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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2001-05-16

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 The University  of  British  Columbia
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF MAY 16, 2001
Attendance
The Ninth Regular Meeting of the Senate of the University of British Columbia for the Session
2000/01 was held on Wednesday, May 16, 2001 at 8:00 p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis
Building.
Present: Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert (Vice Chair), Vice President B. C. McBride, Dean F. S. Abbott, Dr. P.
Adebar, Dr. J. D. Berger, Ms. E. Blewett, Dean J. Blom, Mr. P. T. Brady, Dean J. A. Cairns, Ms.
E. J. Caskey, Mr. T. C. Y. Chan, Mr. C. Eaton, Dr. D. Fisher, Dr. D. Granot, Dean F. Granot,
Mr. E. Greathed, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Ms. M. Hassen, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Dr. P. E. Harding,
Ms.J. Hutton, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. C. Jillings, Dean M. M. Klawe, Dr. S. B. Knight, Dr. B. S.
Lalli, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Dr. D. M. Lyster, Dr. M. I. MacEntee, Mr. B. J.
MacLean, Dr. P. L. Marshall, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dean D. Muzyka, Dr. P. N. Nemetz, Mr. H.
Poon, Dean M. Quayle, Ms. C. Quinlan, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten, Dr. C. Shields, Dr. C. E.
Slonecker, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. B. Stelck, Mr. E. Storm, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dean J. R.
Thompson, Dean R. J. Tierney, Mr. D. Tompkins, Ms. G. Y. C. Tsai, Dean A. Tully, Mr. D. R.
Verma, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky, Dean E. H. K. Yen
Regrets: President M. C. Piper (President), Dr. W. L. Sauder (Chancellor), Mr. R. Affleck, Dr. R.
W. Blake, Mr. P. T. Burns, Dr. H. M. Burt, Mr. A. Campbell, Dr. R. Goldman-Segall, Rev. T. J.
Hanrahan, Dr. J. Helliwell, Mr. R. R. Hira, Ms. S. Iwagami, Dr. D. D. Kitts, Dr. V. LeMay, Mr.
G. Lloyd, Dr. W. R. McMaster, Ms. V. G. Mirehouse, Mr. R. W. Morasiewicz, Dr. G. N. Patey,
Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Dr. J. Perry, Dr. W. J. Phillips, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon, Dr. V. Raoul, Ms.
H. E. Roman, Dr. J. N. Saddler, Dr. K. Schonert-Reichl, Mr. A. F. Sheppard, Mr. B. Simpson, Dr.
D. Sjerve, Ms. D. Soochan, Dr. R. C. Tees, Mr. W. Tong, Dr. R. J. K. Wilson, Mr. W. Yuen
By Invitation: Dr. B. Bemmels, Dr. G. Deer, Dr. M. Goldberg, Dr. S. E. Grace, Dr. N. Guppy
Vice President B. Sullivan, Dr. P. Yachnin
Vol. 2000/01 12665
 Vancouver Senate 12666
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Dr. Berger l        That the minutes of the meeting of April 18,
Dr. Rosengarten J       2001 be accepted as circulated.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
NOMINATING COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP (P. 12381)
At the April 18, 2001 meeting, two vacancies had been declared for student
representatives to serve on the Nominating Committee for the term from May 16, 2001 to
May 15, 2002. The Secretary of Senate had since received nominations for Ms. Erica
Blewett and Mr. Christopher Eaton.
Mr. McNulty l        That nominations close.
Dr. Slonecker J
Carried.
Ms. Blewett and Mr. Eaton were declared members of the Nominating Committee by
acclamation.
UNIVERSITAS 21 AND U21 GLOBAL
Dr. Fisher referred to Senate's April 18 approval in principle of joining U21 Global,
recalling the long and thorough debate. He drew attention to the fact that discussion
about this change in university policy continued among faculty members. He indicated
that he would introduce a notice of motion on this issue under "Other Business."
Upon invitation, Dr. Michael Goldberg gave an update on U21 Global. In April, the
Board of Governors had approved, subject to due diligence, UBC's participation in U21
Global as well as an equity investment in the amount of $500 000 USD. Dr. Goldberg
and President Piper attended
 Vancouver Senate 12667
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Candidates for Degrees
the Universitas 21 annual general meeting in Boston in early April. In addition to the 17
member universities discussed at the April meeting of Senate, the Georgia Institute of
Technology, New York University and the University of Virginia had elected to lend their
names to U21 Global. The University of Virginia had also approved an investment in U21
Equity in the amount of $1 million USD. The Thomson Learning Board of Directors was
to meet on May 16, and was expected to decide whether Thomson Learning was prepared
to proceed with the joint venture. Although more than the minimum 12 universities had
joined U21 Global, equity investments fell short of the $25 million USD target by
approximately $5 million. If Thomson Learning agreed to proceed, the venture would be
activated at the time the legal document is registered. In response to a query, Dr.
Goldberg stated that UBC had not yet made its investment, but had pledged to do so.
Candidates for Degrees
Vice President McBride    l        That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Dean Blom i        as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, effective May 2001; and
That the Acting Registrar, in consultation with
the Deans and the Chair of Senate, be
empowered to make any necessary
adjustments.
Dr. Slonecker stated that approximately 5500 students were to graduate at the May
ceremonies, and he invited all members of Senate to participate in the Chancellor's
procession. One of the candidates was Ms. Frances Medley, former Assistant Secretary to
Senate, who was to be conferred a Bachelor of Arts. Members of Senate offered a round
of applause.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12668
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
2010 WINTER OLYMPICS BID
The following report was circulated.
A. 2010 Winter Olympics Bid - Status Report
Results of review carried out with respect to the principles enunciated by the Board.
1. Minimal impact on students
• Plan to meet all of needs with additional beds
• 1200 new single rooms configured to house athletes, team officials and offices
• Potential sites are available; options to be reviewed
• Student demand exists for expanded capacity
• Open early - January 2010 or Fall 2009 - to "commission" through conference use
2. Academic term must meet standard requirements
• January 4 to April 15 (classes) to May 3 (exams)
• Mid-term break extended an additional week, February 8-19
• 61 teaching days; 13 exam days
• Meets current standards
3. Security provisions
• Adequate security will be in place (confirmed by U. of Utah)
• Security arrangements will not impede normal campus functioning outside the
Athletes' Village perimeter
4. Financial Assistance
• Commitment to a significant capital contribution in the form of a pre-paid rent
5. Academic Legacy
• Agreement in principle by the Vancouver-Whistler 2010 Bid Corporation to a
significant academic legacy, even in the event that UBC is not utilized for the Village.
B. Further consultations undertaken with University members and the surrounding community.
External & Legal Affairs
Academic & Provost
Administration
Alma Mater Society
AMS Bike Co-op
Alumni Association
Board of Governors
 Vancouver Senate 12669
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Campus RCMP
Carey Hall
Community & Regional Planning
Engineering
Utilities
Information Technology
Geography
Grad Students Representative
HP/UBC Athletics
Law
Administrative Heads of Units
PAC/Employee Groups
Parking
Personal Security Manager
Plant Operations
Purchasing
Registrar
Research
Sustainability
Transportation & Planning
Vancouver School of Theology
UBC/JBF Rideshare Consultant
University Architect
BCCM & Wreck Beach Preservation
City of Vancouver
CUPE 2950
Dunbar Residents' Association
Greater Vancouver Regional District
GVRD Parks
Hampton Place
Ministry of Transportation & Highways
NW Property Owners Association
RCMP
St. Andrew's
St. James House
Thames Court
The Balmoral
The Bristol
The Chatham
The Pemberley
The Regency
The Sandringham
The Stratford
SW Marine Drive Homeowners' Association
Translink
West Hampstead
West Point Grey Academy
 Vancouver Senate 12670
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
West Point Grey Residents' Association
Wyndham Hall
University Hill Elementary
University Hill Secondary
UEL Ratepayers Association
UEL Tenants Association
University Endowment Lands
Upper Kits Residents' Association
C. Public Opinion Poll:
303 telephone surveys were conducted in immediate Westside neighbourhoods. Results
showed high level of awareness and significant support for the 2010 Bid; idea of the University
being host for the Athletes' Village supported by 67% with further 10% neutral.
D. University of Utah Visit
Carnegie Level 1 research university with 25,000 students
Administrative, senate and student leadership all supportive. Contracts have been finalized.
Has presented excellent opportunities for community-building.
The tradition of a cultural Olympiad offered concurrently with the Games has enabled many
creative learning and performance opportunities for faculty and staff. A number of academic
departments have also secured significant contracts for research or service.
UBC Olympic Village Work Group
Brian Sullivan (Chair): Vice President, Students
David Barnes: Director, UBC Plant Operations
Lisa Castle: Director, Labour Relations, Human Resources
Fred Fotis: Director, Housing & Conferences
Mark Fraser: Vice President, Administration, Alma Mater Society
Gordon Lovegrove: Director, TREK Program Centre
Karen McDonald: Strategic Communications Specialist, Public Affairs
Freda Pagani: Director, Sustainability
Andrew Parr: Director, Food Services
Bob Philip: Director, Athletics & Recreation
Al Poettcker: President, UBC Properties Trust
Fred Pritchard: Director of Planning, Campus Planning & Development
Janice Robinson: Assistant Director Residence Life, Housing & Conferences
Mike Sheard: Director, Campus Security
Dorothy Yip: Manager, Purchasing & Project Development, Food Services
 Vancouver Senate 12671
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
At its May 17 meeting, the Board of Governors expected to decide whether to accept the
invitation from the Vancouver-Whistler 2010 Bid Corporation to host the Athletes'
Village. The Board had given its preliminary approval in July 1998. The University Work
Group preparing the Board report had asked for comments from Senate as part of an
extensive on- and off-campus consultation process. Vice President McBride invited Vice
President Brian Sullivan to speak to the report.
Vice President Sullivan emphasized that the Board had made very clear the principles to
be honoured should UBC elect to host part of the Olympic Games. He stated that UBC
could learn from similar event hosting experiences at the Georgia Institute of Technology,
the University of Utah, the University of Victoria and the University of Manitoba.
Preliminary indications were that the University should not hold classes during the
Games, and that academic standards for term length and contact hours could still be met
by extending the February midterm break by one week.
Vice President Sullivan stated that hosting the Olympic Games would entail significant
physical enhancements to the campus, as well as a housing legacy. The Board had also
requested a non-athletic academic legacy as part of the agreement, although it was
uncertain what form it might take.
In response to a query, Vice President Sullivan stated that the working group had
consulted student groups. The Alma Mater Society and the Graduate Student Society were
both involved, and the Alma Mater Society had strongly and unanimously endorsed the
Olympic bid. Although the Faculty Association was not part of the working group, Vice
President Sullivan noted that some exciting ideas about collaborative and contract
research had been brought forward. The initial
 Vancouver Senate 12672
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
focus was on hosting the athletes' village: should the bid be successful, the University
would appoint a continuing management group which would be more inclusive.
In response to a query, Vice President Sullivan stated that it was not yet clear whether a
sports facility would be constructed on campus.
UNIVERSITY ENGLISH REQUIREMENT: WRITE, WRITE, AND RE-WRITE
Please see 'Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write.'
Vice President McBride introduced the report. The English Requirement Committee had
been constituted by the Committee of Deans, who are frequently made aware by potential
employers that graduates' written communication skills are inadequate. He cited the
example of a fourth year Honours Microbiology student who had not written an essay
since completing his/her first year English courses. The Committee proposed to expand
the solid foundation of first year English into the curriculum such that writing skills are
continually enhanced.
A 1998 survey of baccalaureate graduates of British Columbian public universities
showed that only 54% of Arts graduates felt that their ability to write well was enhanced
by their university education. Corresponding statistics for other Faculties were as follows:
Education, 29%; Applied Science, 26%; Science, 23%, Commerce & Business
Administration, 21%. Dr. McBride stated that the report did not constitute a
condemnation of the English Department, but instead confirmed that other departments
had failed to integrate writing instruction across the curriculum. He invited Dr. Paul
Yachnin, Chair of the English Requirement Committee, to speak to the report.
Dr. Yachnin stated that the Committee had met almost weekly from September 2000 until
March 2001, when the Committee submitted its report. He described the Committee
members as some-
 Vancouver Senate 12673
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
what wary of each other's intentions at the beginning of the process. Faculties were
concerned that the English Department wished to download its work, while faculty from
the English Department were worried that other Faculties would insist on maintaining the
status quo. Despite initial concerns, the Committee completed its work and produced a
document that was in no way the product of a compromise. The recommendations had
three main components:
1. Focus on writing across all disciplines;
2. Distribution of the writing requirement across all years of undergraduate
programs;
3. Implementation of a "points system" to facilitate the distributed requirement.
The English Department would play a leadership role in enhancing writing in the
undergraduate curriculum, but partners in other departments would also shoulder the
responsibilities. Each Faculty would have the opportunity to design its own version of the
umbrella writing requirement.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate endorse the idea of further
Dr. Berger i        exploring the principles of "writing through
the curriculum" as set out in the Write, Write,
and Rewrite report. Such exploration would
involve, at a minimum, consultation with
Faculties, with faculty, and with students and
would result in a report back to Senate with
specific recommendations; and
That an ad hoc Senate Consultative " Writing
Requirements" Committee be struck by the
Senate Nominating Committee.
Dr. Williams stated that Princeton University had, after a two-year evaluation period,
voted to replace a system similar to the proposed writing requirement. Princeton students
had previously fulfilled the writing requirement by taking courses designated with a "W,
which indicated a significant writing component. In evaluating the effectiveness of these
"W" courses, the dean of the College and the faculty committee had determined that this
method was inadequately preparing students. Dr. Williams was hopeful that some form of
evaluation of the success of the UBC proposal would occur after a suitable period of time.
 Vancouver Senate 12674
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
In response to a query from Mr. Tompkins, Dr. Yachnin stated that the Committee did
not discuss writing instruction for graduate students, as this was not included in its
mandate. A Writing Requirement as described in the proposal might benefit graduate
students because the proposal specifies that writing instruction may be delivered by
teaching assistants, provided that they themselves have been given writing instruction.
In response to queries, Dr. Yachnin stated that neither technology nor the Language
Proficiency index had been features of the Committee's discussions.
Dr. Rosengarten spoke against many of the ideas in the report. He questioned the need
for another Senate committee to consult and return to Senate with recommendations, as
he believed this to have been the responsibility of the English Requirement Committee.
Dr. Rosengarten described claims of "significant uncertainty and unhappiness" about the
present English requirement as vague and general in the extreme. Although the Committee
had invited individual submissions, there had been no systematic survey of students and
faculty that would indicate widespread discontent. He disagreed with Dr. Yachnin's
statement that students and sessional faculty in the English Department had been closely
involved in the development of the report.
Dr. Rosengarten stated that he could not ascertain what was wrong with the pedagogical
efficacy of the present English requirement. Although the idea of a discipline-based
writing program has real value, Dr. Rosengarten offered the opinion that writing
instruction should remain anchored within the English department, which has long held
the responsibility for maintaining the standards of written expression. He added that
ENGL 112 could lend itself quite easily to a discipline-based approach.
 Vancouver Senate 12675
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
At present, ENGL 112 students meet thrice weekly. Discussions, assignments, quizzes,
and the final examination are all focused on writing. The report proposes that students
substitute courses designated "WI", which might be taught by non-writing specialists and
have only a small writing component. He suggested that this would give the student little
opportunity to improve. He asked whether it was realistic, for example, to ask a Biology
professor to devote the necessary time to justify the WI designation.
Although writing experts disagree about how best to teach writing, they all agree that it
cannot be taught as an incidental add-on to courses in unrelated disciplines. Dr.
Rosengarten emphasized that he was not arguing against reform, but against an exercise
of doubtful value with no real foundation in a felt need or deficiency.
Dr. Rosengarten suggested that the Deans might ask the English department to reexamine its first year course with the needs of other Faculties in mind. He pointed out
that a number of ENGL 112 sections were already targeted at writing for the sciences.
Mechanisms could be found to devise more and more varied courses, perhaps with the
cooperation of the UBC Writing Centre.
Dr. Rosengarten proposed that the Senate leave the present English requirement in place,
and invite the English Department to confer directly with the Faculties, with the UBC
Writing Centre and with other bodies on the development of new, first-year, discipline-
based writing courses. This solution, in his opinion, would obviate the need for yet
another Senate committee, and leave the issue in the hands of those best placed to address
any needs in the current system. A more practical and considered set of proposals could
then come forward to be endorsed by everyone.
 Vancouver Senate 12676
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
The Vice Chair recognized Dr. Sherrill Grace, Head of the English Department and
former senator. Dr. Grace stated that although she shared many of Dr. Rosengarten's
opinions, she wished to also thank the Deans for assembling the Committee and to praise
the Committee's work.
Dr. Grace expressed the opinion that writing skills are not developed through three or six
credits of coursework, but continue to be enhanced at every stage of life. She agreed that
UBC could do a better job at delivering writing instruction. ENGL 112 sections contain
35 students each, for example, which is not pedagogically sound. Although students
consistently rate their instructors as excellent, they are not satisfied with the course itself.
The English Department has taken steps in the past two years to remedy the situation,
including appointing Dr. Janet Giltrow, a 3M teaching award winner and a specialist in
rhetoric, language, and composition.
Dr. Grace suggested that Senate endorse Recommendations 1 and 2 only, and send the
report back for further deliberation about the practicalities of moving forward. She stated
that a proposal for a Centre for Research in Discourse and Society had been prepared and
submitted to the Dean of Arts in 1999, and that funding for this new Centre will be a
high priority in the future. The mandate of the Centre would include:
•    developing research concentrations in language in the scholarly disciplines,
language in the workplace, and language in the public domain;
hosting a variety of research activities;
offering graduate and undergraduate programs in discourse studies; and
directing writing instruction in the English Department and contributing to writing
instruction across the university.
Mr. Brady pointed out that the motion did not specify terms of reference or a timeline for
the proposed ad hoc Committee. Vice President McBride suggested that a report should
be delivered by the December 2001 meeting of Senate. After further discussion, it was
decided that the Nominating Committee would draft the terms of reference for the ad hoc
Committee as well as determine
 Vancouver Senate 12677
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
its membership. Dean Isaacson suggested that the Nominating Committee should also
consider whether to include resource requirements and admissions issues in the mandate
of the ad hoc Committee.
Dean Tully spoke in support of the need for further exploration. He suggested that Senate
and/or the ad hoc Committee consider:
• some kind of a pilot program, which would generate feedback before changing the
overarching structure of the English Requirement;
• think creatively about the UBC Writing Centre and its relationship to introductory
writing courses and the Language Proficiency Index;
• consider the expansion of upper-level courses, which had been cut back in previous
years.
Dr. Berger spoke in support of the motion, adding that it was important not to dilute
students' exposure to first-year writing courses, but instead to enhance offerings in the
third and fourth years.
The motion was
put and carried.
ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INTERDISCIPLINARY INSTITUTE IN HUMAN EARLY
LEARNING (HELP)
Dr. McBride had circulated the background and rationale for the establishment of this
new Institute within the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The text of the document is not
included in the Minutes. Copies are available from the Manager, Senate & Curriculum
Services.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Granot i        interdisciplinary institute in Human Early
Learning (HELP) within the Faculty of
Graduate Studies.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12678
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL CANADIAN STUDIES CENTRE
Dr. McBride had circulated the background and rationale for the establishment of this
new Centre in the Faculty of Arts. The text of the document is not included in the
Minutes. Copies are available from the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Tully i        International Canadian Studies Centre in the
Faculty of Arts.
Carried.
COLLEGE OF HEALTH DISCIPLINES
Dr. McBride had circulated for information a proposal for the establishment of a new
College of Health Disciplines. The text of the document is not included in the Minutes.
Copies are available from the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Dr. McBride l        That the proposal to establish a new College of
Dr. Fisher i       Health Disciplines be received, and
That the proposal be referred to the Academic
Policy Committee.
Vice President McBride encouraged members of Senate to forward their comments to Dr.
Richard Tees, Chair of the Academic Policy Committee. In response to a query, Vice
President McBride stated that the necessary funding for the College would be made
available through the reallocation of resources.
The motion was
put and carried.
GUIDELINES CONCERNING INTERFACULTY PROGRAMS
Vice President McBride had circulated the following guidelines concerning interfaculty
programs for the information of Senate. The guidelines were drafted by a sub-committee
of the Committee of Deans, comprised of Alan Tully, Dean of Arts; Derek Atkins,
Associate Vice
 Vancouver Senate 12679
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
President, Academic Planning; Joost Blom, Dean of Law; Neil Guppy, Associate Vice
President, Academic Programs; Maria Klawe, Dean of Science; and Moura Quayle, Dean
of Agricultural Sciences. The guidelines had been reviewed by the Senate Academic Policy
Committee.
Fostering Broad Interfaculty Programs
March 2001
Context
The Academic Plan invites us to "explore the creation of a flexible and responsive inter-faculty
College system to foster integration and collaboration." The primary intent of this invitation
was to foster effective cooperation across existing university units so as to enhance
undergraduate education at UBC. Colleges were imagined as an answer to a perceived need for
broader interdisciplinary initiatives than either current or planned joint degrees and joint
programs could deliver. Some areas of educational importance, such as sustainability and
health, involve multiple departments, multiple schools and multiple faculties. Their breadth is
one of their distinguishing characteristics.
Assuming these observations are sound and that we should move in the direction they
indicate, the problem for the University is to facilitate the efforts of faculty committed to these
broad interdisciplinary initiatives: 1) to ensure the involvement of a wide spectrum of
interested faculty across the University; 2) to develop programs that have coherence as well as
breadth; 3) to provide opportunity for students to enroll easily in a wide range of related
courses [frequently from outside the student's department or faculty]; and 4) to develop sets of
course offerings or programs that can be easily identified and effectively profiled.
Interfaculty Programs
The committee is unanimous in thinking that our focus should be on creating opportunity for
interfaculty programs to flourish. Structures should follow opportunities not precede them.
The best course of action, then, is not to begin with the concept of a college - the terminology
itself is so heavily freighted with multiple and often contradictory meanings that its use can as
easily become counterproductive as liberating - but to concentrate in each case on clearing an
efficacious path forward.
An interfaculty program would have undergraduate learning as the primary focus. Such a
program would offer, through courses of instruction, minors, majors, or honours degrees. As
part of its mandate it should also be given responsibility to, in consultation with Faculties, coordinate the offering of courses and integrate research into undergraduate education in its
particular area of focus. Any administrative support should be small, scaled to the number of
students involved.
Special attention must be given to the circumstances of Program faculty in relationship to
promotion and tenure. University criteria for promotion and tenure must reflect, in
unambiguous language, experiences representing professional growth, scholarship,
 Vancouver Senate 12680
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
teaching accomplishments, and developing maturity and leadership capacity that are
consonant with the responsibilities and challenges Program affiliation entails.
Interfaculty programs should clearly enunciate goals and establish a timetable for their
achievement. They should undergo an academic review similar to the regular reviews of
academic Departments. This review would entail an assessment of progress made on an unit-
based Academic Plan articulated by the interfaculty program early in its development.
Decisions about the unit's continuation or rollup would be based on this assessment.
In principle and once an interfaculty program was established, budgetary arrangements for all
resources devoted to the program should be by way of dollar transfers to the units providing
the resources. The transfers should be for the actual cost of providing those resources.
Infrastructure and support costs should be included and any released time for teaching in the
program ought to be compensated in proportion to the faculty member's salary, not on the
basis of sessional teaching rates.
Getting There
For broad interdisciplinary initiatives the committee believes that initial emphasis should be
placed on attaining breadth and flexibility within a developing program. To that end we
recommend the following generic model, a model that ought to be used flexibly to achieve
desired ends:
1. As a first step a clear statement by a committed group of scholars needs to be crafted
showing that a wide spectrum of faculty from many units are dedicated to fashioning a
coherent interfaculty program that is broadly interdisciplinary. This statement needs to
be supported by the Committee of Deans before recurring funding for such a program
can be committed (through the annual budget process).
2. A leader who emerges from this interdisciplinary interest group should act as coordinator and be given sufficient resources to develop and implement the program.
This program would need the approval of the University Senate.
3. The Coordinator would report to the Associate Vice-President, Academic Programs on
a schedule worked out with the Associate V.P.
4. The Coordinator should articulate a clear governance structure, agreed upon in
consultation with the Deans of Faculties affiliated with the program.
By way of illustration, by 2005 someone surfing our UBC web site might easily find
interfaculty programs in:
Sustainability
Molecular and cell biology
Interdisciplinary studies
New media studies
Policy studies.
 Vancouver Senate 12681
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Guidelines for Proposals
In an initial statement proposing a new interfaculty program, the following questions ought to
be addressed:
1. How will this program advance broad interdisciplinary studies at UBC?
2. Why can't this occur within existing structures?
3. What are the learning objectives of the program?
4. How many students will benefit from this program?
5. What are the space and budget requirements?
6. What are the Faculties and who are the faculty members involved?
7. What, if any, synergies or efficiencies are possible by co-ordinating existing activities
(e.g., course offerings, workshops/seminars)?
8. Other details the proposing group feels are important to an assessment of the quality,
viability, and sustainability of the program.
In response to a comment from Dr. Slonecker, Vice President McBride agreed that such
proposals should also specify which Faculty would confer the degree.
ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY OF CANADA RESEARCH
CHAIR
Vice President McBride had circulated a proposal to establish the new Multiple Sclerosis
Society of Canada Research Chair, supported by the Multiple Sclerosis Society MRI
Group. He stated that the Chair would be a welcome addition to the Brain Research
Centre, which previously housed the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada Professorship in
Multiple Sclerosis Research. Through the generosity of Dr. Donald Paty, Dr. David Li and
the Multiple Sclerosis Society MRI Group, a fully funded Chair was to be established in
its place.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Cairns i        Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada Research
Chair.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12682
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
ESTABLISHMENT OF CH.I.L.D. FOUNDATION CHAIR IN PAEDIATRIC
GASTROENTEROLOGY RESEARCH
Vice President McBride had circulated a proposal to establish the CH.I.L.D. (Children
with Intestinal and Liver Disorders) Chair in Paediatric Gastroenterology Research. The
Chair was to play a leadership role both in the laboratory and in the community, where
the holder of the Chair was to play a prominent part in promoting awareness,
understanding and support for children suffering from Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis,
and other forms of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Cairns J        CH.I.L.D. Foundation Chair in Paediatric
Gastroenterology Research.
Carried.
HEART AND STROKE FOUNDATION CHAIR IN CARDIOLOGY: NAME CHANGE
Vice President McBride proposed that the name of the Chair be changed to in order to
recognize the donor of the majority of the endowment.
Vice President McBride    l        That the Heart and Stroke Foundation Chair
Dean Cairns J        in Cardiology be renamed as "The Sauder
Family and Heart and Stroke Foundation
Chair in Cardiology."
Carried.
Academic Policy Committee
Dr. Fisher presented the reports in the absence of the Chair.
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES: POLICY DOCUMENT AND DELETION OF
PROVISIONAL ADMISSION
Please see 'Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document.'
 Vancouver Senate 12683
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
The Faculty of Graduate Studies policy document had been presented by the Academic
Policy Committee for Senate approval in January 2001, at which time a vote was
postponed. Dr. Fisher presented a revised version of the document, explaining that several
changes had been made. The policy on transfer credit for courses taken during a
Qualifying year had been amended such that courses which are not necessary to meet the
criteria for full admission may be assessed transfer credit on approval of the Department
and the Dean of Graduate Studies. Furthermore, the description of unconditional
admission had been expanded to contain more inclusive language.
Dr. Fisher l        1.   That Provisional Student Status be deleted,
Dean Granot J an^ that the Calendar and policy document
be amended to reflect this deletion; and
2. That the amendment to the policy on
Qualifying students (Section 2.3) be
approved; and
3. That the Faculty of Graduate Studies policy
document be approved as amended.
In amendment.
Mr. Tompkins l        That Section 1. of the motion be deleted, such
Dr. Yaworsky J        that Provisional Student Status remain part of
the document.
Speaking to the amendment, Dr. Fisher acknowledged that he had not been previously in
favour of deleting provisional admission, particularly since the Faculty of Education
enrolled many provisional students. Discussions had taken place about the need to
maintain flexibility for students and departments. The strengthening of the statement on
Unconditional Admission, combined with the proposed policy to accept Unclassified
courses for transfer credit, had satisfied Dr. Fisher and most other members of the
Academic Policy Committee that provisional status could be deleted.
 Vancouver Senate 12684
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
Mr. Tompkins responded that there had also been many hours of debate by graduate
students, and that they were soundly against the deletion. The position of graduate
students had three components:
1. Better communications between the Faculty of Graduate Studies and departments
would be required in order to avoid inconsistency in the use of provisional
admission;
2. General agreement that some departments have misused the policy such that
students who should have been fully admitted were placed on provisional status;
3. Disagreement with the idea that this deletion would not mean losing flexibility.
Many graduate students expect that a "lower tier" of prospective students would
be seriously disadvantaged by having to spend an additional year as Qualifying or
Unclassified students.
Dean Granot stated that UBC was perhaps the only Canadian university still using
provisional admission: other universities had abolished the practice due to the
disadvantage it created for students. She expressed the hope that students presently
admitted as provisional would be granted full admission with the support of their
respective departments.
Dr. Adebar spoke against the amendment, stating the deletion of provisional admission
would allow departments to make decisions on a case-by-case basis about which students
would be offered unconditional admission.
The motion to
amend was put
and failed.
The original
motion was put
and carried.
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES: UNCLASSIFIED COURSES FOR TRANSFER CREDIT
Current Policy
Classification of Students (2000/2001 UBC Calendar, p 43):
Unclassified Students
A student enrolled for studies not intended to lead to a particular degree or diploma.
Unclassified students should normally have a recognized degree. Students without a
 Vancouver Senate 12685
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
degree who are eligible for admission to the university may be admitted as unclassified
students (a) to allow to take a limited number of courses in a specific area to upgrade or
achieve a qualification, or (b) when they are not admissible to or do not which to enter a
specific program. Students in category (b) other than those aged 65 or older may take no more
than 12 credits per academic year and no more than 18 credits in total while registered as
unclassified. Admission as an unclassified student does not guarantee that a student will be
able to register for any course offered. Admission as an unclassified student does not imply
future admission as a regular student. Unclassified students will not receive transfer credit
since they are not in a program to which credit can be transferred. Unclassified credits will
not be transferred to graduate programs. Students with a failed year in a faculty will not be
admitted as unclassified until they have discontinued their studies for at least one year. After a
second failed year admission as unclassified will be subject to the approval of the Senate
Admissions Committee.
Proposed Change:
Eliminate the sentences above in bold italics and add the following paragraphs:
Courses taken as an unclassified (or non-degree) student may be approved for transfer toward
a graduate program on permission of the Department and the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.
Consistent with standard transfer credit regulations, students are limited to transferring a
maximum of 12 credits or up to 40% of the program credit requirements, whichever is more,
toward their Master's program. No more than six credits of transfer credit may be at the
undergraduate level (300-400). To be eligible for transfer, a minimum "B" standing must have
been achieved and the course(s) must not have been counted toward the completion of another
degree or program.
Rationale:
Students who demonstrate strong academic preparedness for graduate studies may elect not to
enter a graduate program at a particular time, whether for financial reasons, employment
conflicts, course availability, etc., but may plan to register eventually as a graduate student.
Currently, these students are discouraged from doing so once they understand that their
credits will not transfer to a subsequent graduate program.
It is common practice at our peer institutions to permit graduate students to transfer credit for
courses taken while a non-degree student toward a subsequent graduate program. UBC is
losing prospective graduate students to other universities which are prepared to grant transfer
credit for these courses.
This policy change was approved by Graduate Council on December 7, 2000, and amended
by the Academic Policy Committee on March 12, 2001.
Dr. Fisher l        That the proposed policy on Unclassified
Dean Granot i        Courses for Transfer Credit be approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12686
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Admissions Committee
Admissions Committee
Dr. Lyster presented the reports as Chair of the Committee.
JANUARY ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
The following report had been circulated.
January Admission of Undergraduate Students
The Senate Admissions Committee recommends the following motion for approval.
MOTION: That Senate supports the principle of admitting a small number of undergraduate
students every January.
Implementation Date: for students starting in January, 2003
Rationale:
Currently we admit approximately 4,000 new first year students and 1,600 college transfer
students each year. About 97% of those admissions occur in September, about 2-3% in May,
and a very small number in January (10-15 students). We would like to begin admitting more
students in January, eventually admitting up to 800-1000 students (14-15%) at that time.
Initially, the number admitted in January would be approximately 250-300 (5%), and the vast
majority of those students would be transfer students. In 2000-01, as a trial, we admitted 120
new transfer students in January. The goal would be to double that number by January 2003,
and then gradually to increase the number to between 10 and 15% of new undergraduate
intake. As with September intake enrolment targets, these January intake numbers would
come to Senate for approval.
Advantages of higher January intake:
• Greater flexibility in starting times for students.
• Enhanced enrolment management in meeting our Provincially funded targets.
• Greater ability of Faculties to optimize course utilization by " backfilling" for students
from September who drop out, fail, transfer out, etc.
• Improved domestic and international student recruitment.
Implementation:
With this principle in place, our Admissions Office could make the necessary administrative
changes to add a formal January admission cycle. This would require some small editorial
changes in the UBC calendar (e.g., application deadline dates) and on our application forms.
In addition, January admissions would require some other Student Service units and some
Faculty units to make adjustments, including student advising, awards and financial aid,
student housing, and so forth.
These implications have been reviewed by an ad hoc task force who reported to the Senate
Admissions Committee (Margery Fee, Louise Legris, Neil Guppy (chair), Sham
 Vancouver Senate 12687
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Admissions Committee
Pendleton, Paul Harrison, Richard Spencer, and David Holm). That committee recommended
to the Senate Admissions Committee that we adopt the principle set out in this motion, and
the Senate Admissions Committee agreed.
Not all Schools or Faculties would choose to make use of this January admission cycle. Those
that do will work with Student Services to ensure the appropriate support systems are in place.
Some other universities have a January admission intake, including SFU.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate support the principle of admitting
Vice President McBride    J       a small number of undergraduate students
every January.
Carried.
FACULTY OF MEDICINE: NEW UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN MIDWIFERY
The following report had been circulated.
Faculty of Medicine, Family Practice (Division of Midwifery)
Proposal for a New Undergraduate Program in Midwifery
Proposed Calendar Entry: (2000/2001 Calendar, Pg. 298, Col 3, immediately preceding
"Postgraduate Education")
The midwifery program prepares students to provide primary care for women and their
families through pregnancy and up to the third month after birth. Midwives, although
independent practitioners, work as part of the health care team. The four-year program
combines broad-based knowledge and understanding in the humanities, and the social and
bio-medical sciences.
Academic Advising
Academic advising is recommended. Advising sessions are offered to students entering first
year before their registration access date. Students with advance credit are expected to seek
advising through the Midwifery Program office (address below).
Admission
All inquiries relating to admission to first year of the Midwifery Program should be addressed
to Enrolment Services. Inquiries related to admission with advanced standing should be
directed to the Midwifery Program.
The last day of submission of applications for admission from secondary school to the
Bachelor of Science in Midwifery program for the Winter Session beginning the following
September is February 28, with supplementary documents (see under Other Requirements) to
be at the Midwifery Program office by March 31. Official transcripts are to be in the hands of
Enrolment Services by June 30.
 Vancouver Senate 12688
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Admissions Committee
The Midwifery Program has a limited enrolment. Since the number of qualified applicants is
expected to exceed the number of places available, fulfillment of the following requirements is
not a guarantee of admission. The Faculty reserves the right of selection of all students for
admission to the program.
Admission to the four year Bachelor of Science in Midwifery Program will be offered to those
students who not only demonstrate academic potential but also demonstrate an understanding
of the requirements to practice as a midwife in BC and a strong motivation. Candidates should
demonstrate the qualities and potential for competencies to practice as a midwife. Candidates
may be invited for an interview at the discretion of the Admissions Committee.
Applicants should review the English Language Admission Standard as outlined in the
University Calendar.
Admission from Secondary School
Application for admission must be made through Enrolment Services. Procedures, policies and
admission requirements to the University of British Columbia are specified in part II,
"Undergraduate Admission." Due to enrolment limitations, not every qualified applicant will
be offered admission. Admission is based on a selection process which strives to enrol the most
highly qualified applicants.
Admission with Advanced Standing
Advanced standing includes a degree from an approved college or university or at least 30
credits towards a degree in another field of study.
Candidates may be admitted to the second year of the program with an overall average of
65% (2.50 on a 4-point scale) in the courses listed below or their equivalents at an approved
college or university.
• Biology 153 (6) or equivalent
• English (3-6) or equivalent (English 112 recommended)
Due to enrolment limitations, the academic standing required for admission may be higher
than the above average and is subject to change each academic year. Fulfillment of the above
requirements does not guarantee admission.
Applicants who have completed college and or university courses should consult an advisor in
the midwifery program. The University will consider granting transfer credit for all post
secondary courses completed.
Other Requirements
Applicants for admission must submit the following additional supplemental admission
requirements to the Midwifery Program by March 31:
• Two letters of reference (form provided in the application package). It is recommended
that one referee be a teacher, instructor, employer or supervisor
• A current resume (form provided in the application package)
 Vancouver Senate 12689
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Admissions Committee
• A written personal statement about the applicant's reasons for requesting admission to the
Midwifery Program and understanding of the profession of midwifery (format provided in
the application package)
• Interim transcripts
• Supplemental application form and processing fee. A processing fee of CAD $107.50 must
accompany the supplemental application admissions forms that are returned to the
Midwifery Program. This fee is non-refundable and should be made payable to the
University of British Columbia. Applications will not be processed unless the fee is
received.
Inquiries and requests for a supplemental application package may be addressed to: (address
not known as yet)
Incomplete applications and late applications will not be considered.
Applicants with advanced standing who are accepted will be sent a letter of acceptance and
details about the registration procedures.
Re-admission
The Faculty reserves the right to re-admit students and to stipulate conditions attached to readmission. Application for re-admission to the Program will be reviewed on an individual
basis.
Rationale:
The Ministry of Advanced Education Training and Technology (MAETT), after preliminary
proposal review, has invited The University of British Columbia to develop and provide a
university based Midwifery Education Undergraduate Program that will also prepare students
for entry to the Register of Midwives with the College of Midwives of British Columbia
(CMBC). In 1997 British Columbia through the Health Professions Regulation Act started to
regulate midwives, and midwifery is now an integral part of BC health services. Midwives are
primary care practitioners reimbursed directly by the government for their services. Women
may access midwives without referral. Most midwives hold admitting privileges to their local
hospital and provide all care for women and babies without complications, on their own
responsibility, including the prescription of a limited number of medicines. Until now no
education program has been available in BC. This program will be the first west of Manitoba.
The program will be situated within the Department of Family Practice, Faculty of Medicine.
Because of the limited number of registered midwives to act as preceptors the enrolment will
be limited to 10 students per year in the first years of the program. The planning group has
already received approximately 150 queries about the program even though there has been no
announcement of program approval. Many of the applicants will be mature students who have
extensive experience in the childbirth field and because of the large numbers of applications
expected we have set up an admission process that considers supplemental materials to GPA.
We are recommending Biology 12 and Chemistry 11 as secondary school requirements
because of the nature of the discipline. Midwifery requires specialized knowledge in anatomy,
physiology, microbiology and pharmacology along with the physiology of pregnancy, birth
and newborns.
 Vancouver Senate 12690
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Agenda Committee
Because so many applicants are likely to have advanced credit we have put in place a
mechanism for granting advanced credit.
Effective Date: September 2002
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions statement for the new
Dean Cairns J       program in Midwifery be approved.
Dr. Slonecker raised the issue of the proposed credential "Bachelor of Science in
Midwifery." He asked whether this was the most appropriate name for the degree
considering that the curriculum included only one science course. It was agreed that this
discussion would be postponed until the report of the Curriculum Committee.
The motion was
put and carried.
Agenda Committee
TIME OF SENATE MEETINGS ON WEDNESDAY EVENINGS
Dr. Slonecker had circulated a report proposing a change in the time of Senate meetings
from 8:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., to 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Senate & Curriculum Services
had conducted a survey of members of Senate which requested members' preferences on
three possible start times: 6:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m., and 8:00 p.m. When appropriate
weighting factors were applied to the results, members' overall preference appeared to be
a 7:00 p.m. start time. In addition to being the most popular weighted response, the 7:00
p.m. start did not appear to disadvantage any particular group of senators.
Dr. Slonecker l        That, effective September 2001, Senate
Dean Isaacson J        meetings be scheduled from 7:00 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. and that the Rules and Procedures of
Senate be amended accordingly.
 Vancouver Senate 12691
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Budget Committee
Dr. Shields drew attention to the fact that some classes in the Faculty of Education are
held from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., and that those faculty and students would be
disadvantaged by the earlier start time.
The motion was
put and carried.
Budget Committee
Please see 'Appendix C: Budget Committee Report 2000 - 2001.'
Dr. MacEntee presented the report as Chair of the Committee. He drew attention to the
Committee's outstanding request for a third term of reference. Dr. Williams, as Chair of
the Nominating Committee, responded that the Nominating Committee planned to
review the terms of reference for all Senate Committees over the summer and report to
Senate in the fall.
Dean Granot wished to correct, for the record, that the Interdisciplinary Oncology
Program resided in the Faculty of Graduate Studies rather than in the Faculty of
Medicine.
Curriculum Committee
Please see 'Appendix D: Curriculum Proposal Summary.'
Dr. Berger presented the reports as Chair of the Committee.
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Dr. Berger l        That the curriculum proposals from the
Dean Quayle i       Faculty of Agricultural Sciences be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Dr. Berger l        That the curriculum proposals from the
Dean Tierney i       Faculty of Education be approved.
Mr. Brady inquired as to the rationale for the change to pass/fail grading for teaching
practica, and whether Senate could expect a report on this pilot project. Dean Tierney
responded that the
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 16,2001
12692
Curriculum Committee
Faculty hoped that students would focus more on their proficiencies rather than on letter
or percentage grades. The effectiveness of the pilot project would be evaluated. Dr.
Yaworsky asked how Master of Education applications would be evaluated for
competitive admission. Dean Granot acknowledged that this constituted a problem, but
that the problem was not unique to the Faculty of Education.
The motion was
put and carried.
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Dr. Berger l
Dean Isaacson J
That the curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Applied Science be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF ARTS
Dr. Berger
Dean Tully
That the curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Arts be approved.
In response to a query, Dr. Berger confirmed that GEOG 456 was to be crosslisted as
FINA 445, although FINA 445 did not appear as a new course in the report.
The motion was
put and carried.
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Dr. Berger l
Dean Granot J
That graduate course proposals from the
Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, the Faculty of Applied Science, the
Faculty of Education, and the Faculty of
Science be approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12693
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Curriculum Committee
International Master of Business Administration (IMBA)
Dr. Berger introduced the proposal for the International Master of Business
Administration, and invited Dr. Bemmels to assist in answering questions. Although the
credential name was new, existing curriculum would be used to deliver the program.
Dr. Bemmels stated that this new delivery of the Master of Business Administration was
intended for students residing in a host country. The first host institution would be
Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Most of the program would be delivered abroad, although
a portion would take place on the UBC campus. The new name would help distinguish
the internationally-delivered degree from the standard day program, and would be more
competitive in the market. All teaching would be done by UBC faculty in English.
Dr. Berger l        That the proposed International Master of
Dean Muzyka i        Business Administration be approved.
In response to a query, Dr. Bemmels stated that there would be no additional resources
required for the program, as all costs would be recovered through tuition fees. A cohort
of 30 students would be required to cover all costs.
There was some discussion about the TOEFL score required for admission. The IMBA
standard was to be 550, which was lower than the 600 minimum for the day program.
Dr. Bemmels explained that the IMBA student cohort would contain students with similar
English language skills, and that the 550 minimum still met the Faculty of Graduate
Studies requirement.
 Vancouver Senate 12694
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Curriculum Committee
In response to a query, Dr. Bemmels stated that the quality of the program would be
assessed in much the same way as for the regular program; the faculty did not intend to
change the program standards in any way.
The motion was
put and carried.
Faculty of Medicine: Health Care and Epidemiology
Dr. Berger l        That the proposed HCEP course proposals be
Dean Cairns J        approved.
Dean Abbott noted that first year Pharm.D. students were required to take HCEP 500
and HCEP 506, and asked for some reassurance that the course material would still be
available. Dean Cairns stated that there should be no problem.
The motion was
put and carried.
Faculty of Graduate Studies: Institute of Asian Research
Dr. Berger l        That the curriculum proposals from the
Mr. Verma J       Institute of Asian Research be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
Dr. Berger presented the proposal for revisions to the Bachelor of Dental Science
program. The Bachelor of Dental Science in Dental Hygiene was to have three entry
options: one from high school, another for students who had completed a two year
diploma program in dental hygiene, and a third option for diploma graduates with 30
credits of transferable university coursework. Dr. Berger drew attention to an amendment
made by the Curriculum Committee to the footnote
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Minutes of May 16,2001
12695
Curriculum Committee
regarding electives in order to ensure that the number of credits taken at UBC complied
with the UBC policy on Requirements to Receive a Degree or Diploma as outlined in the
Calendar.
Dr. Berger
Dean Yen
That the Bachelor of Dental Science in Dental
Hygiene be approved as amended.
Carried.
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Bachelor of Science combined with Doctor of Medicine or Doctor of Dental Medicine
Dr. Berger l        That the proposed deletion of the combined
Dean Cairns J        Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine or
Doctor of Dental Medicine be approved.
Carried.
Bachelor of Science (Midwifery)
Dr. Berger introduced the proposal, recalling earlier discussion about the proposed name
of the degree. He suggested that "Bachelor of Medicine in Midwifery" might be more
appropriate.
Dr. Berger
Dean Cairns
In amendment.
Dr. Slonecker
Dean Klawe
That the proposed Bachelor of Science
(Midwifery) be approved.
That the degree name be amended as
"Bachelor of Midwifery," to be abbreviated as
B.Mw.
The amendment
was put and
carried.
The Chair of the Budget Committee noted that the proposal had not come to the
Committee for its customary review. Vice President McBride apologized, stating that this
error occurred because the program did not require approval by the Degree Program
Review Committee, and
 Vancouver Senate 12696
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Library Committee
that Budget Committee review was usually conducted at the same time. Both Dean Cairns
and Vice President McBride reassured members of Senate that the program would not
proceed unless it was fully funded by the provincial government.
In amendment.
Dr. Shields l        That approval of the Bachelor of Midwifery be
Dean Klawe i       subject to consideration by the Budget
Committee.
The amendment
was put and
carried.
The amended
motion was put
and carried.
For clarification, the approved degree name was "Bachelor of Midwifery," to be
abbreviated as "B.Mw." and the program was approved subject to consideration by the
Budget Committee.
Library Committee
Dr. Rosengarten had circulated the following report, as Chair of the Committee.
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
REPORT TO SENATE, MAY 2001
1.   Space
Over the last two years the Senate Library Committee has paid particular attention to the
availability of space to support Library collections and services. In 1999-2000 the Committee,
like its predecessor, was made sharply aware of the growing need for environmentally suitable
space for a collection of rare and unique materials that should be recognized as a national
treasure. The Committee was given a tour of the Main Library, and learned of that building's
many problems. Of particular concern is the situation in Special Collections, where it is
becoming increasingly difficult to maintain the stringent storage conditions needed to meet
national archival and preservation standards. The
 Vancouver Senate 12697
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Library Committee
opening of Koerner brought a breathing space, removing more than half a million books from
Main Library and thus reducing the threat of structural damage to the older building. But the
underlying problems remain: as acquisitions continue to grow, and as new forms of multimedia publication and information technology require more space and service support, Main
Library is unable to meet the increasing demands being made upon it.
In February 2000, at the Committee's suggestion, an account of these problems was presented
to Senate, which passed a resolution asking that the University give priority to the Library in
its next fundraising campaign. Over the next several months the Librarian and the Chair of
the SLC met with almost all the Faculty Deans, as well as with the Graduate Student Council,
to explore a proposal for action. Briefly, the proposal, first mooted almost twenty years ago,
was to build a new Main Library on the "footprint" of the old. The heritage core would be
preserved and renovated. The new wings would provide high-density library storage, reading
rooms, a properly-equipped Special Collections area, meeting rooms and classrooms, and
space for the University's growing complement of interdisciplinary programs. The main
concourse, currently used to house the old card catalogue, would become a Learning
Commons. These facilities would be known collectively as the University Learning Centre
(ULC). The cost was estimated at about $60 million, considerably less than the $100 million
estimated for the second phase of the Koerner Library.
This proposal was accepted by the Administration for inclusion in the University's Case
Statement. Thanks to a $1 million donation by Dr. and Mrs. Chapman, work has already
begun on the Learning Commons, which is due to open in August 2001. Another donation,
from Dr. W. Chung, has made it possible to refurbish a room off the main concourse to house
Dr. Chung's magnificent collection of Western Canadiana, also a gift to the UBC Library (the
official opening was held on 3 May 2001). The corresponding room at the other end of the
concourse, already renovated and named in recognition of the generosity of Earl and Suzanne
Dodson, has been allocated new funding for equipment that will enable it to function as
instructional space.
2.   Acquisitions
The Senate Library Committee has received regular updates about Library expenditures,
especially in Acquisitions. This year, despite the soaring costs of serials and the decline in the
value of the Canadian dollar, UBC has not had to make any cuts in serial subscriptions. This is
in part a result of an increase of $500,000 in last year's acquisitions budget, in part a
consequence of the Library's timely subscription to a number of on-line journal providers. The
Library was also able to negotiate favourable rates with its suppliers. The Library has sought
to maintain a balance between the purchase of monographs and the purchase of serials: in
2000-2001, 74% of the acquisitions budget has gone to serials and e-resources, 26% to
monographs, which represents a small shift of 3% towards monograph purchases over the last
three years.
All academic libraries have been plagued by the steep price increases in scholarly journals, and
various solutions have been proposed. This was the topic of a presentation to the SLC by Dr.
John Willinsky of the Faculty of Education, who described his proposal for a "Knowledge
Exchange Model for Scholarly Publishing," an approach intended to facilitate access to on-line
publishing for both writers and readers.
 Vancouver Senate 12698
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Library Committee
The UBC Library has been at the forefront of the efforts to make electronic resources more
easily available to users, and is a leading participant in the Canadian National Site Licensing
Project funded by the CFI. Given the rapid migration of many scholarly journals to electronic
formats, the Senate Library Committee was especially concerned by the "access versus
ownership" issue, whereby a library's subscription to e-journals does not bring permanent
access, unlike the purchase of printed copies. The Committee feels strongly that the Library
must continue to purchase "hard" copies of scholarly publications well into the foreseeable
future.
3. Strategic Plan
The Committee was pleased to be able to provide the Librarian with feedback concerning the
Library's draft Strategic Plan and its subsequent Implementation Plan. The Library's goal is
embodied in the Strategic Plan's title: "Furthering Learning and Research." This ambitious
undertaking, linked through both format and goals to Trek 2000, is an important reminder
that the Library is essential to the University's attainment of its academic vision and goals.
4. New Teaching Programs
The Senate Library Committee was made aware of the growing demands made on the Library
by the introduction of new courses and programs that, in line with the goals proposed in Trek
2000, emphasize the importance of research at every level of education. The shift to problem-
based learning in Medicine, for example, has greatly increased use of the Woodward Medical
Library, putting pressure on both the collections and on Library staff. Faculties should make
sure that they include consideration of the potential demands for expanded library collections
and increased instructional support when they submit plans for new teaching programs.
The Committee also discussed the implications of the recently-announced agreement between
Universitas 21 and Thomson Learning, by which UBC will collaborate with a dozen other
universities in a new global distance-learning program. Members recognized the potential
advantages of such an arrangement; at the same time, they expressed concern about control
over intellectual property rights, pedagogical quality, and library resources. It would appear
that no special funding is contemplated to meet potential increases in the use of the libraries
belonging to affiliated institutions. These matters are to be raised with Dr. Michael Goldberg
at a specially-convened meeting of the Committee on 14 May 2001.
5. The Library and Research Infrastructure
The Committee has spent some time on the important question of the Library's role within the
University's research infrastructure. Although the provincial and federal governments have
begun to acknowledge the huge burden carried by the universities in meeting the indirect costs
of research, the Library is usually excluded from the calculation of grants or subsidies; yet it
plays a major role in almost every area of research, whether as the storehouse of materials on
the history of science, for example, or as the repository of unique maps and manuscripts. The
Committee agreed that, as the University enjoys increasing success in obtaining funding for
new or expanded areas of knowledge, the Library should receive a corresponding increase in
funding if it is to provide
 Vancouver Senate 12699
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Extension of Meeting Time
adequate support for such programs. University administrations across the country need to
educate granting agencies on the necessity of acting like their US counterparts by allowing the
inclusion of library funding requirements as part of any research grant application.
Respectfully submitted,
Dr. H. J. Rosengarten (Chair)
Mr. A. Baggish
Ms. E. J. Caskey
Dr. A. G. Hannam
Mr. K. Haycock
Dr. D. D. Kitts
Dean M. M. Klawe
Dr. V. LeMay
Ms. Y. C. Lu
Dr. D. M. Lyster
Dr. W. J. Phillips
Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon
Ms. C. Quinlan
Dr. D. Sjerve
Mr. B. Warren
Extension of Meeting Time
Dr. Williams i        That, in accordance with Section 3.1.3 of the
Dr. Fisher i        Rules and Procedures of Senate, the
adjournment of the meeting be postponed until
11:00 p.m.
Carried.
Nominating Committee
Dr. Williams presented the reports as Chair of the Committee.
COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS FOR STUDENT SENATORS
The Nominating Committee recommended that Senate approve the following
appointments of student representatives to the Committees of Senate for the term from
May 16, 2001 to March 31, 2002 (unless otherwise specified) and thereafter until a
replacement is appointed:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. Howard Poon
Mr. Ryan Morasiewicz
 Vancouver Senate 12700
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Nominating Committee
Academic Policy
Brian MacLean
Mr. Timothy Chan
Admissions
Ms. Hannah Roman
Mr. Wallace Yuen
Agenda
Mr. Chris Eaton
Appeals on Academic Standing
Ms. Diana Soochan
Mr. Wesley Tong
Mr. Wallace Yuen
Budget
Mr. Timothy Chan
Mr. David Tompkins
Continuing Studies
Mr. Adam Campbell
Ms. Hannah Roman
Curriculum
Mr. Ryan Morasiewicz
Ms. Hannah Roman
Ms. Diana Soochan
Ms. Gina Tsai
Elections
Ms. Michelle Hassen
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Mr. Chris Eaton
Library
Ms. Erica Blewett
Mr. Timothy Chan
Ms. Sakura Iwagami
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 16,2001
12701
Student Awards Committee
Ms. Gina Tsai
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
Ms. Michelle Hassen
Mr. Howard Poon
Mr. Wallace Yuen
Student Awards
Ms. Michelle Hassen
Mr. Wesley Tong
Tributes
Ms. Erica Blewett
Mr. Adam Campbell
Dr. Williams l
Dr. Rosengarten J
That Senate accept the recommendations of the
Nominating Committee with respect to
committee assignments for student senators.
Carried.
TRIENNIAL REVIEW OF SENATE COMMITTEES' TERMS OF REFERENCE
Dr. Williams had circulated a reminder to chairs of Senate Committees that, in
accordance with Section 4.1.8 of the Rules and Procedures of Senate, the Nominating
Committee would conduct its triennial review over the summer. He invited Chairs to
forward suggestions for changes to the Secretary of Senate by June 30, 2001. The
Nominating Committee hoped to report to Senate in September.
Student Awards Committee
NEW AWARDS
Please see 'Appendix E: New Awards for Approval.'
Dr. Thompson
Dean Granot
That the awards be accepted and
recommended for approval by the Board of
Governors, and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12702
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Report from Acting Registrar
Report from Acting Registrar
Please see 'Appendix F: Summary of Changes to Triennial Election Regulations.'
Dr. Holm presented the regulations as Acting Registrar. The complete regulations are
available upon request from the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Dr. Rosengarten i        That Senate approve the Regulations for the
Dr. Slonecker i       2001-2001 Triennial Elections as amended.
In response to queries from Mr. Brady, the Acting Registrar stated that:
1. Paper ballots would be available in addition to telephone or internet voting
options;
2. The names of nominators would be made available in all elections conducted by
the Registrar; and
3. The Agenda Committee considers requests for leaves of absence from Senate. Such
requests are received by the Registrar and then forwarded to the Agenda
Committee.
The motion was
put and carried.
Other Business
NOTICE OF MOTION
Dr. Fisher gave notice of the following motion:
"That, at its next meeting, Senate have a full debate on the academic and social
implications of becoming a member of the joint venture U21 Global with Universitas
21."
LIBRARY CONSULTATION
Ms. Quinlan noted that Senate had approved a number of new centres, institutes and
programs, but that consultation with the Library had not been conducted in every case.
Although the Library worked very hard to support new programs, advance consultation
would be very helpful in future.
 Vancouver Senate 12703
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Adjournment
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September 19, 2001 at
7:00 p.m.
 Vancouver Senate 12704
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
A PROPOSAL TO REFORM THE UNDERGRADUATE ENGLISH REQUIREMENT
English Requirement Committee
Paul Yachnin (English) Chair
Brian Bemmels (Associate Dean, Commerce)
Bruce Dunwoody (Associate Dean, Engineering Student Services)
Keri Gammon (Student Senator)
Janet Giltrow (English)
Brigitte Reynolds (Graduate Student, English)
Lome Whitehead (Associate Dean, Science)
March 1, 2001
Contents
I.      Recommendations
II.      Background
A. Responses to "Advancing Literacy: A Discussion Paper on the UBC
Undergraduate English Requirement"
B. Reforming the Requirement: Central Issues
III. Explanations and Rationale
A. General Rationale
B. Individual Recommendations, Definitions of Terms, and Specific Rationale
IV. Toward Implementation: Some Suggestions
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Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
I.      Recommendations
The English Requirement Committee recommends
1. That the University institute a Writing Requirement applicable to all
undergraduate students in all undergraduate programs.
• The requirement to be named the "Writing Requirement" rather
than the " English Requirement"
• The Writing Requirement to replace each individual Faculty's
English Requirement
2. That the following entry be added to the Academic Regulations section of
the University Calendar:
"All undergraduate students are required to collect at least six Writing Intensive points as
part of their degree program. Refer to the Degree Requirements of individual Faculties for
specific courses that satisfy the Writing Requirement for that Faculty."
3. That, wherever feasible, Faculties and Departments develop WI (i.e.,
Writing Intensive) courses at the first-year level and above, either on their
own or in collaboration with other Faculties and Departments.
WI courses to be of two basic kinds:
• Dedicated Writing Courses (i.e., courses dedicated to the study and
practice of writing) in which WI points = course credits
• Integrated Writing Courses (i.e., courses that integrate the study
and practice of writing with a non-Writing course) in which WI
points = 1/3 of course credits
See section III.B.3 for clarification and definitions.
4. That the English Department continue to offer a range of WI courses at the
first-year level and above and provide substantial help to other Faculties
and Departments undertaking to design WI courses.
5. That individual Faculties designate specific WI courses that allow their
students to fulfil the Writing Requirement in ways that are appropriate to
the Faculty's programs and that also afford students a measure of flexibility
in terms of course selection and course timing.
6. That the University create a fund, or designate some portion of the TLEF or
other existing fund, to support the development of WI courses within
various Departments and Faculties.
7. That the University create an on-going professional development fund,
which will be made available to those who participate in the development
and teaching of WI courses.
77.      Background
The English Requirement committee was created on the recommendation of the
Committee of Deans. The committee was asked "to investigate the pedagogical efficacy of
our first-year English requirement in the light of the learning objectives of these courses
 Vancouver Senate 12706
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
and the needs of students in our different Faculties, and to propose alternative
arrangements if these seem warranted" (committee mandate document). We were not
asked to look into the efficacy of the LPI, and we have not done so, except to consider
how the LPI would relate both to the various models of writing instruction previously
outlined (in the discussion paper of November 9) and to the present proposed model. We
were also not asked to consider the budgetary dimensions of either the present English
Requirement or the possible alternative models. Again, we have not done so, although we
have not entirely ignored such matters in our thinking.
A.      Responses to "Advancing Literacy: A Discussion Paper on the UBC Undergraduate
English Requirement"
The committee began discussions in September. In early November, we submitted a
preliminary report to the Committee of Deans. This document, "Advancing Literacy: A
Discussion Paper on the UBC Undergraduate English Requirement," outlined our
assessment of the present state of affairs, explained why, in our judgment, the English
Requirement was in need of revision, offered a set of working principles, and introduced
six possible models of undergraduate Writing instruction.
These models included (A) the status quo, (B) a fully elective system (i.e., no requirement),
(C) a Faculty-based requirement (where students take Writing courses in their home
Faculties), (D) a "partnership" option (where Faculties team up with the English
Department in order to design and offer Writing courses), (E) a "3 and 3" option (where
students complete 3 credits in first year in English and 3 in third year in their home
Faculty), and (F) the creation of a separate Department of Communication charged with
the responsibility of designing and offering Writing courses. The six models were intended
to provoke discussion and creative thinking rather than to represent an exhaustive list of
possible ways of teaching Writing.
"Advancing Literacy" was discussed by the Committee of Deans on November 14 and
subsequently circulated (in a shorter version) to the University community. The responses,
which came from individuals and from Directors, Heads, and Deans (writing for their
units), represented a range of opinion on a number of central questions and also offered
numerous valuable suggestions. Finally, a public forum took place January 18, which
featured a wide-ranging discussion of issues and options.
All but a few respondents were committed to the continuation of some kind of Writing
Requirement. Along with this general endorsement of required Writing instruction, there
was also interest in a measure of liberalization, possibly including a broader range of
Writing courses or a less strict time-frame or perhaps other ways of satisfying the
Requirement. There were some eloquent arguments in favour of the status quo (with
perhaps better funding and/or minor modifications); however, most respondents felt that
the present Requirement did need to be re-thought and that the University could probably
do a better job of teaching Writing. A majority felt that the idea of a Faculty-based
Requirement, which would exclude the English Department, was problematic or even
unworkable, especially since the English Department had years of experience as well as
considerable expertise in the field of Writing. Most also felt that the creation of a new
Communication Department would not in itself address any of the University's concerns
about undergraduate Writing. One colleague wrote: "the thought of one more
administrative unit makes my eyes glaze over."
 Vancouver Senate 12707
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
The models that were felt to be most promising were D (partnering) and E (3 & 3).
Although there were serious concerns about the feasibility of both models, there was
broad support for an initiative that would signal the whole University's commitment to the
promotion of effective writing, and many people also expressed the view that good writing
was so central to the advancement of knowledge in a range of disciplines that Writing
instruction should be a feature of courses in Departments other than English (as a matter
of fact, there are several Writing courses outside the English Department).
A number of members of the English Department objected to the committee's
characterization of first-year English courses and students' attitudes toward the courses.
These colleagues argued that the courses, particularly ENGL 112, were far more
pedagogically effective than the Discussion paper allowed, and that students responded
well to them. We acknowledge that many students have benefited from the dedicated
teaching provided by instructors of first-year English courses. In light of the evidence that
we have gathered and the responses that we have received, however, we respectfully
suggest that the courses that make up the present English Requirement do not offer
students a sufficiently flexible, varied, or effective Writing program. Moreover, we affirm
that the shortcomings of these courses are a consequence of the existing structure in which
the courses are embedded and are not to be attributed to the cohort of Sessional
Instructors in the English Department, a group that the Discussion paper characterizes as
conscientious and creative, and whose level of pedagogical achievement is said to be
"extraordinary given the inherent difficulties of the course."
Finally, a small number of colleagues took issue with the new name that we had proposed
for the English Requirement. They suggested that the word "literacy" was misleading since
the Discussion paper was almost exclusively concerned with writing. They also argued that
both the phrase, "Advanced Literacy Requirement," and the accompanying working
principle ("that it is assumed that entering students are already literate and are required to
develop more advanced skills") were misleading because in fact many entering students do
not possess basic competence in English writing. While we question this assumption of
what constitutes " literacy," we acknowledge that the controversy surrounding the word
might confuse students and colleagues about the nature of the Requirement. Since we are
indeed concerned primarily with writing and since the controversy about "literacy" might
complicate matters unnecessarily, we have decided to move from an " Advanced Literacy"
to a "Writing" Requirement.
B.       Reforming the Requirement: Central Issues
A number of issues emerged as central in the committee's own deliberations and in the
responses to the discussion paper. One issue was timing-at what stage or stages in
students' programs ought they to complete courses in fulfillment of the Requirement? A
second question-really a cluster of interrelated questions-had to do with the relationship
between Writing and Literary Studies: to what degree is the study of literature the best
setting for Writing instruction? Connected to this was a debate about how readily skills
learned in English courses would transfer to composition tasks in other disciplines. This
led to the discussion around the idea of "writing in the disciplines"; indeed, model C
outlined a full-fledged version of a discipline-based Writing program. A third important
issue had to do with who would teach the new courses envisioned by several of the
models. While this is an problem that must ultimately be left to those who design
 Vancouver Senate 12708
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
and oversee the implementation of a new program, it has nevertheless occupied our
attention and the attention of a number of colleagues.
Many respondents argued that students should fulfil some part of the Requirement in first
year. Others emphasized the importance of continuing instruction in Writing throughout
the undergraduate program. Of course, these are not incompatible principles: if it chose to,
the University could require three or even six credits of Writing in each year of the
undergraduate program. As the respondents themselves recognized, however, funding and
time are limited and core program requirements have a legitimate priority, so that even the
most intensive Writing program would have to share resources, time, and space in
programs with other areas of study.
A number of colleagues disagreed with the Discussion paper's view that study in the
English Department is not to be identified with the study of Writing; they maintained that
the English Department was indeed the best place to teach a set of general and portable
skills. According to one response, "the skills that English teaches its students are
transferable skills, adaptable to almost any rhetorical situation." Others, who disagreed
with this view, argued that instruction in Writing should take place, at least in large part,
in close relation to students' chosen disciplines. One colleague in Science expressed
frustration " that students are taught norms in their first-year English courses that counter
norms in my own discipline"; he suggested that "students need to write, write, and
rewrite, and writing in their home disciplines is the most natural way for them to get the
practice and feedback that they need."
The question of who would teach the courses in a program featuring some emphasis on
discipline-based Writing was of serious concern to a number of respondents. Several asked
the committee for clarification of the phrase "qualified... faculty" in the working principle,
"That the course(s) fulfilling the Requirement be taught by qualified members of the
faculty." While, as has been noted, this issue will be addressed definitively at a later time
by another committee or implementation group, it is worthwhile noting here that our
intention was partly to signal to the University as a whole the need to enhance the profile
and recognize the value of those who teach Writing. Moreover, since there are in fact very
few Ph.D.'s in Rhetoric and Composition available to be hired, it will be necessary to hire
those who have demonstrated expertise and experience in the field and also necessary to
provide funding and other means to facilitate their professional development as fully
qualified scholars and teachers of Writing.
One issue that came up several times was the situation of ESL students, the principal
concern being, of course, to envision ways of helping ESL students to develop basic and
intermediate English writing skills. One suggestion was for streaming of students
according to whether or not they were competent in basic written English (of course, such
streaming could also include English as a First Language students). There were suggestions
also for the continuation of the mainstreaming of ESL students. While we acknowledge
that this general area of concern is largely beyond the scope of the committee's mandate,
we nevertheless believe that our recommendations will help ESL students improve their
abilities as writers in English in specific ways, and that the recommendations will in
general create a setting likely to foster innovative ways of teaching students to write
English as an additional language.
 Vancouver Senate 12709
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
Finally, there was one area of disagreement that tended to remain below the surface,
largely because it concerned underlying assumptions about how students learn university-
level writing. Some respondents seemed to assume that students could be taught to write
once and for all, as if writing were a limited and definable set of skills, something like
riding a bicycle. Others assumed, and sometimes stated explicitly, that learning to write
university-level English is a task of long duration, that it cannot be achieved in one
thirteen-week course, but rather that it is a matter of developing complex, high-level skills
over a number of years. We find ourselves in broad agreement with the latter view.
In light of the written responses, the public forum, discussions with numerous members of
the University community, and the committee's own thinking, we have arrived at the
present set of recommendations.
777.      Explanations and Rationale
A.      General Rationale
The Discussion paper succeeded in provoking creative and critical thinking about the best
ways to enhance undergraduate writing. Colleagues, members of staff, and students from
across the campus have entered into what we hope will be a continuing dialogue about
Writing, and they have provided us with a wealth of ideas and arguments. However, the
present recommendations are motivated, first of all, by what we did not encounter in the
written responses, the student focus-groups discussions, the public forum, or in the many
conversations with colleagues and students that we have had since September. No one has
expressed the view that learning to write well is not an important feature of an
undergraduate education. Indeed those who have written or spoken to us about the
English Requirement seem universally to believe that effective, expressive writing is a
central goal of a university education, a necessary ability in most professional activities,
and a requisite dimension of a fulfilled life.
Putting aside the possibility that there is a silent majority hostile toward the project of
enhancing undergraduate writing at UBC, we believe that there is support across the
University for changes to the existing requirement that would give students more varied
and more effective ways of learning to be better writers. We believe that our
recommendations will go some way toward achieving that goal.
Most contributions to the discussion over the past several months have stressed the need
for the continuation of a writing requirement of some kind. Many respondents stated that
student choice was important, especially since a wider range of offerings would allow
students to take Writing courses in their own disciplines, or for that matter in fields of
interest that lie outside their disciplines. Finally, a number emphasized that students
should be encouraged to study Writing throughout their undergraduate programs. We are
substantially in agreement with all three principles.
The present set of recommendations allows for a degree of freedom of choice for students
under the umbrella of a six-point Writing Requirement, not to mention a degree of
freedom for Faculties undertaking to design WI programs for their students. For example
(and provided that the particular Faculty permitted it), students could combine one
"dedicated" course (worth 3 WI points) in their home discipline in their first year with
three "integrated" courses (each worth 1 point) in three other disciplines in each of the
 Vancouver Senate 12710
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
following years; or students could take one dedicated WI course in year one and a second
such course in year two, three, or four. Faculties that would like their students to have a
broader acquaintance with the Humanities could require their students to take one or
more 1-point WI courses in appropriate Departments in Arts.
We envision that a three-credit first-year Writing course in the English Department will be
a popular foundation for WI programs in many Faculties, but we think that Faculties
might also see the value of designating entry-level Writing courses in other disciplines,
including their own. In any case, Faculty-designed WI programs such as these (and it is
easy to imagine other combinations) would allow students to work on and improve their
writing throughout their undergraduate careers in ways that would be educationally
exciting, specific to program needs and student interests, and relatively easy to integrate
with existing undergraduate programs.
The advantages of counting WI points rather than WI courses are considerable: not only
will students be able to take courses that feature instruction in Writing in (up to) all four
years of their undergraduate programs, but it will also be relatively easy to mount WI
courses, especially "integrated" courses where instruction in Writing comprises a quarter
to a third of class time and attention. Since a point-system will have the overall effect of
making the design and teaching of WI courses less onerous, Departments and Faculties are
more likely to be willing to take on the responsibility for such courses. Of course, one of
our recommendations is that Departments and Faculties collaborate with the English
Department in the design of WI courses; but we also envision the situation where members
of the English Department will work as collaborators with members of other Departments
in co-designed and co-taught WI courses. For more about this, see section IV, "Toward
Implementation."
The point system will also facilitate the introduction of discipline-based WI courses, which
will give students the valuable opportunity to write in an area of study where they are
knowledgeable and to write in the particular disciplinary language of their chosen field of
study.
Finally, the Writing Requirement will benefit ESL students in two major respects. Under
the present system, most students are required to complete two 3-credit English courses in
first year (only one of five first-year courses in English, from which students must choose,
features specific instruction in Writing). The large number of writing assignments
combined with the inherent challenge of literary study, which often demands close analysis
of complex poetic language, can demoralize even the hardest-working students, especially
those whose first language is not English. In contrast, the new system will allow students
to fulfil the Requirement gradually and in stages over the course of their undergraduate
programs. Moreover, in the new system, students will be able to fulfil at least part of the
Requirement in their chosen field of study, where they will be dealing with more familiar,
discipline-specific language, methodology, and format.
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Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
B.      Individual Recommendations, Definitions of Terms, and Specific Rationale
1. That the University institute a Writing Requirement applicable to all
undergraduate students in all undergraduate programs.
• The requirement to be named the "Writing Requirement" rather
than the " English Requirement"
• The Writing Requirement to replace each individual Faculty's
English Requirement
Most Faculties presently require six credits of first-year English; however, some require
only three, and it might happen in the future that still other Faculties, under the pressure
that expanding knowledge exerts on core programs, will also decide to reduce their
Writing Requirement. The ability to write well is centrally important in all academic
disciplines and in all the professional activities that our students will engage in after they
graduate; therefore, we believe that all Faculties should agree to a minimum six-point
requirement. The establishment of a University requirement would both signal and
safeguard our commitment to teaching Writing to all undergraduate students. The
recommended change in the name of the Requirement is in accord with the campus-wide
commitment to the enhancement of students' writing, since "English" is normally
identified with a particular Department whereas "Writing" refers to an activity with a
range of disciplinary applications.
2. That the following entry be added to the Academic Regulations section of
the University Calendar:
"All undergraduate students are required to collect at least six Writing
Intensive points as part of their degree program. Refer to the Degree
Requirements of individual Faculties for specific courses that satisfy the
Writing Requirement for that Faculty."
While the language of "collecting points" might seem more akin to frequent flyer plans
than to academic degree programs, we believe that a WI point system will be simple to
implement and easy for students and advisers to keep track of. All WI courses will have
regular departmental designations and credit weight, and each will also count for either 3
or 1 WI points. Indeed, the point system will make the Writing Intensive courses easier to
integrate with existing programs than the present Requirement, since selected courses
already included in particular degree programs could be converted into 1 -point WI courses
by the addition of formal, integrated instruction in Writing.
Hours of Writing instruction or pages of assigned student writing can likely be counted in
a number of ways, and the Deans' Committee and/or the implementation committee might
devise a system better than the recommended "point system" (based perhaps on the
existing credit weight of courses). The crucial principle here is that whatever method of
counting course-work in Writing is adopted, whether by points, credits, or some other unit
of measurement, it must facilitate and be adaptable to the creation of a range of different
courses in a range of disciplines.
Six WI points represents, we believe, a reasonable and practicable minimum. The Deans'
and/or implementation committee might consider raising the Writing Requirement from 6
to perhaps 9 points on a campus-wide basis. Even if this is not the case,
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Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
individual Faculties might consider increasing the WI point requirement for their own
students.
3. That, wherever feasible, Faculties and Departments develop WI courses at
the first-year level and above, either on their own or in collaboration with
other Faculties and Departments.
WI courses to be of two basic kinds:
• Dedicated Writing Courses (i.e., courses dedicated to the study and
practice of writing) in which WI points = course credits
• Integrated Writing Courses (i.e., courses that integrate the study and
practice of writing with a non-Writing course) in which WI points = 1/3 of
course credits
While the specific descriptions of WI courses will be established by Faculties and
Departments working in collaboration with an implementation committee, we nevertheless
offer the following suggestions:
• Since the primary purpose of WI courses is to help students improve their
writing skills, all such courses should include at least one composition
assignment per each WI point. The assignments should be at least 1000
words in length (or a greater number of shorter assignments); more
importantly, they should be returned to students with detailed, expert
feedback. Revision and rewriting of marked assignments could also be a
valuable component of such courses.
• Since an important secondary purpose of WI courses is to help students
improve their understanding of the social, historical, and disciplinary
function of writing, some WI courses, especially at senior levels, should
emphasize the theoretical study of writing communities, discourse and
society, disciplinary rhetoric, and so on.
• Since the Writing Requirement aims to foster a range of WI courses in
different disciplines and with different emphases, "dedicated" courses
should include offerings with a theoretical and/or historical focus as well
as offerings in introductory and advanced Composition.
Theoretical/historical offerings might include courses like the following:
(1) "The Writing of Evolution," which studies the language of Huxley,
Darwin, Gould, etc.; (2) a course that focuses on the language of botanical
description and its role in the history of colonization; (3) a course on the
genres of Anthropology, which investigates the development of
ethnographic writing, from its beginnings to current disciplinary forms and
debates; (4) a course on the history of the experimental journal-article,
which studies this form of writing from the appearance of "methods"
descriptions in the eighteenth century to present-day forms; (5) a course
called "The Rhetoric of Historiography" that examines language and
ideology in notable historians from Thucydides to Gibbon to Zemon
Davis. These theoretical/historical courses would also include practical
work on students' own writing.
Since individual instruction and detailed feedback is a requisite feature of
WI courses, the ratio of students to instructors should not exceed 25 to 1.
Larger, lecture-type courses could also be designated as WI, provided that
they feature seminar-type groups working on Writing assignments with
expert instructors at the recommended ratio. If TAs are to be employed in
WI courses, they
•
 Vancouver Senate 12713
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
should receive appropriate training before they begin their teaching
assignments.
•     Since the implementation of the new Writing Requirement and the
creation of new WI courses represent a campus-wide undertaking, the
responsibility of determining which courses may be designated WI should
lie with a broadly-constituted implementation committee. Since the English
Department has particular expertise in the field, it should be well
represented on the committee.
4. That the English Department continue to offer a range of WI courses at the
first-year level and above and provide substantial help to other Faculties
and Departments undertaking to design WI courses.
In light of the majority of responses to the Discussion paper, it is clear that the English
Department must continue to play a leading role in the enhancement of undergraduate
Writing instruction, both by helping other units develop their own courses and by
continuing to provide innovative and effective WI courses. Release time should be made
available to those members of the English Department who help other Department and
Faculties in the design of WI courses.
5. That individual Faculties designate specific WI courses that allow their
students to fulfil the Writing Requirement in ways that are appropriate to
the Faculty's programs and that also afford students a measure of flexibility
in terms of course selection and course timing.
While we are recommending the adoption of a campus-wide requirement, we also
recognize that Faculties have a responsibility to establish their students' degree
requirements in light of the needs and emphases of particular disciplines. It is therefore to
be expected that the range and sequence of courses designated as satisfying the Writing
Requirement will not be uniform from Faculty to Faculty.
We also encourage Faculties to be flexible about course selection and course timing in
order to give their students more freedom of choice and in order to allow students,
especially those for whom English is an additional language, to fulfil the Requirement over
a longer period of time. Of course, Faculties will assume the responsibility for designing
the sequence of WI courses in their Faculties so that students move from less to more
advanced levels of work.
 Vancouver Senate 12714
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
Finally, while we are emphasizing Writing instruction here, we also recognize the
considerable value of teaching oral communication (including presentation skills, etc.),
which we think could be combined with Writing instruction in some courses.
6. That the University create a fund, or designate some portion of the TLEF or
other existing fund, to support the development of WI courses within
various Departments and Faculties.
We believe that funds should be allocated to Faculties and Departments during the startup period in order to allow faculty members release time for research and consultation as
they develop new WI courses.
7. That the University create an on-going professional development fund,
which will be made available to those who participate in the development
and teaching of WI courses.
There are many able and even gifted writers among the faculty across the campus, but
there are few experts in Writing practice, theory, and pedagogy. Since, moreover, there are
very few Ph.D.'s in Rhetoric and Composition available to be hired, it will be necessary for
existing and incoming Faculty to develop their pedagogical skills in Writing instruction.
The provision of professional development funding will also make it more attractive to
faculty members to participate in the teaching of WI courses.
TV.      Toward Implementation: Some Suggestions
The following suggestions might be of use to those undertaking to implement a new
Writing Requirement, if a decision is made to implement key ideas in this proposal.
• Since the questions surrounding the present English Requirement have
already been discussed across the campus, and since this set of
recommendations is in part a reflection of that discussion, we suggest
that the present document should also be widely distributed-and
revised if appropriate-in advance of the first phase of adoption and
implementation.
• As is presently the case vis-a-vis first-year English, successful
completion of the LPI should be a prerequisite for any WI course.
• However, since numerous students fail to achieve a satisfactory
standing on the LPI-and some write it repeatedly (some more than
twenty times!)-the Committee of Deans (or the implementation
committee) might consider making an exception to the above rule by
designating the Writing Centre course, Writing 098, a WI course worth
one point. This would encourage students to take 098, which would in
turn improve their chances of achieving a satisfactory standing on the
LPI. Note, however, that students who already had 1 WI point from
098 might object to then being required to take WI courses totaling 6
points (which would give them a total of 7 points).
• An alternative suggestion is to allow students to count successful
completion of Writing 098 in place of satisfactory standing on the LPI.
Under this option, students would have to write the LPI once only.
In either case, the skills required to pass 098 must be equivalent to
those needed to achieve satisfactory standing on the LPI.
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Appendix A: Write, Write, and Re-Write
• First-year programs (such as Arts One or Foundations), which
presently satisfy the English Requirement, should count for 6 WI
points under the new system. However, it would not be inappropriate
to review these programs in order to ascertain that they provide
Writing instruction broadly equivalent to that envisioned by the
Writing Requirement. The implementation committee might also
consider reducing the points allocated to such programs in order to
ensure that students take further WI courses in years two, three, or
four.
• The same allocation of 6 WI points should be extended to College
courses that presently satisfy the English Requirement, and the same
process of review should be undertaken. Here again, the
implementation committee might consider reducing the points
allocated to such College courses in order to ensure that students take
further WI courses in years two, three, or four.
• The total number of WI courses must, of course, be sufficient to
accommodate the needs of the undergraduate student body. While it is
likely that Departments in Arts will more readily be able to design WI
courses, we believe that it is crucial to the success of the new
Requirement that Faculties and Departments across campus commit
resources to WI courses, and that the task of teaching Writing to
undergraduate students be borne equitably by all Faculties.
• The Deans' and/or the implementation committee might consider what
role the proposed Centre for Research in Discourse and Society might
play vis-a-vis the new Requirement. We suggest that it could facilitate
the productive interrelationship or research and teaching in the field of
Composition Studies, could help design courses across a range of
disciplines, and could serve as a centre of collegial and intellectual life
for those who create and teach WI courses.
• The implementation committee will need to consider the question of
staffing of WI courses, an area of planning that might include the
formulation of job descriptions, application procedures, and
professional development programs. In the likely event that sessional
faculty participate in the design and especially the teaching of WI
courses, they should be allowed the time and professional development
funding necessary to perform at high scholarly levels. Where WI
courses are designed to be co-taught by tenured and sessional faculty,
the instructors should work together to ensure that the instruction in
Writing is fully integrated with the basic course content.
• Integrated courses could be created by the addition of an extra unit of
Writing instruction to existing courses. The credit value of the course
should be increased accordingly, and the additional unit should in any
case be integrated with the basic course content.
• The Deans' Committee and/or the implementation committee will of
necessity establish a timetable for the implementation of the new
Requirement. We think that such a timetable needs to capitalize on the
present momentum but must also allow time for satisfactory planning
and review. We think that it would be ideal to aim to have the new
Writing Requirement fully in place three years after it is given final
approval.
 Vancouver Senate 12716
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
1.0 ADMISSION
1.1. Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Musical Arts, and Doctor of Education
A student may apply for admission to the degree program by writing directly to the
Department in which the program is offered or by writing to the Dean's Office, Faculty of
Graduate Studies, 180-6321 Crescent Road, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z2, or by email
at graduate@interchange.ubc.ca. Up-to-date information on admission is available on the web
at www.grad.ubc.ca. Students are normally admitted to study only in fields that are formally
authorized by Senate to offer doctoral programs. All applications must be accompanied by an
application fee at the time of submission. Consult the Faculty of Graduate Studies website
(www.grad.ubc.ca/) for information on current application fees.
The number of candidates that can be accommodated is limited and Departments will accept
the best qualified students as vacancies occur. Most students begin their program of study at
the start of the Winter Term (the beginning of September) but limitations on the number of
students that can be accommodated require that applicants be selected well before this date.
Students are encouraged to submit applications for admission as early as possible.
Applicants for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.) and Doctor
of Education (Ed.D.) must have completed the following requirements prior to admission:
a. In the case of the Ph.D. and Ed.D., a master's degree (or equivalent) with clear evidence
of research ability or potential, or in the case of the D.M.A., a master's degree (or
equivalent) with outstanding ability in performance or composition (for D.M.A.).
b. A bachelor program with one year of study in a master's program with 18 credits of first
class average, of which normally 10 credits must be at the 500-level or above and at least
10 credits must be of first class standing, and clear evidence of research ability or
potential (for Ph.D.) or outstanding ability in performance or composition (for D.M.A.).
Transfer directly into a doctoral program is not normally permitted beyond the first year
of study at the master's level and will not be permitted after completion of the second
year.
c. In exceptional cases, applicants who hold an Honours bachelor degree with an overall
average in the "A" grade range and who demonstrate advanced research ability may be
granted direct admission to a doctoral degree program on recommendation of the
admitting Department and approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
 Vancouver Senate 12717
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
1.1.1. International Students
Applicants for admission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies are welcomed and encouraged
from international students who hold a credential deemed comparable to a Canadian
masters degree and who demonstrate superior academic standing. Specific minimum
admission requirements established by the Faculty of Graduate Studies for graduates of
different countries may be found on the Graduate Studies Admission web site at
www.grad.ubc.ca/applications. These are minimum requirements; specific programs may
have higher requirements.
1.1.1.1.      English Language Proficiency Requirement
Applicants from a university outside Canada in which English is not the primary
language of instruction must present evidence of competency to pursue studies in the
English language prior to being extended an offer of admission. Acceptable English
language proficiency tests for applicants to graduate studies are:
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language): minimum score of 550 (paper
version); 213 (computer version);
IELTS (International English Language Testing Service): minimum overall band score
of 6.5 with no other component score less than 6.0
MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery): minimum overall score of
81.
1.1.2. Required Documentation
The following information is required in support of an application to the Faculty of
Graduate Studies:
• Graduate Studies Application Form (paper or electronic version)
• Application fee
• Three confidential reference reports (must contain original signature and be received
sealed)
• Two sets of all official postsecondary academic records in original language and
certified translation (if originals cannot be attained by applicant, then attested,
certified copies of originals are acceptable). To be considered official, academic records
must be received in official university envelopes, sealed and endorsed by the issuing
institution.
• Evidence of English Proficiency where applicable (TOEFL, IELTS, or MELAB are all
acceptable).
• Supplementary information required by admitting Department (e.g. GRE, statement of
intent, research proposal, etc.)
 Vancouver Senate 12718
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
1.1.3.   Admission
Admission to the Ph.D., D.M.A., or Ed.D. program will be in one of the following
categories:
[Underline: New text: Strikcthrough: Deleted text.]
a. Unconditional admission. Granted when the applicant meets all admission
requirements and all final official documentation has been received. Applicants who
have a bachelor's degree, or its academic equivalent, which does not meet the
requirements stated above, but who have had significant formal training and relevant
professional experience to offset such deficiencies, may be granted admission on the
recommendation of the appropriate department or faculty and approval of the Dean of
the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
b. Conditional admission. Contains condition(s) that must be met before offer can be
considered final. Such conditions may include final documentation showing degree
conferred, or submission of academic records from previous institutions. The Letter of
Admission stipulates deadline dates as to when the conditions must be met. Failure to
comply with a condition will normally result in a student having to withdraw from the
program. Due to immigration restrictions, applicants from China who require a visa to
enter Canada cannot be issued a conditional admission.
e:—Provisional admission. Contains provisions that must be met in the first year of the
graduate program in order for the student to be upgraded to full status. Failure to meet
the stated academic requirements in year one will normally result in the student having
to withdraw. Provisional admission is available only to applicants who do not require
a student visa to enter Canada.
1.1.3.1.       International Students
Students who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents must apply for Student
Authorization (Student Visa). Applications can be made at any Canadian Consulate or
High Commission.
1.2. Master's Degrees
A student may apply for admission to the master's degree by writing directly to the
Department in which the program is offered or by writing to the Dean's Office, Faculty of
Graduate Studies, 180-6321 Crescent Road, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z2, or by email
at www.grad.ubc.ca/applications. Up-to-date information on admission is available on the
web at www.grad.ubc.ca. Students are admitted to study only in fields that are authorized by
Senate to offer master's-level programs. All applications must be accompanied by an
application fee at the time of submission. Consult the Faculty of Graduate Studies website for
more information. The number of candidates that can be accommodated is limited, and
Departments with limited facilities will accept the best-qualified students as vacancies occur.
 Vancouver Senate 12719
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
Most students begin their program of study in September, but limitations on the number of
students that can be accommodated require that applicants be selected well before this date.
Students are encouraged to submit applications for admission as early as possible.
1.2.1. Students with a bachelor's degree from a Canadian or American university or
college
Applicants for a master's degree program must hold a bachelor degree or its academic
equivalent with:
a. Honours in the field of the proposed masters courses with at least 12 credits of third-
and fourth-year courses in the A-grade range (at UBC 80% or higher) in the field of
study, or
b. A minimum overall average in the B+ range (at UBC 76%) in third- and fourth-year
courses prescribed by the Department concerned as prerequisite to the master's
program.
These are the minimum requirements for admission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Departments may have additional admission requirements. Consult the Departmental
listings in the Calendar to confirm the admission requirements for specific degree
programs.
1.2.2. International students
Applicants for admission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies are welcomed and encouraged
from international students who hold a credential deemed comparable to a Canadian
bachelor degree and who demonstrate superior academic standing. Specific minimum
admission requirements established by the Faculty of Graduate Studies for graduates of
different countries may be found on the Graduate Studies Admission web site at
www.grad.ubc.ca/applications. These are minimum requirements; specific programs may
have higher requirements.
1.2.2.1.      English Language Proficiency Requirement
Applicants from a university outside Canada in which English is not the primary
language of instruction must present evidence of competency to pursue studies in the
English language prior to being extended an offer of admission. Acceptable English
language proficiency tests for applicants to graduate studies are:
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language): minimum score of 550 (paper
version); 213 (computer version);
IELTS (International English Language Testing Service): minimum overall band score
of 6.5 with no other component score less than 6.0
MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery): minimum overall score of
81.
 Vancouver Senate 12720
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
1.2.4. Required Documentation
The following information is required in support of an application to the Faculty of
Graduate Studies:
• Graduate Studies Application Form (paper or electronic version)
• Application fee
• Three confidential reference reports (must contain original signature and be received
sealed)
• Two sets of all official postsecondary academic records in original language and
certified translation (if originals cannot be attained by applicant then attested, certified
copies of originals are acceptable). To be considered official, academic records must be
received in official university envelopes, sealed and endorsed by the issuing institution.
• Evidence of English Proficiency where applicable (TOEFL, IELTS, or MELAB are all
acceptable).
• Supplementary information required by admitting Department (e.g. GRE, statement of
intent, research proposal, etc.)
1.2.5. Admission
Admission to the master's program will be in one of the following categories:
[Underline: New text: Strikcthrough: Deleted text.]
a. Unconditional admission. Granted when the applicant meets all admission
requirements and all final official documentation has been received. Applicants who
have a bachelor's degree, or its academic equivalent, which does not meet the
requirements stated above, but who have had significant formal training and relevant
professional experience to offset such deficiencies, may be granted admission on the
recommendation of the appropriate department or faculty and approval of the Dean of
the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
b. Conditional admission. Contains condition(s) that must be met before offer can be
considered final. Such conditions may include final documentation showing degree
conferred, or submission of academic records from previous institutions. The Letter of
Admission stipulates deadline dates as to when the conditions must be met. Failure to
comply with a condition will normally result in a student having to withdraw from the
program. Due to immigration restrictions, applicants from China who require a visa to
enter Canada cannot be issued a conditional admission.
e?—Provisional admission. Contains provisions that must be met in the first year of the
graduate program in order for the student to be upgraded to full status. Failure to meet
the stated academic requirements in year one will normally result in the student having
to withdraw. Provisional admission is available only to applicants who do not require
a student visa to enter Canada.
 Vancouver Senate 12721
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
On the recommendation of the home Department, a student with a bachelor degree who
lacks prerequisites for a chosen field of graduate study may be allowed to register as a
qualifying student for a period of no more than one year. Satisfactory completion of a
qualifying year does not guarantee admission to a graduate program. Qualifying status is
granted to students only at the recommendation of the Department. Qualifying students
are not considered graduate students.
1.3. Students Transferring to UBC with Faculty Supervisors
Students who transfer to UBC with newly hired faculty members may choose one of the
following:
• Transfer to UBC in order to complete a UBC degree. In this case, students should apply for
admission in the usual way by submitting the application form, application fee,
transcripts, letters of reference and any other supporting documentation required by the
Department. It is expected that fees will be assessed as if the years spent by the student at
the previous university were paid at UBC for that period. The maximum time to complete
the program will be calculated on the same basis. Eligibility for awards will be as if the
years spent by the student at the previous university were spent at UBC.
or
• Apply to become a Visiting Student in order to complete their work and graduate from
their original university. Students may spend up to a year at UBC as a Visiting Graduate
Student. Credits completed while a Visiting Student may not subsequently be credited
toward completion of a degree at the University of British Columbia.
1.4. Visiting Students
A visiting graduate student is one who is attending UBC to complete course work and/or
research toward the requirements of a graduate degree at the home university. To be eligible
for admission as a visiting student to UBC, the student must be currently registered in a
graduate program with good standing at another recognized university. Normally, students
may hold visiting status at UBC for a maximum of twelve months.
Applicants for regular visiting student status (other than those applying under the Western
Deans Agreement or the Exchange Agreement) must submit the following documentation:
• Graduate Studies Application Form
• Application fee
• Two sets of official transcripts of the graduate program for which the applicant is
currently registered.
 Vancouver Senate 12722
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
• Evidence of English proficiency, where applicable, in the form of an official TLEF, IELTS
or MELAB score.
• Letter of permission from the home university's Registrar or Department Head confirming
that the course work and/or research undertaken at UBC while a visiting student is for the
purpose of completing the graduate degree requirements at the home university.
At the recommendation of the Department, the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies will
issue a formal offer of admission to the visiting student. Visiting students cannot use the
Student Service Centre on the web to register; they must be registered in course work or non-
credit activity (if doing research only) by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
1.5. Staff as Graduate Students
Staff at the University of British Columbia are permitted to register for degree programs in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies provided standard admission requirements are met. See The
University of British Columbia Policy and Procedure Handbook, Policy #45.
1.6. Faculty as Graduate Students
Full-time faculty are not normally allowed to register for programs leading to University of
British Columbia degrees or diplomas. See the University of British Columbia Policy and
Procedure Handbook, Policy #46.
1.7. Authenticity of Documents
Every student who applies to the Faculty of Graduate Studies must confirm that all statements
made and all documentation submitted in support of their application are true, complete and
valid. Students are responsible for the authenticity of the documentation submitted in support
of their application for admission to the University of British Columbia.
The Faculty of Graduate Studies reserves the right to return transcripts, degree certificates
and/or reference letters to the originator for verification. The Dean of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies reserves the right to rescind a letter of admission or to request that a student withdraw
if it is determined that a student has submitted falsified documents in support of their
application for admission.
2.0 CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENT
 Vancouver Senate 12723
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
2.1. Doctoral Student
Full time students are expected to engage in their studies on a full-time basis. All doctoral
students are considered full-time students and are assessed fees according to schedule A. (See
under Fees in the University Calendar.) Full-time students are eligible for graduate
scholarships and fellowships. Normally, Teaching Assistantships (TAs) and Research
Assistantships (RAs) are limited to full-time students.
Departments may articulate specific limitations regarding concurrent paid employment as
consistent with the definition of full-time study. Recipients of Teaching Assistantships (TAs)
must adhere to the TA union's regulations governing number of hours worked while holding a
Teaching Assistantship.
2.2. Master's Student
2.2.1. Full-time study:
Full time students are expected to engage in their studies on a full-time basis. All master's
students are considered full-time and are assessed fees according to schedule A. Full-time
students are eligible for graduate scholarships and fellowships. Normally, Teaching
Assistantships (TAs) and Research Assistantships (RAs) are limited to full-time students.
Departments may articulate specific limitations regarding concurrent paid employment as
consistent with the definition of full-time study. Recipients of Teaching Assistantships
(TAs) must adhere to the TA union's regulations governing number of hours worked while
holding a Teaching Assistantship.
2.2.2. Part-time study:
In many Departments, masters students have the option of pursuing the degree through
part-time study. Students wishing to pursue their degree through part-time study must
apply in writing to the Registrar's Office to change from fee schedule A to schedule B. See
under Fees in the current University Calendar for more information. Part-time students are
not eligible for scholarships and fellowships, and normally do not qualify for Teaching
Assistantships (TAs) and Research Assistantships (RAs). Students are not normally
permitted to switch from part-time status (Schedule B) to full-time status (Schedule A).
(See under Fees in the University Calendar.)
2.3.-Provisional Student
A student whose academic record falls marginally below that required by the Faculty of
Graduate Studies and/or the Department, or whose academic background in the chosen field
of study is not fully adequate, may be admitted as a provisional student, on complete a
number of prerequisite courses or attain specific grades in required courses in the first year of
 Vancouver Senate 12724
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
study. These prerequisites arc identified by the Department and approved by the Faculty of
Graduate Studies, and arc identified in the student's Letter of Admission. Courses deemed
"prerequisite" by the Department arc not be counted toward the standard degree program
requirements.
Once these prerequisites have been met, the student's status will be upgraded. A student who
docs not meet the prerequisites outlined in their Letter of Admission in the time specified will
normally be required to withdraw from the program.
Provisional student status is available only to applicants who do not require a student visa to
enter Canada.
2.3. Qualifying Student
A student whose academic background entitles them to serious consideration for admission to
graduate studies but who is considered to be inadequately prepared to enter a graduate
program in the specific discipline (e.g. three-year degree holders from other Canadian
universities, or a student changing from one field of study to another) may be admitted as a
qualifying student. Qualifying students are not considered graduate students.
If, at the end of a qualifying year, the Department and the Faculty of Graduate Studies are
satisfied with the caliber of the student's work, the student may apply for admission to a
graduate degree program. Courses taken during a qualifying year arc for the purpose of
meeting admission requirements only and arc therefore not transferable to a subsequent
graduate degree program. Courses taken during a qualifying year or term, which are necessary
in order to meet the requirements of full admission to Graduate Studies, cannot be transferred
to a subsequent graduate program. However, other courses may be transferred upon the
recommendation of the department and with the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies.
Qualifying student status is available only to applicants who do not require a student visa to
enter Canada.
2.5. Visiting Graduate Student
A visiting graduate student is one who is attending UBC to complete course work and/or
research toward the requirements of a graduate degree at another recognized university.
To be eligible for admission as a visiting student to UBC, the student must be currently
registered in a graduate program with good standing at the home university. Normally,
students may hold visiting status at UBC for a maximum of twelve months. Prior approval of
both
 Vancouver Senate 12725
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
the home university, the UBC Department, and the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies is
required.
Visiting students, with the exception of those governed by the Western Deans' Agreement,
Graduate Exchange Agreement, and other special agreements, pay tuition fees on a per credit
basis.
2.5.1. Visiting Students under the Western Deans' Agreement:
The Western Deans' Agreement provides an automatic tuition fee waiver for visiting
students from participating universities. Under the terms of this agreement, graduate
students in good standing from UBC can register in any of the universities listed below
without paying tuition or student fees. The same is also true for students of other
participating institutions who wish to attend classes or conduct research at UBC.
The Western Deans' Agreement is supported by the universities of: Alberta, Athabasca,
Brandon, Calgary, Lethbridge, Manitoba, Northern British Columbia, Regina,
Saskatchewan, Simon Fraser, and Victoria.
2.5.2. Visiting Students under the Graduate Exchange Agreement:
The Exchange Agreement allows graduate students in good standing at UBC, McGill
University, the University of Toronto, and the University of Montreal to take courses at
each other's universities without having to pay tuition fees to the host institution.
Students wishing to apply for visiting student status under either of these special
agreements should consult the Graduate Studies website for more information
(www.grad.ubc.ca/prostudents/apply/p&pmanual/admiss/visiting).
2.5.3. Other exchange agreements:
Departments may have exchange agreements with similar Departments at other
institutions. Students should consult their Graduate Advisor or the Exchange Program
Office of the University for more information. Courses taken through exchange
agreements or as visiting students at other institutions would be eligible for credit as
transfer credits.
2.6. On-Leave Status
Students who find it necessary to interrupt their graduate studies may apply to the Dean of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies for on-leave status. Leave is granted when a student is best
advised for personal, health or other reasons to have time completely away from his/her
academic responsibilities. Leave, not including parental leave or leave to pursue concurrent
pro-
 Vancouver Senate 12726
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
grams, for masters or doctoral students is limited to one year. A leave will normally begin on
the first day of term, for a period of 4, 8 or 12 months.
2.6.1. Parental leave: A graduate student who is bearing a child or who has primary
responsibility for the care of an infant or young child is eligible for parental leave. A
request for parental leave should be made through the student's Department for a
minimum leave of fourth months to a maximum of twelve months. Where possible,
students enrolled in course work should coordinate their leave to coincide with the
beginning of an academic term.
It is understood that students with on-leave status will not undertake any academic
or research work, or use any of the University's facilities during the period of leave.
Students must inform the University immediately upon return.
The time spent on-leave is not counted as part of the allowed time to completion for
the degree. On-leave students continue to be registered and must pay a reduced fee
for the leave period.
2.6.2. Leave to pursue a second program of study: Following academic consultation,
graduate students may apply for leave-of-absence from one program to pursue a
second program of study. In this case, the student is responsible for both on-leave
tuition fees as well as the tuition fees associated with the second program. A leave of
absence for these reasons may exceed one year. Time to completion of the first degree
program would be extended by the span of time on the leave of absence.
Students granted leave-of-absence or parental leave retain the full value of any
University Graduate Fellowship or other award whose terms and conditions are
established by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Awards will be suspended at the
onset of the leave, and reinstated at the termination of the leave period, provided the
student returns to full-time study at that time. Other awards will be paid according
to the conditions established by the donor or granting agency.
3.0 ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
3.1. Program of Study
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3.1.1.   Doctoral Students
All doctoral students admitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies must register when they
begin their studies.
Each doctoral candidate is supervised by a committee of not less than three faculty
members, which may include faculty members from Departments other than the
candidate's home Department. With the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, the committee may also include qualified persons who are not faculty members.
The supervisory committee is responsible for guiding the student in planning research and
preparing the thesis.
In some Departments, the student is responsible for securing the Chair of the supervisory
committee; in others, the Department will assign the Chair. Students should consult with
their Graduate Advisor in this respect. Changes may be made to the candidate's committee
with the approval of the candidate's home Department. Students who are unable to secure
a Chair should ask either the Graduate Advisor or the Department head for assistance. In
very exceptional circumstances, the head may ask the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to appoint a Chair. In some instances and for a brief period of time only, a student
may be assigned an interim committee until such time as a more permanent committee can
be established.
Upon registration, the doctoral student will consult with his or her committee to develop a
program of study, subject to the approval of the home Department. The program of study
will consist of seminars, directed readings, consultations and such formal courses as may
be deemed essential for the fulfillment of the requirements for the degree. Some
Departments require competence in languages other than English. The Department in
which the student intends to write the thesis shall determine the number of such languages
and a satisfactory level of competence. A major part of the doctoral candidate's work will
consist of a thesis embodying the results of original research.
Changes in the program of study may be required during the period of study. These
changes must be reviewed and approved by the candidate's committee and the home
Department.
NOTE: courses listed in the Calendar under Departments may not all be offered annually.
Students should apply to the Department concerned for detailed information about course
offerings in any given year.
3.1.1.1.      Transfer Credits
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Doctoral students are not normally eligible for transfer credit. In doctoral programs
where there is a prescribed amount of course work, students may be eligible for course
exemptions on the basis of previous learning or experience
3.1.2.   Master's Degree Students
All master's degree students admitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies must register
when they begin their studies.
Each student's program of study must be approved by the Department concerned.
Some Departments require competence in languages other than English. The Department
in which the student intends to write the thesis shall determine the number of such
languages and a satisfactory level of competence.
Faculty of Graduate Studies regulations for masters degrees provide for full- or part-time
studies, as well as for programs with thesis and programs without thesis. The choice of
these options lies with the individual Department. Departments are also free to prescribe
work beyond the minimum requirements described below. Students should contact
Departments directly for more information on program options.
3.1.2.1. Program Requirements (Thesis and Non-Thesis Program)
The minimum course requirements are 30 course credits, of which at least 24 must be
numbered 500 to 699. A maximum of 6 credits at the undergraduate level in courses
numbered 300 to 499 may be counted towards a masters degree. A comprehensive
examination in the form of a final written and/or oral examination is at the discretion
of the Department.
In specific programs, minimum requirements may be higher than 30 course credits.
Students should consult the Departmental listing in the Calendar for more
information.
NOTE: courses listed in the Calendar under Departments may not all be offered
annually. Students should consult the Departmental listing in the Calendar for more
information.
3.1.2.2. Transfer Credit
a.   Students registered in a master's program may be permitted to take up to 12 credits
or up to 40% of the total number of credits needed for degree completion
(whichever is more) at another university to be counted toward a University of
British Columbia graduate degree. These credits cannot have been counted toward
the completion of
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another credential. Only courses in which at least a B standing (UBC 74%) is
obtained will be considered for transfer.
b. Undergraduate students who have maintained an overall B+ (76%) average in their
completed third and fourth year courses, and who have completed at least 75% of
the third and fourth year requirements for their undergraduate degree, may be
eligible to register in graduate courses. Upon admission to the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, these credits, to a maximum of 12 credits or 40% of the total number of
credits needed for degree completion (whichever is more), may be applied towards
a graduate degree.
c. The 12 credit (40%) restriction does not apply to students in UBC approved
Exchange Agreements established by the UBC Exchange Programs Office. These
include the Western Deans Agreement, the Exchange Agreement, and other
agreements established by the Exchange Programs Office.
d. Requests for transfer credit must be accompanied by a letter from the home
Department addressed to the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The
Departmental letter must provide an academic justification for allowing the
transfer credit on a course by course basis.
3.1.2.3.      Exemptions
Students may be exempted from specific course requirements if the Department is
satisfied that the student has acquired the knowledge from courses previously taken or
from experience. Exemptions do not reduce the total credits required for a degree. In
such cases, the Department should substitute a more appropriate course. The
exemption from the specific requirement must be recorded on the student's academic
record.
3.2. Academic Progress
3.2.1.   Doctoral Students
The progress of all students working toward the Ph.D., D.M.A. and Ed.D will be reviewed
regularly and at least once each year in June by the home Department and the Dean of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. A candidate may be required to withdraw if progress has not
been satisfactory as shown by course work, the comprehensive examination, progress on
the thesis, or other requirements of the Department or the Faculty.
3.2.1.1.      Definition of Satisfactory Progress:
A minimum of 68% (B-) must be achieved in all course work taken for credit. Where a
grade of less than 68% (B-) is obtained in a course, and on the recommendation of the
Department and the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the
student may repeat the course for higher standing or take an alternate course. If the
Department does not make such a recommendation, or if the recommendation is not
approved by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the student will be required
to withdraw. A student who obtains a grade of less than 68% in more than one course
will
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normally be required to withdraw. If progress in research is unsatisfactory, a student
will be required to withdraw. The student will be informed of unsatisfactory academic
progress in writing by their committee before any action regarding withdrawal is
taken.
A minimum mark of 68% must be obtained in all courses taken as part of a qualifying
year for a doctoral program or to satisfy provisional standing. When repeating a failed
required course, a minimum mark of 74% must be obtained. Higher minimum marks
may be required.
If a course is repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript. The higher mark will
be used to determine promotion in a program and in any decision to admit or
withdraw a student from a program. For all other purposes, averages will be calculated
using both marks.
It is expected that a doctoral student will be admitted to candidacy within two years
from the date of initial registration. A student who is not admitted to candidacy will be
required to withdraw from the program. Extensions may be granted under exceptional
circumstances and with the permission of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
3.2.2.   Master's Students
The progress of all students working toward the masters degree will be reviewed regularly
and at least once each year in June by the home Department and the Dean of the Faculty
of Graduate Studies. A candidate may be required to withdraw if progress has not been
satisfactory as shown by course work, the comprehensive examination, progress on the
thesis, or other requirements of the Department or the Faculty.
3.2.2.1.    Definition of Satisfactory Progress:
A minimum of 60% must be obtained in any course taken by a student enrolled in a
master's program for the student to be granted Pass Standing. However, only six
credits of Pass Standing may be counted towards a master's program. For all other
courses, a minimum of 68% must be obtained.
On the recommendation of the Department and the approval of the Dean of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies, the student may repeat a course for higher standing or
take an alternate course. If the Department does not make such a recommendation, or
if the recommendation is not approved by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies,
the student will be required to withdraw. A student who obtains a grade of less than
68% in an excessive number of courses will normally be required to withdraw. The
student will be informed of unsatisfactory academic progress in writing before any
action regarding withdrawal is taken.
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A minimum mark of 68% must be obtained in all courses taken as part of a qualifying
year or to satisfy provisional standing. When repeating a failed required course, a
minimum mark of 74% must be obtained. Higher minimum grades may be required.
If a course is repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript. The higher mark will
be used to determine promotion in a program and in any decision to admit or
withdraw a student from a program. For all other purposes, averages will be calculated
using both marks.
3.3. Duration of Program
3.3.1. Doctoral Students
Students with a bachelor degree who are admitted to a doctoral program will normally be
expected to spend the equivalent of at least two consecutive years of full-time study at the
University. With the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies,
Departments may make different regulations concerning duration of study, sequence of
study and location of full-time study.
Students must maintain continuous registration throughout all years until graduation by
keeping up with tuition fee payments.
If the degree is not awarded within a period of six years from initial registration, the
student's eligibility for the degree will be terminated and the student will be required to
withdraw from the program. Under exceptional circumstances, extensions may be granted
by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Students who, for health or personal reasons including childbirth and having primary
responsibility for he care of a child, must interrupt their students should apply for a leave.
See "On-leave Students" under Classification of Students. The period of leave is not
counted toward time to completion.
3.3.2. Master's Students
Students in a master's program are expected to spend the equivalent of at least one year in
full-time study. Some programs may be of longer minimum duration. Students must
maintain continuous registration throughout all years until graduation by keeping up with
fee payments.
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Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
If a degree is not awarded within a period of five years from initial registration, the
student's eligibility for the degree will be terminated and the student will be required to
withdraw from the program. Under exceptional circumstances, extensions may be granted
by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. This restriction applies equally to full-time
and part-time students.
Students who, for health or personal reasons including childbirth and having primary
responsibility for the care of a child, must interrupt their studies should apply for a leave.
See "On-leave Students" under Classification of Students. The period of leave is not
counted toward time to completion.
3.4. Examinations and Thesis
3.4.1.   Doctoral Students
The doctoral student will take the following examinations:
a. Course examinations where applicable; a minimum of 68% must be obtained unless
otherwise specified;
b. Tests of the student's ability to read languages other than English where Departmental
regulations require it;
c. A comprehensive examination normally held after completion of all required course
work and intended to test the student's grasp of the chosen field of study as a whole,
and the student's ability to communicate his or her understanding of it in English or in
French. The candidate's committee will set and judge this examination in a manner
compatible with the policy of the Department concerned. The comprehensive
examination is separate and distinct from the evaluation of the thesis prospectus.
d. A Department may require a formal examination of the thesis before it is transmitted
to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for final oral examination.
Students should consult their Graduate Advisor for information about the departmental
requirements.
All doctoral candidates are required to complete a thesis. A candidate's thesis must be
presented according to procedures and in the form described in " Instructions for the
Preparation of Graduate Theses," which is available on the web at www.grad.ubc.ca or
from the Special Collections Division in the Library, the Faculty of Graduate Studies, or
the candidate's home Department. Students should refer to the current year's Calendar or
check the Faculty of
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Graduate Studies website for information regarding deadlines for submission of doctoral
theses.
All doctoral students will take a final oral examination or thesis defence:
a. All doctoral theses must be assessed by an examiner external to the University, as well
as by internal examiners. The external examiner is chosen by the Dean of the Faculty
of Graduate Studies in consultation with the Department concerned. Procedures for
choosing a suitable external examiner must be initiated at least three months before
completion of the thesis. The external examiner's written report must be received
before the final examination can take place.
b. Final oral examinations can be scheduled no sooner than eight weeks after submission
of the approved thesis to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. All other degree
requirements must also have been completed.
c. The final oral examination is open to all members of the university and to the public.
Notice of the examination will be available on the web at www.grad.ubc.ca.
d. The Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies must approve the membership of the
examining committee. The Dean or the Dean's designate chairs the examination. The
examining committee judges the candidate's success and makes a recommendation to
the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
More information on oral examination procedures is available on the web at
www.grad.ubc.ca/currstudents/orals/guide/htm. Students registered in a doctoral program
are not permitted supplemental examinations.
3.4.2.   Master's Students
There is no general requirement for a comprehensive examination at the masters level.
Departments may, at their own discretion, require a comprehensive examination in the
student's field of study as part of the degree requirements.
Where a comprehensive examination is required, Departments must make available to
students a written statement of examination procedures such as the purpose, form, length,
subject area(s) and scope of the examination, as well as information on the criteria for
evaluation.
In the creative and performing arts, a thesis may consist of creative work (e.g. paintings,
writing) or of a performance. Departments may, at their discretion, require additional
supporting documentation.
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In programs requiring a thesis, the thesis must be presented according to procedures and in
the form described in "Instructions for the Preparation of Graduate Theses," which is
available on the web at www.grad.ubc.ca or from the Special Collections Division in the
Library, the Faculty of Graduate Studies, or the student's home Department.
3.5. Withdrawal, Reinstatement and Readmission
A student wishing voluntarily to withdraw from the University must obtain the approval of
the Dean, Director or Department Head, and the Graduate Advisor in the home Department
on the " Change of Registration" form. When the withdrawal is approved, the academic
record will show the date of withdrawal and a standing of "W" in all courses not completed
on that date.
If withdrawal is not approved, the student will remain registered in all courses and a final
grade and/or standing will be assigned at the end of the term or session.
A student who does not complete formal withdrawal procedures will be liable for all assessed
fees until such procedures are completed.
3.5.1. Request to Withdraw for Non-Academic Reasons:
The Faculty of Graduate Studies reserves the right to require a student to withdraw from a
program of study if the Faculty, in consultation with the home Department, considers the
student to be unsuited to proceed with the study or practice of the chosen discipline or
field of study. Request to withdraw for non-academic reasons would not prevent the
student from immediately applying for entry into a different program of study.
3.5.2. Reinstatement:
This applies when a student's registration has lapsed but the student is permitted to
resume the program. Normally, if the student is reinstated, courses that have been
completed will be credited to the degree, and only outstanding degree requirements must
be completed. The student's start date remains the date of initial entry to the program and
the time limit for completion of the degree is not affected.
A student may be reinstated on the recommendation of the Department if:
• The student is in good academic standing.
• Any delinquent fees or charges are paid including tuition and continuing fees owing for
the period during which the student did not register.
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Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
•     The time limit for degree completion, including the sessions in which the student was
not registered, has not expired.
Sometimes, even if the student is reinstated, he or she doesn't have enough time left to
complete the outstanding degree requirements. A decision, based on the academic merits
of the case, will determine whether the student should be readmitted as a new student or
reinstated. In the latter case, an extension of the time limit may be requested. In addition,
if more than two years have elapsed since the student last registered, the Faculty of
Graduate Studies may impose additional requirements to ensure that the student is current
in the field and is academically prepared to complete the degree requirements.
A student who is required to withdraw for academic reasons is not eligible for
reinstatement.
3.5.3.   Readmission
This applies when it is appropriate to admit a student who was previously registered, as if
for the first time. An application for admission, whether to the same or a different
program, will be evaluated as a new application. A new application form and application
fee must be submitted.
A maximum of 12 credits or up to 40% of the total number of degree credits of previously
completed course work may be applied toward the new degree program requirements,
provided the courses were completed no longer than five years from the date of
readmission. Courses eligible for transfer must have been awarded a grade of at least B
(74%). Normal program requirements apply, as does the standard time allowed for degree
completion: five years for a Master's student; six years for a Doctoral student.
3.6. Academic Record
3.6.1.   Transcript of Academic Record
The transcript is a student's official academic record and includes the student's complete
record at the University of British Columbia. Student records and transcripts are
confidential and transcripts will be issued only at the request of the student or appropriate
agencies or officials.
Application for a transcript can be made online at www.student-services.ubc.ca or in
person at the Student Access Stations in Brock Hall. Please allow at least one week from
the date the application is made. Transcripts will not be issued to students who have any
outstanding fees,
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including library and other charges, to the University. Fees for transcripts are payable in
advance; transcripts will not be provided until payment is received. See the Calendar for
more information.
Students are encouraged to order transcripts as early as possible. Transcripts may be
requested up to six months in advance of a due date.
3.6.2. Retention of Student Records
Academic records, including all information appearing on a Transcript of Academic
Record, are retained indefinitely. Notations of student discipline are retained according to
the terms of the penalty imposed. Materials supporting applications for admission,
correspondence and transcripts from other institutions and similar material may be
destroyed five years after a student's last registration, except for doctoral students, where
materials may be destroyed after two years from the date of graduation. Other material
may be destroyed sooner.
Students who submit irreplaceable material may request the return of that material. Such
requests must be submitted with the original material. The office to which the material is
submitted will return the material as soon as possible, and not later than six months after
the student's graduation or last registration.
3.6.3. Senate Appeals on Academic Standing
Students may protest decisions relating to their academic standing. Students should protest
a decision first with the faculty member directly involved in the decision and then, if
necessary, with the Department Head, the Dean of the Faculty involved, and finally with
the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
The Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing is a standing committee of the
University Senate, which is the senior academic authority in the University. Information on
the policies and procedures of this committee can be found in the Calendar (see Academic
Regulations, Senate Appeals on Academic Standing).
3.6.4. Student Discipline
The President of the University has the right under the University Act (section 61) to take
whatever disciplinary action is deemed to be warranted by a student's misconduct. The
specific provision as to Offences, Penalties and Procedures are in the Calendar (see
Academic Regulations, Student Discipline).
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4.0 AWARDS AND FINANCIAL AID
The University offers a wide range of programs to recognize students with high academic
achievement and to provide financial assistance to those who cannot meet basic education
costs. Academic awards for graduate study are administered by the Dean's Office, Faculty of
Graduate Studies. Financial need-based awards are administered by the Office of Awards and
Financial Aid, University of British Columbia, 1036-1874 East Mall, Vancouver, B.C.,
Canada, V6T 1Z1; telephone (604) 822-5111 or email awards.enquiry@ubc.ca.
Financial support for graduate students usually comes from the following sources:
• Merit based awards, scholarships and fellowships administered by the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, including University Graduate Fellowships, Izaak Walton Killam Predoctoral
Fellowships, endowed awards and annual donors.
• External funding agencies including Natural Science and Engineering Research Council
(NSERC), Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the Canadian
Institutes of Health (CIHR), the Science Council of BC, and others.
• International Partial Tuition Scholarships administered by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
• UBC Teaching and Research Assistantships administered by individual Departments.
• Need-based awards and financial aid including loans, bursaries, work/study program and
emergency assistance.
4.1. Merit Based Awards
4.1.1.   University Graduate Fellowships (UGF):
The Faculty of Graduate Studies administers an annual competition that provides
approximately 400 graduate fellowships to students who are engaged in full-time study or
research leading to a graduate degree. The funds for these awards are made available from
the University budget.
Awards are made on the basis of merit, and are open to any graduate student regardless of
citizenship or visa status. The value of these awards is reviewed annually. Each award
covers a twelve-month period beginning September 1, and is offered for either one or two
years.
Awards are made on the basis of nominations provided by home Departments to the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. Students must contact their home Departments for deadline
dates. Recipients are notified in March. Both incoming (new) and current students are
eligible for
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nomination. There is a second competition for late incoming applicants with a
departmental deadline of March.
4.1.2. Izaak Walton Killam:
The Izaak Walton Killam Predoctoral Fellowships are the most prestigious awards
available to graduate students at UBC. The awards are funded from an endowment to the
University from the I.W. Killam Trust. Awards are made each year to the top doctoral
candidates in the University Graduate Fellowship (UGF) competition. The value of the
awards is reviewed annually. No special application is required since all UGF nominations
are automatically considered for Killam Predoctoral Fellowships.
4.1.3. Endowed Awards:
There are several endowed awards that are adjudicated as part of the University Graduate
Fellowship (UGF) competition. These include several fellowships with a stipend equivalent
to that of a UGF. There are some restrictions with respect to field of study as specified by
the donor. Students wishing to be considered for these affiliated awards should indicate
those awards for which they are eligible on their UGF Application Form. Detailed
descriptions of these awards are available in the web and in the Awards and Financial Aid
Reference Guide to the UBC Calendar (copies distributed to all graduate Departments).
For application procedures students should consult their Departments.
4.1.4. University Awards:
There are a limited number of awards available to graduate students in specific fields of
study. These awards are provided by external donors. Details can be found in the Awards
and Financial Aid Reference Guide available in Departments. Awards are normally made
on the recommendation of Departments in conjunction with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. Nominations for these awards are normally submitted to the Faculty of Graduate
Studies prior to June 15 for distribution in the upcoming academic year.
4.1.5. Deferral of Awards:
University Graduate Fellowship (UGF) awards can be deferred within the academic year
(i.e. students can take up their awards in September or January) but cannot be deferred to
the following academic year. Students who are unable to access their UGF award within
the academic year, must reapply to the UGF competition
4.2. Awards from External Funding Agencies
4.2.1.   Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Councils (NSERC):
NSERC administers Canada-wide scholarship competitions for graduate students. The
competitions are open only to Canadian citizens or permanent residents. Awards are made
on the basis of academic excellence.
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Students should discuss eligibility and application procedures with their Department. The
deadline for submission of NSERC scholarship nominations by Departments to the
Faculty of Graduate Studies is early October. Files are reviewed by a University-wide
committee that selects UBC's quota of ranked nominations. These nominations are
forwarded to NSERC in time to meet the December 1 national deadline. Competition
results are announced in April. For more information visit the NSERC website at
http://www.nserc.ca
4.2.2. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC):
SSHRC administers a national competition for doctoral students in the social sciences and
humanities. The Faculty of Graduate Studies solicits nominations for SSHRC Doctoral
Fellowships from Departments in early December. Files are reviewed and ranked by a
University-wide committee. In accordance with a quota established by SSHRC, UBC sends
a list of the highest-ranking candidates to the Council by January 15. SSHRC competition
results are announced in March.
4.2.3. Institutes of Health (CIHR):
CIHR administers Canada-wide scholarship competitions for graduate students. The
competitions are open only to Canadian citizens or permanent residents. Awards are made
on the basis of academic excellence. The value of the awards is reviewed annually.
4.2.4. Science Council of British Columbia:
The BC Science Council offers Graduate Research and Engineering Technology (GREAT)
Awards to graduate students at BC universities in the natural, applied, and social sciences,
and in the professional disciplines. The competition is open only to Canadian citizens or
permanent residents. The value of the awards is reviewed annually. Awards are made on
the basis of research proposals that must include collaboration between the student, a
faculty member, and an external BC company or agency from industry.
Fellowship guides and application forms for the national research council awards are
available from the Departments or from the Faculty of Graduate Studies early in the fall
term. Information about all research awards administered by the Faculty of Graduate
Studies can be found on the Graduate Studies web site: http://www.grad.ubc.ca
4.3. International Partial Tuition Scholarships
International students admitted to research programs charging tuition fees of $7,200 are
eligible for an International Partial Tuition Scholarship of $3,600 which is applied directly to
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reducing tuition fees. Students are eligible for this award as long as they are not recipients of
any external scholarships or funding that covers the cost of their tuition. Some Departments
may offer additional money toward the International Partial Tuition Scholarship. Please
contact your Department for more information.
International students in eligible programs are automatically considered for this scholarship by
the Faculty of Graduate Studies in August of each year and do not need to apply.
4.4. Teaching and Research Assistantships
Student service appointments are intended to help qualified graduate students meet the cost of
their studies at the University. Student appointments may involve part-time duties in teaching,
research or other academic activities. Normally, only those students registered full-time in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies are eligible. Appointments offered to students prior to their
admission to the faculty are contingent upon admission.
4.4.1. Teaching Assistantships (TAs):
Most Departments have a limited number of TAs available for registered full-time
graduate students. Full Teaching Assistantships involve 12 hours work per week in
preparation, lecturing or laboratory instruction although many Departments offer partial
TA appointments at less than 12 hours per week. Teaching Assistantship rates are set by
collective bargaining between the University and the Teaching Assistants Union, a local of
the Canadian Union of Public Employees.
Since 1996/97, ten Teaching Prizes that include a Certificate and $1,000 are offered to
UBC Teaching Assistants.
4.4.2. Research Assistantships (RAs):
Many professors are able to provide RAs from their research grants to support full-time
graduate students under their supervision. The duties constitute part of the student's
graduate degree requirements. Research Assistantships are coordinated and administered
at the departmental level. Stipends vary widely and are dependent on the field of study and
the type of research grant from which the assistantship is being funded.
The entire stipend of a Research Assistantship is considered a scholarship, the conditions
of which may be specified by the granting agency. For tax purposes, the stipend is
considered an award rather than payment for work. Appointments may be for any
specified period satisfactory to the grantee, and conditions of appointment may be
specified by the granting agency.
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A Research Assistantship is a form of financial support for a period of graduate study and
is therefore not covered by a collective agreement.
Note that Research Assistantships are rare in the humanities and social sciences.
4.5. Need Based Awards for Graduate Students
4.5.1. Student Loans for Full-time Students:
Canadian citizens and permanent residents who are carrying at least 60% of a full course
load and can demonstrate financial need may qualify for aid through student loan
programs sponsored by the Federal and Provincial Governments. Students must apply for
loans through the Province in which they have established residency. Residents of British
Columbia may apply for loans through the BC Student Assistantships Program (BCSAP),
which combines the Federal Canada Student Loan Program and the Canada Study Grant
for Students with Dependent Children with the Provincial BC Student Loan Program.
Student loan programs are administered on the UBC campus by the Office of Awards and
Financial Aid. Application forms are available from that office. In addition, the Ministry
of Advanced Education, Training and Technology maintains an excellent website covering
most aspects of their student loan and grants program at
www. aett.gov. be. ca/studentservices.
4.5.2. Canada Study Grant and Canada Student Loans for Part-time Students:
Students who are registered in the part-time masters degree option (Fee Plan B) may be
eligible for federal grants and loans to cover direct educational costs for tuition, prescribed
texts, local bus transportation, child care during class hours, and an incidental allowance
of $10 per week. Applicants must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents who have
not defaulted on a previous full-time or part-time Canada Student Loan. Assistance is
allocated on the basis of assessed financial need as determined by the gross annual income
of the student (and spouse, if applicable) and the size of the student's immediate family.
The maximum part-time grant is $1200 per year.
Students whose income level is too high to qualify for the grant or who need additional
assistance on top of the grant may be eligible for a Part-time Canada Student Loan of up
to $4000. Payment of interest on a part-time loan begins 30 days after it is cashed, with
payment of principal starting six months after the student ceases to be enrolled. Further
information and applications are available from the Office of Awards and Financial Aid.
 Vancouver Senate 12742
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
Since processing can take several weeks, students are urged to apply for part-time
assistance four to six weeks before the start of classes.
4.5.3. Canada Study Grants for Female Doctoral Students:
In conjunction with the Canada Student Loan Program, the Federal Government offers
need-based grants of up to $3,000 per academic year to female doctoral students in fields
of study in which women are currently under-represented in Canadian universities (e.g.
engineering, agriculture, business administration, mathematics and physical sciences).
Applicants must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents who have not defaulted on
previous government student loans.
Grant applications are available from UBC's Office of Awards and Financial Aid and must
be submitted to that office, along with a fully completed student loan application. Students
should use the loan application for the province in which they are deemed to be a resident
under Canada Student Loan regulations. The student's request for aid will be assessed
according to the standard need-based criteria used for the Canada Student Loan Program.
The first $3,000 of assessed need will be met in federal grant, with any remaining need
being met in a combination of federal and provincial student loans.
Grant cheques and loan documents for students who qualify for aid are sent to the UBC
Awards Office for release upon confirmation of continued registration.
4.5.4. Bursaries:
Bursaries are non-repayable awards that are allocated primarily on the basis of financial
need, although other factors may also be considered. The value of the awards varies
widely depending on the circumstances of the applicant. Applications for bursaries
requiring affiliations with groups such as unions, employers, the armed services, etc. are
available from the Office of Awards and Financial Aid in early March and must be
received by June 30. Applications for open bursaries are not available until September 1
and must be submitted by October 1. A special application for awards restricted to
students with disabilities is available in early summer and must be received by October 15.
First consideration is given to students who have also applied for a Canada Student Loan,
and it is common for the Awards Office to suggest a combination of these two types of
support. In general, undergraduate students receive preference for bursary support.
4.5.5. Work/Study Program:
Graduate students who have applied for a Canada Student Loan may also be eligible for
employment in a work/study program sponsored by the BC Ministry of Advanced
Education, Training and Technology and the University. A variety of
 Vancouver Senate 12743
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix B: Faculty of Graduate Studies Policy Document
jobs is available on campus, and an effort is made to place students in career-related
positions whenever possible. Pay rates vary but are equivalent to those paid for
comparable work or those established by collective agreement. Applications are available
from the Office of Awards and Financial Aid in mid-August and must be submitted no
later than October 1.
4.5.6.   University Loans and Emergency Assistance:
Students who have exhausted all other means of financing their current educational
program may be eligible for assistance through the Office of Awards and Financial Aid in
the form of a university loan or an emergency bursary. Students wishing to apply for such
assistance should arrangement for an appointment with an Awards Advisor in that office.
 Vancouver Senate 12744
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix C: Budget Committee Report 2000 - 2001
Appendix C: Budget Committee Report 2000 - 2001
Senate Budget Committee Report 2000-2001
PROCEDURAL ISSUES
In my report to Senate last year I requested that the terms of reference of the Senate Budget
Committee be clarified to highlight the advisory role of the committee relating to " Statements
of Intent for New Programs". At present, the committee has two terms of reference:
1. to meet with the President and assist in the preparation of the University budget. In
advising the President on the University budget, the Senate Budget Committee may
request information on any of the fund accounts of the University.
(Senate minutes September 14, 1994)
2. to make recommendations to the President and to report to Senate concerning
academic planning and priorities as they relate to the preparation of the University
budget.
(p. 6239 and pp. 7721-2 Senate Minutes)
On Oct.l6th, 1996, the SBC was instructed by Senate to consider, in response to requests
from the Vice President Academic and Provost, and in cooperation with the Committee of
Deans, all proposals from Schools or Faculties planning new degree programs (p. 11530 Senate
Minutes). Unfortunately, the process in place for making these considerations was unclear,
probably because it was impractical to meet easily with the Committee of Deans. Therefore,
the SBC adopted a new process for reporting on the budgetary implications from each
Statement of Intent. This involves one or more of the following steps: 1) an immediate
statement of approval to the Provost; 2) contact between the Chair of the SBC and the
appropriate Dean to seek resolution of concerns raised by the SBC; 3) a meeting of the Chair,
the Dean and the Provost if resolution is not obtained by the Chair and the Dean alone; and 4)
a report to the President immediately and to the Senate in the annual report from the SBC
indicating the unresolved budgetary concerns.
Consequently, we propose the following as a third term of reference for the SBC:
3. to consider, in response to requests from the Vice President Academic and Provost, and
in cooperation with the appropriate Deans or Directors, the budgetary implications of
all "Statements of Intent" from Faculties or Schools planning new degree programs,
and to report unresolved concerns directly to the President and to Senate.
Senate forwarded this request to the Nominating Committee for consideration and report to
Senate, but, as yet, we have no further direction.
STATEMENTS OF INTENT FOR NEW PROGRAMS
This past year, the Committee considered the budgetary implications for new program
proposals relating to an M.Sc. degree and a Ph.D. degree through an "Interdisciplinary
Oncology Program" in the Faculty of Medicine. We were asked also for advice relating to an
Agricultural Centre at the Botanical Gardens. We identified concerns about the budgetary
implications of both proposals, and brought the concerns to
 Vancouver Senate 12745
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix C: Budget Committee Report 2000 - 2001
the attention of the Provost's Office. Three other proposals - a Ph.D. in Women's Studies and
Gender Relations; a Ph.D. in Library, Archival and Information Studies; and a Master's
Program in Critical Curatorial Studies - were sent to us by the Provost's office and
acknowledged by us without concern.
BUDGET DEVELOPMENT AND PRIORITIES
President Piper involved the SBC throughout the year in the development of a general strategy
with the other three major universities in the province to attract more financial support from
Government. Essentially, the strategy focused on an increase to the Base Operating Grant, a
bridging over the next 3 years of the " GAP" in funding between the grant to universities in BC
relative to the grant provided by the governments to universities in the other provinces;
additional funds for student accepted in response to the government's "ACCESS" program;
and infrastructural support for research. We advised the President that "ACCESS" positions
should not be targeted to any particular program.
BUDGETARY INSPECTIONS AND ADVICE
Dr. Samarasekera, Vice President Research, presented in June of last year the challenges facing
research at UBC, and her strategies for strengthening research within the framework of the
Trek 2000 Initiatives. In response to her presentation, the Committee endorsed an increase in
GPOF budget funding in 2000/01 for her research initiatives.
Dr. McBride discussed the implications of the "Medicine Health Action Plan" proposed by the
Ministry of Health to provide space for eight students annually to a total of 32 students at
$60,000 per student along with university administration costs and infrastructure-costs.
Eventually, there will be funding for an additional 64 medical residents He explained that
UBC was cooperating with the UNBC to address the shortage of physicians in rural areas of
the province by initiating a program in 2004 that will allow 15-20 medical students to reside
at the UNBC for part of their education.
Dr. Derek Atkins explained how the Provost's office was managing the finances associated
with the Canada Research Chairs.
Budgetary matters were heard from ancillary services involving the Bookstore, Parking &
Security, Food Services, UBC Athletics & Recreation, UBC Housing & Conferences, and from
Applied Research and Evaluation Services (ARES), Media Services, Continuing Studies, Green
College, St. John's College. Concerns were raised about St. John's College, and the Committee
requested that this matter be discussed further. We have plans to hear about Plant Operations,
Utilities, and about Information Technology (IT) Services.
Respectfully submitted,
Michael MacEntee (Chair)
May 2001
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 16,2001
12746
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposal Summary
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposal Summary
CATEGORY 1
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Course changes
Program change
Faculty of Applied Science
New courses
Course deletions
HMEC 100 (becomes HECO 200), HUNU 301 (becomes
FNH 342)
New Human Ecology major in the Bachelor of Science (Food,
Nutrition and Health) program.
CHBE 483, MMPE 482
CHBE 472, 478
CIVL 220
GEOG 331, 456
Faculty of Arts
Geography
New courses
Psychology
New course PSYC 407
School of Social Work & Family Studies
New courses SOWK 316, 416
Course changes SOWK 335
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 16,2001
12747
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposal Summary
Women's Studies
New courses
Faculty of Dentistry
Program changes
Faculty of Education
Teacher Education Office
Program changes
Course changes:
WMST 320, 405, 440
Add new Bachelor of Dental Science in Dental Hygiene
Delete of Bachelor of Science combined with Doctor of Dental
Medicine
Pilot pass/fail grading system
New section on Professional Conduct
ARTE 314, 320
BUED 314
CSED 314
CUST 314
EDST 314
EDUC 310
EDUC 311, 420
EPSE 306, 313, 423
HMED 314
LLED 301, 310, 312, 313, 314, 315, 318, 320, 324, 325
MAED 314, 320
MUED 314,320
PETE 314, 320
SCED 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 320
SSED 314, 320
TSED 314,320
 Vancouver Senate 12748
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposal Summary
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Arts
New courses GEOG 518
GREK 501, 502
HEBR 509
LATN 501, 502
Applied Science
New courses APSC 540, MMAT 593, MMPE 582
Commerce & Business Administration
Program change New International Master of Business Administration (IMBA)
New course BAFI 509
Education
New course LLED 526
Institute of Asian Research
New course IAR 505
Program change Add thematic stream: Asian-Canadian studies
Medicine
New courses HCEP 501, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 522, 543, 544
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 16,2001
12749
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposal Summary
Program changes Deletion of Bachelor of Science combined with Doctor of
Medicine
Science
New courses
Faculty of Medicine
New program
ATSC 699
PHYS 540, 542, 543
Bachelor of Midwifery (B.Mw.)
CATEGORY 2 UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM CHANGES
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Course change FNH 342
Faculty of Applied Science
Course changes
Program changes
Faculty of Arts
Course changes
Program changes
CHBE 357, CHBE 480, CHBE 489, MECH 280, MMPE 295,
MMPE 432
Complementary studies courses, Engineering Physics, Mineral
and Mineral Process Engineering, Supplemental examinations
SOCI 350, SOCI 380, SOCI 381, SOCI 382, SOCI 383, SOCI
400
Major in Sociology, Minor in Sociology
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
Course changes COMM 309, COMM 400, COMM 437, COMM 438,
COMM 439, COMM 456, COMM 486, COMM 295,
COMM 297, COMM 307, COMM 365, COMM 396,
COMM 408, COMM 444, COMM 447, COMM 465,
COMM 473, COMM 493, COMM 588, COMM 589, BUSI
330,
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 16,2001
12750
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposal Summary
Course deletions
Program changes
Faculty of Medicine
Course deletions
BUSI 331, BUSI 400, BUSI 401, BUSI 441, BUSI 451, BUSI
442, BUSI 452, BUSI 445, BUSI 455, BUSI 499
COMM 241, COMM 296, COMM 379, COMM 388
Human Resources Management
FMPR 451, FMPR 480, FMPR 481, SURG 425, SURG 448,
SURG 450, SURG 475, ANAE 450, OPTH 390, OPTH 425,
ORPA 425, ORPA 450, ORPA 475, PAED 351, PAED 425,
PAED 450, PAED 451, PAED 452, RADI 430, RADI 465,
OBST 425, OBST 450, OBST 451, OBST 475, OBST 476,
MEDI 425, MEDI 445, MEDI 450, MEDI 451, MEDI 452,
MEDI 453, MEDI 475, HCEP 450, PSYT 401, PSYT 425,
PSYT 450, PSYT 452, PSYT 475
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Course changes PHAR 300, PHAR 402, PHAR 403, PHAR 453,
Faculty of Science
Course changes BIOC 300, BIOC 302, BIOC 303, BIOL 345, BIOL 341,
ENVR 200, ENVR 300, ENVR 449, PHYS 100, PHYS 101,
PHYS 102, PSYC 365,
Course deletion EOSC 423
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 16,2001
12751
Appendix D: Curriculum Proposal Summary
CATEGORY 2 GRADUATE CURRICULUM CHANGES
Course changes
Course deletions
Program changes
EDST 576, FRST 545, OOCH 504, OOCH 511, OOCH 512,
OOCH 540, IEST 551, IEST 502, ATSC 599, PHYS 528,
CHBE 564, CHBE 566, MMAT 592, CIVL 562, FOOD 500,
FOOD 520, FOOD 521, FOOD 522, FOOD 523, FOOD,
524, FOOD 525, FOOD 526, FOOD 527, FOOD 600.
CHBE 555, CHBE 556, CHBE 562, CHBE 573, CHBE 576,
CHBE 578, MMAT 552, MMAT 554, MMAT 559, MMAT
560, MMAT 571, MMAT 573, MMAT 574, MMAT 575,
MMAT 577, MMAT 581, MMAT 583, MMAT 594, FOOD
502, FOOD 503, FOOD 504, FOOD 505, FOOD 506,
FOOD 507, FOOD 508, FOOD 509, FOOD 512, FOOD
513, FOOD 516, FOOD 518,
Master of Arts in Asia Pacific Policy studies
 Vancouver Senate 12752
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix E: New Awards for Approval
Appendix E: New Awards for Approval
ASSOCIATION of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia Prize-A $500 prize and a plaque are
offered by the Association of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia to a student member of the
Association who has achieved an outstanding record during the four year program in Dentistry.
The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Dentistry. (Available 2001/2002
Winter Session)
ASSOCIATION of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia Award-A $500 award is offered by the
Association of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia to a well-rounded student member of the
Association who is entering the second year of the D.M.D. program, exhibits potential for a
distinguished career in the dental profession, and has demonstrated outstanding qualities in
leadership, academics and community service. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Dentistry. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
ASSOCIATION of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists Victoria Branch Bursary-A $240
bursary has been endowed by members of the Victoria Branch of the Association of Professional
Engineers and Geoscientists for a student in second-year Engineering (B.A.Sc). (Available
2001/2002 Winter Session)
ASSOCIATION of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists Gold Medal in Geoscience-A
mounted gold medal is offered by the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of
B.C. to the graduating student with the highest standing in a Bachelor of Science program who
has taken courses leading towards registration as a professional geoscientist. The award is made
on the recommendation of the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences. (Available 2001/2002
Winter Session)
ASSOCIATION of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists Achievement Award in Geoscience-
An engraved plaque is offered by the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of
B.C. to students completing the fourth year of a Bachelor of Science program who have taken
courses leading towards registration as professional geoscientists. One plaque is awarded in each
branch of Geoscience, specifically Geology, Geophysics, Geochemistry and Environmental
Geoscience (Geotechnics), to students who show great promise. The awards are made on the
recommendation of the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences. (Available 2001/2002 Winter
Session)
ASTRAZENECA Undergraduate Scholarship-A $4,000 scholarship is offered by AstraZeneca
Canada Inc. to a student entering the fourth year of an honours Bachelor of Science program with
a specialization in Biology, Pharmacology or Chemis-
 Vancouver Senate 12753
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix E: New Awards for Approval
try. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Science in a three-year rotation
commencing with Biology in 2001/2002. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Elizabeth BACKMAN Scholarship in Natural Resources Conservation-A $1,000 scholarship has
been endowed by Elizabeth Backman (B.A.'45, B.S.W.'46) for an undergraduate student in the
fourth year of the Natural Resources Conservation Program in the Faculty of Forestry. First
preference is given to a First Nations student and second preference to a student taking Integrated
Field School (CONS 451). The scholarship is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Forestry. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
BELL Globemedia Fellowship-Two fellowships of $12,500 each are offered by the Canadian
Media Research Consortium to students in the Master of Journalism program who have a stated
interest in media research with a Canadian focus. The award is made on the recommendation of
the School of Journalism in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available
2001/2002 Winter Session)
B.C. MEDICAL Services Foundation First Nations Scholarship in Health and Human Service
Programs-A $5,000 scholarship is offered through the Vancouver Foundation by the B.C. Medical
Services Foundation Scholarship Fund, established by Dr. John H.V. Gilbert, for a First Nations
student enrolled in a professional degree program in Health or Human Services. Students wishing
to be considered for the award should apply to the Division of First Nations Health Careers, 188-
1985 West Mall, UBC by the November 30 deadline. The award is made by nomination of the
selection committee, Institute for Aboriginal Health. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Gerry and Jack BURCH Bursary-A $1,000 bursary is offered by Gerry and Jack Burch to an
undergraduate student entering the third or fourth year of the Forest Resources Management or
the Forest Operation Programs in the Faculty of Forestry. Preference is given to students from
outside the Lower Mainland. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
C.K. CHOI Memorial Entrance Scholarship-A $2,500 scholarship has been endowed by The
University of British Columbia to honour the memory of C.K. Choi. The scholarship is offered to
an outstanding student entering the University from secondary school or transferring from
another post-secondary institution. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
COMMUNITY Prize in South Asian Studies-A $400 prize has been endowed for a graduate
student specializing in South Asian Studies. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Department of Asian Studies, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available
2001/2002 Winter Session)
 Vancouver Senate 12754
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix E: New Awards for Approval
John D'EATHE Award in Urban Land Economics-A $500 award is offered in recognition of John
D'Eathe's contributions to the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration. It is awarded to
a third year student specializing in Urban Land Economics who demonstrates scholarship,
leadership, and involvement in student activities. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Harry and Florence DENNISON Fellowship in Medical Research-Fellowships totalling $13,000
have been endowed through a bequest by Florence Helen Dennison for masters and doctoral
students undertaking research in Medicine. The awards are made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Medicine in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First awards available
for the 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Sheila EGOFF Scholarship in Library and Information Studies-Scholarships totalling $1,500 have
been endowed by friends and colleagues to honour Sheila Egoff's dedication to teaching and to the
profession of Library and Information Studies. The scholarships are awarded to students in the
Master of Library and Information Studies program with preference to students entering first
year. The awards are made on the recommendation of the School of Library, Archival and
Information Studies in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2001/2002
Winter Session)
EXPORT Development Corporation International Studies Award-A $3,000 award is offered by
the Export Development Corporation to an undergraduate student who demonstrates leadership
and initiative in areas such as, undergraduate internships, industry-sponsored projects and
cooperative education programs, and who excels in studies related to international business
relations or finance. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Ken HAYCOCK Award in Library and Information Studies-A $300 award has been endowed by
friends and colleagues to honour Ken Haycock, Director of the School of Library, Archival and
Information Studies. The award is offered to a graduating student with good academic standing in
the Master of Library and Information Studies program who demonstrates leadership skills. The
award is made on the recommendation of the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies
in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Meg HICKLING Prize in Sexual Health Education and Development-A $300 prize has been
endowed by friends and colleagues in honour of Meg Hickling, R.N., to recognize her 27 years of
service to individuals, families and the community as a sexual health educator. The prize is offered
to a student completing the fourth year of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing who has
 Vancouver Senate 12755
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix E: New Awards for Approval
achieved high standing in at least three courses in community health and education, covering
topics such as Family Studies, Community Health, Women's Health, Children/Child Bearing, and
Principles of Education. The award is made on the recommendation of the School of Nursing.
(Partial funding available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Janusz J. KLAWE Memorial Science One Scholarship-A $1,000 scholarship is offered in memory
of Janusz J. Klawe by Maria Klawe, other family members and friends. The award is offered to an
undergraduate student entering the Science One Program in the Faculty of Science and is made on
the recommendation of the Director of Science One. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Abdul LADHA Scholarship-A scholarship of $1,000 is offered to a student entering the Science
One Program from a B.C. secondary school, with first preference given to a student from King
George Secondary School in Vancouver and second preference to a student from any secondary
school in the Burnaby School District. An additional scholarship of $1,000 may be offered in
some years, without geographic restriction, to any student entering Science One from secondary
school. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Director of Science One. (Available
2001/2002 Winter Session)
Wai-Man LEUNG Memorial Bursary-Bursaries totalling $2,400 have been endowed by Mrs.
Valerie Yip in memory of her mother, Wai-Man Leung. The bursaries are awarded to students
with good academic standing who require financial assistance. (Available 2001/2002 Winter
Session)
McCARTHY Tetrault Scholarship-Two scholarships of $1,000 each are offered by the law firm of
McCarthy Tetrault to outstanding undergraduate students entering second year in the Faculty of
Law. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2001/2002
Winter Session)
Markus MEISTER Memorial Prize in Computer Science-A $300 prize has been endowed by
Maria Klawe and friends in memory of Markus Meister for the student obtaining the highest
standing in the final year of the Bachelor of Science program in Computer Science. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Department of Computer Science. (Available 2001/2002
Winter Session)
Kotaro ONO Basketball Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum value of
$500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered to
outstanding members of the Varsity Basketball Team in any year of study. The awards are made
by nomination of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available 2001/2002 Winter
Session)
 Vancouver Senate 12756
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix E: New Awards for Approval
PHARMASAVE Drugs (Pacific) Ltd. Award-A $1,500 award is offered by Pharmasave Drugs
(Pacific) Ltd. for a student in the third or fourth year of a Bachelor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
program who demonstrates leadership skills and has an interest in community practice. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. (Available
2001/2002 Winter Session)
Eugenie Phyllis and Philip Edward REID Memorial Prize in Morphological Sciences-A $700 prize
has been endowed by Janet Reid in memory of her husband Professor Philip E. Reid, who served
tirelessly as Coordinator of the B.M.L.Sc. program from 1980 to 1994, and in memory of his
mother, Eugenie Phyllis Reid, who encouraged and supported his life-long love of science. The
prize is awarded to the graduating student in the B.M.L.Sc. program with the highest overall
academic standing in morphological sciences courses (Pathology 304, Pathology 305, Pathology
404). The award is made by nomination of the Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science
Committee. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Michael SMITH Memorial Fellowship-A $25,000 fellowship is offered as a tribute to Dr. Michael
Smith by his friends, Dr. Donald B. and Mrs. Eleanor J.Y. Rix, for a masters or doctoral student
in any field of study. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
TAL Institutional Management Research Scholarship in Finance-A $5,000 award is offered by
TAL Institutional Management to a doctoral student in Commerce whose research focuses on
current financial issues, such as investment finance, portfolio construction, globalization of
investment finance, risk management, and financial engineering. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration in consultation with
the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Dr. Derek VALLIS Scholarship in Agricultural Sciences-Scholarships totalling $4,100 have been
endowed by Dr. Derek Vallis for students in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, with preference
given to students from the interior of British Columbia. The awards are made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Previously-Approved Awards With Changes in Terms:
Michael and Sonja KOERNER First Nations Fellowship-A $11,000 fellowship has been endowed
by Michael and Sonja Koerner and the Province of British Columbia for a Canadian First Nations
graduate student. Preference is given to a student
 Vancouver Senate 12757
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix E: New Awards for Approval
studying commerce and business administration. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Graduate Studies in consultation with the First Nations House of Learning.
How amended?- The words "an aboriginal graduate student" have been changed at the donor's
request to read "a Canadian First Nations graduate student".
UMA Group Ltd. Scholarship in Civil Engineering (Award 02238)-A $3,900 scholarship has been
endowed by UMA Group Limited and the Province of British Columbia for a student entering the
second year of a Master of Applied Science program in Civil Engineering. The award is made on
the recommendation of the Department of Civil Engineering in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Change in effect for the 2001/2002 Winter Session)
How amended?- Engineering discipline has been specified and scholarship has been restricted to
graduate students.
 Vancouver Senate 12758
Minutes of May 16,2001	
Appendix F: Summary of Changes to Triennial Election Regulations
Appendix F: Summary of Changes to Triennial Election Regulations
2001 - 2002 TRIENNIAL ELECTIONS
Please find attached the proposed schedule and regulations for the 2001 - 2002 Triennial
Elections of representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate. For comparison
purposes, I also have included the version of these regulations that was approved by Senate at
the May 1998 meeting of Senate to apply to the 1998 - 1999 Triennial Elections.
The following changes to the Regulations are proposed for the 2001 - 2002 Elections:
1. The order of the elections has been changed such that the Chancellor and Convocation
Senators elections are completed in May rather than in February.
In previous years, coordinating the advertising of elections with the Chronicle's publication
schedule has meant a gap of two months or more between the publication of the candidate
profiles and the opening of the polls. We hope to increase voter participation by arranging the
schedule such that voters receive their candidate information at the same time as the polls
open in early March. This later schedule leaves six weeks from the completion of the elections
until the Chancellor-elect takes office on June 25, 2002.
2. "Voting shall be conducted using TeleVote" has been replaced by "Voting shall be
conducted on Televote, through the Internet and/or by paper ballot as determined by
the Registrar."
Enrolment Services plans to replace the current TeleVote Elections System with a web-based
elections system plus a paper ballot support for those voters who do not have access to a
computer. This more flexible statement will also allow the Registrar to adapt the process
based on the scope and type of election.
3. The replacement procedure for Convocation Senators has been amended such that if a
replacement cannot be found among the nominees who were not elected, the vacancy
is filled by a person nominated by the remaining Convocation Senators (rather than by
the Alumni Association).
Although the Convocation Senators may choose to consult the Alumni Association in filling
the vacancy, the Convocation Senators are more familiar with the requirements of Senate. This
would see the procedure revert to the iteration that was in place prior to December 1995.
4. Candidates in the election of the Convocation Senators have now been invited to
submit a statement of 150 words maximum, in addition to their biographical
information.
Enhancing the candidate profiles will better inform voters.
5. All references to The Chronicle have been updated to read The Trek.
RECOMMENDATION
That Senate approve the Regulations for the 2001 - 2002 Triennial Elections as amended.

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