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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1996-05-15

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 THE   UNIVERSITY    OF   BRITISH    COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF MAY 15, 1996
Attendance
Present: President D. W. Strangway (Chair), Chancellor R. H. Lee, Vice-President D. R. Birch,
Mr. S. Arnold, Dr. A. P. Autor, Mr. J. A. Banfield, Dr. J. Barman, Dr. J. D. Berger, Mr. J. Boritz,
Mr. P. T. Brady, Dr. D. G. A. Carter, Ms. L. Chui, Dr. T. S. Cook, Dr. M. G. R. Coope, Dr. J. H.
V. Gilbert, Ms. J. K. Gill, Dean M. A. Goldberg, Mr. C. Gorman, Dean J. R. Grace, Dr. S. E.
Grace, Mr. H. D. Gray, Dr. M. Isaacson, Dr. J. G. T. Kelsey, Mr. M. Kirchner, Professor V. J.
Kirkness, Dr. S. B. Knight, Mr. A. Legge, Dr. M. Levine, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Mr. R. W. Lowe,
Dr. D. M. Lyster, Dr. D. J. MacDougall, Dean M. P. Marchak, Dean B. C. McBride, Mr. B. G.
McDonald, Dean J. H. McNeill, Dean A. Meisen, Dr. M. D. Morrison, Mr. V. Pacradouni, Dr. R.
J. Patrick, Mr. R. L. de Pfyffer, Mrs. M. Price, Professor M. Quayle, Dean J. F. Richards, Dr. H.
B. Richer, Dean N. Sheehan, Mr. D. Shu, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. L. J. Stan,
Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dr. S. Thorne, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Mr. D. R. Verma, Dr. E. W. Whittaker,
Dr. R. M. Will, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dean E. H. K. Yen.
Regrets: Dr. D. R. Atkins, Dr. S. Avramidis, Dean C. S. Binkley, Dr. A. E. Boardman, Mr. A.
Briggs, Dr. D. M. Brunette, Dr. D. H. Cohen, Dr. J. Gosline, Rev. J. Hanrahan, Dean M. J.
Hollenberg, Professor P. T. K. Lin, Mr. S. Lohachitranont, Dr. M. MacEntee, Mr. W. B.
McNulty, Mr. J. Murray, Ms. C. Ng, Mr. J. Nobbs-Thiessen, Dr. W. J. Phillips, Dr. D. J. Randall,
Professor R. S. Reid, Professor J. A. Rice, Dr. R. A. Shearer, Dr. A. J. Sinclair, Dean C. L. Smith,
Ms. C. A. Soong, Dr. W. Uegama, Dr. W. C. Wright Jr.
Minutes of the previous meeting
Mr. Banfield l        That the minutes of the eighth regular meeting
Dr. Slonecker i        of Senate for the Session 1995-96, having been
circulated, be taken as read and adopted.
Dean Marchak drew attention to page 11422, stating that Dr. Barbara Heldt should be
listed as Professor Emerita of Russian.
The motion was put and carried,
with the noted correction.
11434
 Vancouver Senate 11435
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Business arising from the minutes
Business arising from the minutes
SENATE NOMINATING COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP (P.11410)
In accordance with established procedures, two student vacancies on the Senate
Nominating Committee had been declared at the previous meeting. In response to a call
for nominations to fill these vacancies, Ms. Carol Ng and Mr. Matthew Kirchner had
been nominated.
Ms. Chui i        That nominations close.
Dr. Slonecker J
Carried.
There being no further nominations, Ms. Carol Ng and Mr. Matthew Kirchner were
declared elected.
ELECTION OF ONE FACULTY MEMBER AT-LARGE TO SENATE (P.11421)
At the previous meeting, Dr. Kelsey drew Senate's attention to a problem with the recent
election for a faculty member at-large to serve on Senate, namely that a very small number
of votes were cast, and he had asked for some information about the election.
The Registrar explained that there are ten "at-large" positions for faculty members on
Senate. Nominations for those ten positions were called for on January 10, 1996 with a
deadline of January 31. The last day of voting was to be March 6. However, there were
only nine nominations so no voting instructions were mailed out and no election was
conducted. This left one position still to be filled, and in accordance with established
procedures, a special election was called to fill the vacancy. A call for
 Vancouver Senate 11436
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Business arising from the minutes
nominations was sent out on March 14 with a deadline for their return by March 29.
Seven nominations were received. Voting instructions were mailed on Tuesday April 2
and the last day for voting was April 12. The first votes were cast on Thursday, April 4
and voting continued each day until April 12. The Registrar agreed that the time for
voting was certainly short and stated that he would not be comfortable with any shorter
period. However, he thought that it was significant that in the original time frame, when
there were 21 days for nominations to be made, only nine were received. He did not think
that it was fair to conclude that timing had a a great deal to do with the level of interest in
the nomination and election of people to fill that position.
Dr. Kelsey had also raised the issue of the necessity for faculty members using the
telephone voting system to use their employee ID as their identification. He had asked if
the social insurance number could be used as an alternative. The Registrar said that he
had been advised by Mr. Fogarassy, a member of the legal staff in the President's Office,
that it is not acceptable to use the social insurance number for this purpose. However, at
a recent meeting, the issue of using the social insurance number as an identifier for
students had been raised, at which time it had been asserted that the Privacy
Commissioner had recently reversed his decision and therefore the use of the number is
acceptable. The Registrar stated that there may have been a change, but the advice he had
received was that it was not acceptable.
The Registrar stated that this was not the first use of the telephone voting system, and he
felt it was therefore fair to say that faculty would have known that they needed their
employee number to cast a ballot. In any event, the voting instructions did give a
telephone number which voters could call to get their employee ID number.
 Vancouver Senate 11437
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Chair's remarks and related questions
The Registrar informed Senate that there are two planned developments that will address
the question of voter ID. He hoped that within two or three years all faculty will be able
to use a single ID and password to access the parts of the UBC administrative systems that
they are authorized to use (eg. grant holders will be able to go on-line to check their
accounts). He stated that a World Wide Web version of the election system is also being
developed which will allow any faculty member who is on the voters list to vote in an
election using a World Wide Web browser to access the election system. He said that this
will solve the ID issue and allow voters to see a list of candidates as on the paper ballot
and also to access information about candidates.
Dr. Kelsey thanked the Registrar for the thoroughness of his response but observed that
the ten day period available for voting fell over the Easter holiday period. The Registrar
responded that votes were cast on both Good Friday and Easter Monday.
In response to a query by Dr. Isaacson, the Registrar stated that the number of votes cast
using the telephone voting system was small compared to the number of votes cast in
previous elections, but he could not confirm how small.
Chair's remarks and related questions
ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF SENATE
President Strangway informed Senate that Fran Medley was to receive one of the
President's Service Awards for Excellence. The award is presented to five people each year
at the Spring Congregation ceremonies. Mrs. Medley received a round of applause from
members of Senate.
 Vancouver Senate 11438
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Candidates for Degrees
MEMBERS OF SENATE
President Strangway paid tribute to those members attending their last Senate meeting,
drawing particular attention to Dr. Robert M. Will, Dean John H. McNeill and Dr.
Thelma S. Cook, who have served on Senate for 21, 17, and 14 years, respectively.
The President then created a new tradition by presenting certificates of appreciation to all
those leaving Senate.
Candidates for Degrees
Mr. Brady l        That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Dean McBride J        as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chair of
Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried.
Scholarships and Awards
A list of scholarships, medals and prizes awarded to students in the graduating classes was
circulated for information. Dr. Cook informed Senate that the recipients of the Governor-
General's Gold Medals for the Master's and Doctoral Programs, both entered UBC from
foreign universities. In addition, of the other 25 winners of awards, 14 entered UBC
directly from high schools, all but two of whom came from B.C. high schools. Of the
remaining 11, four came from other B.C. universities, four came from other Canadian
universities and three entered UBC from foreign universities. Dr. Cook noted that among
the heads of graduating classes there were many major scholarship winners, three of
whom were entrance scholarship winners: the head of the graduating class in Applied
Science, the
 Vancouver Senate 11439
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
head of the graduating class Rehabilitation Sciences (Occupational Therapy), and the
Governor-General's Silver Medalist in the Faculty of Science. Also, two heads of class
received the prestigious Wesbrook Scholar's designation: the head of the graduating class
in Rehabilitation Sciences (Physiotherapy), and the head of the graduating class in the
Faculty of Law.
Reports of Committees of Senate
ACADEMIC BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE
Professor Quayle, chair of the committee, presented the following report, which had been
circulated:
This report summarizes the results of the 1995 recommendations to Senate and
outlines a new recommendation for 1996.
RECOMMENDATION A: (1995)
That the President commit the University to an open planning process which will
build trust within the university community and with our neighbours. This process
should embody the principles of academic priority and ecological and
environmentally responsible infrastructure. Most importantly, the process must
include the articulation of a clear vision for the campus community as a whole.
It is the opinion of the Senate Academic Building Needs committee members that
while attempts have been made to involve the university community in the planning
process, on the whole this has not been effective. In our view, the planning vision is
still not driven by a clear academic vision for our campus. A specific example is the
status of the academic units on the south campus in terms of an academic vision for
their future. The units involved are within the Faculties of Agricultural Sciences,
Forestry and Science and include the Departments of Animal Science, Botany, Forest
Sciences, Plant Science, and Zoology, the UBC Botanical Gardens and the UBC
Animal Care Centre. These units feel that land-based academic programs currently
form an integral part of UBC's activities and this is likely to increase, rather than
decrease. A number of the existing land-based life science programs have an
operational time horizon of ten to twenty years. These issues need to be addressed in
the context of the Official Community Plan.
 Vancouver Senate 11440
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
RECOMMENDATION B: (1995)
That the President articulate the process by which both general building and
academic building priorities should be reviewed, considering academic, community
and infrastructure objectives, and funding opportunities. The SABN should play an
active role in that process, specific to their mandate from Senate.
We feel that we still do not have an adequate working process for the review of
academic building priorities. For example, our input is "too little, too late" and that
often the academic aspects of a particular project are less significant than other
influences. However, we remain hopeful that campus Academic Master Plan for
building needs will be forthcoming in the near future. A sub-committee of the
President's Property and Planning Advisory Committee (PPPAC) (the new name for
the President's Advisory Committee on Space Allocation (PACSA)) will be struck to
assist in the consolidation of the Faculty Master Plans. A consultant will be hired to
complete this work; the sub-committee will oversee the project.
RECOMMENDATION C: (1995)
That the President develop a strategy for:
a) the funding of essential Campus infrastructure such as power plants and
other "hidden systems" with a view towards an environmentally responsible
approach to providing energy to the Campus;
b) the funding of continued operations and maintenance of the campus
building and landscape inventory; and
c) the funding of the campus "public realm" — the framework for the
experience of the campus for pedestrians and cyclists.
The UBC Infrastructure Plan responds to parts (a) and (b) of this recommendation.
Strategies for attention to the public realm remain unclear. SABN is requesting
assistance from Campus Planning and Development in the preparation of a "checklist" for use in reviewing developments.
In terms of new recommendations, the Senate Academic Building Needs Committee
proposes the following:
THE QUALITY OF THE PHYSICAL CAMPUS
It is appropriate to recognize the progress that has been made on the campus in the
last decade in regard to planning. The very fact that a Campus Master Plan is in place
and that an Official Community Plan is in process is a tribute to the hard work of the
administration and the campus community in general.
 Vancouver Senate 11441
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
However, the SABN continues to be concerned about the quality of the campus, both
its buildings and public spaces. We think that it is time to review how the Campus
Master Plan is being implemented. We also feel the need for more checks and balances
in the design-planning process. The President's Property and Planning Advisory
Committee is not a design review group. It is perhaps timely to institute a professional
design review process for the Campus.
RECOMMENDATION:
That the President request:
a) a review of the implementation of the Campus Master Plan to date; and,
b) a strategy to provide more checks and balances within the building approval
process in the area of design and planning, such as a UBC Design Panel.
The Committee again wishes to express its appreciation for the continued support of
Campus Planning and Development.
Professor Quayle summarized the contents of the report, explaining that the new
recommendation for Senate's consideration was about the quality of the physical campus.
The committee also wished to recognize the progress made on campus in the past decade
in terms of planning. Professor Quayle stated that the fact that there is a campus master
plan in place and that an official community plan is in process is a tribute to all the work
that has been done at both the administrative level and the community level in general.
She noted, however, that the committee is concerned about the general quality of both
buildings and public spaces and suggested that it is time for the campus master plan to be
reviewed in terms of its implementation. As stated in the report, the committee also
suggested that there is perhaps a need for some more checks and balances vis-a-vis the
design planning process and that there should be a design review group on the campus.
 Vancouver Senate 11442
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Professor Quayle concluded her remarks by expressing the committee's thanks and
appreciation to Campus Planning and Development, and to Tim Miner in particular for
his guidance and help over the past year.
Professor Quayle l        That the President request:
Dr. Grace J a)  a review of the implementation of the
Campus Master Plan to date; and,
b) a strategy to provide more checks and
balances within the building approval
process in the area of design and
planning, such as a UBC Design Panel.
Carried.
ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE
Report on Admission Policy for International Students
Dr. Will, chair of the committee, presented the following report, which had been
circulated:
International Students
Present policy
Present Senate policy relating to international students dates from 1989 when Senate,
acting on a recommendation from the President's Task Force on Liaison, Recruiting
and Admissions, approved a policy "welcoming" applications from "outstanding"
international students, with the stated purpose of increasing the international
component of the undergraduate student body. In order to ensure that only superior
students would be admitted the approved policy stipulated that successful
international applicants would be required to have a minimum academic standing
equivalent to a GPA of 3.5 (78%). This GPA can be put into context by noting that
the GPA required for admission to UBC directly from Grade 12 in 1989 was in the
range of 2.5 (67%) to 2.7 (69%), depending on program.
 Vancouver Senate 11443
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
A higher GPA requirement for international students imposed by this new policy
resulted in a decline in the number of international students admitted, causing Senate
in 1991 to revise its policy on international students by replacing the requirement of a
GPA of 3.5 with a Calendar statement that only international students with "superior
academic standing" would be admitted. The revised policy included the provision that
no international student would be admitted with a GPA of less than 3.1(74%). This
minimum GPA was still substantially above the GPA required of domestic applicants
(Canadian citizens and permanent residents) for direct admission to UBC in 1991.
This GPA differential, however, has been substantially eroded since 1991 - for
example, Applied Science and Science now have admission GPAs that are equal to or
exceed the minimum established in 1991 for international applicants.
Market-based tuition for international students
The proposal to admit international students paying market-based tuition fees requires
that Senate revisit its policy relating to the admission of international students. There
are three issues or concerns that need to be addressed:
1. the maximum number of international students to be admitted to (registered in)
any given program under a market-based tuition fee policy;
2. a means of defining and implementing a policy on market-based tuition fees in
such a way that no domestic students are displaced;
3. the maintenance of academic standards and the quality of programs for both
domestic and international students.
Ideally, a proposal to alleviate the consequences of reduced funding by the admission
of international students on a market-fee basis should offer the prospect of improving
the quality of education of domestic students, and increasing the number of places
available to them. As an absolute minimum, such a proposal should incorporate
safeguards that preserve both the level of access that Canadian citizens and permanent
residents now have to UBC's undergraduate programs, and the standard or quality of
these programs.
As always, we are constrained by the difficulty of having to articulate policy that is
equally appropriate to, or reflects the particular circumstances of, all programs to
which it is intended to apply. We recognize that, at least initially, the opportunities
provided by market-based tuition fees appear to be greater, or more certain, in some
programs than others.
 Vancouver Senate 11444
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Maximum number of international students.
Senate policy on international students, while intended to increase their relative
number in the undergraduate student population, is silent on a target or limit on the
number of international students. Second to None, the University's strategic plan,
mentions a global figure of 4% to 6% international students as an objective for all
undergraduate programs, but this figure was not included in the Mission Statement,
condensed from Second to None, that was approved by Senate in 1989. In view of the
initiative on market-based fees, it is now necessary that Senate approve a maximum or
upper limit on the number of international students to be admitted.
The proposal for market-based tuition fees provides for a maximum number of
international students (exclusive of exchange students) for any program equal to 15%
of the program's present quota. It is proposed that present quotas be increased by
10% to accommodate the additional international students expected to be attracted by
a market-based fee policy. This way of expanding the allowable international
component of the undergraduate student body, the proposal suggests, would result, at
maximum, in approximately 13.5% of admissions being in the international category
(15 as a percentage of 110). This 13.5% figure is based on the doubtful premise that
present quotas allow under existing Senate policy for a maximum 5% (4% to 6%)
international students. For programs that have subscribed (filled) quotas and fewer
than 5% international students (Arts and Science are examples), this 13.5% maximum
for international students, if achieved, would displace domestic students.
Ideally, a maximum or limit on international students should also be applied to total
enrolment in all years of a program, and not just to the annual intake or admission of
new students. But our practice of controlling and managing enrolments through
admission quotas requires that we focus on the mix of incoming students, as between
domestic and international students, as a means of keeping the latter within some
prescribed limit, and thus preventing the displacement of domestic students.
We therefore propose that the number of international students admitted to (registered
in) a program in any academic year not be allowed to exceed 15% of the number of
domestic students registered in the previous year. This formulation has the advantage
of preserving existing numbers of domestic students, unless, of course, further
reductions in faculty budgets and capacity were to necessitate lower quotas.
The difference between a maximum of 15% based on the previous year's admission
(registration) of domestic students and a maximum expressed as 13.5 % of a
program's adjusted quota, as proposed by the President's office, is
 Vancouver Senate 11445
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
insubstantial for most programs, and would be felt only in the event that demand for
market-tuition admissions proved buoyant and pressed against the allowable limit. For
programs that presently have few or any international students (e.g. Medicine), there
would be no difference. For the BA program, which had 44 international students
registered in first year in 1995-96, out of a total of 1472 new registrations (new to
UBC), the maximum based on the previous year's registration of domestic students
would be 214 (15% of 1472 minus 44), whereas the 13.5% maximum on the adjusted
quota would be 225. In Science, where international students composed only 2.2% of
new registrations in first year in 1995-96 (compared to 3% in the BA program), the
maximum for international students would be reduced by 10, from 181 to 171, if
based on the previous year's registration of domestic students.
Implementation
The importance of defining a maximum for international students that is related to the
actual number of domestic students presently registered is seen when the possible
consequences of eliminating the GPA (admission average) differential applied to
international applicants is considered. This differential has without question
represented a restraint on the number of successful applicants to first degree programs,
although less so today than when it was initiated in 1989, at which time it appears to
have contributed to an actual decline in international admissions. The differential has
disappeared for admission to first-year Science and Applied Science because of the
escalation of the GPA required for the admission of domestic students, but it is still a
factor in Arts and other programs where its elimination would increase the
competition faced by domestic applicants, with the result that fewer would be
successful. The GPA (admission average) differential applied to applicants to the
second and third years continues to constitute a barrier for international students
wishing to enter most programs, including Science and Applied Science. If is difficult
to say with any degree of certainty what the magnitude of the displacement of
domestic students might be if the differential were removed, especially in view of the
substantial increase in tuition fees for international students that is proposed. But
there is a risk that cannot be taken, if we are to take seriously a commitment not to
increase the number of higher-paying international students by reducing the
opportunity of British Columbians and Canadians from other provinces to attend
UBC. If the program of market-based tuition fees proves successful, then there is
reason for concern.
The Senate Admissions Committee supports the continued use of admission quotas
that reflect program capacity as defined by level of funding, space and physical
facilities. We have noted that for the purpose of establishing a maximum for
international students greater attention will have to be given than in the past to the
numbers of domestic and international students admitted and
 Vancouver Senate 11446
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
registered under quota. International students so admitted will, under the President's
proposal, be charged market tuition fees. However, the proposal, to be successful, and
prove a source of additional funding for the University, must recruit international
students in addition to those presently accommodated within funded quotas. These
additional, market-fee students make up a program's supernumerary quota - student
places that are beyond or outside the University's funded capacity. The number of
these supernumerary places in any year, we suggest, should be the subject of
agreement between the relevant dean and the Vice President Academic, to ensure that
students admitted to fill them can be accommodated, with the extra funding available,
without reducing the quality of instruction for other students.
It is proposed, furthermore, that a program's quota be presented to Senate for
approval in the form "1000 + 50 suppl.", if, as in this example, the funded quota is
1000, and 50 international students in addition to the those included in the funded
quota are to be admitted and registered. Illustrating further: if the 1000 places in the
funded quota consist of 930 domestic places and 70 international places, based on the
previous year's numbers, the total quota for international applicants, all of whom
would pay market-based tuition fees, would be 120. The maximum allowable number
of international students that could be admitted (registered) in any year in this
example would be 140 (15% of 930). The objective would be to admit (register) 930
domestic and 120 international students.
The President's proposal for market-based tuition fees states "all international
students admitted will have achieved a higher level on admission requirements than
any Canadian student not admitted". Translated, this means that the minimum GPA
(admission average) for international students can be equal to but not below the GPA
cutoff for domestic students. But it can be higher, and will be higher in the event that
there are more qualified international applicants than places available at the minimum
GPA or GPA cutoff for domestic students. In such a situation, there would be two
admission GPAS, one for domestic students and another, higher GPA for international
students.
A more likely scenario, we believe, especially in the initial years of charging market-
based tuition fees, would be that the number of international applicants with the
requisite GPA for admission would fall short of quota. In the event that the number of
international admissions is less than the international component of the funded quota
(70 in the above example), the Committee recommends that unfilled places be made
available to domestic students for that year only. This is a necessary provision, if for
no other reason than that it protects the FTE base used to determine the University's
operating budget. If a shortfall of international students were to persist, suggesting
that demand for places at market tuition fees is not there, then the funded quota
should be amended in favour of the number of domestic applicants it can
accommodate.
 Vancouver Senate 11447
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Changes in a program's funded quota would, according to the implementation model
presented here, be reflected in a proportional adjustment in the number of domestic
and international admissions (registrations). If in the above example the funded quota
were to be increased from 1000 to 1100, the number of places for domestic students
would increase from 930 to 1023, and for international students from 70 to 77. Such
an upward adjustment in the number of international students admitted as part of
funded quota would reflect UBC's long-standing commitment to increase the
international component of its student body.
In conclusion, the Committee makes the following observation about the probable
success of market-based tuition fees as a means of generating additional revenue for
the University. There is little evidence that existing demand in the international
community for UBC's undergraduate programs is sufficient to guarantee the success of
a market-based tuition strategy. In the absence of vigorous promotion, and possibly
contract arrangements where appropriate, there is little reason to expect an increase in
the number of international students, even with a lower GPA required for admission
to most programs. Numbers may in fact decline, initially. There is also little known
about the nature of the demand for UBC programs. If demand proves to be relatively
responsive to an increase in tuition fees (price), then we could end up with fewer
international students and less revenue. This responsiveness or sensitivity to higher
tuition fees will very much depend on the alternatives prospective applicants have for
obtaining as good an education elsewhere at a lower cost, or what may be perceived as
being a better or preferred educational experience at the same cost. At the level of
tuition fees contemplated, the competition for international students, especially from
other North American (U.S.) universities, is likely to be considerable. Again, only a
concerted effort, expensive both financially and in terms of administrators' time, to
promote UBC and seek out prospective students is likely to give UBC the edge and
opening needed to assure success.
Recommendations
1. That international students be admitted to undergraduate programs at a GPA
or admission average that is no lower than the minimum GPA or admission
average applicable to Canadians and permanent residents of Canada entering
the same program, i.e., that the present differential GPA applied to domestic
and international applicants be discontinued.
2. That the maximum number of international students admitted to and registered
in an undergraduate program in any year be established at 15% of the number
of Canadians and permanent residents registered in that program in the
previous year.
 Vancouver Senate 11448
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
3.  That faculties and schools, in presenting admission quotas to Senate for
approval, also be required to present for approval the number, if any, of
supernumerary international students they expect to admit.
These recommendations do not require a change in the Calendar entry relating to the
admission of international students.
Dr. Will reminded Senate that the question of the admission policy for international
students was referred to the Senate Admissions Committee at the February 14, 1996
Senate meeting. He stated that while the matter of fees for international students on a
market-oriented basis is the responsibility of the Board of Governors, the admission and
mix or composition of students is the responsibility of Senate. The proposal submitted to
the Board of Governors, if it were to be implemented as stated, would require an
adjustment to existing Senate policy relating to international students. Dr. Will stated that
the Senate Admissions Committee, in its recommendations, had provided a mechanism for
implementing the President's commitment that if the University goes for market-oriented
fees for international students, resulting admissions will not be at the expense of B.C.
residents. The committee interpreted this commitment to be residents of Canada, not just
residents of B.C. He stated that the committee's recommendations guarantee that the
admission of international students will not be at the expense of Canadian citizens and
permanent residents of Canada, should the new admission policy applicable to
international students result in a great demand on the part of international students to
come to UBC. He also noted that the committee recommends the removal of the
differential, established by Senate in 1987, requiring international students to have a
higher grade point average for admission.
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Dr. Will l        That international students be admitted to
Dr. Berger i        undergraduate programs at a GPA or
admission average that is no lower than the
minimum GPA or admission average
applicable to Canadians and permanent
residents of Canada entering the same
program, i.e., that the present differential GPA
applied to domestic and international
applicants be discontinued.
That the maximum number of international
students admitted to and registered in an
undergraduate program in any year be
established at 15% of the number of
Canadians and permanent residents registered
in that program in the previous year.
That faculties and schools, in presenting
admission quotas to Senate for approval, also
be required to present for approval the
number, if any, of supernumerary international
students they expect to admit.
In response to a query, Dr. Will stated that the recommendations would not affect
international students already enrolled at UBC.
After further discussion, the
motion was put and carried.
Proposed Calendar statement on deadline for admissions appeals
A proposal to establish a deadline date for appeals against admissions decision had been
circulated. Dr. Will explained that the purpose of establishing a deadline is to ensure that
if the outcome of an appeal is acceptance, the student will be registering in courses by the
first week of classes rather than at a later date, which in some cases may preclude
successful completion of course requirements. The proposal would also ensure
consideration of an appeal on the basis of requirements
 Vancouver Senate 11450
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and assessments effective in the session to which application was made, thus avoiding the
possibility that a successful appellant might be admitted the following year, with a cohort
of incoming students subject to different (and possibly more stringent) admission criteria.
Dr. Will l        That appeals against decisions will be
Dean Goldberg i        considered on applications for the current year
only and appeals should be submitted to the
Senate Admissions Committee, do the
Registrar's Office, by the 15th of the month
prior to start of classes.
Dean Grace pointed out that doctoral students are admitted at any time of the year and
that this should be taken into consideration in such cases. Dr. Will responded that on
occasions where the program allowed it, students had been admitted in January.
The motion was
put and carried.
Mandated enrolment increase for 1996/97
The following report from Vice President Birch on the mandated enrolment increase for
1996/97 was circulated at the meeting:
I reported to Senate at its April meeting that The University of British Columbia is
expected by government to achieve a four percent increase in undergraduate
enrolment without any increase in its operating grant. This translates into a growth
target of 921 undergraduate FTEs.
By a two-thirds majority, Senate delegated to the Senate Admissions Committee the
power to approve and recommend to the Board of Governors revised admission
quotas for the undergraduate programs of the various faculties and schools for
1996/97 and required the Senate Admissions Committee to report back to the May
meeting of Senate on the decisions taken and the academic consequences of those
decisions. Since that time Deans have worked with the
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Academic Vice President and Provost to establish plans for meeting the mandated
enrolment increase. In addition, Deans have reported to the Senate Admissions
Committee on their plans and the academic consequences they foresee.
Acting on the authority delegated to it, the Senate Admissions Committee has
approved mandated admission quotas to supplement the quotas already approved by
Senate. These are presented in the attached table 1. To provide the context, I have also
attached table 2 showing full time equivalent students (90/91 to 95/96) and
"Productivity increases" (96/97). Also attached is table 3 showing current projections
of undergraduate enrolment change for 1996/97 and the April 4, 1996 memorandum
to Deans re enrolment planning for 1996/97. (See Appendix A for tables and
memorandum.)
Beyond the establishment of mandated quotas, enrolment planning for 1996/97 is
precipitating some curriculum decisions. One example is the regularizing by some
faculties of provisions under which cooperative education students will earn credit for
the academic requirements associated with their work terms. There may be additional
curriculum matters. In order to deal with these in a timely way, I recommend that
Senate approve the following motion:
That Senate delegate to the Senate Curriculum Committee the power to approve
and recommend to the Board of Governors curriculum changes proposed by
faculties and schools prior to the September 1996 meeting of Senate and that the
Senate Curriculum Committee report back to Senate on the decisions taken and the
implications of those decisions.
Dr. Will reminded Senate that even if the quotas do not change from one year to another,
enrolment does. For example, enrolment in a program next year could go up by the flow-
through as the result of exceeding the quota this year, or down if the quota is not
achieved. He said that the only way of achieving the mandate of the Ministry of
Education, Skills and Training to increase enrolment by 4% is to increase quotas, or in
the absence of a quota, to admit more students. It soon became clear to the Senate
Admissions Committee, however, that the responses of the schools and faculties to a
request to increase enrolment by 4% were not additive. The means identified by some
faculties to increase enrolment were at the
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expense of enrolment in another faculty (or faculties). This occurred when a proposed
increase could have resulted in a transfer of students from one faculty to another, with the
result that total enrolment in the University would not have increased as intended. Dr.
Will stated that these "flow-through" consequences of the various proposals to increase
enrolment in faculties and schools had been identified by Dr. Walter Sudmant, of
Institutional Research and Planning, from the computer data base, and that the result of
this exercise is that a target headcount of over 1100 has been established rather than the
921 FTEs expected by the Ministry. He stated that this target was probably necessary in
order to achieve the required number of FTEs. Dr. Will then asked Vice President Birch to
comment.
Vice President Birch expressed his appreciation to the Senate Admissions Committee and
to the Deans, who had been working with people within their faculties and the Registrar's
Office in an effort to work out reliable plans even though there are some complex
relationships among the variables involved.
Vice President Birch stated that there appeared to be very little difficulty in meeting the
increased quotas at the first-year level but that faculties had put a great deal of effort into
trying to distribute the enrolment increases across the years. This distribution was
necessary because the flow-through effects would be horrendous if all the increases were
to be accommodated at the first year level. Vice President Birch stated that it was not clear
what would happen with transfers into second and third years given the number of
degree-granting institutions in the province, and
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given the volatility and dynamics of transfers even across faculties within the University.
Referring to table 1, Vice President Birch stated that rather than showing one revised
quota, the Senate approved quotas are retained as the base while the quotas for the
mandated increase this year are identified separately.
Vice President Birch noted that approximately 17,000 undergraduate applications,
excluding post-baccalaureate programs such as Law, Medicine, and Education, are
processed by the Admissions Office for what amounts to about 7,000 places. He
suggested, therefore, that UBC could be fairly confident about being able to meet the
revised quotas, although they might not be distributed in just the right way. He stated
that the revised quotas include increases of about 400 to 500 at the second- and third-
year levels, which could be more problematic. Vice President Birch also noted that there
was an increase of about 25% in the outstanding student initiative applicants, which
brings those numbers up significantly. He stated that the Faculty of Science estimates that
to meet its quota, which has been raised at the first year level, it will have to drop its
admission GPA to approximately 83%, which was not a major compromise in terms of
the academic quality of the students to be admitted. Vice President Birch stated that if
that was an indication of what was to happen, Senate could be fairly confident that while
academic quality may be compromised in other ways, which it inevitably is if more
students have to be taught with the same resources, it is not going to be compromised by
a significant decline in the quality of the students admitted.
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Vice President Birch drew Senate's attention to the motion contained in the report
concerning curriculum changes that will be made as a consequence of this exercise, some
of which, he said, should have been implemented earlier. For example, the Faculties of
Applied Science and Science were looking at mechanisms for awarding academic credit for
the academic component of co-operative education programs. It was therefore necessary
that power of approval be delegated to the Senate Curriculum Committee in order that
such changes can be implemented as quickly as possible.
Dr. Birch i        That Senate delegate to the Senate Curriculum
Dean Meisen i        Committee the power to approve and
recommend to the Board of Governors
curriculum changes proposed by faculties and
schools prior to the September 1996 meeting
of Senate, and that the Senate Curriculum
Committee report back to Senate on the
decisions taken and the implications of those
decisions.
Mr. Brady asked if the Deans were satisfied that the 4% increase in enrolment could be
accommodated without adverse academic consequences, particularly as there would be no
increase in either the operating grant or the tuition fees.
Dr. Will responded that although the Deans had responded in a spirit of cooperation, no-
one had accepted that the increases could be easily accommodated. He noted that the
University Act gives the University the autonomy to set enrolment quotas. However, the
ministry had overriden that right by saying the University
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has to take, at least for one year, 4% more students. He said that everyone knew that it
could be done only with great cost academically. He stated that the next step had to be a
careful assessment of the effect of the imposed increases, and to submit a report to Senate
on the costs, implications, and disadvantages to current and future students.
Dean Marchak stated that the impact on the Faculty of Arts would vary from department
to department, the biggest impact being on the Department of English which will have to
provide first-year English classes for most of the additional students. Dean Marchak
stated that new sessional lecturers will have to be found because the current faculty could
not possibly handle such an increase. She stated that similar problems apply to
Economics, Psychology and Geography, and that classroom accommodation would also
be a major problem. Dean Marchak informed Senate that the School of Music poses a
different problem in that each new student has to be given tutorials at the same rate as
others coming into the orchestral program, and that the cost would therefore exceed the
tuition per person because people from downtown would have to be hired. She also cited
similar difficulties with the studio programs in Fine Arts and stated that there is a limit to
what can be done with Theatre and Creative Writing. Dean Marchak noted that although
the School of Social Work may obtain a grant from the government to accommodate
more students into a bachelor's program, the students they will accommodate will mostly
come from the Bachelor of Arts, which will change the flow-through problem and more
students will have to be accommodated at the first
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Reports of Committees of Senate
year level so that some of them can go into social work under the new funding program.
Also, most of the additional students to be taken in by the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration will have to come from the Faculty of Arts in order for them to
realise their quota.
Dean Marchak stated that although the Faculty of Arts has been informed that a portion
of the additional tuition received as a result of the increase in enrolment will be returned
to the faculty, it will not be enough to provide the necessary additional teaching
resources.
Mr. Brady claimed that Senate had not paid enough attention to the academic fall-out of
taking in 4% more students. He insisted that the University should be saying that it
cannot be done with the current resources, and that the government should be told that
the academic quality will suffer as a result. He expressed his disappointment at the
apparent lack of opposition by the Deans to a proposal that will impose on students a
lack of service, accommodation and staff to do the job that students are paying for.
Vice President Birch said that he appreciated Mr. Brady's comments and assured him that
the Deans had not taken this matter casually. He said that the Deans had responded to a
request by the Senate Admissions Committee to forecast the academic consequences.
However, the collective judgement was that there would be a great deal more reality to a
report submitted to Senate in September after the enrolment increases are implemented
and the consequences are documentable. Vice President Birch said that, as stated at the
previous meeting, the University was
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not in a strong position to oppose the mandated increase because it had accepted, over an
extended period of years, designated enrolment related funding for an undergraduate
population of approximately 1000 full-time equivalent students beyond the enrolment
level of the past year. Therefore the 4% that the University is accommodating is on a base
that was already 4% below what it was officially funded for at the undergraduate level.
He stated that the University is very concerned that there are such watertight
compartments between undergraduate and graduate enrolment funding, particularly
because of over-enrolment (and under-funding) at the graduate level where it would make
a lot of sense to be able to transfer resources, given the University's distinctive role in the
province. Nonetheless, having accepted designated enrolment related funding over a
period of six or seven years, and having a very clear figure in all of our reports about
what the funded level of enrolment was, Vice President Birch said that the University was
not in a very strong position to tell the government that they are forcing it to go beyond
the level that it is funded for and that it can accommodate.
Dean McBride stated that the Faculty of Science was not at all happy at having to increase
enrolment by 4%, and that it could not take 4% if those additional tuition fees are not
allocated according to some reasonable formula that guarantees that the faculty can meet
the needs of the students. He stated that one of the problems will be an increased need for
laboratories, even though some time slots are available in the mornings. He said that
another problem is that enrolment will be strictly limited in certain programs, such as
Biology. As a result, students entering the faculty for
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the first time will not be guaranteed their first choice, but they could be accommodated in
other programs. Dean McBride expressed concern at the effect this process will have on
the advising and counselling that students receive.
The University Librarian, Dr. Patrick, also expressed concern at the additional demand
the 4% increase will have on the Library.
Dean Meisen commented that the Deans had submitted to Vice President Birch statements
which document very clearly the revised quotas and the resulting negative impacts. He
said that, presumably, those statements could be shared with Senate at the appropriate
time.
Mr. Gray suggested that Senate should express its concern, and that that concern be
conveyed to the government.
The motion was
put and carried.
Mr. Gray
Mr. Banfield
That Senate express its concern to the
government at the 4% mandated increase in
enrolment.
Carried.
Education Abroad Programs
Dr. Will asked that it be recorded in the minutes that the committee recommends that
there be a review of the Education Abroad Programs when the new Senate takes office.
He said that, given the nature of the program, it does not necessarily follow that the
Senate Admissions Committee is the body to do it. He
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suggested that the review committee might consist of people from the Senate Admissions
Committee, the Senate Curriculum Committee and the Administration. He stated that the
committee was not concerned about those programs that have their genesis in an
academic setting; i.e. initiated or proposed by a faculty or department, but it was
concerned about programs initiated elsewhere. The committee was also concerned about
the University's ability to provide the kind of counselling, support and infrastructure
needed for these programs. Dr. Will suggested that if this review it is to be done properly
it must have considerable Senate input.
APPEALS ON ACADEMIC STANDING
Dr. MacDougall, chair of the committee, informed Senate that a report on the
committee's activities would be submitted to the September meeting of Senate.
BUDGET COMMITTEE
Dr. Isaacson, chair of the committee, presented the following report, which had been
circulated:
The terms of reference of the Senate Budget Committee are:
To meet with the President and assist him in the preparation of the
University budget. In advising the President on the University budget, the
Senate Budget Committee may request information on any of the fund
accounts of the University; and
To make recommendations to the President and to report to Senate
concerning academic planning and priorities as they relate to the
preparation of the University budget.
In this context, the operation of the Committee and its activities over the past year are
as follows:
 Vancouver Senate 11460
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Operation of the Committee
The Committee holds regular meetings once a month from September to May, a series
of meetings each summer to consider the President's annual budget strategy, and
additional meetings each year as necessary. At its regular meetings the Committee
considers a variety of issues of interest to members of the Committee and it also
discusses with the President issues which he raises. From time to time, the Committee
invites presentations from various officers of the University. In some instances, the
Committee has been somewhat concerned about the need to be informed in a more
timely way in order to assist the President adequately. In other instances, it has been
very satisfied with the information received and has been able to provide advice to the
President and Vice-Presidents which has been well received and acted upon.
The President's 1995/96 Budget
An important component of the Committee's work relates to a consideration of the
President's annual budget strategy. This activity takes place each year shortly after the
Committee's report to Senate in May. Because of this timing, the Committee agreed
that it would report on this particular matter to Senate early each Fall. Such a report
on the President's 1995/96 budget was made to Senate at its October 1995 meeting.
1996/97 Budget Guidelines
The Committee suggested a number of changes which were incorporated into the
document 1996/97 Budget Guidelines. This document plays an important part in the
preparation of the University's annual budget.
The President's 1996/97 Budget
The President's 1996/97 Budget will be presented to the Committee in about a month,
and will be described in the Budget, Planning and Accountability Report - 1996/97
which is to be published in the Fall. The draft submissions of ancillary units have
already been presented to the Committee for information. The overall budget is made
up of several funds, of which the Core General Purpose Operating Fund is central. Its
principal income items are the provincial grant and tuition fees, and its principal
expense items are salaries and benefits. It is expected that the overall changes in these
categories will be relatively minor.
Information Technology Funding
The Committee heard from the Vice President Student and Academic Services on
funding for information technology, and there was a general discussion of related
issues. The Committee noted the need to develop a funding policy to address fully
information technology issues.
 Vancouver Senate 11461
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Tuition Fees for International Students
The Committee provided comments on initial versions of a proposal relating to
market-based tuition fees for international students. However, the proposal that was
eventually presented to the Board of Governors for approval was provided to the
Committee with insufficient opportunity for consideration and comment - until after
the proposal had been approved. The Committee reaffirmed its interest in examining
specific proposals that may be made in the future.
Centralized Units
Recommendation 4 of the report Centralization and Decentralization which was
accepted by Senate in January 1995 states:
That the Senate Budget Committee be requested to study those centralized
units which enjoy full or partial monopoly status on the campus,
particularly ancillary units, and to bring recommendations to Senate and to
the President not later than the December 1995 meeting of Senate, on a
mechanism to ensure that each such unit defines its service in relation to the
academic community's needs, provides that service to a standard which
meets or exceeds that found in the competitive marketplace, and justifies its
operating costs and scale of charges in relation to the fair market value
found in the Greater Vancouver area.
A sub-committee was charged with dealing with this request and prepared a report
Helping Centralized Units to Become More Responsive which was adopted by the full
Committee. This report was subsequently accepted by Senate at its February 1996
meeting.
Constituency Support for UBC
The Vice-President External Affairs, the Manager, Media Relations, and the Manager,
Government Affairs and Relations briefed the Committee on the state of community
and government support for UBC. The briefing focused on perceptions of the
University by the media and the wider community, the University's relationship with
the different levels of government, and fund-raising activities in the private sector. The
Committee views these issues as being of critical importance in affecting the
University's long-term financial climate. Committee members provided a number of
suggestions with respect to such activities.
Externally Funded Projects
The Committee briefly discussed the budgetary implications of the financing and
planned construction of St. John's College, in the light of an apparent short-fall of
funding for the project. In such cases, it is not clear what level of
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Reports of Committees of Senate
funding should be in place before construction begins. When, at the start of
construction, the level of funds which have been secured is less than originally
projected, the Committee considers it important to ask whether the project can be
properly completed and operated without an additional subsidy from University
funds. The Committee did not have an opportunity to consider this issue in detail, and
suggests that it be considered more fully by the incoming Committee.
Continuing Studies
The Committee met with the Associate Vice President for Continuing Studies to
understand better the structure and activities of Continuing Studies. A central point of
discussion related to the non-separation of the credit and non-credit components of
the Continuing Studies budget. One consequence of this is that there is an implicit
subsidy of non-credit activity from credit activity income. Although such a subsidy
appears to be needed and may well be appropriate, some members felt that this should
be made explicit, rather than arise as an implicit consequence of the budgetary
structure that is in place. It was noted that the inclusion of credit programs in the
Continuing Studies operation encourages cross-disciplinary initiatives and
technological innovations in delivery.
Other Issues
In addition to the items highlighted above, the Committee also heard briefly and
commented on the following issues during the past year:
• The Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (considered in May 1995)
• Decentralization of academic computing
• Early termination agreements for faculty
The Committee was generally very satisfied with the arrangements in place with
respect to these matters.
Unfinished Business
Outstanding Student Initiative. The July 1995 motion of the Committee included the
statement: "The Committee notes that the increased and planned expenditure relating
to the Outstanding Student Initiative represent significant commitments. It would
appreciate receiving reports on the Initiative during each of the next three years so that
it may examine the effectiveness of the corresponding expenditures." The Committee
has received such a report and intends to consider the matter at its May 1996 meeting.
Tuition Fees for International Students. As indicated above, the Committee is
interested in examining specific proposals relating to tuition fees for international
students.
 Vancouver Senate 11463
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Reports of Committees of Senate
Externally Funded Projects. As indicated above, the Committee would like to examine
further the funding arrangements that are in place, including the use of endowment
funds, for externally funded projects.
Administrative Policies for Classrooms. The Committee had intended to consider the
budgetary implications of administrative policies for classrooms, taking account of the
recent Classroom Master Plan as well as a report from a committee relating to
classroom operational policies. However, the latter report is not yet available.
The incoming Senate Budget Committee may wish to place the above four items on its
agenda.
Dr. Isaacson spoke briefly to the report, highlighting the various issues dealt with by the
committee.
Dr. Isaacson i        That the report be accepted.
Dr. MacDougall i
In response to a query by Mr. Brady, Vice President Birch confirmed that there will be a
line in the budget for funding professional development for faculty and teaching
assistants. An amount of $200,000 has been established on a recurring basis for core
operations as of next year. This year there is an amount of $100,000 in recurring funds
and $100,000 in soft money, plus project funds.
Dr. Richer asked if University money was being put into the construction of St. John's
College. The President responded that University money would not be used to fund the
project.
Mr. Gray stated that the Budget Committee Reports submitted to Senate do not reflect the
flavour of the work of the committee. He said the committee had full, spirited, and candid
discussions of a number of the issues presented, and he urged
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future committees to continue in the same manner. He commended the President for his
patience and responsiveness.
Dr. Isaacson expressed thanks and appreciation for the support received from members of
the committee and from the staff of the President's Office, particularly the office of
Budget and Planning.
The motion to accept the
report was put and carried.
1
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE (SEE APPENDIX B)
Dr. Berger, chair of the committee, presented the following report:
Faculty of Applied Science
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the Faculty of
Applied Science.
Faculty of Forestry
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals submitted by the
Faculty of Forestry.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the Faculty of
Graduate Studies, subject to minor editorial changes. Dr. Berger drew attention to a
proposal to establish a new Master of Landscape Architecture program. He explained
that the undergraduate program was being replaced by a graduate program. The
undergraduate courses will be phased out over the next four years and new graduate
courses will be phased in.
 Vancouver Senate 11465
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Reports of Committees of Senate
School of Nursing
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the School of
Nursing.
Dr. Berger l        That the proposals of the Faculties of Applied
Dean Goldberg i        Science, Forestry, Graduate Studies, and the
School of Nursing, be approved.
Carried.
Editorial changes
A list of editorial changes had been circulated for information.
Policy re records of editorial changes
Dr. Berger explained that an editorial change policy had been implemented as a result of
recommendations by the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on University Organization. He
stated that coordinating editorial changes with substantive changes had become
increasingly problematic and that this would require further procedural development. The
committee therefore recommended that the Registrar's Office maintain the editorial
change forms as a permanent record.
LIBRARY COMMITTEE
Dr. Gilbert, chair of the committee, spoke briefly to the following report which had been
circulated:
The Senate Library Committee met eight times during the past academic year; the
Chair and the University Librarian met twice with the Chairs of the Library Advisory
Committees and the senior Librarians and Bibliographers from the Library System.
 Vancouver Senate 11466
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The Senate Library Committee has focused its discussions on three major topics: the
Library's Restructuring Plan, the Library's new computer system, and the Library
Review Report, all of which hold implications for the Library's academic functions.
In the Library's Restructuring Plan, the Senate Library Committee has been concerned
to ensure that service point reorganization, circulation policies and changes to
interlibrary loan work effectively for all Library users. We have monitored the
procurement process for a new computer system which will be phased in at the
beginning of spring 1997. The Senate Library Committee wishes to assure Senate that
this major decision was reached after very thorough and careful evaluation by all
sectors within the Library. When the system comes on-line, it will mark a major step
forward for the Library's information systems, and thus for the academic endeavour.
As Senators well know, the Library underwent a major review this year, with Dean
Lynn Smith of Law as Chair of the Review Committee. The Review produced more
than 70 recommendations, six of which were directed specifically to the Senate
Library Committee. One of those recommendations dealt with an issue, the Serials to
Monograph spending ratio, which has become a major focus for the Senate Library
Committee as we try to find solutions to the serials pricing problems. We consulted
widely with the Library Advisory Committees on the applicability of a requirement
established some years ago by the Senate Library Committee, which essentially
required the Library to spend 65% of its collection budget on serials and 35% on
monographs. Our wide discussions with the Library Advisory Committees indicated
that none of the major areas in the Library actually have a ratio of 65:35 although the
average for the Library as whole does approximate these figures. Each Library
Advisory Committee therefore agreed that they would determine, within appropriate
guidelines, their own ratio of serials to monographs expenditures, a mechanism which
appears to have worked effectively this year. The Senate Library Committee has
agreed that the 65:35 serials to monographs ratio is no longer relevant or useful, and
that each Library Advisory Committee should be left to determine the ratio
appropriate to its academic area. We recommend to Senate that the requirement of a
fixed Serials to Monographs ratio be withdrawn.
A second recommendation of the Library Review Report directed to the Senate
Library Committee concerned establishing a Collections Management Council. This is
in process of discussion. In the next session of Senate, the Library Committee will act
on a third recommendation made in the Review: that is, to establish a Sub-committee
of the Senate Library Committee to review arrangements for collection coordination in
the Library.
A fourth recommendation concerned two committees approved by Senate in 1995 as a
result of the Senate Library Committee's report "Scholarly communication, serials and
technology: problems and possibilities". These
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Committees - one to examine policies concerning information technology, and a
second to examine the infrastructure necessary to make information readily available -
were struck by the Vice President, Student and Academic Services. These two
committees will shortly report to the Advisory Committee on Information Technology,
and we anticipate that their reports will be made to Senate in September.
The Chair of the Senate Library Committee, the University Librarian and the Vice
President, Student and Academic Services have met on a semi-regular basis this year to
discuss Library-related matters which needed discussions in the Senate Library
Committee. A recommendation that such meetings take place was made in the Review
Report.
As observant Senators will note, the Koerner Library is well along in construction and
we look forward to moving into the new Library later this year. I would like to bring
to the notice of Senate the very generous gift of Earl and Suzanne Dodson who have
contributed $100,000 to provide a second elevator for the building. The Dodsons have
also provided funding for lighting at the top of the Atrium and for expanding the
rooftop patio by the staff lounge.
During this session of Senate, the Senate Library Committee has been particularly
concerned to develop its relationship with the Library Advisory Committees. We are
pleased to report that the process is going well. The Senate Library Committee sees the
Advisory Committees as very necessary components in the planning of Library
activities, since these Committees represent faculty and student opinions. The Library
Advisory Committees also serve as fora for issues about which the Senate Library
Committee wishes to canvas faculty and student views.
The Senate Library Committee is pleased to announce that in March 1997, UBC and
Simon Fraser University will co-host "Research Communication at the Millennium", a
national conference on scholarly communications to be held at SFU Harbour Centre -
an indirect result of the publication of the 1995 report to this Senate. This meeting
will receive support from national professional associations, granting agencies, etc.
The Senate Library Committee is also pleased to report that the first UBC Library
Lecture will be held in October 1996, at which the speaker will be Dr. Michael Lesk
of Bellcore. This lecture will be co-sponsored by the Library, the Department of
Computer Science, and the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies.
In conclusion, the Senate Library Committee reiterates that the role of the Senate
Library Committee is to advise on Library policy as indicated in the University Act. It
is not the role of the Senate Library Committee to comment on aspects of
management, personnel or internal organization within the Library. During this term
of Senate, the Senate Library Committee has worked exceptionally hard on a number
of issues which are crucial to the future of the Library. However, it is of interest to
note that a number of issues raised in the 1988
 Vancouver Senate 11468
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Review of the Library are still with us. These include, for example, the role of the
provincial government in the funding of the UBC Library. It is the Senate Library
Committee's view that, as with every other academic and administrative unit at UBC,
the Library will face severe challenges during the next three years; it will need
considerable imagination to ensure those challenges are met successfully in order that
the integrity of the Library as a resource central to the academic goals at the university
is maintained. The Senate Library Committee urges that the university administration
pay close heed to the tenor of the Library Review Report and to its recommendations,
given the centrality of the Library to the academic exercise, and the Senate Library
Committee urges that, when and where possible, the University Administration assure
the Library its strongest support.
Finally in closing, I should like to thank all members of the Senate Library Committee
for their service during the past three years. Their continual interest and support have
been greatly appreciated. I should also like to thank the University Librarian, Dr. Ruth
Patrick, for her support of the Senate Library Committee and for engaging the Senate
Library Committee in many crucial decisions concerning the Library. I should like to
make special mention of the University Librarian's Executive Secretary, Jean-Philipe
Wilmshurst, who has been a very efficient and facilitative Secretary to the Senate
Library Committee during the past three years. Finally, I should like to acknowledge
the tremendous help of Ms. Janice Kreider, Coordinator of Collections, who, each
month, provided us with either uplifting or depressing news about the state of
international money markets relative to the price of serials. Acting on the data which
Ms. Kreider has continuously supplied, the Senate Library Committee is delighted to
inform Senate that, for this year at least, there will be no cuts in the serials collection.
Alas, we can make no such guarantee for the coming years.
Dr. Gilbert highlighted three major aspects of the report: the Library's Restructuring Plan,
the Library's new computer system, and the Library Review Report. Dr. Gilbert also drew
special attention to the very generous gift of $100,000 made by Suzanne Dodson, a UBC
librarian, and her husband, Earl, for the installation of a second elevator in the new
Koerner Library.
Dr. Gilbert expressed his gratitude to members of the committee who had worked
incredibly hard on the many issues brought before the committee. Dr. Gilbert paid a
 Vancouver Senate 11469
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
special tribute to the Librarian's Executive Secretary, Jean-Philipe Wilmshurst, and to
Janice Kreider, Coordinator of Collections, for the enormous amount of work they have
done for the committee over the past three years.
Dr. Gilbert l        That the report be received.
Mr. Banfield J
Carried.
On behalf of the committee, Dr. Grace expressed appreciation for the work done by Dr.
Gilbert as chair of the committee over the past three years. She stated that, under his
leadership, some very good steps had been taken to enhance the communication between
faculty, students and the Library.
Dr. Autor informed Senate that, in order to assist the Library, the Senate Curriculum
Committee has developed a system that ensures that library consultation takes place when
proposals for new programs, new courses or course changes are submitted.
NOMINATING COMMITTEE
Dr. Williams, chair of the committee, presented the following report on the committee's
recommendations to fill vacancies on Senate committees:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. S. Arnold - continuing member
Mr. A. Legge - replacing Mr. D. Khan
Academic Policy
Mr. S. Arnold - continuing member
Mr. J. Murray - replacing Mr. D. Shu
 Vancouver Senate 11470
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions
Mr. J. Boritz - replacing Mr. D. Culhane
Mr. J. Nobbs-Thiessen - replacing Mr. C. Lim
Agenda
Mr. J. Murray - replacing Mr. D. Culhane
Ms. C. Ng - replacing Mr. T. Lau
Appeals on Academic Standing
Mr. J. Boritz - continuing member
Ms. J. K. Gill - replacing Mr. E. B. Goehring
Ms. C. Ng - replacing Mr. T. Lau
Budget
Mr. J. Nobbs-Thiessen - replacing Mr. E. B. Goehring
Mr. V. Pacradouni - replacing Mr. E. C. H. Woo
Continuing Studies
Mr. S. Lohachitranont - replacing Mr. T. Lau
(1 vacancy)
Curriculum
Mr. A. Briggs - replacing Mr. D. G. Geros
Ms. J. K. Gill - replacing Mr. I. Gill
Mr. B. G. McDonald - replacing Mr. A. Lau
(1 vacancy)
Elections
(1 vacancy)
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Ms. C. Ng - replacing Mr. C. Lim
Library
Mr. J. Boritz - continuing member
Ms. L. Chui - continuing member
Mr. C. Gorman - replacing Ms. J. Dzerowicz
 Vancouver Senate 11471
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
Mr. J. Boritz - continuing member
Mr. C. Gorman - replacing Mr. D. Khan
Mr. M. Kirchner - replacing Mr. C. Lim
Student Awards
Mr. A. Legge - replacing Ms. L. Lam
Mr. D. Shu - continuing member
Tributes
Ms. L. Chui - continuing member
Mr. M. Kirchner - replacing Mr. E. B. Goehring
Dr. Williams l        That the recommendations of the Nominating
Dr. MacDougall J        Committee be approved.
Carried.
COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AWARDS (SEE APPENDIX C)
New Awards
Dr. Cook, chair of the committee, presented a list of new awards for acceptance by
Senate.
Dr. Cook l        That the awards (listed in Appendix C) be
Dean McBride J       accepted and forwarded to the Board of
Governors for approval and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
Carried.
Annual Report
Dr. Cook presented the following annual report, which had been circulated for
information:
 Vancouver Senate 11472
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
The report includes:
• Summary of awards presented to Senate between September 1993 and May 1996
• Summary of issues addressed by the Committee
• Issues for future consideration
1. SUMMARY OF AWARDS
The committee met 14 times and recommended acceptance of 183 awards. Total
annual value of these awards is about $1.2m. 125 awards (68%) are funded through
endowments and 58 awards (32%) are annually funded.
Of the total number of awards, the distribution by category of award is:
20 fellowships
69 scholarships
44 prizes
10 awards
40 bursaries
The distribution of awards and the total annual dollar value of awards by Faculty are
summarized in appended spreadsheets. (See Appendix C - Annual Report)
2. SUMMARY OF ISSUES
Conditions for Acceptance of Awards approved by the Senate in May of 1990 remain
in effect and have facilitated both the negotiation processes with donors as well as the
approval processes through the University governing bodies. The Committee is
satisfied that these conditions remain in effect for the foreseeable future.
Non-conforming Awards include approximately 200 (about 7% of the total
administered by UBC) which were approved prior to implementation of the
'Conditions for Acceptance of Awards'. These awards include discriminatory terms
which contravene current policy. Review of these awards was undertaken in the
Awards and Financial Aid Office in consultation with the Development Office.
Annually funded awards are changed as is appropriate and possible each year when
donors confirm funding. Endowed awards are being reviewed as administration of the
awards becomes increasingly difficult. With endowed awards the ability to change
terms is constrained by obligations to the donor and occasionally a necessity to
demonstrate that the award can no longer be administered as specified. The
Committee supports the commitment of the Awards and Financial Aid Office, in
cooperation with the Development Office, to continue to eliminate as many nonconforming awards as is possible.
 Vancouver Senate 11473
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Affiliation Award defines a category in which the recipient is required to provide
evidence of affiliation with a specified group or organization. For example, the
recipient must be a Sun-Province carrier, or a dependent of a member of a specified
union or professional organization. The Committee accepts new awards within this
category only if the terms are consistent with Senate policy. The Committee
discourages donors from creating affiliation awards and scrutinizes carefully any new
awards of this type.
No new affiliation awards were accepted during the 1993-96 term of the Senate.
Donors with existing affiliation awards were permitted to vary terms within the
existing descriptions, but only if such variations conformed with existing policy.
Changes to existing affiliation award description were deemed to create new awards
and were presented to Senate for approval.
Transfer of Academic Merit-based awards for Graduate Students to the Faculty of
Graduate Studies was undertaken in the summer of 1995 and is substantially
completed. Responsibility for academic merit-based funding for graduate students
transferred to the Faculty. Financial need-based funding, prizes and cheque
distribution remain with the Awards and Financial Aid Office. The Awards Office also
remains responsible for: 1) relations with the Development Office and the governing
bodies of the University to develop and approve new awards; and 2) electronic and
operational systems which monitor whether university policy and donor obligations
are met in the award assignment process. The Senate Committee supports this
continued monitoring of the award assignment process to ensure that awards are
assigned in accordance with existing Senate policy.
The Committee supports the transfer and the cooperation between the Faculty and the
Awards and Financial Aid Office to resolve funding issues for graduate students.
Award Term Review Projects were undertaken at the initiation of the Faculties of
Commerce and Education to ensure that existing award terms permitted effective
administration of awards within the changed program and/or department structure.
Outstanding Student Initiative Program, although outside the purview of the Senate
Awards Committee, is supported and viewed by the Committee as an important
recruiting tool for undergraduate students entering UBC from secondary schools. The
program originated in 1989-90 as an initiative of the President's Office arising from
the Task Force on Liaison, Recruiting and Admission.
An ad hoc review was initiated by the Vice-President Student and Academic Services
and Chaired by the Registrar in 1994. The chair of the Senate
 Vancouver Senate 11474
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Students Awards as well as the Director of Awards and Financial Aid
participated in the review. For 1995-96 program year, this recruiting program
included : a renewable scholarship of $10,000 payable at $2,500 for 4 years assuming
that students maintain scholarship standing; early offer of admission; early access to
Telereg; assured space in university graduate residence; opportunity to by-pass the
lottery system to obtain Parkade parking; as well as welcoming and congratulatory
letters and phone calls from various levels of the university.
The Committee noted that there are unresolved policy issues related to the program
and recommends that a program advisory committee be established by the Vice-
President Student and Academic Services. It is suggested that a representative from the
Senate Committee on Student Awards, the Senate Admissions Committee and the
Senate Budget Committee be invited to membership.
150% Rule which administratively linked the assignment of University Scholarship
Program scholarships and awards assigned on the recommendation of Faculties was
eliminated in 1993 at the recommendation of the Committee and with the approval of
Senate. The elimination of the Rule has had the anticipated effect of permitting the
Awards and Financial Aid Office to assign the University Scholarship funding in a
timely manner prior to student registration in September. Students receive University
Scholarship award assignments during the summer, know the precise amount of the
award assigned and what portion of their fees the award will pay. This together with
improvements in the administration of the BC Student Assistance Program loans by
government has substantially reduced the demand for short term UBC loans in
September. In addition, Faculty appointed scholarship Chairs within departments can
now recommend scholarships with knowledge of how this will affect a student's
overall merit-based funding from all university sources as this information is available
on Student Information System.
The Committee has reviewed the data resulting from the elimination of the 150% Rule
and is satisfied.
An Entrance Bursary Program was initiated by the Director in 1994. The program is
funded by an existing endowment, a new annual gift and is supplemented through the
University bursary budget. In the first year, the program provided about $70,000 in
Entrance bursary to students entering UBC from secondary schools who had
demonstrated financial need which could prevent them from attending UBC. Students
in need of funding were identified through the Entrance Scholarship application
process with the cooperation and assistance of secondary school principals and
counselling staff. In 1995-96, about $150,000 in Entrance bursary was provided to
students entering from secondary schools. The Committee supports the continuation
of the program.
 Vancouver Senate 11475
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
ISSUES FOR THE FUTURE
The Committee suggests review of:
1) "the 90% of a full course load with no failed courses" provision particularly
for those Faculties in which 90% of a full course load is greater than is required
in the four years of an undergraduate program in Arts and Science; and
2) scholarships for part-time undergraduate and graduate students as this has not
been reviewed since 1989-90.
CONCLUDING COMMENTS
The Committee compliments the preceding Vice President Administration and
Finance, A. Bruce Gellatly for the inclusion of the university awards in the 1994-95
Financial Statements. The Committee commends the Director of Awards and Financial
Aid, Carol Gibson, and the Awards Coordinator in the Development Office, Elizabeth
Ko, for their continued cooperation to ensure that awards brought forward to the
Committee and to Senate are consistent with the policies governing awards as
approved by Senate.
Dr. Cook summarized various aspects of the report, drawing particular attention to the
committee's comments under the heading "Outstanding Student Initiative Program". As
stated in the report, Dr. Cook, said that there are unresolved policy issues related to the
program. She asked that it be recorded in the minutes that the committee suggests that a
special review committee be established by the Vice-President Student and Academic
Services, the membership to include a representative from the Senate Committee on
Student Awards, the Senate Admissions Committee and the Senate Budget Committee.
Dr. Cook paid tribute to the work done by members of the committee, and gave special
thanks to Mr. Bruce Gellatly, former Vice President Administration and Finance, for
including information on awards in the University's 1994/95 financial statements. Dr.
Cook also commended Ms. Carol Gibson, the Director of Awards and Financial Aid, for
her major contribution to the re-doing of the awards program.
 Vancouver Senate 11476
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Report of the University Librarian - 1994-95
STUDENT APPEALS ON ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE
Senate was informed that a report on the committee's activities would be submitted to the
September meeting of Senate.
Report of the University Librarian -1994-95
Dr. Patrick, University Librarian, presented the report, stating that it highlights some of
the strategic activities engaged in to achieve the Library's mission, which is to provide
outstanding access to the universe of recorded knowledge. Dr. Patrick noted that
electronic acquisitions and access to Internet have increased, and that teaching programs
are being increased through the Teaching and Learning Program. She stated that in order
to find out what users need, interaction with users through focus groups has increased.
Services have also improved through the implementation of self service renewal and check
out.
Dr. Patrick stated that over the past six years the Library has focussed on two strategic
areas; technology and facilities. She stated that the Library has reallocated $1 million to
acquire technology, and that technology had been used to reduce operating costs and
improve service. Dr. Patrick announced that the Library had received an award for
quality and productivity for document delivery service from the Canadian Association of
University Business Officers, which she said was evidence that the Library manages its
resources in the best possible way.
Referring to facilities, Dr. Patrick stated that it was anticipated that Phase I of the Walter
C. Koerner Library will be completed in December, and that there will be 900 user
stations together with a fully equipped computer training laboratory to help in the
transition towards a digital library. The Library is also working towards developing a
Master Space Plan.
 Vancouver Senate 11477
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Report on Official Community Plan
Dr. Patrick expressed thanks and appreciation to the 15 library advisory committees for
their advice, and gave special thanks to the Senate Library Committee who, she said, had
worked diligently to understand the complex issues of the Library.
Report on Official Community Plan
Professor Quayle, member of the G.V.R.D. Planning Advisory Committee presented the
following report on the U.B.C. Official Community Plan, for information:
At the April 17, 1996 Senate meeting I reported on the progress of the Official
Community Plan from both a professional and personal point of view. Since that
meeting, there has been one Planning Advisory Committee meeting where a draft
"Vision for the UBC Community" was discussed. This vision statement would be
positioned at the beginning of the Official Community Plan document, hopefully
driving both the planning principles and the plan itself. This draft vision statement,
not yet formally approved or reviewed by all the necessary groups, begins with the
statement: A vision for the UBC community: creating an exemplary community for
living, working and learning. It is then suggested that the plan must address some key
elements which are outlined below:
living - working - learning
The community is a place to live and work, where learning is infused in daily life; the
academic tradition is reflected in all aspects of the community. The questioning
inherent in learning permeates everyday activities.
respect - harmony - patterns
The community is planned, designed, constructed and inhabited with the utmost
respect for the land and its patterns — natural, cultural and historical. The community
harmonizes with its setting and its academic core. Residents, staff and students join in
a sense of stewardship for the environment. Neighbouring communities are
considered.
stimulating - healthy - interactive
The community seeks diversity of people, form, use, processes and interactions. The
community mixture that results is stimulating and is constantly encouraging
interaction with the environment and with the community academic resources.
creativity - innovation - renewal
The community evolves continually through creativity, innovation and renewal. Its
landscape and activities follow ecological cycles and parallel natural systems. Through
an understanding of these processes, learning is fostered.
 Vancouver Senate 11478
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Report on Official Community Plan
demonstration - experimentation - leadership
The community is different from others — it leads by example. It provides a testing
ground for theories generated within the university, and offers back ideas and
interactions. This connection between academic endeavours and community life offers
a demonstration to other communities of what is possible.
A narrative description of the envisioned community follows these key elements in the
proposed vision statement. An important question arises if this vision were to be
adopted — what actions are required to realize such a vision?
In terms of process and timing, a meeting is scheduled between the UBC Board of
Governors and the GVRD Board of Directors on May 22 to discuss the Official
Community Plan status. At the Planning Advisory Committee we are expecting a
second and final draft of the plan by the end of May.
It would be extremely useful if Senate would engage in some discussion about the
general academic aspects of the Official Community Plan. At the last meeting I raised
issues about the responsibility of the university as an educational institution, the
articulation of an academic vision, the seeking of balance among ecology, economy
and community, the demand for more creativity, and an emphasis on the campus
"cluster of communities" concept were raised.
Some issues and questions that Senate may wish to address include:
The content and clarity of the academic vision for U.B.C.'s future, especially in the
context of its influence on the development of the south campus lands, requires
debate. In other words, how do we find balance among
1) the desire to maximize endowment to sustain the university and further the
academic vision,
2) the opportunity to be leaders in building a sustainable community and,
3) the mandate, as a university, to plan and develop those lands in an
environmentally sound manner?
Assuming that it is important to enhance the teaching and research mandate of
U.B.C, how should we be considering the long term influence of planning moves
on academic units who are directly affected? These units with South Campus
enterprises include the Faculties of Agricultural Sciences, Forestry and Science, the
Departments of Animal Science, Botany, Plant Science and Zoology, the UBC
Botanical Gardens and the UBC Animal Care Centre. This group has made its
academic concerns known to the administration along with specific suggestions to
make their enterprises more efficient and responsive to the OCP directions. The
President's Property and Planning Advisory Committee passed a motion at its last
meeting to refer a detailed memo from the above concerned parties to the President
underlining our concerns about these academic issues.
The concept of mixed use has been applied throughout the campus community in
the draft Official Community Plan. This will support the
 Vancouver Senate 11479
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Report on Official Community Plan
GVRD's objectives of creating communities where living, working, shopping and
playing are in close proximity. On the main campus, this concept has the potential
to create a much more vibrant and active place for a longer period each day. Are
there issues around the "commercialization" of the campus? Where do we draw
the line?
These questions are just some of the many that surround the Official Community Plan
— and any public planning process, for that matter. The comments of Senate on these
and other issues would be appreciated.
Professor Quayle commented briefly on the report, stating that a second draft of the
Official Community Plan was expected towards the end of May and that the Planning
Advisory Committee will be meeting in early June to consider that draft.
Professor Quayle summarized the issues and questions outlined in the report that perhaps
Senate might wish to address, stating that she would be interested in hearing from
senators that have a viewpoint on these matters.
Vice President Birch expressed appreciation to the deans of the three faculties which
currently have academic activities located on the south campus and Totem Field, the Plant
Operations and the Animal Care Unit, and noted that out of a series of meetings came an
agreement on a number of principles. The heads of the relevant departments have worked
collaboratively in arriving at a set of principles. It was agreed
1. that less intensive functions which can be relocated away from the University to
such places as the Agassiz or Oyster River farms, will be;
2. functions which are more appropriately located in the academic core of the
campus, will be; and
3. that revenue from development should support the re-location, in whole or in part.
A decision was made that the Totem Field, which is the most desirable location for
integrated land based life sciences uses, should be assured for those uses for the next thirty
years.
 Vancouver Senate 11480
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Other business
Other business
POLITICAL SCIENCE - PROGRESS REPORT
Dean Grace reported that he had received that morning, the second of three promised
reports from the Department of Political Science. He explained that the report contains an
outline of how the department has complied with the terms of the agreement reached
between Dr. Elkins and himself last October. It also states how the department feels that
it now meets or will soon meet the terms of the matrix of expected and desirable elements
recently approved by Graduate Council. In addition, the report includes as an appendix
the Working Group 3 report, "Fostering a Supportive Environment", which, among many
elements, provides a statement on professional conduct for faculty. About twenty
recommendations, motions and sub-motions have been adopted by the department,
including the establishment of an equity and academic freedom advisory committee to be
chaired by the head. Dean Grace said it was clear that an enormous amount of work has
been going on in the department in response to the questions that were at issue last
summer and fall.
NOTICE OF MOTION RE ACADEMIC ADVISING
Ms. Lica Chui gave notice of motion for the September meeting to the effect that a
committee be established to look at the issue of academic advising for undergraduate
students.
Report of the Tributes Committee (in camera)
EMERITUS STATUS
Dean McBride, chair of the committee, presented a report recommending that the
following be offered emeritus status:
Mr. J. Atrens
Professor Emeritus of Law
Mr. R. C. Beaumont
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Germanic Studies
Dr. T. Roy Bentley
Professor Emeritus of Language Education
Dr. Paul Bradley
Professor Emeritus of Economics
Mrs. Alena Branda
Senior Instructor Emerita of Human Kinetics
Mrs. Lore Brongers
Administrative Librarian Emerita
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11481
Report of the Tributes Committee (in
camera)
Dr. William F. Caselton
Associate Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Dr. Bomshik Chang
Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Dr. John A. R. Coope
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
Dr. Marian G. R. Coope
Associate Professor Emerita of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Mr. Richard Copley
Senior Instructor Emeritus of Geography
Dr. J. Allan S. Evans
Professor Emeritus of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies
Dr. Armin Frei
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Dr. Douglas L. Golding
Associate Professor Emeritus of Forest Resources Management
Dr. Donald D. Greenwood
Professor Emeritus of Audiology and Speech Sciences
Dr. Henry C. Hightower
Professor Emeritus of Community and Regional Planning
Dr. L. E. Hill
Professor Emeritus of History
Dr. Muhammad Iqbal
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Dr. Wolfgang G. Jilek
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry
Dr. Lawrence D. Jones
Professor Emeritus of Commerce and Business Administration
Ms. Diana Kent
General Librarian Emerita
Mr. William J. P. Logan
Associate Professor Emeritus of Curriculum Studies
Dr. Larry F. Moore
Associate Professor Emeritus of Commerce and Business
Administration
Dr. Ian H. Plenderleith
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Dr. G. Stephen Pond
Professor Emeritus of Oceanography
Dr. Angus Rae
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Dr. Hilton Ramsey
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Dr. G. F. Schrack
Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering
Dr. Fred E. Stockholder
Assistant Professor Emeritus of English
Dr. Stanford N. Stordy
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Dr. J. Neil Sutherland
Professor Emeritus of Educational Studies
Dr. Maria G. Tomsich
Associate Professor Emerita of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Dr. Bruce L. White
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Dr. Jerry S. Wiggins
Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Dr. Robert M. Will
Dean Emeritus of Arts and Professor Emeritus of Economics
Dr. James V. Whittaker
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Dean McBride
Dr. Slonecker
}
That the recommendations of the Tributes
Committee concerning emeritus status, be
approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 11482
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Report of the Tributes Committee (in camera)
Dean McBride informed Senate that, in future, the Calendar listings of emeritus status
will list Vice Presidents. Vice Presidents and Deans will also be listed under their
respective departments.
HONORARY B.SC. (PHARM.) DEGREES
Dean McBride reminded Senate that at the January meeting a motion was approved
offering honorary B.Sc. (Pharm.) degrees to those persons who became members in good
standing of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia and who received their
training in this province prior to the granting of B.Sc. (Pharm.) degrees by The University
of British Columbia. Dean McBride informed Senate that the committee had considered
the list of those eligible, and recommended that the following individuals be granted
honorary B.Sc. (Pharm.) degrees at a special ceremony in the fall:
Robert William Barclay
Paul Harold Erling Bjarnson
Adeline Marie Bluenauer
Stuart Wallace Boucher
Bernhard Harry Brown
Douglas Arthur Tim Chipperfield
Ian William Coote
Douglas Morrison Crosby
Joseph Anderson Crowder
Stanley Reginald Davies
Charles William Doodson
Bernard Alfred Ellams
Gerald Arthur Elliott
Peter Gehrke Guthie
Henry H. Hersog
Kathleen Jean Mary Lange Jancowski
Bruce Elbert Johnston
James E. Leahy
Erica Merian McCall
Merwyn Elliott Balfour McVicar
Elmer S. Meier
Robert Gwynne Milward
Stuart Richardson Pallott
 Vancouver Senate 11483
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Dr. Robert M. Will
• Roland Norman Pengelly
• Kenneth Ansley Pitman
• Henry Elbourne MacKay Richards
• Alexander R. Thomson
• Vera Salone Varner
• John Joseph Weicker
Dean McBride l        That the recommendations of the Tributes
Dean McNeill i        Committee concerning the granting of
honorary B.Sc. (Pharm.) degrees be approved.
Carried.
Dr. Robert M. Will
Dr. Gilbert said that since this was probably the last occasion on which Senate would
have an opportunity to hear the perorations of its institutional memory, it would not be
appropriate for members to leave without recognising Bob Will. Dr. Gilbert said that he
had enjoyed listening to and working with him on committees. He stated that Senate had
been exceedingly fortunate that Dr. Will had reminded members, on more than one
occasion, of their academic responsibilities to a university which he obviously loves. Dr.
Gilbert said "I know that we all wish him well as he goes from us tonight".
Dr. Will received a standing ovation from members of Senate.
Adjournment
The meeting adjourned at 10:30 p.m.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September 18, 1996.
 Vancouver Senate 11484
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Appendix A
Appendix A
MANDATED ENROLMENT INCREASE FOR 1996/97
Memorandum to Deans
Today we received the letter from the Ministry of Education, Skills and Training confirming the
message already conveyed that the 4% productivity increase announced by the Premier would
carry with it the expectation that UBC would increase its undergraduate enrolment by 921 FTE
students. UBC would also be deemed to have an increase of 4% or 152 FTE in the number of
funded places for graduate students. During the next few months the MEST will engage with us in
discussion of future enrolment plans at the undergraduate and graduate levels in the light of
UBC's distinctive role in the provincial system of higher education and with reference to
performance and outcomes.
In this week's preliminary discussion of strategies for achieving an increase of 921 FTE
undergraduate students, the following points were made:
1. It is essential that we actually achieve the increase since the Ministry has stated clearly
that, if there is a shortfall (as determined by reviewing November enrolment) the
scheduled grant payments will be reduced accordingly.
2. Tuition revenue from 921 FTE students is about $2 million about half of which has
already been built into 1996/97 budget projections to minimize the need for reallocation.
This leaves a potential $1 million to reinforce the capacity required to enrol the additional
921 FTE or approximately $1,000 per student.
3. The starting assumption is that we will make our best efforts to increase enrolment by 4%
in each undergraduate program. To the extent that we cannot confidently predict an
increase of 4% in a particular program, we will have to plan for an increase of more than
4% in another program or programs in order to offset the shortfall. First we will
determine whether another program in the same faculty can be increased to provide the
required offsetting enrolment and, failing that, we will determine which other faculty can
do so.
4. To the extent that enrolment increase in one faculty drives costs in another faculty, the
faculty providing service teaching will require financial support. For example, Arts for
first-year English and Science for first-year Mathematics. Funds may be shifted
subsequently in keeping with shifts in the teaching demands from one faculty to another.
5. We will attempt to increase the number of students admitted to 2nd, 3rd and 4th years in
order to minimize the enrolment bulge in 1st year but, with the sharp increase in the
number of degree-granting institutions in the province, transfer patterns may be changing
and we may have to take an increased proportion of newly admitted students into 1st
year.
6. A significant increase in Extrasessional Studies enrolment is projected but, since some of
this is likely to constitute a shift of students from daytime to evening courses, we cannot
safely assume that the increase in Extrasessional Studies enrolment can be considered a net
increase in total enrolment.
7. Enrolment will increase by a substantial percentage in courses offered in a distance
education/distributed learning mode but this is, as yet, on a fairly small base. This source
of enrolment will grow in significance in the next few years.
 Vancouver Senate 11485
Minutes of May 15,1996	
Appendix A
8. Diploma programs will be promoted and faculties will examine the potential for filling
courses with any unused capacity with unclassified and occasional students.
9. Faculties will consider the possibility of accelerating implementation of plans for program
simplification, block timetables, extrasessional scheduling and other means of increasing
efficiency and controlling costs in order to increase enrolment.
10. Underlying the provincially-mandated "productivity increase" is the expectation that
institutions will accommodate the 4% increase in enrolment with no increase in the
provincial operating grant and no increase in tuition rates. The small amount available
from the fact that more undergraduate students will be enrolled and will, therefore, pay
tuition fees, will be allocated first to those faculties which take a disproportionately high
share of the enrolment increase and those faculties which take on additional service
teaching for students enrolled in other faculties.
I have attached a table showing Full-Time Equivalent Students (undergraduate) by program in
each of the past six years. The right-hand column shows the required distribution of the
"productivity increase" across programs on the assumption that each program will produce an
increase in enrolment of 4%.
I would appreciate receiving a preliminary draft plan as soon as possible from each Dean showing
how the 4% increase will be achieved. Submitting an outline by Friday, April 12 would be helpful
even if it requires refinement during the following week.
Attached: Full-Time Equivalent Students (90/91 to 95/96) and "Productivity Increases" (96/97)
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11486
Appendix A
Tables
Mandated enrolment increase for 1996/97
tablel: Previously Approved and Mandated Quotas for 1996/97
Faculty
Level/Program
Quota
Quota Subtotal
Mandated Quota
Increase
Arts
Yearl
1,500
250
Year 2
450
100
Years 3 &4
350
120
Total
2,300
470
AgSci
Yearl
125
125
-
Applied Sci
Yearl
450
9
Year 2
513
22
Total
963
31
Commerce
Year 2
375
35
Year 3
85
15
Total
460
50
Dentistry
40
7
Education
B.Ed. (Sec)
360
15
B.Ed. (Elem) 12 mth
216
36
B.Ed. (Elem) 2 yr
114
12
NITEP
30
Total
720
63
FNSC
Yearl
35
3
Year 2
45
5
Year 3
15
Total
95
8
Forestry
BSF
BSc (Nat. Resource)
BSc Wood Prod.
65
20
20
Total
105
-
Human Kin.
Yearl
65
8
Year 2
45
8
Year 3
60
8
Total
170
24
Law
180
23
Medicine
120
24
Rehab
70
8
Music
250
-
Nursing
Yearl
80
-
Post RN
107
4
Total
187
4
Pharm.
Yearl
140
4
Science
Yearl
1,100
200
Year 2
250
50
Year 3
150
50
Total
1,500
300
Social Wk
40
4
Grand Total
7,425
1,013
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(2)
(2)
(4)
Total enrolment of 500 represents an increase of 9 students.
Allocation between programs is dependent on demand; this is an example.
Includes BMLS and Medical Residents with no Senate approved quotas.
Indicates last year's intake into PRN program, but is not an approved quota.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11487
Appendix A
table 2: Full-Time Equivalent Students
1990/91
1991/92
1992/93
1993/94
1994/95
1995/96
Productivity
increases
Undergraduate
GENERAL PROGRAMS
Arts:        1st and 2nd years
Upper years
3305
3561
3311
3708
2901
3734
2966
3574
2875
3324
3010
3258
126
137
Education:  1st and 2nd years
Upper years
19
2091
28
2152
21
1925
21
1891
32
1889
25
1896
1
79
Fine Arts
100
112
92
98
117
101
4
Family & Nutritional Sc
162
165
204
257
270
292
12
Music
259
270
263
253
261
251
11
Phys. Ed. & Recreation
620
623
572
586
533
570
24
Science:   1st & 2nd years
Upper years
2487
1639
2718
1728
2528
1913
2298
2205
2378
2181
2465
2065
103
87
Social Work
110
105
122
118
117
90
4
Unclass. & Senior Citizens
653
766
968
906
693
639
27
SUBTOTAL GENERAL
PROGRAMS
15006
15686
15244
15174
14670
14661
614
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
Agricultural Sciences
282
340
373
414
440
449
19
Applied Sci (excl. Nursing)
1847
1962
1992
2072
2111
2098
88
Commerce
1311
1285
1290
1287
1273
1250
52
Forestry
237
251
283
365
371
469
20
Law
709
730
674
610
581
546
23
SUBTOTAL PROFESSIONAL
PROGRAMS
4386
4568
4611
4748
4776
4813
202
HEALTH SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Dentistry
155
153
155
164
158
157
7
Dental Residents
7
7
7
7
6
6
0
Dental Hygiene
0
0
0
0
6
6
0
Medicine
485
473
475
477
478
483
20
Medical Laboratory Science
39
45
41
50
48
46
2
Medical Residents
508
508
525
496
545
582
24
Subtotal Medicine
1032
1026
1041
1023
1071
1111
47
Nursing
484
514
529
568
540
460
19
Pharmaceutical Sciences
404
434
425
450
440
460
19
Pharmaceutical Residents
0
0
0
0
17
13
1
Rehabilitation Medicine
185
191
191
200
199
197
8
SUBTOTAL HEALTH
SCIENCE PROGRAMS
2267
2325
2375
2412
2436
2411
101
Open Learning Agency
0
0
0
0
81
81
3
Total Undergraduate
21659
22579
22230
22334
21962
21965
920
Notes:
1. 5th year unclassified Education, included in upper years - Education
2. 1st & 2nd year Education includes only NITEP
3. Landscape Architecture included with Agricultural Sciences
4. Visitors included with program
5. Engineering FTE based on average normal load in prior years
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11488
Appendix A
table 3: Forecast Changes in Enrolment for 1996/97
Headcount increased intake
Flow-through
changes
Year      Year      Year
1 2 3
Other    Total
Net total changes FTE
in FTEs Target
Ag Sci
46
0
0
0
46
37.7
19
FNSC
18
3
5
0
26
21.6
12
Arts (B.A.)
(51)
250
100
120
419
362.0
263
BFA
-
0
0
0
-
0.0
4
Music
-
0
0
0
-
0.0
11
Social
Work
4
0
0
4
3.8
4
Commerce
15
35
15
0
65
60.5
52
Dentistry
-
0
7
0
7
7.0
7
Education
70
70
80.0
80
Engineering
47
9
22
0
78
97.1
88
Forestry
60
0
0
0
23
83
73.9
20
H. Kinetics
10
8
8
8
34
30.6
24
Law
-
8
15
0
23
21.7
23
Medicine
-
24
24
24.0
47
Rehab
-
8
0
0
8
8.0
8
Pharm. Sci.
-
4
0
0
4
4.0
20
Nursing
(53)
0
0
4
(49)
-44.0
19
Science
64
200
50
50
364
327.6
190
Unclassified
-
0
0
0
-
0.0
30
Total
156
529
222
182
117
1206
1115.5
921
(1) Includes FTE from co-op program credits
(2) Includes diploma program increase of 23 FTE
(3) Includes MD students returning from LOA
(1)
(2)
 Vancouver Senate 11489
Minutes of May 15,1996	
APPENDIX B
APPENDIX B
COURSE AND CURRICULUM PROPOSALS
Faculty of Applied Science
Change in Faculty of Applied Science Calendar Statement - replace MATH 254 with
APSC 201, and under Admission from Science change CPSC 111 to CPSC 122
Bio-Resource Engineering
Program change
Chemical Engineering
Program changes
Civil Engineering
Program change
Electrical Engineering
Deletion ELEC 351
Program changes
Engineering Physics
Program change
Geological Engineering
Program changes
METALS AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING
Change MMAT 394 - change in hours and credits, now (3)
MMAT 458 - change in title, hours, prerequisite, credits, now (3)
Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
Program change
Faculty of Forestry
Natural Resources Conservation
Changes to the B.Sc. (Natural Resources Conservation) Program
New Course        CONS 451(15) Integrated Field School
Changes CONS 440, 481, FRST 486 - change in description
 Vancouver Senate 11490
Minutes of May 15,1996	
APPENDIX B
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Chemical Engineering
New Course        CHML 567 (2-4)d System Identification and Adaptive Control
Change CHML 565 - change in title, description and credits, now (2-4)d
Civil Engineering
New Course        CIVL 525 (3) Developing Computer Application for Civil
Engineering
Change CIVL 566 - change in description, title and credits, now (2)
Deletions CIVL 509, 548, 561, 578, 587, 588
Curriculum Studies
Change in Calendar entry:        Curriculum Studies
The Department offers a Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies
Educational Psychology and Special Education
New Courses      EPSE 591 (3) Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation
EPSE 593 (3) Design and Analysis of Research with Small Samples
and Single Subjects
EPSE 594 (3) Meta-Analysis: Quantitative Research Synthesis
Change EPSE 601 - change in credits, now (3/6)c
Electrical Engineering
Changes ELEC 550, 570, 576, 581, 582, 589 - change in credits, now (3)
Geological Sciences
Deletions GEOL 510, 512, 516, 531, 551, 593
Germanic Studies
New Course        GERM 506 (3/6)d Intercultural Competence and Second Language
Acquisition
 Vancouver Senate 11491
Minutes of May 15,1996	
APPENDIX B
Health Care and Epidemiology
M.H.A. degree - change to Calendar statement:
The Graduate Program in Health Administration is designed to provide the
educational and professional foundations that are necessary for those aspiring to
management and leadership positions in the health care field. The 15-month program
emphasizes analytical thinking through generic curriculum rather than through
narrow areas of subspecialization. A comprehensive exam test analytic abilities.
Flexibility is provided for students who wish to pursue individual interests through
elective course work, a clerkship project, a management project, and an essay. A thesis
is not required. Late afternoon-early evening course scheduling permits a part-time
approach which many students prefer and need. A Master of Health Administration
(M.H.A.) degree is awarded after successful completion of 30 credits of course work
and other requirements.
HCEP 528 (3) Demographic Principles and Methods in Health
HCEP 517, 599 - change in credits, now (3)
New course
Changes
History
Changes
Deletion
New Courses
HIST 547, 548 - change in credits, now (3/6)d
HIST 584
HIST 550 (3) Readings in Early Modern European History
HIST 551 (3-12)d Topics in Early Modern European History
HIST 552 (3) Seminar in Early Modern European History
HIST 568 (3) Readings in Early Modern Japanese and World
History
HIST 587 (3-12)d Topics in Economic History
HIST 588 (3-12)d Topics in Social History
Landscape Architecture
New Graduate Program - Master of Landscape Architecture
Changes LARC 510 - change in credits, now (2-9)
LARC 599 - change in title, now Research Thesis - Open only to
MASLA candidates
Deletions LARC 199, 205, 206, 220, 221, 251, 254, 305, 306, 320, 340, 351,
355, 405, 420, 430, 431, 440, 451, 454, 499
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
APPENDIX B
New Courses
11492
LARC 421 (3) Introduction to Landscape Architecture: Landscape
Architecture Nature and Society [replaces LARC 221]
LARC 422 (3) Landscape Architectural History [replaces LARC 220]
LARC 501 (9) Design Studio 1: Introduction - Restricted to MLA
students
LARC 502 (9) Design Studio 2: Design Methods
LARC 503 (9) Design Studio 3: Urban and Sustainability Workshops
LARC 504 (9) Design Studio 4: Urban and Regional Public Realms
LARC 505 (9) Design Studio 5: Patterns, Policies and Types
LARC 511 (1) Introductory Workshop [replaces LARC 199]
LARC 520 (3) Theories in Experience and Place
LARC 521 (3) Design Methods and Theories [replaces LARC 320]
LARC 525 (3) Design-Research Methods in Landscape Architecture
LARC 531 (3) Introduction to Landscape Technology [replaces
LARC 251]
LARC 532 (3) Structures and Materials [replaces LARC 351]
LARC 533 (3) Advanced Landscape Technology [replaces LARC
451]
LARC 535 (3) Introduction to Computers in Landscape Architecture
[replaces LARC 355]
LARC 541 (3) Landscape Planning and Management [replaces
LARC 440]
LARC 542 (3) Visual Resource Management Theories (Same as
FRST 490) [replaces LARC 340]
LARC 551 (1) Professional Practice 1 [replaces LARC 254]
LARC 552 (3) Professional Practice 2 [replaces LARC 454]
LARC 580 (2-6) Directed Studies in Design Analysis, Programming,
and Theory
LARC 581 (2-6) Directed Studies in Landscape Planning and
Sustainability
LARC 582 (1-3) Special Topics Seminar
LARC 598 (9) Design Thesis - Open only to MLA candidates
Language Education
Changes
LANE 534 -
EADM 561
Change in Calendar entry:
change in credits
- change in prerequisite
Language Education
The Department offers a Ph.D. in Language Education
 Vancouver Senate 11493
Minutes of May 15,1996	
APPENDIX B
Library, Archival and Information Studies
New course ARST 596 (3) Professional Experience
Changes ARST 598, LIBR 598 - change in title and assignment of 3 credits
LIBR 539, 542, 579 - change in credits, now (3-9)d
Change in program requirements
Mechanical Engineering
New Course        MECH 698 (3) Seminar
Change MECH 598 - change in description
Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
New Courses      MMPE 574 (3) Mining Environment Case Studies
MMPE 581 (3) Environmental Technologies and Issues in Mining
Change MMPE 580 - change in credits from (2) to (3)
MMPE 551, 598, 698 - change in description
Deletion MMPE 592
PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS
New Course        PCTH 514 Seminar in Pharmacology or Therapeutics
Physics
Change PHYS 555 - change in credits, now (l-6)c
Sociology
Changes SOCI 504 - split into two courses:
SOCI 502 Research Design and Techniques - Quantitative; and
SOCI 503 Research Design and Techniques - Qualitative
SOCI 501 now 500, old 502 now 501, 503 now 504
New Courses      SOCI 507 (3/6)d Advanced Theory Seminar
SOCI 508 (3/6)d Advanced Methods Seminar
SOCI 512 (3/6)d Feminist Studies and Sociology of Gender
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11494
APPENDIX B
Statistics
New
Changes
Deletion
Theatre
New
Changes
STAT 518 (3) Theoretical Statistics.
STAT 536 (3) Statistical Theory for the Design and Analysis of
Clinical Studies
STAT 537 (3) Linear Models
STAT 534 - change in title, description and prerequisite
STAT 550 - change in prerequisite
STAT 519
THTR 507 (3) Scenery Design Studio II
THTR 508 (3) Costume Design Studio II
THTR 551 (3) Lighting Design I
THTR 505, 506 - change in credits, now (3)
School of Nursing
Changes NURS 105 - change in credits, now (3)
NURS 445 - addition of a credit value of (3)
EDITORIAL CHANGES
Summary of Editorial changes, Term 2. April 30 1996
DEPT
Course
Calendar page      Change
AAHE
508
deletion of redundant number
AAHE
531
deletion of redundant number
AAHE
532
deletion of redundant number
AAHE
565
deletion of redundant number
AAHE
601
deletion of redundant number
AAHE
602
deletion of redundant number
AGEC
407
prerequisite
AGEC
411
prerequisite
AGEC
420
prerequisite
AGSC
60 b
correction of fee statement
AGSC
93 a
new statement of application fee
AGSC
60 b
AGSC 301 field trip fee
AGSC
60 b
AGSC 300 field trip fee increase
ANTH
143b
change to fit new hons B.A..
ANTH
121c
brings entry into line with new req.
ANTH
121c
deletion of ANTH 333 from prog.
ANTH
122a
changes credits of animal biology program electives. To reflect current courses
ANTH
121c
change to fit new B.A. regs.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11495
APPENDIX B
ANTH
121a
ANTH
121c
ANTH
255c
ANTH
220
ANTH
221
ANTH
301
ANTH
310
ANTH
329
ANTH
333
ANTH
401
ASIA
125a
ASIA
522
ATSC
200
ATSC
300
BAMS
510
BATL
p. not li
BATL
510
BATL
580
CLST
CLST
98 b
CLST
84 b
CLST
83 b,c
CLST
102 b
CLST
303
EDUC
222 b
EDUC
234 a
ENGL
394
EPSE
235 c
FNAR
237 b
FOPR
363
FRST
207 b
FRST
205 be
FRST
231
FRST
486
GEOG
132 c
GEOG
133 a
GEOG
425 a
GEOG
290
GEOL
235
HIST
426
HIST
501
HIST
505
HIST
506
HIST
510
HIST
511
HIST
516
HIST
520
HIST
521
HIST
525
HIST
526
HIST
530
HIST
531
HIST
533
HIST
535
HIST
536
HIST
538
HIST
540
HIST
541
HIST
543
HIST
550
HIST
553
HIST
555
HIST
555
HIST
558
HIST
560
p. not listed in Grad. St. section.
change program to fit current courses.
change program to fit current courses
supplement to prev. change form
change in title and description
change in title and description
delete, replaced by ANTH 222
delete - no longer offered.
change in title descr and credits
delete - no longer offered
change in title, descr. and credits
new paragraph - entry requirements
title
title
title, description
title
Change in administrative responsibility for Centre from Commerce to Graduate Studies
title
title
change in department name
list of courses
List b, list of courses
List of courses
List of courses
number
clarification of credit requirements
clarification of promotion requirement
description
clarification of admission requirement
clarification of program requirement
prerequisite
addition of footnote
changes to footnotes
title, description
description, prerequisite
deletion of redundant phrase
change in list of courses
change in list of courses
change vector
prerequisite
description
change number, title, credits
change number
change number, title, credits
change number
change number, title, credits
change number, title, credits
change number
change number, title, credits
change number
change number, title, credits
change number
change number, title, credits
change number
change number
change number, title, credits
change number
change number
change number, title, credits
change number
change number
change number
change number
change number, title, credits
change number
change number
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11496
APPENDIX B
HIST
562
change
number
HIST
562
change number, title, credits
HIST
564
change number
HIST
567
change number
HIST
567
change number, title, credits
HIST
570
change number
HIST
574
change number
HIST
574
change number, title, credits
HIST
575
change number
HIST
576
change number, title, credits
HIST
577
change number, title, credits
HIST
578
change number
HIST
578
change number, title, credits
HIST
580
change number, title, credits
HIST
581
change number, title, credits
HIST
582
change number
HIST
587
change number, title, credits
HIST
589
change number
HIST
590
change number, title, credits
HIST
593
change number, title, credits
HIST
595
change number
HIST
HKIN
HKIN
HKIN
596
261 a
263 a
262 b
change number, title, credits
HKIN
110
title, description
HKIN
200
number, title, description
HKIN
362
description
HKIN
364
prerequisite
HKIN
367
description
HKIN
368
prerequisite
HKIN
371
prerequisite
HKIN
481
prerequisite
LTAL
548
credits, title
LAST
136 c
change to course list
LAST
136 c
change to course list
LATN
411
prerequisite
LATN
411
prerequisite
LATN
411
prerequisite
LATN
412
prerequisite
LATN
413
prerequisite
LATN
414
prerequisite
LATN
416
prerequisite
LATN
417
prerequisite
LATN
418
prerequisite
LATN
419
prerequisite
LATN
420
prerequisite
LATN
421
prerequisite
LATN
425
hours
LATN
425
prerequisite
LIBR
510
445a
change title and description
LING
137a
delete ENGL 329 acceptability for linguistics credit
LING
137b
typographical error
LING
137b
change in course numbers.
LING
137b
change in course numbers
LING
137c
change in prerequisite
LING
137ab
Adjustment of program statement to fit current courses
and prerequisites
LING
200
445c
split 6cr course into 2 3 cr. courses
LING
201
445c
split 6cr course into 2 3 cr. courses
LING
300
445c
change
n numbering of prerequisite
LING
310
445c
change
n prerequisite
LING
350
446a
change
n prerequisite
LING
400
446a
change
n numbering of prerequisite
LING
405
446a
change
n prerequisite
LING
415
446a
change
n prerequisite
LING
420
446a
change
n description
LING
433
446a
change
n vector
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11497
APPENDIX B
LING
434
446a
change in vector
LING
100,101
cut 6 cr course into two 3 cr. courses
LSAR
15a
correction of error in superscript
MICB
398
description
MICB
402
description
MICB
499
description
PATH
542
description, cross-listing
PATH
582
cross-listing with PHAR 582
PATH
583
cross-listing with PHAR 583
PHAR
402
delete corequisite
PHAR
403
delete corequisite, vector
PHAR
412
delete inactive course
PHAR
582
cross-list with PATH 582, vector
PHAR
583
cross-list with PATH 583, vector
PHIL
210
number, credits
PHIL
551
credits
PHIL
560
credits
PHYS
250
description, prerequisite
PHYS
251
description, prerequisite
PHYS
270
vector
PHYS
351
description
PHYS
352
prerequisite
PHYS
454
description
PHYS
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PHYS
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PHYS
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PLNT
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PLNT
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PLNT
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prerequisite
PLNT
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PLNT
498
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PLNT
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PLNT
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PSYC
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PSYC
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478a
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PSYC
549
478a
change in credits allowed
PSYC
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478a
change in credits allowed
PSYC
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RHSC
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RHSC
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 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11498
RSPT
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change in number
change in number
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change in numbering of prerequisite
change in number
change in numbering of prerequisite
change in numbering of prerequisite
change in numbering of prerequisite
delete inactive course
change units
482 b       delete description
482b       delete course
482 delete description and prerequisite
482 delete description and prerequisite
482 delete description and prerequisite
482 delete description and prerequisite
482 delete description and prerequisite
482b       delete description
482c       change title
482c       change title, delete description
482c       change title, delete description
482c       delete description, change prereq.
482c       delete description, change prereq
482c       delete prerequisite
482c       delete prerequisite
482c       delete prerequisite
482c       change units, delete description
482c       delete description
482c       delete description
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482c       delete course
347 c      change in course numbers
prerequisite
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490a       change number
490a       change number
 Vancouver Senate 11499
Minutes of May 15,1996	
APPENDIX C
APPENDIX C
NEW AWARDS RECOMMENDED TO SENATE
Barbara ALLAN Scholarship in Medicine - Scholarships to a total of $6,000 have been
endowed through a bequest from Enid Mae Dearing. The scholarships are awarded to
graduate students in Medicine studying neurology and are made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Medicine in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available
1996/97 Winter Session)
Douglas and Jean BAILEY Scholarship - Scholarships to a total of $17,600, endowed from
the estate of Jean Bailey, alternate between Medicine and Pharmacy beginning with Pharmacy
in 1996. The awards are made on the recommendation of the appropriate Faculty and in the
case of a graduate student, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available
1996/97 Winter Session)
Pierre BERTHIER Education Abroad Scholarship - Scholarships totalling $21,000 have been
endowed in honour of Pierre Berthier. The awards are offered to students participating in
Education Abroad Programs and are made on the recommendation of the Education Abroad
Program Advisory Committee in consultation with the Director of the Office of Awards and
Financial Aid. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session)
Normand M. BOUCHARD Memorial Scholarship in Film - A $2,500 scholarship has been
established in memory of Normand M. Bouchard by his parents. The award is offered to a
student in film pursuing a B.A. degree or a Diploma in Film Studies, and will be made on the
recommendation of the Department of Theatre and Film. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session.)
BROWN Bros. Ford Award in Athletics - One or more awards of $1,500 each are endowed
by Brown Bros. Ford and the Province of British Columbia. The awards are offered to
students in good academic standing with outstanding athletic abilities and are made on the
recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available 1996/97 Winter
Session.)
BROWN Bros. Ford Scholarship in Athletics - One or more awards of $1,500 each are
endowed by Brown Bros. Ford and the Province of British Columbia. The awards are offered
to students having outstanding academic and athletic abilities and are made on the
recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available 1996/97 Winter
Session)
Mary A. BRYANT Scholarship in Education - A $1,000 scholarship has been endowed by
Mary A. Bryant. The award is offered to a student entering the Faculty of Education's
Secondary Teaching program who has obtained a degree majoring in Biology. Preference may
be given to students who have obtained an Honours degree in Biology. The award is made on
the recommendation of the Faculty of Education. ( $300 Currently Available: $1,000
Available 1997/98 Winter Session)
Joe DELLASAVIA Memorial Prize in Engineering - A $350 prize has been endowed in
memory of Joe Dellasavia by friends and colleagues. The award is offered to an
undergraduate student in the computer engineering option in Electrical Engineering and is
made on the recommendation of the Electrical Engineering department. ( $275 Available
1995/96 Winter Session.)
 Vancouver Senate 11500
Minutes of May 15,1996	
APPENDIX C
Adam and Elizabeth Ann DUNDAS Bursary - Bursaries to a total of $4,900 have been
endowed through a bequest from Elizabeth Ann Dundas. The awards are offered to students
in any year and program of study. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session)
FACULTY Women's Club Violet Eagles Bursary - A $500 bursary has been endowed through
the bequest of Violet Eagles, Ph.D (University of Toronto), supplemented by donations from
the Faculty Women's Club. It recognizes Violet Eagles' contribution as past president and
longtime member of the Faculty Women's Club, her teaching contribution to the Faculty of
Agriculture, and her outstanding personal qualities. The award is offered to a female graduate
student in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. ( Available 1996/97 Winter Session.)
John GAITANAKIS Prize in Architecture - A $300 prize has been endowed by Professor John
Gaitanakis in the area of sustainable development. The award is offered to a student in the
Master of Architecture program (M. Arch.) for achievement of a design project emphasizing
ecological consideration in the urban environment. The award is made on the
recommendation of the School of Architecture in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. ($175 Available 1995/96 Winter Session.)
Marianne HUYER Memorial Prize - A $500 prize has been endowed in memory of Marianne
Huyer by Dr. Michael Smith. The award is offered to a graduate student for the best Ph.D.
thesis submitted to the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The award is
made on the recommendation of the department in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session )
Cheryl KINTON Memorial Award - An award of $500 has been endowed by friends, family,
and members of the 1993-1994 UBC Women's Basketball Team in memory of Cheryl Kinton
in recognition of her contribution to the University and the community in the sport of
Basketball. The award is offered to a member of the UBC Women's Basketball Team in good
academic standing who exhibits high standards of leadership. Preference may be given to a
B.C. resident who has come from a community outside the Lower Mainland. The award is
made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee in consultation
with the Head Women's Basketball Coach. ($225 Available 1995/96 Winter Session.)
Gertrude LANGRIDGE Graduate Scholarship in Humanities - A scholarship of $5,300 has
been endowed through the bequest of Gertrude Langridge. The award is offered to a graduate
student in any field of Humanities and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session)
Gertrude LANGRIDGE Graduate Scholarship in Medical Sciences - A scholarship of $5,300
has been endowed through the bequest of Gertrude Langridge. The award is offered to a
graduate student in any field of Medical Sciences and is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session)
 Vancouver Senate 11501
Minutes of May 15,1996	
APPENDIX C
Jean MACDONALD Graduate Fellowships - Fellowships totalling $27,000 have been
endowed through a bequest from Flora A. Musgrave (B.A.'26). The awards are offered to
graduate students in any field of study and are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Partial Funding Available 1996/97 Winter Session)
John Alexander MCDONALD Scholarship in Humanities - Scholarships to a total of $45,000
have been endowed through a bequest from John Alexander McDonald, Associate Professor
Emeritus of Spanish (1974). The awards are offered to fourth year undergraduate students
taking a combined Major or Honours program in two Humanities fields. Preference may be
given to students in Hispanic and Italian Studies, English, French, Classics, Philosophy, or
Fine Arts. The awards will be made on the recommendation of the respective departments in
consultation with the Dean, Faculty of Arts. (Partial Funding Available 1996/97 Winter
Session)
Kathleen McANULTY Memorial Prize in Graduate Periodontics - A $1,000 prize has been
established in memory of Dr. Kathleen McAnulty by her husband, Loc Nguyen. The award is
offered to a student in Graduate Periodontics on the recommendation of the director of the
program, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1995/96 Winter
Session)
Douglas MORELLI Memorial Prize in Marketing - A $1,500 prize has been established by
Architel Systems Corporation in memory of Douglas Morelli. The award is offered to a
graduating student excelling in marketing, and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Commerce. (Available 1995/96 Winter Session)
Flora S. MUSGRAVE Scholarship in Nursing - Scholarships totalling $13,500 have been
endowed through a bequest from Flora A. Musgrave (B.A.'26) and are offered to students in
Nursing. The awards are made on the recommendation of the School of Nursing and, in the
case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available
1996/97 Winter Session)
OYEN Wiggs Green & Mutala Prize in Intellectual Property - A $500 prize, the gift of Oyen
Wiggs Green & Mutala, is offered to a law student who achieves high academic standing in
the course in Intellectual Property. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Law. (Available 1995/96 Winter Session)
William John SPLAN Scholarship in Forestry - Scholarships to a total of $17,500 have been
endowed through a bequest from Ardath Frances Splan. The awards are offered to third or
fourth year undergraduate students in the Forest Science or Forest Resources Management
program in the Faculty of Forestry. The awards are made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Forestry. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session)
Roy STOKES Medal in Archival Studies - This medal is offered to the graduating student in
the Master of Archival Studies Program whose record, in the opinion of the School, is most
outstanding. The medal honours Roy Stokes, second director of the School of Library,
Archival and Information Studies. (Available 1995/96 Winter Session.)
 Vancouver Senate 11502
Minutes of May 15,1996	
APPENDIX C
Florence and Lynn SULLY Scholarship in Athletics - One or more awards of $1,500 each are
endowed by Florence and Lynn Sully. The awards are offered to students having outstanding
academic and athletic abilities and are made on the recommendation of the President's
Athletic Awards Committee. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session.)
VANCOUVER Geotechnical Society Scholarship - A $1,000 scholarship has been endowed
by the Vancouver Geotechnical Society. The award is offered to an incoming M.Eng. or
M.A.Sc. student in geotechnical engineering on the basis of excellence in the last two years of
an undergraduate curriculum. The award is offered to a student in the department of Civil or
Geological Engineering, and is made on the recommendation of the respective department in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session)
Esme MacCulloch WILLING Bursary - Bursaries to a total of $4,700 have been endowed
through a bequest from Esme MacCulloch Willing. The awards are offered to students in any
year and program of study. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session)
John WORRALL Alumni Bursary in Forestry - Bursaries to a total of $1,200 have been
endowed in recognition of the teaching contribution of Dr. John Worrall in the Faculty of
Forestry. The award, initiated by the 1970-1990 forestry alumni, is offered to students
entering first year Forestry. (Available 1996/97 Winter Session.)
 COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AWARDS - APPENDIX TO ANNUAL REPORT
Award Number
Name of Award
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
4819
Leonard S. KLINCK Memorial Fellowship
Endowed
$8,000
Agricultural Sciences/Graduate Studies
2521
Shuryo NAKAI Scholarship in Food Science
Endowed
$460
Agricultural Sciences (Food Science (/Graduate Studies
4832
W. D. POWRIE Scholarship in Food Science
Endowed
$385
Agricultural Sciences (Food Science (/Graduate Studies
778
Brian K. de P. CHANCE Memorial Scholarship in Animal Science
Endowed
$1,250
Agricultural Sciences (Animal Science)
779
MASUNO Travel Award
Endowed
$2,400
Agricultural Sciences (Landscape Architecture)
777
B.C. Forage Council Prize
Annual
$500
Agricultural Sciences/Graduate Studies
8188
Catherine BERRIS Associates Inc. Bursary
Annual
$500
Agricultural Sciences (Landscape Architecture)
4848
Mary and David MACAREE Fellowship
Annual
$15,000
Agricultural Sciences or Forestry/Graduate Studies
5105
James and Mildred OLDFIELD OSU-UBC Student Exchange Scholarship
Annual
$500
Agricultural Sciences
780
Tames ROSE Prize in Landscape Architecture
Annual
$300
Agricultural Sciences/Graduate Studies
*"*"
FACULTY Women's Club Violet Eagles Bursary
Endowed
$500
Agricultural Sciences
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
2257
ROGERS Communication Scholarship
Endowed
$2,100
Applied Science
4807
RIO Algom Scholarship
Endowed
$2,400
Applied Science (Mining & Mineral Process Engineering or Geological Sciences
8173
Lilly SCHATER Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$330
Applied Science (Mechanical Engineering)
4807
RIO Algom Scholarship
Endowed
$2,400
Applied Science/Science, alternating (Mining & Mineral Processing Engineering & Geological
Sciences)
2258
UMA Group Ltd. Scholarship in Engineering
Endowed
$1,500
Applied Science/Graduate Studies
2260
FORTY-FIRST Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference Scholarship
Endowed
$3,000
Applied Science (Chemical Engineering)
2261
Ernest PETERS Prize
Endowed
$1,000
Applied Science (Metals and Materials Engineering)
2263
Ken STRAUSS Memorial Scholarship in Civil Engineering
Endowed
$1,200
Applied Science/Graduate Studies
2264
T. D. HETHERINGTON Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$1,500
Applied Science or Forestry
8177
jack B. MITCHELL Memorial Bursary in Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
Endowed
$2,500
Applied Science (Mining and Mineral Process Engineering)
7302
WRIGHT Parry Taylor & Fuller Engineering Ltd. Bursary
Annual
$500
Applied Science (Civil Engineering)
2262
GLENAYRE Scholarship in Electrical Engineering
Annual
$1,500
Applied Science (Electrical Engineering)
"
joe DELLASAVIA Memorial Prize in Engineering
Endowed
$350
Applied Science (Electrical Engineering)
**
John GAITANAKIS Prize in Architecture
Endowed
$300
Applied Science (Architecture/Graduate Studies)
"
Flora S. MUSGRAVE Scholarship in Nursing
Endowed
$13,500
Applied Science (Nursing/Graduate Studies)
<-<-
VANCOUVER Geotechnical Society Scholarship
Endowed
$1,000
Applied Science (Civil or Geological Engineering/Graduate Studies)
Faculty Total                                                                                                                                               $35,080
FACULTY OF ARTS
1277
Earle BIRNEY Scholarship in Creative Writing
Endowed
$2,000
Arts (Creative Writing)
1278
Paul S. PLANT Memorial Scholarship in Canadian Studies
Endowed/Ann
ual Gift
$1,500
Arts (Canadian Studies)
3344
Wallace BERRY Memorial Prize in Music Theory
Endowed
$550
Arts (Music)/Graduate Studies
4828
Benjamin John EDINGER Memorial Prize in French Literature
Endowed
$750
Arts (French)/Graduate Studies
1279
Ann MUNTON Memorial Scholarship in English
Endowed
$300
Arts (English)
1285
Carol COATES Literary Prize
Endowed
$300
Arts (English)/Graduate Studies
1280
Fritz LEHMANN Memorial Prize in History
Endowed
$450
Arts (History)
1281
LIU Lin Ping Memorial Scholarship
Endowed
$1,800
Arts (International Relations,Anthropology or Geography)
1282
Belle MULHOLLAND Memorial Prize in Religious Studies
Endowed
$300
Arts (Religious Studies)
4844
Mairi Grant CAMPBELL Fellowship in English Literature
Endowed
$18,000
Arts (English Literature (/Graduate Studies
8191
CHIEN'S Cultural Foundation Bursary
Endowed
$660
Arts (Political Science or Economics)
1284
Gilean DOUGLAS Scholarship in English
Endowed
$12,800
Arts (English)/Graduate Studies
**To be presented to Senate on May 15, 1996
11503
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11504
APPENDIX C
8193
Joan FLYNN Memorial Bursary in Social Work
Endowed
$350
Arts (Social Work)
1283
CANADIAN Society for Asian Arts Prize
Annual
$500
Arts (Fine Arts)
4837
GOEL Prize in Political Science
Annual
$300
Arts (Political Science)
3345
Marion McCarroll AMES Memorial Prize in Music
Annual
$300
Arts (Music)
4827
ART History Travel Research Scholarship
Annual
$6,000
Arts (Fine Arts)/Graduate Studies
**
Normand M. BOUCHARD Memorial Scholarship in Film
Annual
$2,500
Arts (Film)
"
John Alexander MCDONALD Scholarship in Humanities
Endowed
$45,000
Arts (Hispanic and Italian Studies, English, French, Classics, Philosophy, Fine Arts)
"
Roy STOKES Medal in Archival Studies
Annual
Arts (Library, Archival and Information Studies)
Faculty Total
FACULTY OF COMMERCE & BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
1619
Abtar BERAR Prize in Finance
Endowed
$300
Commerce & Business Administration/Graduate Studies
8182
ODLUM Brown Limited Bursary in Commerce
Endowed
$2,250
Commerce & Business Administration (Study Abroad & Exchange Program)
7300
BRITISH Columbia Bond Dealers Association Bursary
Endowed
$300
Commerce & Business Administration
4825
CGA Education Foundation Doctoral Fellowship
Annual
$8,000
Commerce & Business Administration/Graduate Studies
1620
KPMG Peat Marwick Thorne First Nations Award
Annual
$2,000
Commerce & Business Administration/First Nations House of Learning/Graduate Studies
1621
P. Dermot MURPHY Scholarship in Urban Land Economics
Annual
$2,000
Commerce & Business Administration (Urban Land Economics)
<-<-
Douglas MORELLI Memorial Prize in Marketing
Annual
$1,500
Commerce & Business Administration (Marketing)
FACULTY OF DEN
1776
BEAVERS Dental Bill Scott Prize
Endowed
$300
Dentistry
1775
CU&C Health Services Society Scholarship
Annual
$1,000
Dentistry
175
B.C. Dental Hygienists Association Gold Medal
Annual
Dentistry (Dental Hygiene)
8197
FINE Arts Dental Laboratories Ltd. Bursary (2 @ $500)
Annual
$1,000
Dentistry
1777
FINE Arts Dental Laboratories Ltd. Prize in Prosthodontics (2 @ $500)
Annual
$1,000
Dentistry
**
Kathleen MCANULTY Memorial Prize in Graduate Periodontics
Annual
$1,000
Periodontics/Graduate Studies
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
8180
Albert LAITHWAITE Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$450
Education (Human Kinetics)/Graduate Studies
4835
Jay WADSWORTH Memorial Scholarship in Special Education
Endowed
$300
Education (Educational Psychology and Special Education)Graduate Studies
3928
Peter Andrew MARRON Memorial Award
Endowed
$1,000
Education (Human Kinetics)
8190
CANADIAN Yugoslav Community Association Bursary
Endowed
$600
Education
1966
Marilyn HUNNINGS Memorial Scholarship in Education
Endowed
$9,400
Education
4851
Patricia DYER Memorial Award in Education
Endowed
$500
Education/Graduate Studies
8198
Hilda Ellen Silver KARST Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$300
Education
4843
Bert E. WALES Bursary in Adult Education
Annual
$1,000
Education
**
Mary A. BRYANT Scholarship in Education
Endowed
$1,000
Education (Secondary Teaching program)
Faculty Total
$14,550
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
2356
Paul Robert STEINER Memorial Scholarship in Wood Science
Endowed
$1,700
Forestry
4826
Edward W. BASSETT Memorial Scholarship in Reforestation
Endowed
$3,000
Forestry/Graduate Studies
4830
Brenda HANSON Memorial Scholarship in Forestry
Endowed
$1,000
Forestry/Graduate Studies
2355
William John SPLAN Scholarship in Forestry
Endowed
$17,500
Forestry
**To be presented to Senate on May 15, 1996
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11505
APPENDIX C
4849
NAMKOONG Family Fellowship in Forest Sciences
Endowed
$10,000
Forestry/Graduate Studies
2349
ASSOCIATION of B.C. Professional Foresters Norman B. Crist Memorial Prize
Annual
$750
Forestry
2350
ASSOCIATION of B.C. Professional Foresters Scholarship
Annual
$1,375
Forestry
2351
ASSOCIATION of B.C. Professional Foresters Scholarship for Technical School
Graduates
Annual
$1,375
Forestry
2352
BACKMAN Award in Natural Resources Conservation (2 @ $1,000)
Annual
$2,000
Forestry/Graduate Studies
2353
PACIFIC Regeneration Technologies Inc. Silviculture Scholarship
Annual
$1,000
Forestry or Agriultural Sciences
4838
SOPRON Alumni Fellowship
Annual
$13,500
Forestry/Graduate Studies
2354
Tanet KETCHAM Scholarship
Annual
$1,000
Forestry
2348
ASSOCIATION of B.C. Professional Foresters Graduating Prize
Annual
$500
Forestry
**
William John SPLAN Scholarship in Forestry
Endowed
$17,500
Forestry
**
John WORRALL Alumni Bursary in Forestry
Endowed
$1,200
Forestry
4820
DU PONT Canada Fellowship in Pulp and Paper
Endowed
$1,800
Graduate Studies
4821
R. Howard WEBSTER Foundation Fellowships
Endowed
$25,000
Graduate Studies
2922
Harold NAUGLER Memorial Prize
Endowed
$350
Graduate Studies (School of Library, Archival and Information Studies)
4831
Michael and Sonja KOERNER First Nations Fellowship
Endowed
$8,850
Graduate Studies/First Nations House of Learning
4833
SHAUGHNESSY Hospital Volunteer Society Fellowship in Health Care
Endowed
$15,000
Faculty of Graduate Studies (Health Care)
4842
SCOTT Paper Graduate Fellowship
Endowed
$14,400
Graduate Studies
8194
M. Dorothy MAWDSLEY Bursary
Endowed
$19,800
Graduate Studies (Women Studies)
4852
FLETCHER Challenge Canada Limited Fellowship
Endowed
$30,000
Graduate Studies
4834
ST. John's Fellowship
Annual
$15,000
Graduate Studies
4847
GOEL Graduate Scholarship in Indian Studies
Annual
$5,000
Graduate Studies
4850
AURORA Society Geoffrey Lane Nanson Scholarship
Annual
$1,000
Graduate Studies
4829
GREEN College Fellowship
Annual (2
years)
$15,000
Graduate Studies/Green College Admissions Committee
4846
William and Dorothy GILBERT Scholarship in Bio-Medical Sciences
Annual
$2,000
Biotechnology Laboratory Graduate Student Awards Committee/Graduate Studies
**
Gertrude LANGRIDGE Graduate Scholarship in Humanities
Endowed
$5,300
Graduate Studies (Humanities)
**
Gertrude LANGRIDGE Graduate Scholarship in Medical Sciences
Endowed
$5,300
Graduate Studies (Medical Sciences)
**
fean MACDONALD Graduate Fellowships
Endowed
$27,000
Graduate Studies
2872
FERRIS Ladner McColl Memorial Prize in Law ( 3 @ $400)
Endowed
$1,200
Law
2881
Stella Chuk Quon WONG Scholarship in Law
Endowed
$1,800
Law
8192
Leonard St. M. DUMOULIN Q.C. Memorial Bursary in Law
Endowed
$450
Law
4822
David L. VAUGHAN, Q.C. Memorial Scholarship
Endowed
$800
Law/Graduate Studies
7764
LAW Foundation Bursary
Endowed
$40,000
Law
2876
Boyd FERRIS Memorial Prize in Advocacy
Endowed
$400
Law
2877
Hugh LADNER Memorial Prize in Labour Relations
Endowed
$400
Law
2878
Bruce MCCOLL Memorial Prize in Alternate Dispute Resolution
Endowed
$400
Law
2879
LAW Foundation First Nations Award
Endowed
$10,000
Law
2867
Andrew THOMPSON Prize in Legal Institutions of Canadian Government
Annual
$1,000
Law
2880
MCRAE Holmes & King Prize in International Taxation
Annual
$750
Law
*To be presented to Senate on May 15, 1996
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11506
APPENDIX C
2873
MCCARTHY Tetrault Prize in Torts
Annual
$750
Law
2874
OSGOODE Society Legal History Prize (2 books)
Annual
Law
**
OYEN Wiggs Green & Mutala Prize in Intellectual Property
Annual
$500
Law
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
3294
Dr. Jay C. CHENG Memorial Medical Education Foundation Prize
Endowed
$700
Medicine (Psychiatry)
8181
Sheri MESCANIUK Memorial Bursary in Psychiatry
Endowed
$700
Medicine (Psychiatry)
8185
Zoeann Rea ARMSTRONG Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$300
Medicine (Cardiology)
4836
WAH-SHEUNG Prize in Physiology (2 @ $600)
Endowed
$1,200
Medicine (Physiology (/Graduate Studies
3295
Peter ARMANIOUS Memorial Prize
Endowed
$300
Medicine (Post-Graduate Education Committee in Cardiology)
8201
RIX Bursary in Medicine
Endowed
$600
Medicine
8182
Chung Nin LAM Memorial Bursary in Medicine
Endowed
$5,700
Medicine
3298
Victoria Herman VAN DINE Scholarship in Medicine
Endowed
$6,600
Medicine
5600
Margaret HO Scholarships in Medicine
Endowed
$1,800
Medicine
5601
Cynthia ]. HORNER Memorial Prize
Endowed
$500
Medicine (Psychiatry)
5602
Harold KRIVEL Prize in Paediatrics
Endowed
$300
Medicine
8199
KIEVELL Bursary
Annual
$14,500
Medicine
3299
Dennis HARRIS Memorial Prize in Psychiatry
Annual
$300
Medicine (Psychiatry)
8189
Lawrence J. BOWLES Memorial Bursary
Annual
$300
Medicine (Psychiatry)
7301
C. Colin JACKSON Memorial Bursary in Medicine
Annual
$500
Medicine
8200
MCQUID/Pacific International Securities Inc. Bursary
Annual
$1,000
Medicine (Rehabilitation Sciences)
8178
Peter TEPSON-YOUNG Bursary
Annual
$1,000
Medicine
**
Barbara ALLAN Scholarship in Medicine
Endowed
$6,000
Medicine (Neurology)
**
Douglas and Jean BAILEY Scholarship
Endowed
$17,600
Medicine/Pharmacy (alternating)
FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
3756
LONDON Drugs Scholarship
Endowed
$6,000
Pharmaceutical Sciences
8195
University of B.C. Pharmaceutical Sciences
Endowed
$500
Pharmaceutical Sciences
4824
CANADIAN Society of Hospital Pharmacists Prize
Annual
$1,000
Pharmaceutical Sciences/Graduate Studies
4839
PARKE-Davis Doctor of Pharmacy Fellowship
Annual
$12,500
Pharmaceutical Sciences/Graduate Studies
4841
SANDOZ Canada Inc. Doctor of Pharmacy Fellowship
Annual
$12,500
Pharmaceutical Sciences/Graduate Studies
Faculty Total
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
4823
Grace Torchy Stewart ADAMSON Memorial Scholarship in Nursing
Endowed
$3,000
Science (Nursing(/Graduate Studies
4387
DOLMAN Prize in Microbiology and Immunology
Endowed
$500
Science (Microbiology and Immunology)
8184
Gabriel L. ALLARD Memorial Bursary in Computer Science
Endowed
$450
Science (Computer Science)
4388
David SHUM Memorial Prize in Computer Science
Endowed
$450
Science (Computer Science)
4389
Martin FRAUENDORF Memorial Prize in Computer Science
Endowed
$500
Science (Computer Science)
4840
Craig Adams SANDERCOCK Memorial Scholarship
Endowed
$1,200
Science (Botany and Zoology)/Graduate Studies
4390
Thomas and Margerite MACKAY Memorial Scholarship and Fellowship
Endowed
$60,000
Science/Graduate Studies
4391
Dr. Christopher WESTERMAN Memorial Scholarship
Endowed
$1,200
Science (Geology)
**To be presented to Senate on May 15, 1996
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 15,1996
11507
APPENDIX C
4818
Gladys Estella LAIRD Research Fellowship (3 @ $2,000)
Annual
$6,000
Science (Chemistry)/Graduate Studies
8179
JUMPSTART Scholarship Society Bursary in Environmental Sciences (2@ $2,000)
Annual
$4,000
Science (Environmental Sciences)
**
Marianne HUYER Memorial Prize
Ednowed
$500
Science (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology/Graduate Studies)
ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS
4602
David CROMBIE Entrance Scholarship
Endowed
$2,800
4604
AVENOR Inc. Entrance Scholarship
Endowed
$9,000
4606
CROWN Life Insurance National Entrance Scholarship
Endowed
$3,000
4603
RAYROCK Yellowknife Resources Inc. Entrance Scholarship
Endowed
$13,500
4605
Hugh M. BROCK National Entrance Scholarship
Endowed
$26,000
4607
Charles Victor RYDER Entrance Scholarship in Engineering
Endowed
$2,000
Entrance /Applied Science
8175
BUDDHIST Compassion Relief Tzu Chi Foundation Entrance Bursary
Annual
$50,000
C
8171
Harold B. and Nellie BOYES Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$10,000
4601
Fred W. and Gladys E. LAIRD Scholarship
Endowed
$1,000
8172
John Valentine CLYNE Bursary
Endowed
$3,000
5106
WESTCOAST Energy Inc. Education Abroad Language Scholarship
Endowed
$12,000
Education Abroad Program Advisory Committee/Awards and Financial Aid
5100
Hugh M. BROCK Education Abroad Scholarship
Endowed
$112,000
Education Abroad Program Advisory Committee
8183
Alex SUTHERLAND Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$600
5101
CATHAY Pacific Education Abroad Scholarship ( 4 @ $7,500)
Endowed
$30,000
Education Abroad Program Advisory Committee
5102
CHAN Tat Chee Memorial Education Abroad Scholarship
Endowed
$30,000
5103
Walter H. GAGE and Elsie M. HARVEY Education Abroad Scholarship
Endowed
$59,550
Education Abroad Program Advisory Committee
5104
Simon K.Y. LEE Foundation Ltd. Education Abroad Scholarship
Endowed
$30,000
677
Judith C. THIELE Memorial Scholarship
Endowed
$1,300
Committee on Awards for Students with Disabilities
8187
William Donald Mills AGNEW Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$1,275
Committee on Awards for Students with Disabilities
4845
Merv and Mardi BOUCHER Scholarship and Bursary
Endowed
$22,000
8196
CANADIAN Folk Society William and Mary Black Memorial Bursary
Endowed
$240
2357
FLETCHER Challenge Canada Limited Scholarship
Endowed
$30,000
Awards and Financial Aid Office
679
HUNT Personnel Award in Athletics
Annual
$750
President's Athletic Awards Committee
678
DHARMA Master Chuk Mor Scholarship
Annual
$1,000
Awards & Financial Aid Office recommendation
3927
Bob HINDMARCH Award (2 @ $1,500)
Annual
$3,000
President's Athletic Awards Committee
8202
ROYAL Canadian Legion-Shalom Branch 178-Stanley Fisher Memorial Bursary
Annual
$500
8176
LIANG Bursary
Annual
$300
*
Pierre BERTHIER Education Abroad Scholarship
Endowed
$21,000
Education Abroad Program Advisory Committee/Awards and Financial Aid
*
BROWN Bros. Ford Award in Athletics
Endowed
$1,500
President's Athletic Awards Committee
*
BROWN Bros. Ford Scholarship in Athletics
Endowed
$1,500
President's Athletic Awards Committee
*
Adam and Elizabeth Ann DUNDAS Bursary
Endowed
$4,900
*
Cheryl KINTON Memorial Award
Endowed
$500
President's Athletic Awards Committee/Head Women's Basketball Coach
*
Florence and Lynn SULLY Scholarship in Athletics
Endowed
$1,500
President's Athletic Awards Committee
*
Esme MacCulloch WILLING Bursary
Endowed
$4,700

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