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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1998-12-16

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 THE   UNIVERSITY    OF   BRITISH    COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF DECEMBER 16, 1998
Attendance
Present: President M. C. Piper (Chair), Vice-President B. C. McBride, Dean F. S. Abbott,Dr. P.
Adebar, Dean pro tem. D. R. Atkins, Mr. M. Beese, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dean J. Blom, Dr. G. W.
Bluman, Mr. P. T. Brady, Dr. P. C. Burns, Mr. M. Edwards, Dr. V. Froese, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert,
Dean F. Granot, Mr. H. D. Gray, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Dr. P. G. Harrison, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr.
M. R. Ito, Dean M. Klawe, Dr. S. B. Knight, Dr. D. M. Lyster,Dr. D. J. MacDougall, Dr. M.
MacEntee, Dr. P. L. Marshall, Dr. K. May,Acting Dean J. A. McLean, Mr. W. McMichael, Mr.
W. B. McNulty, Mr. R. Morin,Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Mr. R. L. de Pfyffer, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon,
Dean M. Quayle,Ms. C. Quinlan, Dr. D. P. Rolfsen, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten, Dr. R. W. Schutz, Dr.
C. E. Slonecker, Ms. K. Sonik, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. M. Thompson, Dr. S. Thorne, Mr. D. R.
Verma,Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky, Mr. A. Zuniga.
Regrets: Chancellor W. L. Sauder, Mr. R. Appoo, Dr. I. Benbasat, Mr. P. T. Burns, Dean J. A.
Cairns, Ms. A. Cheema, Mr. W. Cheung, Mr. A. Chui, Ms. L. Chui, Dr. V. Gomel, Mr. C. L.
Gorman, Rev. J. Hanrahan, Dr. F. G. Herring, Mr. J. Keng, Dr. V. J. Kirkness, Mr. J. Ko, Mr. J.
Kondopulos,Mr. O. C. W. Lau, Mr. D. K. Leung, Dr. M. Levine, Prof. P. T. K. Lin, Mr. B. Liu,
Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Dr. W. R. McMaster, Mr. A. Mitchell, Dean. S. Neuman,Mr.
V. Pacradouni, Dr. W. J. Phillips, Prof. J. A. Rice, Dean N. Sheehan, Mr. A. H. Soroka,Dr. J. R.
Thompson, Dr. W. Uegama, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Dr. P. A. Vertinsky,Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr., Dean
E. H. K. Yen.
The Minutes of the Previous Meeting
There were two corrections and one addition to the minutes:
1.  Page 11957, Visit to Toronto, amend sixth sentence to begin "UBC alumnus
Dr. Ben Heppner...".
11973
 Vancouver Senate 119 74
Minutes of December 16,1998
Business Arising from the Minutes
2.  Page 11964, Faculty of Science, amend last sentence to read "MITACS will
bring a total of $14.4 million into the network of centres over the next four
years." Add the following sentence: "Dr. Rolfsen thanked Dean Granot, Dean
Klawe, Vice-President McBride and other administrators for their strong
support of PIMS."
Dr. Berger l        That the minutes of the third regular meeting
Dr. MacDougall i        of Senate for the Session 1998-99, having been
circulated, be taken as amended and adopted.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
PACIFIC INSTITUTE FOR THE MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES (PIMS) (PAGES 11958 AND
11964)
A proposal to recognize the UBC Site of the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences
had been circulated at the meeting. The proposal had been withdrawn from the agenda of
the November 18, 1998 meeting of Senate so that several small revisions could be made.
Dean Klawe presented the revised proposal, noting that the Faculty of Science is very
proud of this initiative.
Dean Klawe l        That the UBC Senate officially recognize the
Mr. McNulty i        UBC Site of the Pacific Institute for the
Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) as a research
centre reporting to the Dean of Science.
Dean Klawe clarified that the motion sought to recognize the part of PIMS that is located
at UBC as a research centre so that there could be a formal entity and an administrator
designated as responsible for its operation.
The motion was
put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate 119 75
Minutes of December 16,1998
From the Board of Governors
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations - subject, where
applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented without formal
reference to the President, and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new
programs be asked to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
i.      Proposal from the Continuing Studies Committee for a Diploma in Accounting
(pp. 11933-4).
ii.      Establishment of a Co-operative Education Program in the Faculty of Arts (pp.
11934-5 & 11951).
iii.      New awards (pp. 11945 & 11952-4).
iv.      Faculty of Education: establishment of the Department of Educational and
Counselling Psychology and Special Education, effective April 1999 and the
disestablishment of the Department of Counselling Psychology and the
Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, effective the
same date (pp. 11963).
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
CANADIAN FOUNDATION FOR INNOVATION SUMMARY
President Piper gave a brief report on the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI),
speaking specifically to UBC's position in recent competitions. The CFI was established
several years ago by the Federal Government. A total of $800 million was designated to
support research infrastructure within universities and health science centres. The first
competition was for new research opportunities. UBC finished third in this competition
among Canadian universities: ten projects by new investigators received funding. An
additional 18 projects by new investigators will be submitted for consideration in the near
future. UBC also finished third among Canadian universities in the competition for grants
less than $350,000.
A competition for grants over $350,000 is underway. 10 UBC projects were approved to
proceed to the final phase of consideration. These ten projects will be submitted on either
January 8, 1999 or February 1, 1999 for decision later in the spring of 1999. A total of
145 projects from across Canada will compete for the total $385 million in available
funding. Two subsequent
 Vancouver Senate 11976
Minutes of December 16,1998
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
competitions for grants over $350,000 are planned: one for a total of $200 million in the
fall of 1999, and another for $200 million in the fall of 2000.
The President explained that the CFI funds 40% of projects costs. An additional 40%
would possibly be available through the BC Knowledge Development Fund. Private
donations, including the recent gift from Dr. Stewart Blusson, would provide the
remaining 20% of project costs.
TRIP TO OTTAWA
The President described her recent trip to Ottawa. In advance of the announcement of the
federal budget in February, President Piper met with many members of cabinet as well as
the President of the Canadian International Development Agency and Canada's
Ambassador to the European Union. The meetings focussed on federal support for
research infrastructure. The President lobbied for more funding through all of the
Canadian research councils, increased funding for the Networks of Centres of Excellence
and continued funding for TRIUMF. As the upcoming federal budget has been rumoured
to focus on health-related issues, the President stressed that such a budget should entail
funding for health research. The President remarked that, although no commitments were
made during these meetings, senior officials appear to be aware that Canada is falling
behind as a nation with regard to research.
In response to a question from Dr. Pedersen regarding the CFI, President Piper replied
that the University of Toronto and The University of Montreal had placed first and
second respectively in the competition for new investigators. McGill University and the
University of Montreal had placed first and second respectively in the competition for
funds under $350,000. In the larger competition, the University of Toronto, the
University of Montreal and UBC will submit 14, 12 and 10 projects respectively. The
Chair remarked that the total amount of funding should be considered in addition to the
number of projects.
 Vancouver Senate 11977
Minutes of December 16,1998
Vice-President, Academic and Provost's Report on the Academic Plan
Vice-President, Academic and Provost's Report on the Academic Plan
Vice-President McBride gave a report on the progress of the Academic Plan Advisory
Committee. He reminded members of Senate that four working groups were established,
each including members of faculty and staff as well as student representatives. Each of the
groups was facilitated by a team leader, and the entire group was led by Dr. Michael
Goldberg. The academic planning team was expanded to include the deans at several
stages of the process. The process began with discussion about why an Academic Plan
was necessary, what UBC hoped to achieve through the Plan, and how the Plan might be
developed. The working groups each then began work on their respective mandates and
later presented a written report. The four reports will be synthesized by Dr. Goldberg and
returned to the larger Committee for further discussion in January 1999. A revised
discussion document will be presented to the UBC community and feedback will be
integrated into the document through the early spring of 1999. A draft document will be
presented to Senate in April 1999. Vice-President McBride stated that he plans to circulate
to members of Senate some of the readings that members of the Committee have found
helpful in the planning process.
In response to a query from Mr. Zuniga, Vice-President McBride explained that the
mandate of the Committee was to develop an Academic Plan that would set guidelines for
resource allocation at UBC.
Correspondence
REQUEST FROM OISEUT: "THE ACADEMIC SENATE AND UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE
IN CANADA"
A request from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto
for the participation of Senate in a research project entitled "The Academic Senate and
University Governance in Canada" had been circulated for information.
 Vancouver Senate 11978
Minutes of December 16,1998
Academic Policy Committee
In response to a query from Mr. Brady, Dr. Spencer confirmed that he, as Secretary of
Senate, would complete the first phase of the survey. The second phase of the study would
be sent to members of Senate in accordance with the Senate policy on third-party mailings
to members of Senate.
Academic Policy Committee
FULL-TIME STATUS
Dr. Schutz, as Chair of the Committee, presented the following report on full-time status.
The following five motions were passed at the April, 1998 Senate meeting.
1. That a standard program of study be defined as 30 credits in a Winter Session for all
undergraduate students.
2. That 30 credits should be used as the basis for all calculations of undergraduate full-time
equivalent enrolment.
3. That any undergraduate student who is taking at least 24 credits in a Winter Session be
classified as a full-time student.
4. That Senate instruct the Faculties to review those regulations which define, either explicitly or
implicitly, a full or standard course load for an undergraduate student to be more than 30
credits, and to report back to the committee by October 1st with a rationale for these
requirements.
5. That Senate instruct the Faculties to review their requirements for designations such as "Dean's
Honour Roll", and to report back to the committee by October 1st with a rationale where the
requirement is other than a minimum average of 82% for 27 credits with no failed courses in a
Winter Session.
Motions #4 and #5 required Faculties to report back to the committee by October 1st, if their policies or
requirements did not conform to these standards. As of October 1, 1998, only two Faculties had
responded, suggesting that either, (a) all other Faculties did conform, or (b) some Faculties did not
conform but were unaware of the need to report back to the committee. Consequently, a reminder letter
was sent to all Deans and Directors. In that letter the intent of motion #4 was clarified with the note:
"Faculties are not being asked to give a rationale for programs which include more than 30 credits in
any year, but only for requirements, such as advancement, which are based on a greater than 30 credit
load."
Faculties and Schools were asked to indicate if their policies fall within the guidelines, or if not, to
provide a rationale as to why they do not.
The reported compliance/non-compliance status for each responding academic unit is summarized in the
accompanying table.
Summary of Responses
Most Faculties either do already comply, or have indicated that they are in the process of revising their
Calendar entry in order to meet the policies implied in motions #4 and #5. A number of Faculties are
revising their Calendar statements to conform with the 27-credit basis for designations such as the
Dean's Honour Roll. In many cases the current policy stated 30 credits, but in practice 27 were being
used.
 Vancouver Senate 11979
Minutes of December 16,1998
Academic Policy Committee
The Faculty of Dentistry indicated that there are no credits associated with the new PBL-based first and
second year programs, and therefore the 30-credit policy does not apply.
The Faculty of Education noted that their programs consist of 61-62 credits taken over a 12-month
period, and that eligibility for academic awards is based upon all coursework, rather than a subset of
that coursework.
The School of Rehabilitation Sciences has programs which require 38 or 39 credits in a year. A
prerequisite for advancement is no failed courses, and thus this program does not conform to motion
#4. It was pointed out that if the credits assigned to clinical supervised practice (a requirement for
program accreditation) are removed, then the Rehabilitation Sciences programs conform to the Senate
policies.
Dr. Schutz l        That the report from the Academic Policy
Dr. Gilbert J        Committee on full-time status be received.
Carried.
Dr. Schutz presented the following report on the accountability of advisors.
The Ad Hoc Committee on Advising presented its report to Senate on November 12, 1997, at which
time all recommendations were passed. However, student senator Ms. Neena Sonik commented that the
issue of accountability of advisors should be addressed further, and made the following motion:
"That the recommendation to dissolve the committee be deleted until the question of which
committee should address the accountability issue is resolved."
At the December Senate meeting the Agenda Committee moved:
"That the issue of accountability of advisors be referred to the Senate Academic Policy
Committee."
The Academic Policy Committee sought clarification from Ms. Sonik with respect to the nature of her
concerns. Ms. Sonik noted that faculty or department advisors may give advice to students which is
erroneous, and it is unclear as to what recourse a student has in such cases. She asked "What kind of
official documentation should be provided to students receiving advising in order to prevent potential
disputes?"
The Report of the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Academic Advising addressed the issue of the accuracy
of advice given by advisors and included the following recommendation:
RECOMMENDATION C: that Faculty advisors be given appropriate training and familiarised with all
aspects of degree and programme requirements in their own Faculty, as well as being provided with
information about university regulations and the workings of the Student Information System.
It is acknowledged that despite the best efforts of Faculties and advisors, at times the information
conveyed to a student may in fact be misleading or erroneous, and in such cases the student should not
be unduly inconvenienced when that advice is followed. Thus some recourse must be made available to
the student.
The committee sought advice and information from the Registrar, the Senate Committee on Appeals on
Academic Standing, and the office of the VP Academic and Legal Affairs. Based on cases taken to the
Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing, the existing policy, in effect, states that written
advice given by Advisors is binding in those cases where students who have acted on it in good faith
would face significant disruption or hardship if the advice was not binding. It is the opinion of
Professor D. Pavlich, Associate VP Academic and Legal Affairs, that the university is accountable for
the written academic advice given by faculty, even if that advice is contrary to University regulations or
the program requirements printed in the Calendar. It follows that such advice should be given only by
individuals designated to assume this authority. Professor
 Vancouver Senate 11980
Minutes of December 16,1998
Academic Policy Committee
Pavlich suggested that each Faculty should clearly designate who has the authority to act in this
capacity and should post and circulate lists of their Faculty and departmental advisors.
The committee concluded that the existing policy appears to be adequate, and suggested that all
Advisors be reminded of this policy. A copy of the appended memo was subsequently sent to all
Faculties and Schools.
Dr. Schutz l        That the report from the Academic Policy
Dr. Gilbert J        Committee on the Accountability of Advisors
be received.
In response to a query from Dean Isaacson, Dr. Schutz replied that he did not know
whether accountability implied legal liability on the part of the faculty member. It was
agreed that the Academic Policy Committee would seek further information on this issue
from the Office of the Associate Vice-President, Academic and Legal Affairs and report
back to Senate.
Dr. Isaacson i        That the report be tabled.
Dr. Yaworsky J
Defeated.
The motion, as originally
stated, was put and carried.
EXAMINATION HARDSHIPS
Dr. Schutz presented the following report on examination hardships.
At the April, 1998 meeting of Senate the following motion was put forward:
That the following statement on Examination Hardships be approved:
An examination hardship is considered to be 3 or more exams scheduled within a 24-hour period.
Any student with an examination hardship should speak with the instructors in the courses
concerned to see if a schedule which avoids the hardship can be arranged. If no arrangement can be
made to avoid the hardship, the student should contact the Dean of the Faculty in which the
student is registered. It is the responsibility of the Dean to ensure that arrangements are made to
avoid the hardship.
In the discussion that followed, opinions were expressed that this was not a viable solution to the
problem, and that policy downloads onto Faculties situations that will create a great deal of work. It
was suggested that the problem could be resolved if UBC were to publish an examination schedule at
the same time as the registration guide. The Registrar responded that he had made enquiries into such a
system. He gave various reasons
 Vancouver Senate 11981
Minutes of December 16,1998
Academic Policy Committee
why, at this point in time, UBC is unable to construct a schedule that guarantees to students that if they
register in courses that do not conflict they will get an exam schedule that is conflict free.
An amendment to reassign the responsibility to the head or director was proposed, and then the
following motion put and carried:
That the proposal be referred back to the committee for further thought and possible changes.
The Academic Policy Committee met to reconsider this issue, discussed the feasibility of pre-scheduling
exams with the Registrar, and came to the general consensus that no further action with respect to
exam hardships per se should be taken unless the student senators wish to raise this issue. The
committee asked the Registrar to look into pre-scheduling exams in a way that would satisfy the needs
of Faculties, instructors and students. This conclusion was based on the fact that, (1) the current
guidelines regarding exam hardships (available from the Registrar's Office and appended to this report)
do provide procedures to resolve conflicts which appear to be satisfactory in most instances, (2) the
Registrar indicated that it may be possible to pre-schedule exams, and to publish an exam schedule
prior to registration beginning in the 2000/01 Winter Session.
The Academic Policy Committee is working with the Registrar on this issue and plans to bring a set of
recommendations forward to the Senate early in 1999. A draft of the proposed recommendations is
given below, but the Committee and the Registrar desire to seek further consultation before finalizing
these recommendations and bringing them to Senate for approval. This draft of the proposed
recommendations is presented here for information only. The committee considers that the issue " exam
hardships" is now closed, but that the issue "pre-scheduling of exams" is now on the table and will be
brought forward to Senate no later than the May 1999 meeting.
Recommendations regarding the pre-scheduling of exams - Draft Only
The Academic Policy Committee recommends discontinuing the present practice of scheduling exams
after students have registered, using software which can produce a conflict free schedule. Instead, exams
should be scheduled prior to registration, with the scheduling of exams related to the course schedule so
as to minimize potential exam conflicts. If possible, this should begin in 2000/01. Although this will
reduce the possible choice of courses for some students it will allow students and faculty to make travel
and other end of term plans earlier. Students would be responsible for their exam schedule, as they are
for their lecture schedule. The following policies are recommended.
Recommendation 1. The exam schedule should be published prior to registration, if possible beginning
in the 2000/01 Winter Session.
Recommendation 2. Composite exams will normally only be scheduled when:
• There are six or more sections in the course
• One instructor is teaching three or more sections of the same course
In other cases each section will normally be scheduled according to its scheduling sequence (standard,
associated, or non-standard).
Recommendation 3. It is the student's responsibility to register for courses that will result in an
acceptable exam schedule.
Recommendation 4. The Registrar should be responsible for resolving all issues relating to the
scheduling of exams.
Appendix A: EXAMINATION HARDSHIPS (as defined/circulated by the Registrar's Office)
An examination hardship is considered to be more than two examinations within one day. Students
with hardships should follow these steps:
1. Speak with individual instructors in order to devise an alternative schedule.
2. If an alternative schedule cannot be worked out with individual instructors, see individual
departments to devise an alternative schedule.
 Vancouver Senate 11982
Minutes of December 16,1998
Academic Policy Committee
3.    If an alternative schedule cannot be worked out at the department level, see a faculty advisor to
devise an alternative schedule.
It should be noted that alternative schedules will not always be possible and students should be
prepared to write examinations at the originally scheduled times.
Dr. Schutz l        That the report from the Academic Policy
Dean Isaacson J        Committee on Examination Hardships be
received.
In response to a query from Mr. Brady, Dr. Schutz replied that the Committee had not
conducted research to determine how many examination hardships had occurred.
There was considerable discussion regarding whether early publication of the examination
schedule would resolve the difficulties faced by students. Mr. Brady stated that the goal
was to resolve examination hardships, rather than to facilitate travel and other plans. Dr.
Schutz commented that most complaints from students involving the examination
schedule relate to travel plans. Dr. Berger stated that the inability to travel did not
constitute an examination hardship.
Mr. Brady expressed concern that shifting responsibility for an acceptable examination
schedule to the student would lead to the student's academic program being determined
by the examination schedule. Dr. Schutz pointed out that an examination conflict would
coincide in most cases with a course scheduling conflict.
Dr. Williams spoke in support of the report, stating that the Academic Policy Committee
had discussed the issue of examination hardships several years ago. Since the issue was
first discussed by the Committee, other universities such as Simon Fraser University and
the University of Victoria have begun publishing an examination schedule prior to
registration. Dr. Williams stated that his most recent experience with first-year students
indicates that some of these students face tremendously difficult examination schedules.
Dr. Williams expressed the opinion that a fair
 Vancouver Senate 11983
Minutes of December 16,1998
Admissions Committee
examination schedule, published prior to registration, would alleviate the difficulty for
many of these students.
The motion was
put and carried.
1
In response to a question from Mr. Beese, Dr. Schutz responded that, because the report
had already been prepared, the Academic Policy Committee had not met following the
discussion of examination hardships at the November meeting of Senate. Mr. Beese
further queried how publishing the examination schedule prior to registration would
minimize examination hardships. Dr. Spencer responded that students would be cognizant
of the examination schedule in advance and would deal with the issue of examination
hardships prior to registration and that this may mean that students would necessarily
defer certain courses to the following year in order to maintain an acceptable examination
schedule.
Admissions Committee
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ADMISSION STANDARD AND LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY INDEX
REQUIREMENT
See 'Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency
Index Requirement' on page 11995.
Dr. Harrison, as Chair of the committee, presented the report.
Dr. Harrison i        That Senate adopt the proposed policy on the
Dr. Williams J       English Language Admission Standard.
Dr. Harrison stated the goal of the proposed changes was to better inform potential
students of the level of English that is required to ensure success once admitted to UBC.
The proposed changes reflect a shift away from the current reliance on tests, such as the
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), that evaluate only passive language
skills. A broader range of evaluation of language skills is desirable.
 Vancouver Senate 11984
Minutes of December 16,1998
Admissions Committee
Mr. McMichael spoke in support of the motion as a step in the right direction. He also
pointed out that task-based tests are currently being further developed in order to provide
a fairer and more comprehensive assessment of a student's language ability than provided
by TOEFL. Mr. McMichael further noted that Citizenship and Immigration Canada is
currently funding development of national language benchmarks to be used in the
elementary school system as well as for adult language training. Mr. McMichael
expressed optimism that similar benchmarks would be considered for evaluation of
university students in the future. He drew attention to the fact that the staff of the UBC
English Language Institute could be a great source of information on language testing.
Dean Isaacson expressed support for the motion, but asked why the English Language
Admission Standard was necessarily distinct from the requirements for registering in first-
year English courses. Dr. Harrison responded that there had been extensive discussion
about the Language Proficency Index (LPI) when it was introduced as a placement test for
first-year English. It was agreed that the LPI would not be used as an entrance
examination. Dr. Harrison noted that, although the LPI is not intended to test the
dimensions of language skill that are necessary for admission, it serves its purpose as a
placement test very well.
Dr. May asked what recourse would be available to faculty if it became apparent that a
student who had four years of full-time education in English was not able to cope in a
course or program once admitted. Dr. Harrison replied that the Admissions Committee
had not yet fully explored this issue, but would do so in the future.
The motion was
put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate 11985
Minutes of December 16,1998
Admissions Committee
LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ENGLISH REQUIREMENT FOR FIRST-YEAR ENGLISH
See 'Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency
Index Requirement' on page 11995.
Dr. Harrison i        That Senate adopt the proposed revisions to
Mr. McNulty J        tbe Language Proficience Index requirement
for first-year English.
Dr. Harrison drew attention to the proposal that students who do not pass the LPI by the
stated deadlines shall be required to enrol in a non-credit writing course, and to continue
to enrol each term until the LPI requirement is met. Dr. Schutz expressed doubt that UBC
could require a student to enrol in a non-credit course. Both Dr. Schutz and Mr. Zuniga
suggested that students could be "strongly advised," but not required, to enrol in non-
credit courses.
In response to queries from Mr. Podersky-Cannon and Mr. Gray, Dr. Harrison replied
that LPI completion is not an entrance requirement, and therefore students who have not
met the LPI requirement could not be offered conditional admission.
Mr. Brady asked why the required enrolment in a non-credit was necessary, as a student
is currently barred from completing a program unless the LPI and first-year English
requirements are met. Dr. Harrison replied that a student who continues to study before
meeting the LPI requirements is not only not able to register for required first-year English
courses, but is unable to use the skills those courses provide to succeed in other
coursework.
 Vancouver Senate 11986
Minutes of December 16,1998
Admissions Committee
Dr. MacEntee spoke against the proposed required enrolment in a non-credit course,
pointing out that a student may not perform to his/her full potential if taking the non-
credit course under a sense of duress.
Dr. Schutz l        That the second sentence of the proposed
Dr. MacEntee J       paragraph entitled "Results" be amended to
read: "Students in this latter category are
encouraged to enroll...." and that the last
sentence of that paragraph be deleted.
Carried.
The motion, as amended,
was put and carried.
Note: The paragraph amended in the above motion, "...Results (2nd Paragraph)" appears
on page 12003.
OTHER RECOMMENDATIONS
See 'Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency
Index Requirement' on page 11995.
Dr. Harrison i        That recommendations 9 through 13 be
Mr. McMichael J        approved.
Dean Isaacson pointed out that Recommendation 10 entailed thirteen reports to Senate,
and suggested that it be amended such that the deans report to the Senate Admissions
Committee, which will then bring one report to Senate. Dr. Harrison agreed to amend the
recommendation to read " The Deans and the Senate Admissions Committee should
consider the English language entrance standard for all programs and the Senate
Admissions Committee should report to Senate by October 1999."
The motion, as amended,
was put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate 11987
Minutes of December 16,1998
Admissions Committee
MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY HONOURS PROGRAM: MINIMUM STANDARD
FOR ENROLMENT
Dr. Harrison presented the following proposal, to be effective in September 1999:
Present Calendar Entry (page 316, column 3) Microbiology,2nd para., last sentence:
All students who intend to take Honours in any Microbiology option must consult the head of the
department and the undergraduate advisor.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Change last sentence to:
Enrollment in the Honours option of any Microbiology and Immunology program requires a sustained,
annual academic average above 75%.
Dr. Harrison i        That the proposed change in the minimum
Mr. McNulty i        enrolment standard for the Honours option of
the Microbiology and Immunology program be
approved.
Carried.
BIOLOGY HONOURS PROGRAM: MINIMUM STANDARD FOR ENROLMENT
The Senate Admissions Committee recommended approval of the following change in
minimum GPA for entry into a Biology Honours program.
1998/99 Calendar Entry (page 304, column 3)
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Insert a new section after "Third-Year Standing in Biology"
Biology Honours Programs
"Students wishing to enter a Biology Honours Program option must have a 75% average in courses
taken during the previous winter session."
Dr. Harrison i        That the proposed change in the minimum
Mr. McNulty i        enrolment standard for the Honours option of
the Biology program be approved.
Mr. Edwards asked why minimum enrolment standards had been raised. Dr. Harrison
replied that these standards did not represent an attempt to limit students, but rather to
indicate the GPA that will predict success in the Honours option. Dr. Harrison stated that
students admitted to the
 Vancouver Senate 11988
Minutes of December 16,1998
Curriculum Committee
Honours option with less than a 75% GPA often encounter difficulty in the upper years
of the program.
The motion was
put and carried.
Curriculum Committee
See "Appendix B: Curriculum and Course Change Summary" on page 11997.
Dr. Berger, Chair of the committee, presented the report.
REQUIREMENTS TO RECEIVE A DEGREE, SECOND DEGREE OR DIPLOMA
Second Degree Requirements: Proposed Calendar Entry
The current Calendar entry "Requirements to Receive a Degree or Diploma" (page 39) should be
amended to include requirements for Second Degrees. Subsections 2. and 3. should be revised for clarity
and a new section added, so that the entry would read:
"Requirements to Receive a Degree, Second Degree or Diploma
The requirements for degrees and diplomas are described in Part X, "Faculties and Schools."
Except where the requirements of a particular degree or diploma program specifically state
otherwise, a student must:
1. satisfy all the program requirements by completing studies either at UBC or elsewhere;
2. complete at least 50% of the credits required for the program while registered in it; and
3. in undergraduate programs, complete upper division UBC credits to satisfy at least 50% of
the credits required by (2).
To complete a second or subsequent undergraduate degree or diploma program, a student must, in
addition to the 3 requirements above, also complete at least as many upper division (i.e. 300 or 400
level) credits as are normally required for that program while registered in it. A student may enrol
in a degree program more than once provided that the program does not overlap significantly with
studies for a prior degree."
Dr. Berger l        That the proposed Calendar statement on
Dr. Knight i        Requirements to Receive a Degree, Second
Degree or Diploma be approved.
Carried.
THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Dr. Berger drew attention to the fact that many of the proposed changes resulted from the
Faculty's recent examination of the relationship between course credits and contact hours.
The Faculty of Applied Science also proposed to reduce the number of credits in several
programs, and
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 16,15
115
Curriculum Committee
to separate laboratory hours from lecture hours. The proposed minor in Commerce and
the proposed degree designation for Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering
were put aside to be considered as separate motions.
Dr. Berger
Dean Isaacson
That the proposals from the Faculty of Applied
Science be approved.
Carried.
Minor in Commerce
Dr. Berger
Dean Isaacson
That the proposal from the Faculty of Applied
Science for a Minor in Commerce be approved.
Carried.
Degree Designation for Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering
Dr. Berger noted that the proposed change would take effect in April 2000, rather than in
September 2000 as stated in the report from the Faculty of Applied Science.
Dr. Berger
Dean Isaacson
That the proposed parchment and transcript
notations for Electrical and Computer
Engineering be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Bachelor of Business in Real Estate
Dr. Berger l
Dean pro tem. Atkins        J
That the proposal from the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration for a
Bachelor of Business in Real Estate be
approved.
Dr. Berger spoke briefly to the proposal, noting that the Diploma in Urban Land
Economics (ULE) would be the entry point for the Bachelor of Business in Real Estate
(BBRE). The BBRE would build upon the ULE and bring students to the full
baccalaureate level. Precedent for this
 Vancouver Senate 11990
Minutes of December 16,1998
Curriculum Committee
type of program includes a degree completion program in Dental Hygiene in the Faculty
of Dentistry. The ULE was designed to be completed by distance education, and the
courses taken toward the ULE would be an integral part of the BBRE. This use of Extra-
Sessional Studies courses as part of a degree program would represent a departure from
past practice. The proposal included four new courses.
In response to a query from Dr. Thompson, Dr. Berger stated that it is possible for a
student to complete the ULE without attending the UBC Campus or having direct contact
with a faculty member. The upper-level courses within the BBRE are being developed as
distance-education courses under the supervision of UBC faculty. Dr. Thompson stated
that because a student could complete the entire degree program without direct contact
with UBC faculty, that Senate, or a committee of Senate should examine the implications
of this type of program. It was agreed that other similar programs would likely come
forward for approval in the future.
Mr. de Pfyffer questioned whether the course BBRE 401, Commercial Building
Construction, should be a required course for those students engaged in real estate
appraisal of farmland. Dean pro tem. Atkins confirmed that the BBRE would have an
urban focus and may not suit the professional ambitions of some students. Dean Quayle
added that there are Canadian programs available in Agri-business that might better
address the needs of students with a rural focus, but that they do not devalue the
importance of a program such as the BBRE in the urban realm.
Mr. Gray expressed the opinion that the approval of distance-education degree programs
would play a part in changing the status of UBC from a place to a concept. Mr. Gray
further posited that a large part of the learning experience at UBC currently results from
contact with people, and urged members of Senate to consider the significance of
approving distance-education degree programs.
 Vancouver Senate 11991
Minutes of December 16,1998
Curriculum Committee
Dean pro tem. Atkins spoke in support of distance education, noting that the BBRE
embodied the spirit of Trek 2000, which invites the development of alternatives for
students who are unable to study during regular hours on campus.
Dr. MacEntee referred to Page 16 of the BBRE proposal, which lists Faculty Research
Awards in the Department as "not applicable", and expressed the opinion that a
fundamental aspect of any degree program should be contact with faculty members who
have a research agenda.
Mr. Podersky-Cannon spoke against the proposal, stating that the program would act as
an apprenticeship for one particular industry and should therefore not be designated as a
degree program.
Dr. Schutz spoke against the title "BBRE", referring to Senate policy that degree names be
restricted to the names of Faculties or Schools. Dr. Schutz suggested that a Bachelor of
Commerce in Real Estate would be more appropriate. Dean pro tem. Atkins replied that
because the Faculty was named "the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration,"
the proposed Bachelor of Business did comply with Senate policy on the naming of degree
programs.
In response to a query from Dr. Williams, Dr. Berger responded that the BBRE, if
approved by Senate and the Board of Governors, would require approval of the Degree
Program Review Committee (DPRC). Dean pro tem. Atkins concurred, noting that a
letter of intent had been accepted by the DPRC.
Dean pro tem. Atkins expressed the opinion that UBC should be proud to be associated
with many professional groups, such as the Accounting or Pharmacy professions.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 16,15
11992
Curriculum Committee
Dr. Hannam
Mr. de Pfyffer
That the proposal for a Bachelor of Business in
Real Estate be tabled.
Carried.
The proposals from the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration also included
changes to the Co-operative Education Program and the discontinuation of supplemental
examinations.
Dr. Berger
Dean pro tem Atkins
That the proposals from the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration for
changes to the Co-operative Education
Program and the discontinuation of
supplemental examinations be approved.
Carried.
THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Dr. Berger introduced proposals that the Faculty of Medicine intended to implement in
January 1999.
Dr. Berger
Dr. Slonecker
That the proposals from the Faculty of
Medicine be approved.
In response to a query from Dr. Rosengarten, Dr. Berger explained that the term
"selective" denoted clinical experience with UBC faculty, while an "elective" could take
place in one of a wider array of settings.
The motion was
put and carried.
THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Dr. Berger briefly described the proposals from the Faculty of Education.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 16,15
11993
Curriculum Committee
Dr. Berger
Dr. Froese
That the proposals from the Faculty of
Education be approved.
Carried.
THE FACULTY OF LAW
Dr. Berger introduced a proposal from the Faculty of Law to increase the course load in
the Half-time Program to 60%. This rationale was to make students in the program
eligible for financial aid.
Dean Granot asked why the program was referred to as a "half-time" program rather
than "part-time" program. Dr. Berger replied that the half-time program is the only part-
time option available, and that the Faculty of Law passes/fails students by year.
Dr. Berger
Dean Blom
That the proposals from the Faculty of Law be
approved.
THE FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Dr. Berger
Acting Dean McLean
THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Dr. Berger
Dean Klawe
Carried.
That the proposals from the Faculty of
Forestry be approved.
Carried.
That the proposals from the Faculty of Science
be approved.
In response to a query from Dean Granot, Dr. Berger confirmed that MATH 102/103 and
MATH 104/105 would be acceptable alternatives to MATH 100/101 for many programs
and that Senate would be asked to approve a number of curriculum changes to this effect
in the near future.
The motion was
put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate 11994
Minutes of December 16,1998
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
HEALTH SCIENCES COORDINATING COMMITTEE
Vice-President McBride announced a change of name of the Health Sciences Coordinating
Committee. The new name is the "Council of Health and Human Service Programs"
(CHHSP)
Academic Year 1999-2000
A draft of the Academic Year 1999-2000 was circulated for information.
Other Business
Mr. Brady inquired as to whether there might be sufficient time to reconsider the BBRE
proposal. The Chair replied that the proposal required both reflection and further
discussion and decided to postpone consideration until the January 20, 1999 meeting of
Senate.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIP TO UBC STUDENT
At the suggestion of Vice-President McBride, Dr. Williams announced that the winner of
the 1999 Rhodes Scholarship for British Columbia was Murray McCutcheon. Mr.
McCutcheon is a graduate of the Co-operative Education option of the Honours Physics
program and is currently working toward a Master of Science degree. Mr. McCutcheon
has also been very active in triathlons. Dr. Williams added that Murray McCutcheon's
father is a UBC faculty member in the Department of Physics. President Piper offered
warmest congratulations on behalf of members of Senate.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 10:20 p.m.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on January 20, 1999.
 Vancouver Senate 11995
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency
Index Requirement
RECOMMENDATIONS ON UBC'S POLICY ON ENGLISH LANGUAGE ADMISSION
STANDARD
Academic Standards Include English Language Proficiency
A subcommittee of the Senate Admissions Committee was struck a year and a half ago to study
the English Language Admission Standard and report to the Committee on any changes that were
deemed necessary to bring the Standard into line with current educational standards and practices
in BC, elsewhere in Canada, and in other parts of the world. The English Language Proficiency
subcommittee consisted of members of the Admissions Committee and representatives from the
First-year English program, the Faculty of Graduate Studies, and the English Language Institute.
Consultations occurred with the International Student Initiative. A draft report was presented to
the full Senate Admissions Committee and a modified set of proposals included here was
approved. The report affirms UBC's high standards for English language proficiency but
recommends many changes to the current policy and some further studies.
Incorporated into the "Trek 2000" vision document is the understanding that UBC's admissions
policies should be designed to attract the best students both from within BC and from elsewhere.
To achieve that goal requires that UBC maintains its academic standards while ensuring that
applicants with the best prospects for academic success are accepted. UBC's current admissions
policy implies that prospects for academic success can be predicted from an applicant's grades in
previous courses and achievement of a level of competence in English. Other factors such as an
applicant's social and economic situation, which may also affect academic success, are not directly
included in the admissions policy. Currently, competence in English is one of the first criteria
applied and applicants who may be otherwise qualified may not be considered for admission
because their English skills are judged to be inadequate. Such a practice is acceptable only if the
means of assessing competence in English is effective.
Questions about Tests of English as a Foreign Language
Applicants to UBC are clearly told that "As English is the medium of instruction at The University
of British Columbia, all applicants, regardless of country of origin or citizenship status, will be
required to demonstrate competence in the English language prior to admission" (UBC Calendar
1998/99, p.31). A number of methods of demonstrating competence are available to
undergraduate applicants, but for many applicants who have not been in an English-speaking high
school system for five years achieving a minimum level on the Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL) is the method used.
Language competence encompasses skills in four areas (reading, listening, speaking, and writing).
Questions have been raised about the effectiveness of UBC's admissions policy in ensuring that
students have comprehensive competence in English; these questions center on the use of tests
such as TOEFL and on the reliance on high school education to provide the necessary skills.
Discussions in the subcommittee and elsewhere have questioned especially the rationale for the
 Vancouver Senate 11996
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
current use of the TOEFL. The basic TOEFL is neither a good predictor of academic success at
University nor an ideal measure of English proficiency (see further discussion in rationale 5
presented below). On the first point, universities or academic units within universities have
sometimes raised their minimum TOEFL requirement in the hopes of selecting better qualified
students, but a study by R. Sumner at the University of Western Ontario published in 1995
showed that the average graduation rate of students with TOEFL scores 550-579 was essentially
the same as both the rate for students with TOEFL scores above 580 and the rate for native
English speakers. On the second point, university curricula in many disciplines are now placing
increasing emphasis on oral communication, group study, and problem-solving, so it is not
unexpected that a test such as the TOEFL which evaluates only the passive English skills (such as
listening and reading) sometimes allows students into programs for which their speaking and
writing skills are not adequate. Despite the recommendation from the Educational Testing Service
which administers the TOEFL that the test not be used as an admissions test, that is basically how
it is used at UBC and at many other universities. There is widespread concern that otherwise
academically prepared applicants are being excluded from UBC only because their English
language skills are judged to be inadequate by a less than perfect test.
Extra Academic Challenges for ESL Students
UBC draws a large proportion of its undergraduate student body from BC. There is a large ESL
population in schools in BC, especially in the Lower Mainland where the majority of school
students do not speak English at home, and the schools face difficulties providing suitable classes
that will make new Canadians truly proficient in all four aspects of English. UBC is also
committed to increasing the numbers of international students; some have excellent language skills
but others may still be developing their language proficiency.
One policy change that has been considered and implemented elsewhere but is not recommended
here would be to eliminate tests of competence in English as an admissions criterion and let
students develop their skills while participating in an academic program. There are at least two
drawbacks to such a policy. First, it would put ESL students at a distinct disadvantage. Students
need competence in English in order to do well even in first-year courses, so in addition to making
all the other adjustments to university life that all new students must make, ESL students may also
be struggling to overcome the language barriers keeping them from achieving their academic
potential. Second, even before an undergraduate student attends classes at UBC there is another
test of proficiency in some aspects of English, the Language Proficiency Index exam or LPI.
Successful completion of the essay portion of the LPI (or exemption based on, for example, high
grades in grade twelve English courses) is prerequisite to any of the first-year English courses that
are required for the degree. Thus while ESL graduate students must pass only one test of
competence in English, undergraduate students have to demonstrate competence in two stages.
Sometimes students who do not have to write the TOEFL, for example those educated in the BC
school system, may need help with writing skills but don't realize it until they encounter
difficulties with the LPI exam.
Newly admitted students who cannot pass the LPI exam encounter many obstacles to academic
success. Such students "cannot register either in a first-year English course or in Arts One or
Science One ... [and] are strongly advised to enrol in Writing 098, a non-credit course in the Uni-
 Vancouver Senate 11997
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
versity Writing Centre ... " (p.32 of the 1998/99 Calendar). Some Faculties, for example Arts and
Science, add to that advice the statement that students who have not passed the LPI " should not
register for more than 12 credits per term" (p.lll of the 1998/99 Calendar, Faculty of Arts English
Requirement) or the somewhat stronger "will be permitted to register in no more than 12 credits
of course work per term" (p.298 of the 1998/99 Calendar, Faculty of Science English
Requirement). While some students take the advice offered by the University and the Faculties,
some do not and the credit restrictions have been difficult to administer. When students ignore the
advice or when they take it but are unable to pass the LPI exam before accumulating 30 credits,
they find that further academic studies are denied them. To avoid the disappointment and
frustration associated with lack of progress and loss of time and money by those students, it is
incumbent on the University to ensure that students achieve the required competence in English as
soon as possible.
The subcommittee heard a strong argument for another option based on the ideal of evaluating
applicants first on the basis of academic qualifications. Then, if an academically qualified
applicant was judged to have skills in the English language that were inadequate to ensure success
in an academic program, a suitable alternate program of study would be provided to help the
applicant achieve the required competence prior to the start of, or in parallel with, an academic
program. This option, a kind of "conditional acceptance", is in use at some institutions in Canada
and elsewhere.
What services does UBC offer to ESL students to help them achieve competence in English? There
is no campus-wide program but there are some services including the University Writing Centre
(which offers non-credit writing courses), the Center for Faculty Development and Instructional
Services (which offers workshops for graduate student T.A.'s), and the English Language Institute
(ELI). The ELI is part of the Centre for Continuing Studies and is able to provide comprehensive
evaluation of and instruction for ESL students but its programs are non-credit and offered on a
cost-recovery basis. Recently the Faculty of Dentistry and the ELI have developed a program of
evaluation and study to help a small number of international students achieve the oral
communication skills needed for success in clinical studies. In the end, this report does not
recommend a policy of "conditional acceptance" but does recommend that studies begin
immediately on the feasibility of such an approach at UBC.
The Format of This Report
What follows is a copy of the current Calendar statements on the " English Language Admission
Standard" and the LPI, then a proposal for new statements with eight major changes (with
rationales footnoted), and finally five more recommendations for action on related issues.
The proposed implementation date for these changes is September 2000.
The CURRENT POLICY (page 31-32 of the 98/99 Calendar) is reproduced below:
English Language Admission Standard
As English is the medium of instruction at the University of British Columbia all applicants,
regardless of country of origin or of citizenship status, will be required to demonstrate
competence in the English language prior to admission.
 Vancouver Senate 11998
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
This requirement is distinct from the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) requirement for first-
year English courses at UBC. Please consult the following entry for further information about
the LPI.
With the exception of applicants to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, applicants may
demonstrate English language competence by one of the following:
• Five years of full-time education in English in Canada or the equivalent in another country
where English is the principal language. Such education must include BC Grade 12 or
equivalent and can be in a combination of secondary and post-secondary education.
• A score of 570 minimum on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Some
programs have a higher minimum, e.g., 580 for programs in the Faculty of Arts. A score of
at least 90 on the Michigan English Assessment Battery (MELAB). TOEFL or MELAB
tests taken more than two years prior to application for admission will not be considered.
• Successful completion of six credits of post-secondary English studies for which UBC gives
transfer credit.
• A grade of 80% or better on the Provincial Examination portion of BC English 12 or
English Literature 12 or the equivalent; or a grade of 6 or 7 on the International
Baccalaureate Higher Level English course; or a grade of 5 on the Advanced Placement
English (Language Composition: Literature and Composition).
• Successful completion of the equivalent of five years of full-time instruction in a
school/institution in Canada in which the major language of instruction is other than
English but where the level of English proficiency required is equivalent to that in English
language schools/institutions in Canada. (This will include applicants from CEGEPs who
have completed English as a first language.)
• Graduation from a recognized degree program at an accredited university at which English
is the primary language of instruction and in a country where English is the principal
language.
Language Proficiency Index Requirement for First-Year English
All programs require at least three credits of first-year English; most require six credits. Before
enrolling in any first-year English course or Arts One, or Science One, students must complete
the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) and achieve a minimum score oflevel5 (30/40) on the
essay section of the examination.
Exemptions
• Students in the following categories are exempt from the LPI requirement; all other
students must complete the LPI and achieve a minimum score oflevel5 (30/40) on the
essay section of the examination:
• those with a final grade of "A" (school mark plus government exam mark) in English
12, English Literature 12, or OAC English;
• those with a grade of 5 in the Advanced Placement course in literature and
composition and those with a grade of six or seven in the higher level International
Baccalaureate course in English Literature;
• those who passed UBC's English Composition Test (ECT) prior to September 1992;
• those who have completed six credits of first-year English or the equivalent.
... Results (2nd paragraph)
 Vancouver Senate 11999
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
Students with scores of level 5 or 6 on the essay section should proceed with enrolment in
their first-year English courses, Arts One, or Science One; those with a level 4 or below cannot
register either in a first-year English course or in Arts One or Science One. Students in this
latter category are strongly advised to enrol in Writing 098, a non-credit course in the
University Writing Centre, Ponderosa Annex C, 2021 West mall, telephone (604) 822-9564.
The Proposed Policy on Admissions and Changes to the LPI Requirement
Changes are in bold. The order of the six bulleted items in the English language admission
standard is changed. Rationales are footnoted.
English Language Admission Standard
As English is the medium of instruction at the University of British Columbia all applicants,
regardless of country of origin or of citizenship status, will be required to demonstrate
competence in the English language prior to admission. Competence is expected in all four of
the following skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing.:
This requirement is distinct from the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) requirement for first-
year English courses at UBC. Please consult the following entry for further information about
the LPI.
With the exception of applicants to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, applicants may
demonstrate English language competence by one of the following:
• Four years of full-time education in English in Canada or the equivalent in another
country where English is the principal language. Such education must include BC Grade
12 or equivalent and can be in a combination of secondary and post-secondary education.
Years completed in a recognized international school where English is the language of
instruction may be eligible for inclusion in the required years of instruction.2
• A grade of 70% or better on the Provincial Examination portion of BC English 12 or
English Literature 12 or the equivalent; or a final grade of 5 or better on the International
Baccalaureate Higher Level English course; or a final grade of 4 or better on the Advanced
Placement English Language & Composition or Literature & Composition courses.3
1 Rationale: Success in university studies requires both the ability to learn in a variety of ways, e.g., from the spoken word (from
lecturers and other students) and from the written word (in texts and other written material), and the ability to demonstrate learning
both orally and in writing.
2 Rationale: The current requirement for a minimum of five years of secondary (or secondary and post-secondary) education in English
makes access to UBC difficult for students in many jurisdictions outside of BC (in Canada and other countries) where "high school"
starts in grade 9. As well, within BC non-traditional ways of dividing the elementary and secondary years are being explored; one
includes the "middle school" up to grade 8 and the "high school" from grade 9 to 12. Setting the minimum education requirement at
four years would accommodate a wider range of strong applicants.
Many potentially excellent students graduate in countries in which English is not the principal language but from high schools where
English is the language of instruction and instructors are highly trained in English. When such a school has been evaluated, such
applicants should be treated as though they had studied in an English-language institution. Staff in the Registrar's Office evaluate
foreign high schools and they, with information provided by representatives of the Faculties and the International Student Initiative
program who recruit in foreign countries, can maintain an up-to-date list of acceptable schools. See also recommendation 9.
3 Rationale: Applicants who have studied in an English-language school for fewer than four years but who can achieve high marks on
the BC provincial exams in English should also be accepted on that basis. Analysis of data for first-year registrants who achieved
between 70 and 79% on the provincial exam in English 12 shows that their average marks in first-year English courses (ENGL 110,
111, 112) ranged from 62-72% (an average drop of only 8 percentage points) and that an average of 50% of them achieved grades of
B- or better. Of those registrants, over 70% completed two first-year English courses in their first year at UBC. This record compares
with the average grades of applicants who got 80% on the provincial exam and who currently are acceptable on that basis; their marks
averaged 66-72% in first-year ENGL courses (an average drop of 11 percentage points), with 60% in the B- or better range. There is
no demonstrable difference between the performance of students with provincial exam grades of 70% and 80%. It does not seem
 Vancouver Senate 12000
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
• Successful completion of the equivalent of four years of full-time instruction in a
school/institution in Canada in which the major language of instruction is other than
English but where the level of English proficiency required is equivalent to that in English
language schools/institutions in Canada. Such education must include the equivalent to BC
Grade 12 and can be in a combination of secondary and postsecondary education. (This
will include applicants from CEGEPs who have completed English as a first language).4
• The competence standard indicated on one of the following tests of English language
proficiency that evaluates skills in listening, reading, speaking, and writing:
Competence Level-
CPE (the Cambridge Local Examination Syndicate's (UCLES) Cambridge    C
Proficiency Examination)
IELTS (International English Language Testing System) Academic test 6.5 (no part less than
6.0)
MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery) 85
with the MELAB Oral Interview 85
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)
Either the Paper-based test 55
with the TWE (Test of Written English) 4.0
and the TSE (Test of Spoken English) 50
Or the Computer-based test 22
with the essay 4.0
and the TSE (Test of Spoken English) 50
AEP Certificate (Academic English Program certificate Level from UBC's     600
English Language Institute)
* Unless otherwise stated, the score is the minimum on each part of the examination. Tests taken more than two years
prior to application for admission will not be considered.5
unfair to applicants to accept them on the basis of a provincial English exam mark of at least 70% if their chances of succeeding in
first-year English courses are high.
Likewise, applicants who achieve high marks on the challenging International Baccalaureate or Advanced Placement exams should be
accepted. UBC currently does not accept applicants on the basis of individual IB or AP courses, but the admissions policy is being reevaluated. Senate recently approved a proposal from the Faculty of Arts to award credit for first-year Arts courses to students who
achieve a level 5 in IB Arts courses and 4 in AP Arts courses. Similar policies exist at many other major universities in North America
and elsewhere. It makes sense to accept as evidence of English proficiency the same standards that we are using to establish advanced
credit standing.
4 Rationale: All applicants in Canadian schools who achieve the expected level of proficiency in English should be treated in the same
way. Some students may study in a French-language school, for example, but study English to the standard expected of native English
speakers (i.e., English as a first language, not English as a second language). Since Recommendations 1 and 2 propose to set the
minimum at four years of education it is appropriate that this clause be amended as well.
5 Rationale: For applicants who must submit results of a test of English skills, the requirement for a test that evaluates the four
dimensions of language competence will provide a better means of evaluating the readiness of applicants for study at UBC than the
requirement for only the passive skills (reading and listening) that are tested by the two currently accepted international tests (the basic
TOEFL and MELAB).
There is growing evidence to suggest that raising minimum acceptable grades on tests like the TOEFL (and MELAB), which were not
designed as entrance tests, will not ensure higher academic standards in the institution. Indeed, raising the minimum may actually
exclude many applicants who are likely to succeed in an academic program. A study at the University of Western Ontario by M L.
Simner published in 1995 showed that raising the minimum grade on the TOEFL would not have the effect of increasing academic
standards. Students with TOEFL scores in the 550-579 range were compared with those with scores 580-677 and with Canadian
students who had not submitted TOEFL scores. In both the Faculty of Social Science and the Faculty of Science students in the 550-
579 range performed well in their first year with over 40% getting average marks of B or higher compared with around 30% of
Canadian students. Students in the 550-579 TOEFL range graduated at the same (or higher) rate as Canadian students.
 Vancouver Senate 12001
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
• Successful completion of six credits of post-secondary first-year English studies for which
UBC gives transfer credit.
• Graduation from a recognized degree program at an accredited university at which English
is the primary language of instruction and in a country where English is the principal
language.
The new suggested competence levels on the basic TOEFL and MELAB may seem like a reduction in standards but will be more
effective entrance standards than the current minimum scores because requirements for written and/or spoken components are being
added. Since the TOEFL is the better known of the exams, it will be analyzed in detail. The traditional paper-based TOEFL consists of
three sections with individual scores as follows: Listening Comprehension - 20-68, Structure and Written Expression - 20-68, and
Reading Comprehension - 20-67). There is no actual writing involved in answering the test (for example, multiple-choice questions are
used). An overall test score is reported on a scale of 200-677. Currently UBC looks only at the total scaled score which is norm-
referenced. A TOEFL of 580 (the current minimum for the Faculty of Arts) corresponds to the 79th percentile out of hundreds of
thousands of exams while the proposed minimum (55 on individual parts of the test) corresponds to approximately the 65th percentile.
A new computer-based version of the TOEFL is being phased in worldwide. It retains the same three sections mentioned above but
incorporates an essay into the Structure and Written Expression section. Each section score ranges from 0-30, the essay raw score has a
maximum of 6.0, and the maximum total test score is 300.
How will reducing the minimum score on part of a test lead to more effective entrance standards? By requiring applicants to submit
scores that evaluate not only the passive aspects of language but also the active skills of speaking and writing, the new policy will
enable UBC to evaluate competence in the full range of language skills necessary for success in academic programs. In recent years
faculty across the campus have expressed the most concern about declines in writing and speaking abilities in the student body. If we
continue to admit students on the basis of tests that do not take into account their skills in those areas then we will never see an
improvement. If we simply raise the crossbar using the basic TOEFL, thinking that things will get better in our classrooms, we will be
fooling ourselves.
If this policy is adopted UBC will embark on an experiment. The minimum scores on the added components of the TOEFL and
MELAB and the minima set for the other tests have been chosen after careful study with the guiding principle that we do not want to
set the mark too high for fear of creating yet another, but different, barrier to qualified applicants. Since a TOEFL as high as 570 or
580 is likely to screen out applicants who can benefit from our programs and can benefit the university community, a lowering of that
score is justified. We chose the equivalent of 550 (i.e., 55 on each part) as a conservative move. When deciding on the standards for the
Test of Written English and the Test of Spoken English we entered less well-known territory. If the scores on the TWE and TSE were
closely correlated to the scores on the basic TOEFL, choosing standards on those two tests would be easy - but it would also be
meaningless because we would learn everything we needed to know from the TOEFL alone. We chose a minimum score on the Test of
Written English of 4.0 (the 62nd percentile) and on the Test of Spoken English of 50 (the 74th percentile) because they seemed closest
to the suggested 55 on the basic TOEFL (~65th percentile). (The next level down on the TSE, 45, is the 53rd percentile and that
seemed too low for acceptance). The levels on the basic MELAB, which already includes an essay, were lowered slightly since the
requirement for the oral interview will broaden the basis of assessment and provide a more effective tool. Minimum scores on the other
internationally administered tests were chosen after consideration of the assessment criteria incorporated into each test.
To ensure that applicants are competent in all four language skill areas and to identify any areas in need of improvement will require
the use of scores on individual components of most tests rather than on an overall score. This is especially important for a test such as
TOEFL which is norm-referenced (rather than criterion-referenced) and for which the overall score is a manipulated number, not a
simple sum of component scores.
Accepting a wider range of tests that are available around the world will improve overall access to UBC. Adding a requirement for
additional components of the two tests currently accepted (TOEFL and MELAB) should not disadvantage most applicants if other
tests, not currently recognized but available Widely, are accepted. For example, the Educational Testing Service that offers TOEFL also
offers the TWE at no extra cost five times a year and the TSE anywhere from 5 to 12 times a year, at many of the testing sites.
Beginning in some countries in 1998 the TWE is being incorporated into the standard TOEFL and the tests are being administered by
computer rather than on paper. The change will be implemented world-wide within a few years.
Recognizing the Academic English Program of the UBC English Language Institute (ELI) is warranted because the ELI has developed
an integrated series of courses designed to develop competence in the full range of language skills needed for effective learning at
university. The ELI has trained staff who can evaluate an individual's English skills and identify areas in need of further study. The
courses are available as a UBC certificate program. The only drawback of the current ELI program is its high cost compared with UBC
credit courses. One advantage of such a program is that it allows applicants to improve their language skills while getting accustomed
to Vancouver and to UBC itself, and thus may reduce the 'culture shock' that many students experience in their first term at UBC.
This proposal should be approved only if there is a commitment at UBC to collect and analyze data on the efficacy of the tests and the
standards chosen. See proposal 13 later in this package.
 Vancouver Senate 12002
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
PROPOSAL: Language Proficiency Index Requirement for First-Year English
All programs require at least three credits of first-year English; most require six credits. Before
enrolling in any first-year English course or Arts One, or Science One, students must complete the
Language Proficiency Index (LPI) and achieve a minimum score of level 5 (30/40) on the essay
section of the examination.
 Vancouver Senate 12003
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
Exemptions
Students in the following categories are exempt from the LPI requirement; all other students must
complete the LPI and achieve a minimum score of level 5 (30/40) on the essay section of the
examination:
• Those with a final grade (school mark plus final examination mark) of 80% or above in
BC Grade 12 English or Grade 12 English Literature;6
• Those with a final grade of 'A' in Grade 12 English (senior year) in a Canadian secondary
school outside of BC (final grade of A' in OAC English Language and Literature for
Ontario Applicants);6
• those with a final grade of 4 or better in Advanced Placement English Language &
Composition or Literature & Composition and those with a final grade of 5 or better in
the higher level International Baccalaureate English or English Literature;7
• those who passed UBC's English Composition Test (ECT) prior to September 1992;
• those who have completed six credits of first-year English or the equivalent.
... Results (2ndparagraph)
Students with scores of level 5 or 6 on the essay section should proceed with enrolment in their
first-year English courses, Arts One, or Science One; those with a level 4 or below cannot register
either in a first-year English course or in Arts One or Science One. Students in this latter category
are required to enrol in Writing 098, a non-credit course in the University Writing Centre,
Ponderosa Annex C, 2021 West Mall, telephone (604) 822-9564. Enrolment is required each term
until the LPI requirement is met.8
6 Rationale: The current exemption is restricted to students in BC and Ontario and does not acknowledge students in Alberta (which
also has provincial exams) let alone students in other provinces who do not write provincial exams. The goal is to set a reasonably high
standard so that only those students who are likely to do well in first-year English will be exempted from the LPI exam. Using an
80%final grade (which in other provinces is an 'A' but in BC is a 'B+ ') in the appropriate senior-level English course will signal to
students that continued high performance is required. Students in BC who are unsure of their final grade likely will write the LPI
anyway; it is made available through the BC schools. Students in other jurisdictions may find the proposed clause more welcoming and
a clearer acknowledgement of their achievements.
7 Rationale: Students who will be eligible for advanced credit for first-year English on the basis of their performance in an IB or AP
English course may opt to take a first-year course instead. In such cases, it makes no sense to require them to take the LPI.
8 Rationale: Inability to pass the LPI exam is one measure of a student's lack of preparation to study in the English language. It is
important that students achieve competence in the English language as quickly as possible. Currently students who do not pass the LPI
by the deadline in August "are strongly advised" (Calendar p.32) to enrol in a non-credit writing course; some take the advice but
many do not. Many Faculties now tie promotion to completion of the LPI and the first-year English course requirement. For example,
in the Faculties of Arts and Science, a student must pass the LPI before completing 30 credits and must complete six credits of first-year
English courses before completing 60 credits. When students reach those credit limits without completing the English requirements they
are barred from further studies. To avoid the disappointment experienced by such students and to provide appropriate academic
guidance we propose that stronger measures are in order.
The instructors at the UBC Writing Centre are trained to help students gain the skills needed to pass the LPI All instructors must have
experience teaching in UBC's English 112 ("Strategies for University Writing"). Although the immediate goal of the non-credit course
("Preparation for University Writing") is to help students to achieve a pass on the LPI, the long-term goal is the enable students to
write well-argued, coherent essays and reports of high academic standard. The preparatory course runs for 12 weeks, meeting three
hours a week, and costs $245. A special sitting of the LPI is arranged for students in the course.
Data collected by the University Writing Centre show that completing the non-credit course is an effective way for students to improve
their writing skills. Of the students for whom English is a second language, 51% passed the LPI after taking the non-credit course only
once. Considering that many of those students entered the course having achieved only a level 3 on the LPI (where level 5 is a pass), the
improvement is dramatic. For students for whom English is their first language, the improvement is even stronger. Their average
increase in grade on the LPI is 0.9 and 84% of them pass. The fact that not all students pass the LPI even after taking the preparatory
course attests to the degree of deficiency in writing skills that some students bring to UBC. Without formal instruction, many students
who attempt to improve their language skills on their own ("I'm going to get a tutor" is a statement often heard by faculty counsellors)
take much longer to achieve a passing grade on the LPI exam.
 Vancouver Senate 12004
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
Other Recommendations:
9. The Registrar's Office is encouraged to continue to consult the Faculties on its ongoing review
of institutions and countries that are considered to be "where English is the principal
language", and to report annually to the Senate Admission Committee on any changes made
to the list of countries and institutions whose students are exempt from the requirement to
submit scores of a test of English language proficiency.
Rationale: English is recognized worldwide as a major medium of communication in business,
tourism, and education, and because of changing political or economic realities, educational
institutions may change in their ability to provide instruction in the English language. Staff of the
Registrar's Office study these developments and take part in overseas visits and so are qualified to
provide up-to-date evaluation of countries and institutions which should be exempt from the
requirement for tests of English language competence. Many Faculties send representatives
overseas to meet potential students and their experiences should be incorporated into the review
process.
10. The Deans and the Senate Admissions Committee should consider the English language
entrance standard for all programs and report to Senate by October 1999.
Rationale: Success in any academic program, whether undergraduate, professional or graduate,
should require competence in all four areas of English language skills to the level required for the
program. Current unease among faculty about the lack of English language skills in the student
body probably reflects an entrance requirement (i.e., the basic TOEFL) that does not ensure
competence in some of the most important skill areas. The way to fix the problem is to find a
better means of assessing English language skills and not, as has happened both at UBC and
elsewhere, to raise the minimum TOEFL score. Carefully conducted studies at Canadian
universities and elsewhere have demonstrated that raising the TOEFL requirement alone does not
increase the likelihood of academic success in the student body. The TOEFL was never intended
to be used as an entrance test. The current plethora of English language proficiency standards
among faculties and departments is confusing for applicants and perpetuates the myth that higher
TOEFL scores are an effective way of selecting the most academically prepared students.
Ideally, proposal 4 above will reduce the numbers of students who do not pass the LPI exam the first time and reduce the number
affected by this proposal.
 Vancouver Senate 12005
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix A: English Language Admission Standard and Language Proficiency Index Requirement
Recommendations 1-8 amend the undergraduate admission requirements. It is time to consider
the requirements for admission to other programs (e.g., professional programs and graduate
studies). Already some new models are being implemented. For example Senate approved changes
for the Faculty of Dentistry earlier in 1998 which permitted the use of a broad evaluation of
language skills in cooperation with the English Language Institute. Also, the Department of
Mathematics recognized the need for improved teaching skills for prospective graduate student
TA. 's. and developed a special course of instruction.
11. The Deans and the English Language Institute are encouraged to work together to develop
comprehensive programs of ESL courses that address the needs of undergraduate and graduate
students.
Rationale: A comprehensive ESL program supported by the whole university would indicate to
applicants the commitment of UBC to ensuring their success. The current ELI Academic English
certificate program addresses the needs of many potential students but its costs per term exceed
the cost of most university programs.
12. A committee of Senate should study the concept of offering ESL courses for credit and report
its recommendations to Senate.
Rationale: UBC's student body (actual and potential) includes many individuals whose first
language is not English. Some have studied in B. C. long enough to be exempt from the
requirement for a test of English proficiency; others have not. In both cases, there are many
students who already are fluent in a language that doesn't happen to be English. For them to take
full advantage of UBC's academic offerings they need an opportunity to develop higher-level skills
in English. The question is, should such English courses be offered for credit? Some institutions
allow students to count a small number of credits for ESL courses towards their degree
requirements. The rationale for such an option needs to be evaluated in the context of UBC's
vision and its position in the academic community of BC, Canada, and the world.
13. The Registrar should develop a continuing research database on UBC's English language
entrance standards and their consequences for student achievement in academic programs and
the Senate Admissions Committee should report annually on the results to Senate.
Rationale: UBC's high academic standards are one of the reasons that students are attracted to the
institution. English language requirements are only one aspect of those standards and there exists
no database on which an evaluation can be made of the requirements in the context of UBC's
unique cultural and linguistic environment.
Senate should be aware that these recommendations cannot be implemented easily. It will require
the allocation of resources in the Registrar's Office and the Faculties sufficient to ensure that the
necessary system changes, data collection and analysis, and reporting can be done in a timely
manner.
 Vancouver Senate 12006
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix B
Appendix B
CURRICULUM AND COURSE CHANGE SUMMARY
Faculty of Applied Science
New Minor in Commerce
Revised parchment and transcript notations for Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering,
effective April 2000.
New Course: APSC 279
Changes: APSC 201: remove course pairing from description.
APSC 279: change hours.
APSC 459: change credits, description, hours and add prerequisite.
Bio-resource Engineering
New Course: BIOE 495.
Changes: BIOE 258, 303, 360, 403: delete courses.
BIOE 355: renumber, add prerequisite, change hours.
BIOE 471: change hours.
Program changes to third and fourth years.
Civil Engineering
New Course: CIVL 439
Changes: CIVL 215: change credits.
CIVL 316: change description and hours.
CIVL 340: change hours.
CIVL 418: change title and description.
CIVL 440: change hours
Program Changes effective September 1999:
Program changes to second year, third year - regular, fourth year - regular, third year -
Environmental Option, fourth year - Environmental Option.
Program Changes effective September 2000:
Program Changes to Fourth Year - regular and Fourth Year - Environmental Option.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Changes effective September 1999:
ELEC course designations: change to EECE.
ELEC 251: change credits, corequisites and hours.
ELEC 253: change credits and hours.
ELEC 259: remove course pairing from description.
ELEC 314: change credits, description, prerequisites.
ELEC 315: change description and prerequisites.
ELEC 320: change prerequisites.
ELEC 361: change credits and hours.
 Vancouver Senate 12007
Minutes of December 16,1998
Appendix B
ELEC 366 and 367: delete courses.
ELEC 379: change description and prerequisite.
ELEC 456: change description and prerequisites.
ELEC 461, 464, 469, 472: delete courses.
ELEC 476: change title, description, prerequisites.
ELEC 478: change prerequisite.
ELEC 494: change prerequisite and hours.
ELEC 496: change credits, description, and hours.
ELEC 497: delete course.
Program changes to Second Year - Electrical and Computer Engineering, Third and Fourth Years
Electrical Engineering, Fourth Year Honours Mathematics Option, Third and Fourth Years -
Computer Engineering.
Engineering Physics
Program changes to Second Year, Third Year - Core, and Fourth Year.
Mechanical Engineering
Course Changes:     MECH 203: change credits.
MECH 251, 260, 265, 270, 280, 351, 352: change credits, hours.
MECH 357: change hours.
MECH 453, 454: delete course.
MECH 457: change credits, hours.
MECH 467: delete course.
Program changes to Second, Third and Fourth Years, Third and Fourth Years - Electro-
Mechanical Design Engineering Option.
Change statement for B.A.Sc/M.Eng. in Electro-Mechanical Design Engineering.
Metals and Materials Engineering
New Course: MMAT 359
Changes: MMAT 351: delete course.
MMAT 358, 363: change credits and hours.
MMAT 376: delete course.
MMAT 380: change description.
MMAT 391: delete course.
MMAT 394: change title, description, credits and hours.
MMAT 490: delete course.
Program changes to Second, Third and Fourth Years.
Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
Program change to Fourth Year - Mineral Processing Option.
 Vancouver Senate 12008
Minutes of December 16,1998	
Appendix B
The Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
Change in Calendar statement regarding supplemental examinations.
New Program: Bachelor of Business in Real Estate.
New Courses: BBRE 425, 445, 460, 480.
Co-operative Education Program: change in Calendar statement.
The Faculty of Education
New Courses: EPSE 432, EPSE 433
Changes: EDUC 240: change title, description.
EPSE 320: change title, description.
LANE 478: change description and prerequisites.
Language Education:   change prefix to LANE from READ for READ 310, 391, 392, 472, 473,
474, 475, 476, 477.
The Faculty of Forestry
Natural Resources Conservation
New Courses CONS 340, CONS 449.
Changes: CONS 330: change contact hours.
CONS 451: change description and prerequisites.
Program changes: Change in First Year math requirement, changes to second and third years.
Forest Resources Management
Changes: FRST 252, 348, 452: delete courses.
Program change: Change in First Year math requirement.
Forest Sciences Program
Changes: FRST 430: add footnote.
Program change: Change in First Year math requirement.
Wood Products Processing
New Courses: WOOD 310, WOOD 449.
Changes: WOOD 120: change title.
WOOD 300: change title and description.
WOOD 311: change description.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 16,15
12009
Appendix B
Changes:
Program Changes:
WOOD 312: change description and prerequisites.
WOOD 400: change title, credits, description and prerequisites.
WOOD 411 and 412: change description and prerequisites.
WOOD 476: change title and description.
Changes to Minor in Commerce.
Changes to the Business Area of Concentration.
Changes to the Co-operative Education Program description.
The Faculty of Law
Changes to the Half-time Program.
The Faculty of Medicine
New courses: INDE 440, 441, 442, 443.
The Faculty of Science
Change in Faculty of Science Calendar statement.
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Replace two Honours options with one.
Biology
New Program
New courses
Program changes:
Chemistry
Changes:
Program changes:
Computer Science
Changes:
Program changes:
Co-operative Education Program in Biology.
BIOL 398, 399,498,499.
Change in statement on Biology Honours Programs.
Change in electives for Cell Biology and Genetics Major.
CHEM 417: change in prerequisite.
Changes to Chemistry Major, Environmental Option, Honours: Chemistry,
Honours: Environmental Option, Combined Honours: Physics and
Chemistry.
CPSC 304 and 404: change title, description and prerequisite.
CPSC 216 and 252: change description.
Addition of statement on enrolment restrictions for CPSC 216, 218, 220,
310, 319, 320.
Combined Honours: Computer Science and Physics: changes to Second,
Third and Fourth years.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December It
12010
15
Appendix B
Earth and Ocean Sciences
New course: OCGY 100.
Changes: EOSC 317: delete course.
Integrated Sciences Program
Add Program description.
Mathematics
New courses: MATH 102, 103, 104, 105, 217.
Changes: MATH 100 and 101: change title, description and hours.
MATH 111, MATH 130: change in description.
MATH 140, 141, 153, 154: delete courses.
MATH 152, 215, 200, 220, 221, 223, 253, 255, 320: change in
prerequisites.
Program changes to Major in Mathematical Sciences (MASC).
Microbiology and Immunology
Change in introductory Calendar statement
Physics
New courses:
Changes:
PHYS 252 and PHYS 447.
change description, hours, and prerequisite.
change description and prerequisite.
change title, description, prerequisite and hours.
change credits and hours.
change prerequisite.
change title, hours and prerequisite.
change in credits and hours.
Program changes:
PHYS 203:
PHYS 206:
PHYS 209:
PHYS 250:
PHYS 301:
PHYS 404:
PHYS 409:
Changes to Honours Physics, Honours Physics and Astronomy, Combined
Honours Physics and Mathematics, Major: Physics.
Addenda
New courses:
Changes:
OCGY 403 and GEOP 422.
OCGY 412: change prerequisite.
GEOP 421: change title, description, credits and hours.

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