librarian and Canada's first National
Librarian, died at the University Hospital on August 24, 1999. He was born in New
Westminster, BC on May 11, 1904, and attended schools there, in Surrey and in
Vancouver. He entered the Faculty of Arts at UBC's Fairview Campus in 1923, where
his principal mentors were Walter Sage, Frederick Soward, Garnett Sedgewick, Harry
Ashton, and Frederick Wood. His academic life continued off-campus because during
his undergraduate years he lived in Vancouver with the uncle after whom he was
named, Joseph Kaye Henry, a Professor of English at McGill College, and at UBC in
its first years. Upon graduating from the University of BC in 1927 with first class
honours in history, he was awarded a Nichol Scholarship, which provided for three
years of postgraduate study in France. During these years abroad he studied in Paris at
the Sorbonne and the Ecole Libre des Sciences Politiques. Returning to UBC for a year
in 1929/30, he completed requirements for an M.A. in history. He then attended the
London School of Economics, where he completed a Ph.D. in 1933, under the tutelage
of Harold Laski. Most of his research was conducted in two great national libraries,
the British Museum and the Bibliotheque nationale, experiences on which he was to
draw in future years. Upon returning to British Columbia he was appointed in 1934 as
the Provincial Librarian and Archivist. In 1936 the government added to his
responsibilities by appointing him Superintendent of the BC Public Libraries
Commission; thus he presided over a period during which regional library services
were being extended throughout the province.
In 1940 he succeeded John Ridington as UBC's University Librarian. Among his many
accomplishments in this position were the construction of the first addition to the
Library building, its North Wing, and the acquisition of the collections of his two
great friends, Judge F.W. Howay and Robie L. Reid. Merged, these collections
constitute one
 Vancouver Senate 12216
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Tributes Committee
of the greatest resources for the study of British Columbia and Pacific Northwest maritime
history, and are the cornerstone of UBC Library's Special Collections.
As the Canadian Library Association's second President in 1947/48, he was deeply
involved in the fledgling Association's campaign to convince the Government of Canada
to found a national library, a campaign whose success was realized when on September
11, 1948, Prime Minister Mackenzie King announced the appointment of Dr. Lamb as the
Dominion Archivist "with the special assignment of preparing the way for the
establishment of a National Library in Ottawa." On November 24, 1948 the Cabinet
established a National Library Advisory Committee with Dr. Lamb as its chairman, and
as a result of its work on May 1, 1950 the precursor to the National Library was
established, The Canadian Bibliographic Centre. The Centre commenced immediately on
two major projects, the compilation of a current national bibliography and of a union
catalogue of the holdings of major Canadian libraries. A National Library Act came into
effect on January 1, 1953, and Dr. Lamb assumed the title of National Librarian, a
position in which he was to serve with great distinction until his retirement in 1968, the
year following the opening of a new building for the National Library and Public
Archives. By that time the National Library had acquired a collection of 600,000 volumes
through legal deposit, gift and purchase; had compiled a union catalogue of more than
10,000,000 titles; was responding to more than 80,000 location requests per year; had
published seventeen annual cumulated volumes of Canadiana; had established a
microfilming service for Canadian theses, and published an annual list of theses since
1962. His career as Dominion Archivist was equally distinguished. He established a
systematic program for the collection, retention and organization of government records,
and created a Record Centre to deal with the increasing flow of federal documents. He
collected the papers of Canada's prime ministers, many of which had been dispersed, and
was one of the literary executors of William Lyon Mackenzie King. Since many of the
important documents dealing with early Canadian history are held in institutions in
England and France, he instituted a program of microfilming as a means of repatriating
Canada's historical record.
In addition to his twin careers as an archivist and a librarian, Dr. Lamb pursued a third:
as a scholar and writer. His first historical article was published in the Surrey Gazette,
before he entered university. His writing career commenced in earnest while he was in
Victoria, where he also founded and edited the British Columbia Historical Quarterly.
During his years at the National Library and Public Archives he authored forty-seven
journal articles, ten encyclopedia articles and seventeen reviews and edited for publication
the manuscripts of Daniel Harmon, Simon Fraser, Gabriel Franchere and Alexander
Mackenzie. He was also the chief editorial consultant for the Encyclopedia Canadiana.
His astonishing productivity increased after his retirement, during which he published four
major books of Canadian history, over a dozen more articles, and edited the record of the
voyages of George Vancouver. Until his last days he remained a serious and constant
reader, with a lively interest in current events and in developments within his several
professions.
Dr. Lamb was a member of many professional and academic associations, and was elected
president of almost all of them: the Canadian Library Association, the BC Library
Association, the Society of Archivists (England), the Society of American Archivists, and
the Canadian Historical Association, to name a few. He was elected to
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of October 13,1999
Other Business
12217
the Royal Society of Canada in 1949, served as its President in 1965, and was
awarded in the same year its Tyrrell Medal "for the furtherance of the knowledge of
the history of Canada". He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1969.
He was the recipient of many honours and awards, including honorary degrees from
UBC (1948) and the University of Victoria (1966).
In 1939 he married Wessie Tipping, a French scholar, Vancouverite and another
graduate of UBC. They are survived by their daughter, Elizabeth (Lamb) Hawkins
(whose own professional career was spent in the National Library and National
Archives) and two grandsons. In his will Kaye Lamb remembered UBC by providing
funds for the continuing support of the Howay-Reid collection.
Prepared by Basil Stuart-Stubbs
Dr. Slonecker l
Dr. Rosengarten J
That the memorial minute for William Kaye
Lamb be entered into the Minutes of Senate.
Carried.
Other Business
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES 50TH ANNIVERSARY
Dean Granot invited all members of Senate to participate in events to celebrate the 50th
anniversary of the Faculty of Graduate Studies that were to take place the following week.
Report of the Tributes Committee--in camera
Dr. Helliwell presented the report as chair of the Committee. He took the opportunity to
first announce that Robert Mundell, a UBC graduate, had just been awarded the 1999
Nobel prize in Economics.
Dr. Helliwell presented the following candidates for emeritus status:
Name
Rank
Carlo Giovanella   Senior Instructor Emeritus of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Kenneth Berry        Clinical Professor Emeritus of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Bruce Bohm
Professor Emeritus of Botany
Andrew Gruft        Associate Professor Emeritus of Architecture
 Vancouver Senate                                                                                                                        12218
Minutes of October 13,1999
Adjournment
Name
Rank
Brenda
Morrison
Professor Emerita of Health Care and Epidemiology
Donald Rix
Clinical Assistant Professor Emeritus of Pathology and Laboratory
Medicine
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on November 17, 1999.
 Vancouver Senate 12219
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Appendix A
Appendix A
POLICIES ON THE POSITION OF STUDENTS IN CASE OF A STRIKE
Excerpt from the Minutes of Senate: March 18, 1992, pp. 10299-303
Position of Students in Case of a Strike
The following guidelines on the position of students in case of a strike were circulated at the
meeting:
I. Students who do not cross picket lines
a) Students who choose not to cross a picket line as a matter of conscience must inform the
Dean of the Faculty in which they are registered either in person, by telephone or by letter
that they will not be attending classes or writing examinations; otherwise it will be
assumed that they will be attending and writing. They will be responsible for fulfilling
course requirements and, insofar as possible, they will be evaluated on the basis of the
work they are judged to be able to do under the circumstances.
b) A student who misses an essential component and/or a scheduled examination as a result
of refusing to cross a picket line as a matter of conscience may be expected to attend a
make-up session and/or write an examination scheduled in a supplementary examination
period.
II. Classes or Examinations not held because of a Strike
1) Students unable to fulfill course requirements as a result of the strike:
A student who, as a consequence of the strike, is unable to fulfill course requirements, e.g.
because the strike has made it impossible to obtain necessary and unique library materials,
is responsible for informing the instructor or, if the instructor is absent, the Head of the
Department or the Dean of the Faculty.
2) Evaluation of student performance:
a. Faculty will attempt to examine or otherwise evaluate students according to the
normal evaluation plan for the course.
b. If classes are not held, students will be evaluated on the readings or other sources
for which they could reasonably be expected to be responsible, but will not be
evaluated on material which would have been available only in cancelled classes.
For examination purposes, therefore, students may be responsible for:
i.       the required readings for the entire course;
ii.      the material presented in classes (lectures, seminars, laboratories, etc.) prior to the
strike;
iii.      the material presented in classes not affected by the strike (should there be periods
in which some parts of the campus are struck and not others).
3) If examinations are cancelled:
If there were a minor disruption in the schedule, an attempt would be made to modify the
examination schedule in order to hold all examinations close to their
 Vancouver Senate 12220
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Appendix A
scheduled time and, if that were impossible, an attempt would be made to provide an
evaluation without a final examination.
III. Providing information and reassuring students
It is important that you anticipate the possibility of a strike and do your best to reassure students.
Faculty should, therefore, ensure that:
a) students have a clear and up-to-date course outline in which required readings are
identified;
b) students realize they are responsible for having access to the required textbook(s);
c) students know where the department office is so that they can check for the posting of
information on classes cancelled or otherwise interrupted;
d) evaluation of student performance at the onset of a strike is complete, up-to-date and
available to the Department Head.
Dr. Birch stated that the University was very cognizant of the tremendous pressures that a labour
dispute places on students as well as on faculty and staff. In anticipation that the University might
not be able to avert a labour dispute, the following statement had been included in the
correspondence dated February 28, 1992 circulated to all faculty members: "...If a strike should
occur, it should be remembered that strikes are legal and that members of the University
community are free to follow their conscience in deciding whether or not they wish to cross picket
lines. Staff members' and students' decisions must be respected. The intent of this letter is to
encourage you to provide reassurance to your students and to ensure that you are able to evaluate
their work fairly and assign them grades for their courses."
One of the attachments to that correspondence was the material circulated at the meeting
outlining procedures for students who do not cross picket lines. Dr. Birch stated that the student
senators had suggested to him that these administrative guidelines might have more academic
status if they were endorsed by Senate. He had therefore brought the material to Senate for its
consideration. But, since the guidelines were now in effect, he felt that it would be difficult to
amend them. However, if Senate wished to endorse the guidelines, subject to review by a
committee such as the Committee on Academic Policy, suggestions related to the application of
the guidelines could be considered.
Dr. Birch said he wished to emphasize that the right of faculty members and students to follow
their conscience must be respected.
In cases where the actions of a faculty member had been interpreted as coercive, intimidating, or
directive, the University had sought to find out the basis for such actions and to ensure that it is
not repeated. He stated that where there are large numbers of faculty and students, there is always
the potential for misunderstanding, as well as the potential for individual initiative which might
not be in line with a set of guidelines agreed to by the Deans. He stressed that it was tremendously
important that added pressure not be placed on the students beyond that which they experience as
a natural outcome of a labour dispute.
 Vancouver Senate 12221
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Appendix A
Miss Carole Forsythe, student senator, noted that in previous labour disputes, there had not been
a policy on the position of students in case of a strike, and thanked the administration for
producing one on this occasion. However, the student senators were worried about what was
going to happen to students because the policy was a little too general and somewhat ambiguous.
During a brief discussion of a proposed motion, Senate agreed to waive the requirement of notice
of motion. Miss Forsythe subsequently moved the following motion:
Miss Forsythe i Be it resolved that Senate respect the right of
Mr. Lau J        students to follow their conscience in deciding
whether or not to cross the picket lines in the
current labour dispute with the University;
furthermore, be it resolved that all students unable
to fulfil course requirements as a result of the
labour dispute with the University shall be referred
to the policy statement entitled "Position of
Students in Case of a Strike" submitted by Vice-
President Birch; furthermore, be it resolved that the
Academic Policy Committee be requested to
recommend a detailed policy to Senate regarding
the academic position of students in future labour
disputes with the University.
Speaking to the motion, Miss Forsythe explained that some professors were telling students that if
they did not cross picket lines and attend classes they would be assigned a failing grade for the
course, which was contrary to the policy circulated.
Miss Lahey asked for clarification of the last sentence of item I.(a) which states: "...They
(students) will be responsible for fulfilling course requirements and, insofar as possible, they will
be evaluated on the basis of the work they are judged to be able to do under the circumstances."
She stated that some professors were saying that students are responsible for the material if the
lecture is held. Dr. Birch responded that students will not be responsible for material that is
uniquely available in lectures that they have not attended either by virtue of the class being
cancelled or by their respecting a picket line. He stated that it was very difficult to find wording to
cover all eventualities.
After further
discussion the
motion was put
and carried.
Excerpt from the Minutes of Senate: April 13, 1994, pp. 10778-80
Senate Committee on Academic Policy
Dr. Tees, Chair of the committee, presented the following report, on the Academic Position of
Students in Labour/Management Disputes:
In the event of a strike, it is the University's policy to take every reasonable measure to
remain open. We are committed to maintaining instruction in all courses, access to core
library services and examinations as scheduled. Faculty are responsible for teaching their
courses and students are responsible for fulfilling course requirements. However,
 Vancouver Senate 12222
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Appendix A
the University respects the right of a faculty member or a student, as a matter of
conscience, to refuse to cross a picket line in a labour dispute.
As a matter of University policy, department heads will ensure that every reasonable effort
is made to make alternate arrangements for classes for which an instructor is absent as a
result of refusing to cross a picket line. However, as a matter of University policy, classes
may not be relocated to a non-picketed location. Unavoidable cancellations or room
changes will be posted in or near the departmental office in a place visible to students.
The attached guidelines were circulated by the Vice President Academic and endorsed by
Senate in March 1992. At that time Senate resolved "that the Academic Policy Committee
be requested to recommend a detailed policy to Senate regarding the academic position of
students in future labour disputes with the University." The Senate Academic Policy
Committee has concluded that it is impossible and undesirable to attempt to anticipate all
eventualities since many of the circumstances are unique to a specific labour/management
dispute. It is essential that guidelines be provided for each particular occasion, that
students be party to the articulation of such guidelines and that students who feel they
have been treated unfairly have access to adjudication of their concerns.
Therefore, the committee recommends that in the event of a labour/management dispute
involving picket lines:
1. A committee on academic guidelines be established with membership as follows:
• Vice President Academic and Provost, Chair
• Chair, Senate Academic Policy Committee
• Three Deans
• Two student senators
• Registrar
2. A senior faculty member be designated to serve as arbiter for students who have sought
to resolve their concerns within their Faculties but feel they have been treated unfairly.
 Vancouver Senate 12223
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Appendix A
I. STUDENTS WHO DO NOT CROSS PICKET LINES
(a) Students who choose not to cross a picket line as a matter of conscience must inform
the Dean of the Faculty in which they are registered, in person, by telephone or by
letter, that they will not be attending classes or writing examinations; otherwise it will
be assumed that they will be attending and writing. They will be responsible for
fulfilling course requirements and, insofar as possible, they will be evaluated on the
basis of the work they are judged to be able to do under the circumstances.
(b) A student who misses an essential component and/or a scheduled examination as a
result of refusing to cross a picket line as a matter of conscience may be expected to
attend a make-up session and/or to write an examination scheduled in a supplementary
examination period.
II. CLASSES OR EXAMINATIONS NOT HELD BECAUSE OF A STRIKE
(1) Students unable to fulfil course requirements as a result of the strike:
A student who, as a consequence of the strike, is unable to fulfil course requirements, e.g.
because the strike has made it impossible to obtain necessary and unique library materials,
is responsible for informing the instructor or, if the instructor is absent, the Head of the
Department or the Dean of the Faculty.
(2) Evaluation of student performance:
(a) Faculty will attempt to examine or otherwise evaluate students according to the
normal evaluation plan for the course.
(b) If classes are not held, students will be evaluated on the readings or other sources for
which they could reasonably be expected to be responsible, but will not be evaluated
on material which would have been available only in cancelled classes.
For examination purposes, therefore, students may be responsible for:
i)    the required readings for the entire course,
ii)   the material presented in classes (lectures, seminars, laboratories, etc.) prior to the
strike,
iii) the material presented in classes not affected by the strike (should there be periods
in which some parts of the campus are struck and not others).
(3) If examinations are cancelled:
If there were a minor disruption in the schedule, an attempt would be made to modify the
examination schedule in order to hold all examinations close to their scheduled time and,
if that were impossible, an attempt would be made to provide an evaluation without a
final examination.
III. PROVIDING INFORMATION AND REASSURING STUDENTS
It is important that you anticipate the possibility of a strike and do your best to reassure
students. Faculty should, therefore, ensure that:
 Vancouver Senate 12224
Minutes of October 13,1999	
Appendix A
(a) students have a clear and up-to-date course outline in which required readings are
identified,
(b) students realize they are responsible for having access to the required textbook(s),
(c) students know where the Department office is so they can check for the posting of
information on classes cancelled or otherwise interrupted,
(d) evaluation of student performance at the onset of a strike is complete, up-to-date and
available to the Department Head.
Dr. Tees i That the recommendations of the committee
Dean Sheehan J concerning the academic position of students in
lab our/management disputes be approved.
Carried.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.senmin.1-0390234/manifest

Comment

Related Items