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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1996-04-17

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 THE   UNIVERSITY    OF   BRITISH    COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF APRIL 17, 1996
Attendance
Present: President D. W. Strangway (Chair), Vice-President D. R. Birch, Mr. S. Arnold, Dr. D. R.
Atkins, Dr. A. P. Autor, Mr. J. A. Banfield, Dr. J. Barman, Dr. J. D. Berger, Mr. P. T. Brady, Mr. A.
Briggs, Dr. D. M. Brunette, Dr. D. G. A. Carter, Ms. L. Chui, Dr. T. S. Cook, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Ms.
J. K. Gill, Dean M. A. Goldberg, Mr. C. Gorman, Dean J. R. Grace, Dr. S. E. Grace, Mr. H. D. Gray,
Rev. J. Hanrahan, Dr. M. Isaacson, Dr. J. G. T. Kelsey, Mr. M. Kirchner, Professor V. J. Kirkness, Mr.
A. Legge, Professor P. T. K. Lin, Mr. S. Lohachitranont, Dr. D. M. Lyster, Dr. D. J. MacDougall, Dr.
M. MacEntee, Dean B. C. McBride, Mr. B. G. McDonald, Dean J. H. McNeill, Mr. W. B. McNulty,
Dean A. Meisen, Mr. J. Murray, Ms. C. Ng, Mr. J. Nobbs-Thiessen, Mr. V. Pacradouni, Dr. W. J.
Phillips, Mrs. M. Price, Professor M. Quayle, Dr. D. J. Randall, Professor R. S. Reid, Professor J. A.
Rice, Dr. H. B. Richer, Dr. R. A. Shearer, Dean N. Sheehan, Mr. D. Shu, Dr. A. J. Sinclair, Dean C. L.
Smith, Ms. C. A. Soong, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dr. W. Uegama, Dr. R. M. Will, Dr. W. C. Wright Jr.,
Dean E. H. K. Yen.
Regrets: Chancellor R. H. Lee, Dr. S. Avramidis, Dean C. S. Binkley, Dr. A. E. Boardman, Mr. J.
Boritz, Dr. D. H. Cohen, Dr. M. G. R. Coope, Dr. J. Gosline, Dean M. J. Hollenberg, Dr. S. B. Knight,
Dr. M. Levine, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Dean M. P. Marchak, Dr. M. D. Morrison, Dr.
R. J. Patrick, Mr. R. L. de Pfyffer, Dean J. F. Richards, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. L.
J. Stan, Dr. S. Thorne, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Mr. D. R. Verma, Dr. E. W. Whittaker, Dr. D. Ll. Williams.
Senate Membership
INTRODUCTION OF STUDENT SENATORS
The Chair welcomed to Senate the following student representatives who have been
elected to serve on Senate for one year from April 1, 1996 to March 31, 1997:
Arts
Mr. Jesse Nobbs-Thiessen — Second Year Arts
Dentistry
Mr. Sompatana Lohachitranont — First Year Dentistry
Graduate Studies
Mr. Vighen Pacradouni — Ph.D. Candidate in Physics
Law
Mr. Matthew Kirchner — Second Year Law
11403
 Vancouver Senate 11404
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Senate Membership
Medicine
Ms. Lica Chui — First Year Medicine
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Ms. Carol Sok-Ching Ng — Third Year Pharmaceutical Sciences
Members-at-large
Mr. James Boritz — Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science
Mr. Anthony Briggs - MBA Candidate
Mr. Christopher Gorman — First Year Arts
Mr. Jason Murray — Third Year Arts
Mr. David Shu — Third Year Science
There were no nominations for the Faculties of Agricultural Sciences, Applied Science,
Commerce and Business Administration, Education, Forestry and Science.
DECLARATION OF VACANCIES (UNIVERSITY ACT, SECTION 35(6))
Vacancies for student representatives of the following faculties were declared: Agricultural
Sciences, Applied Science, Commerce and Business Administration, Education, Forestry
and Science.
REPLACEMENTS
Four of the six vacancies have been filled, as listed below:
Agricultural Sciences
Ms. Jasvir K. Gill — Second Year Agricultural Sciences
Applied Science
Mr. Sam Arnold — Fourth Year Applied Science
Commerce and Business Administration
Mr. Adam Legge — Third Year Commerce and Business Administration
Science
Mr. Blair G. McDonald — Third Year Science
 Vancouver Senate 11405
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Minutes of the previous meeting
Minutes of the previous meeting
Dean McBride l        That the minutes of the seventh regular
Dr. Berger J       meeting of Senate for the Session 1995-96,
having been circulated, be taken as read and
adopted.
Carried.
Business arising from minutes
ENROLMENT PLANNING FOR 1996/97
The following letter from Dr. Birch, Vice President Academic and Provost, had been
circulated to members of Senate, prior to the meeting:
On March 19, Premier Glen Clark announced that operating grants to the universities would
not be decreased 1996/97 in spite of the reduction in federal transfer payments to the
provinces. In making that announcement the Premier stated that universities and colleges
would be expected to demonstrate a 4% "productivity increase", ie an increase of 4% in
enrolment without any increase in the operating grant. During the following week ministry
officials informed us that, although we would not be expected to make up the 1995/96
shortfall of approximately 1,000 undergraduate FTEs (the difference between funded and
actual undergraduate enrolment), we would be expected to meet a 4% growth target of an
additional 921 undergraduate FTEs.
On the basis of the information outlined above, the Deans and the Academic Vice President
had a preliminary discussion about the actions required to achieve the enrolment increase
expected of this university. These are outlined in an April 4 memorandum to Deans.
In order to meet the specified growth target, we must admit more students than we anticipated
admitting at the time when Senate and the Board of Governors approved admissions quotas
for 1996/97. Under the University Act, the Board of Governors has the power with the
approval of Senate to establish enrolment quotas. Circumstances will require amendments of
those quotas on very short notice so that the revised quotas can be taken into account by the
Registrar's Office in implementing admissions procedures on behalf of the Faculties.
Nonetheless, it is very important that Senate be apprised of the academic consequences of the
changes proposed.
I have consulted with the Chair of the Senate Admissions Committee and I note that under
section 36 (b) of the University Act Senate (by a two "thirds vote) may delegate powers to a
committee. I, therefore, recommend that Senate approve the following motion:
That Senate delegate to the Senate Admissions Committee the power to approve and
recommend to the Board of Governors revised admission quotas for the undergraduate
programs of the various faculties and schools for 1996/97 and that the Senate Admissions
Committee report back to the May meeting of Senate on the decisions taken and the
academic consequences of those decisions.
 Vancouver Senate 11406
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Business arising from minutes
Vice President Birch stated that, as indicated in the memorandum, in making an
announcement this year that the operating grants to universities would not be cut, the
Premier included a statement about what was euphemistically called a "productivity
increase". Vice President Birch explained that, in return for receiving no grant reduction
and no grant increase, the University is expected to increase undergraduate enrolment by
4%. He stated that UBC was in an unusual position in that it had not met its target for
the current year and was approximately 1035 full time equivalent undergraduate students
below the level for which it was funded. He noted that those universities which had met
their targets were pressuring the ministry to reallocate approximately $7 million of the
grant. The ministry, however, decided not to reallocate the money and not to require UBC
to make up the shortfall in the coming year, but, as already noted, UBC would be
required to meet a 4% growth target. In light of UBCs distinctive role in higher education
in the province, ministry officials will engage with UBC in discussing future enrolment
plans to determine the disposition of the funding for the 1000 FTE shortfall in the current
year.
Vice President Birch stated that several factors make it impossible to predict enrolment
trends. For instance, the fluid situation in the province and the number of institutions
now granting degrees have affected transfer patterns. The fact that UBC has been
significantly under-funded or over-enrolled at the graduate level has also affected efforts
to meet the undergraduate enrolment target.
Vice President Birch stated the ministry had asked about the effects of the "productivity
increase". His response was that if anybody thinks that with the same resources
 Vancouver Senate 11407
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Business arising from minutes
you can deal with 4% more students without diminution of quality they are mistaken. He
said that while the University will do its utmost to maintain quality, and will look at
whether there is any possible under-utilised capacity, it must be recognised that if the
same level of resources is to be applied to more students there is bound to be some
diminution of quality. At the same time, however, UBC was grateful to be in a jurisdiction
which, unlike virtually every other one in Canada, and many throughout North America,
is maintaining the level of the operating grants.
Vice President Birch said that Senate had both the right and the responsibility to oversee
the enrolment planning process, but that it was very difficult for Senate to exercise that
responsibility given the time line. It was for that reason that he had proposed the motion
that Senate delegate its power in this matter to the Senate Admissions Committee. He
realised that it was impossible to predict exactly how the enrolment plans that are to be
made will be met, but he believed it was important that Senate, which is charged with
academic responsibility, delegate its powers to the Senate Admissions Committee on this
occasion.
Dr. Birch i        That Senate delegate to the Senate Admissions
Dr. Berger i        Committee the power to approve and
recommend to the Board of Governors revised
admission quotas for the undergraduate
programs of the various faculties and schools
for 1996/97 and that the Senate Admissions
Committee report back to the May meeting of
Senate on the decisions taken and the academic
consequences of those decisions.
Dean McBride asked if the 4% increase for this year established a new base from which
UBC would operate and, if so, was it the expectation that by the fourth year there would
be a 16% increase in enrolment.
 Vancouver Senate 11408
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Business arising from minutes
Vice President Birch responded that it was his belief that there was no suggestion at all
that there would be a 16% increase in enrolment. It was hoped to increase enrolment in
the upper years through transfer, and to distribute it across the years, rather than have a
huge increase in first year followed by a similar number the next year. He stated that
perception of ministry staff was that UBC had now reached the appropriate number of
funded places across the province, and that although some students may not get into the
institution or program of first choice, there are, nonetheless, programs and places that are
very close to meeting whatever the overall demand may be.
Mr. Gray stated that the Senate was being asked to accommodate something that might
just be there for a political agenda, and that it was being asked to do something
significant in terms of abdicating its power to accommodate the ministry's request.
Dr. Will stated that the University had been given a mandate by the ministry and that the
least the University could do was to concern itself with the academic implications of a 4%
increase in enrolment for 1996/97. However, if the quotas are to be increased, revised
admissions quotas would have to be determined prior to the May meeting of Senate in
order for the Registrar's admissions officers to properly respond in terms of how many
places are available to applicants.
Dr. Will said that the Senate Admissions Committee would be examining the academic
implications of the proposed increase and attempting to find out where more students
could be absorbed at the least academic cost if the faculties and schools cannot
 Vancouver Senate 11409
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Chair's remarks and related questions
take their full 4% indicated in the material circulated by Vice President Birch. Dr. Will
noted that the question of full cost tuition for international students was not totally
unrelated to the present edict in that it also has a lot to do with UBCs capacity to take
more students.
In response to a query by Dean Meisen, Vice President Birch stated that, as already
explained, UBC would be entering into discussions with the ministry in the fall to
determine the disposition of the funding for the 1000 FTE shortfall. He said that the
deputy minister had indicated a willingness to recognise the distinctive role of UBC in
graduate studies and it was the University's hope, therefore, that an agreement could be
reached to the effect that the 1000 FTE undergraduate funding, ie about $7 million, gets
translated into approximately 300 FTEs at the graduate level, thereby reducing the
number of unfunded graduate FTEs.
The motion was
put and carried.
Chair's remarks and related questions
There were no remarks from the chair.
From the Board of Governors
NOTIFICATION OF APPROVAL IN PRINCIPLE OF SENATE RECOMMENDATIONS
Subject, where applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented
without formal reference to the President; and that the Deans and Heads concerned with
new programs be asked to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
i. Awards (pp.11383-5)
ii. Enrolment quotas for 1996/97 (p.11335 & p.11382)
iii. Establishment of The CA Professorship in Accounting (p.11398-9)
iv. Establishment of the Centre for Advanced Wood Processing (p.11399)
 Vancouver Senate 11410
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Senate Nominating Committee Membership
Senate Nominating Committee Membership
In accordance with established procedures, student vacancies on the Nominating
Committee were declared.
A call for nominations to fill these vacancies will be sent to all members of Senate, and
nominations will remain open until the May 15, 1996 Senate meeting. If more than two
nominations are received an election will be held.
Reports of Committees of Senate
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE (SEE APPENDIX A)
Dr. Berger, chair of the committee, presented the following report:
Faculty of Arts
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the Faculty of Arts,
subject to the following:
Add 'd' after the credit values for the Korean courses
Honours Linguistics. Under "Admission to Third Year" change to read:
at least 75% average in the first and second years
at least 80% in Linguistics 200 and 201
Major in First Nations Languages and Linguistics - under "Recommended Courses",
change GEOG 290 to GEOG 426.
Faculty of Law
The committee recommended approval of a revised Calendar statement on examinations,
submitted by the Faculty of Law.
Faculty of Science
With the exception of Biology 329, which had been withdrawn, the committee
recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the Faculty of Science, subject to
the following:
 Vancouver Senate 11411
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Delete last sentence of proposed Calendar statement on Double Major Program
Double Major - delete "It may lead to graduate study...obtained."
Marine Science 400 - delete the note
Marine Science 415 - delete "...will be illustrated...animal phyla."
MATH 335 - delete "Intensive course with required tutorial." Add hours [3-0-1]
MATH 345 - change last sentence to read: "Computer laboratory required." (N.B.
prerequisite has been changed)
Dr. Berger l        That the proposals of the Faculties of Arts,
Dean Goldberg i        Law and Science, be approved.
Dr. Will drew attention to the proposed Calendar statement on admission to Third Year
of the Honours Linguistics program, stating that it was not clear whether the required
averages of 75% in first and second years, and 80% in Linguistics 200 and 201 were
cumulative averages, or whether a 75% average is required in both second and third year,
and 80% required for both Linguistics 200 and 201. It was agreed that the proposed
change be approved, subject to clarification.
The motion was
put and carried.
Averages on Transcripts
The committee recommended that transcripts include the average for a course and the
number of students in a section or course. Dr. Berger explained that the proposal had
been brought to the committee because of problems experienced in the interpretation of
transcripts. The faculties were polled, suggesting that they respond to three alternatives:
i.      to include the average for the course and the number of students, or
ii.      the rank within the class, or
iii.      no change.
All the responses from ten faculties preferred the first alternative.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of April 17,1996
11412
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Dr. Berger
Dr. Randall
That transcripts include the average for each
course a student completes and the number of
students in the course or section.
Carried.
COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AWARDS (SEE APPENDIX B)
Dr. Cook, chair of the committee, presented for Senate's approval the Alexander J. Cohen
Memorial Award in Law.
Dr. Cook
Dean Smith
That the award (listed in Appendix B) be
accepted and forwarded to the Board of
Governors for approval and that a letter of
thanks be sent to the donor.
Dean Smith noted that the award was created in honour of the father of David Cohen.
David Cohen was a very able scholar in the Faculty of Law and was dedicated to
promoting excellence in the University. Professor Cohen, who later became Dean at the
University of Victoria, endowed this scholarship as a gesture of thanks to the Faculty of
Law and the University.
The motion was
put and carried.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
REPORT OF THE GRADUATE STUDIES AD HOC COMMITTEE TO STUDY POSSIBLE
INVOLVEMENT OF THEOLOGICAL COLLEGES IN GRADUATE EDUCATION (SEE
APPENDIX C)
In presenting the report, Dean Grace stated that there are a number of theological colleges
on campus which have a very remote relationship with UBC, even though they
 Vancouver Senate 11413
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Faculty of Graduate Studies
are physically so close. He noted that the theological colleges have certain resources which
would be very useful to some UBC graduate students. He said that graduate programs at
UBC tend to be rather small, rather specialized, and often require specialized resources.
He felt that that was a need for some possible reciprocality because students in these
colleges would benefit from the very rich array of courses and materials available at UBC.
This was the context which led to the establishment of an Ad Hoc committee of Graduate
Council a year ago. The committee consulted widely on and off campus, and with other
universities and theological colleges. Their mandate was to make recommendations on
whether any change should be undertaken which would lead to a greater sharing of
resources in graduate education. The committee made the following recommendations:
1. That a committee of the Graduate Council (proposed by the Nominating
Committee in the normal way) be struck to review courses and faculty at the
Theological Colleges and to compile lists of a) those courses in the colleges that
the colleges wish to open to UBC students and that meet the academic standard
for graduate credit at UBC, and b) those faculty in the colleges who have the
academic credentials to offer such courses and to serve on the committees of
UBC graduate students.
2. That the list of courses then be submitted to the Graduate Curriculum and New
Programmes Committee for its consideration. This committee will then report
to the Graduate Council in the usual way.
3. That, subject to departmental approval, a graduate student at UBC may elect to
take a maximum of 6 credits of courses from this list.
4. That the list of faculty be submitted to the Dean of Graduate Studies, and be
understood to comprise those faculty at the theology colleges who, with
departmental approval, may serve on the committees of UBC graduate students.
5. That the committee established in # 1 above briefly consider recommended
changes each year, and make recommendations about courses to the Graduate
Curriculum Committee and about faculty to the Dean of Graduate Studies.
 Vancouver Senate 11414
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Faculty of Graduate Studies
6. That the following statement be added to the UBC Calendar on p.223:
Graduate courses at the affiliated theological colleges (see p.79)
A limited number of graduate courses at the theological colleges may be taken
for graduate credit at UBC. For a list of such courses and their instructors
consult the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
7. That graduate students at the Theological Colleges be permitted, with the
consent of the instructors and the Departments involved, to take graduate
courses at UBC.
8. That, subject to the approval of the Board of Governors, UBC not charge fees
for UBC graduate courses taken by graduate students at the Theological
Colleges on the condition that the Colleges not charge UBC students for
graduate courses taken in the Colleges.
9. That in the fifth year of these arrangements the Graduate Dean strike a
committee of UBC faculty to review all these procedures and make
recommendations to the Graduate Council. Among other matters, this
committee should pay attention to fees, considering changes in the arrangement
suggested above if the student flows between the Colleges and the University
are not approximately equivalent, and should recommend whether the
committee established under #'s 1 and 5 above should become a Standing
Committee of Graduate Council.
Dean Grace stated that the control and the autonomy of the university would be
protected but that the proposal would reduce some of the rather strong barriers to
cooperation which currently exist.
Dr. Grace l        That the recommendations as outlined above
Dr. Gilbert J        be approved.
In response to a query by Dr. Isaacson regarding recommendation 2, Dean Grace stated
that the list of courses would go through Graduate Council and on to Senate. However, it
would be up to the Senate Curriculum Committee to decide how it wishes to handle such
courses.
 Vancouver Senate 11415
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Faculty of Graduate Studies
With regard to a query about recommendation 8, concerning fees, Dean Grace explained
that students at one institution can take courses at another institution and only pays fees
at the home institution, providing there is more or less an equal flow of students back and
forth. He stated that this arrangement solves a lot of bureaucracy and encourages students
to take courses from an institution other than their own.
The motion was
put and carried.
On behalf of the Vancouver School of Theology, and the other theological colleges on
campus, Dr. Phillips expressed thanks and appreciation for the work done by the
committee and for the vote of confidence given by members of Senate.
PROPOSED CHANGE IN CALENDAR STATEMENT ON COMPREHENSIVE
EXAMINATIONS FOR MASTER'S PROGRAMS WITHOUT THESIS
Dean Grace explained that the current regulation requires that all Master's programs
without thesis have a comprehensive examination. It has been found that there is
considerable variation among departments as to how the policy is interpreted, and at
many universities there is no such requirement. The proposed change would remove the
requirement that Master's programs must have a comprehensive examination, but they
will still be allowed to do so if they wish.
Dean Grace l        That the following change in Calendar
Dr. Isaacson I        statement be approved:
1.   There is no general requirement for a
comprehensive examination in the
Master's program. The department, at
its discretion, may prescribe a
comprehensive examination in the
student's field of study as a degree
requirement.
 Vancouver Senate 11416
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Faculty of Graduate Studies
2.   Where a comprehensive examination is
required, departments must make
available to students a written statement
of examination procedures such as the
purpose, form, length, subject area(s)
and scope of the examination and the
criteria for evaluation.
Carried.
POLICY ON SHARED INTERUNIVERSITY GRADUATE PROGRAMS
The following policy on shard interuniversity graduate programs was endorsed by the
Deans of Graduate Studies of Western Canadian Universities:
Standards of quality:
Shared graduate programs must satisfy the minimum standards for degrees at that
level (master's or doctoral), agreed upon in advance by all participating universities.
These academic standards pertain to admission requirements, number of credits,
program requirements, passing grades, access to resources, quality of faculty, time
limits, thesis or project requirements etc.
Program requirements:
When a proposal is made for a specific shared graduate program, participating
universities will establish, through initial consultation with the respective Deans of
Graduate Studies, the requirements for the proposed program and a list of available
resources (courses, faculty members, equipment, library facilities etc.).
Each university will determine its own internal procedures and criteria for approval of
specific shard graduate programs. Willingness to participate will be shown by the
signatures of relevant department chairs, deans and the graduate dean.
Program management:
One institution must assume responsibility for the coordination of the administration
of the shared program. The management structure of the program, for example a
coordinating committee, shall be agreed upon in advance by the participating
universities. The coordinating university will distribute reports to all participants at an
agreed-upon internal. Formal reviews of a shared program must be held every five or
six years, following a procedure agreed to by the participants.
 Vancouver Senate 11417
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Distance education:
Courses included in shared programs which are offered using distance technology
must conform to the standards of the WCDGS/CAGS Distance Education Policy. If a
program intends to use new modes of course delivery, such as interactive video or
compacted time frame, then this intent should be clearly articulated at the initial stages
of program discussions.
Sharing of revenue:
Shared programs must be designed to provide academic and financial benefits to all
participating universities. Arrangements for sharing revenue and costs must be
specified at the outset, and agreed to by the participating institutions. Any changes to
these arrangements must be formally approved by these institutions.
Students in shared programs will be admitted by one of the participating universities
(the home university). Arrangements for payment of program fees, incidental fees, and
fees for courses taken at other participating universities will be specified at the outset.
The degree will be awarded by the university to which the student has been admitted.
If a component of the program will use the Western Deans' Agreement, this must be
specified at the outset.
Approval of programs and courses:
Each institution awarding the degree must approve the program by its own internal
process, thereby retaining its autonomy. Courses to be offered as part of a shared
program would be approved by each institution.
Dean Grace stated that it was the intention that the proposed policy will facilitate and
encourage the development of joint initiatives across Western Canada initially, and
possibly spread later to other parts of the country. He stated that graduate programs are
rather specialized and that in times of financial exigency it seems appropriate to
encourage universities to work together. The faculty wanted to have a policy that is broad
enough to fit future proposals. With new technologies being developed to allow videoconferencing, a framework was required to facilitate courses that are shared across the
country. Dean Grace said that this is a flexible policy but one which touches on the key
requirements for any such programs and in a sense will act as a checklist as people
develop programs.
 Vancouver Senate 11418
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Report on Official Community Plan
Dean Grace l        That the policy on shared interuniversity
Dr. Thompson i       graduate programs be approved.
In response to a query by Dr. Kelsey, Dean Grace saw no reason why the same thin£
could not be done with courses.
The motion was
put and carried.
n
Report on Official Community Plan
Professor Quayle, Chair, Senate Academic Building Needs Committee and Vice Chair,
President's Advisory Committee on Space Allocation, presented the following report, for
information:
I am reporting to Senate again as a member of the Official Community Plan Planning
Advisory Committee. I last reported to Senate's February meeting. I want to address
both process and content this evening.
For the last month or so, the Planning Advisory Committee has been discussing the
first draft of the Official Community Plan for U.B.C. An invited focus group session
was held on March 23rd and, most recently, a public open house was convened on
April 15. I assume that at the next PAC meeting we will receive a second draft. PAC,
over the last few months, has spent a great deal of time discussing issues of governance
— for the future residents and for the implementation of the plan. Assistance from the
provincial government has been requested to address these issues with the UBC Board
and the GVRD for the long term. However, in the short term, PAC has a subcommittee working on proposals that would recognize the necessity to hybridize
between a university-controlled and a municipal-controlled development process.
As I have mentioned before, this is an extremely difficult process. Legitimate
differences of opinion abound — based sometimes on differences in interpretation and
most frequently around values. There has been considerable concern expressed by the
public (UBC and general public) at the open houses and focus group sessions about
traffic, building height, preservation of the natural environment, the need to create an
academic community — not another Mary Hill or Dunbar, the importance of
affordable housing, the different housing types needed and a general sense of how an
educational institution like a university builds a new community.
 Vancouver Senate 11419
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Report on Official Community Plan
As this process moves along, I am finding myself in both professional and moral
dilemmas. On one hand, I agree with the incredible opportunity presenting itself to
create a balanced and healthy community at UBC. The planning principles that are
driving the Official Community Plan all focus around ecology, economy and
community. On the other hand, I hold some strong views about this particular
landscape — not just any piece of real estate — as requiring special attention in terms of
its development opportunities. I believe that academic issues are at stake here. I would
like to make some points that concern me as a member Senate, of the university
community and of the planning committee. I acknowledge that these sentiments are
based on my particular values.
1. The responsibility of the university as an educational institution and, as such, a
leader for the future is critical. This point is summed up in a quote from the
Halifax Declaration:
"Human demands upon the planet are now of a volume and kind that, unless
changed substantially, threaten the future well-being of all living species.
Universities are entrusted with the major responsibility to help societies shape their
present and future development policies and actions into the sustainable and
equitable forms necessary for an environmentally secure and civilized world."
Therefore, I believe that our academic mandate as expressed in the OCP is critical.
To me this plan is not just about endowment, it is about how we set an example
for other communities.
2. Articulating an academic vision, from which flows a planning vision
I realize that some people feel that our university community has been asked about
their vision, but I am not so sure. I am finding that a lack of clearly stated, or
understood and supported, academic vision is causing problems in the generation
of a planning vision, and subsequently, a plan. It is very difficult, I believe, to
generate a plan for a campus and its new community without clearly stated
academic visions that can be specifically translated into planning visions. I
therefore have been making pleas for more time. It takes time to do a public
process. It takes time to test visions and ideas. We just have not had time. Only
now do I feel that we are beginning to know each other enough on PAC to have
productive discussions! I am worried that we are going to make some substantial
mistakes if we don't adopt a more "not so fast" approach.
3. Seeking balance: ecology, economy and community
We should be using equally bio-physical, community-building and economic
information to evolve the plan. I want to know the carrying capacity of the site for
housing and development based on valuing the land as a precious resource for
other than its real estate value. The land's value is not just for endowment, but for
the creation of community and an acknowledgement of our urban ecosystem.
Again, it depends on your definition of resource. Some will make the argument
need any more forest left on the south campus site? For me, it has to do with the
 Vancouver Senate 11420
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Report on Official Community Plan
ecological infrastructure of the south campus and the effect that development will
have. I make the argument that at the regional level we must be concerned about
traditional storm run-off from sites like the university into rivers like the Fraser.
The plan itself should reflect "creative" infrastructure ideas about managing storm
water on-site. These ideas have tended to be dismissed in this process because the
most economical system on high priced land such as this is to ship it off site —
There should be a study of the cost-benefit of other systems which are more
sensitive to the general Pacific Spirit Park eco-system and to regional concerns
about storm-water management — these systems may take up more land — but so
be it — we are trying to provide a community here that is responsive to the issues
facing the planet — it seems so short sighted and even embarrassing for UBC to be
a ravaging developer in the old model — even professional "developers" now are
behaving differently — the kind of market that UBC would be attracting would
EXPECT a better and different kind of community — part of which is the
infrastructure. But again, these are value issues.
4. Demanding more creativity
We are a university community. We should be far more creative in our ideas for
the community that is going to grow with and around us. There is the need for
more creative programming (the idea of a university cemetery to honour our past)
and much broader, more experimental, ranges of ideas or scenarios. Here again
values enter — what to me is an important ceremonial and sacred notion in the
cemetery, is to others a waste of land. What about a scholar's retreat for campus
folks to get away and "think" ? This is an opportunity for us to program the
campus and its community to support our academic functions in a non-traditional
way.
5. Improving clusters of communities
I am excited by the idea that the development of the campus as a whole will create
a much improved academic setting. There could be "clusters of communities" in
the academic core with their own corner cafes and places to hang out. These
should respond to and enhance the character of the different precincts that exist.
This is a great opportunity to increase informal learning on campus. However, I
am concerned about the control of the commercialization of the campus. I fear
"Disneyfication" and "corporatization" which could easily erode our academic
community. What is the line to be drawn between the "innocent" corner cafe and
the "evil" chain hotel?
These are dicey issues, but I'm not sure we've discussed them enough. They are not
traditional "academic" issues like curriculum and admissions — but they do affect the
academy profoundly. I share these ideas with you mainly to point out the incredible
complexity of the process and the different values which enter into the debate. I
certainly don't have answers. But I see communicating as perhaps the only way
towards a solution. The Planning Advisory Committee is getting extremely frustrated
by the process as is the public, but we continue to try to make progress.
I look forward to any comments and I will report to Senate in May as to our progress.
 Vancouver Senate 11421
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Other business
Other business
ELECTIONS
Dr. Kelsey drew Senate's attention to a problem with the recent election for a faculty
member at-large to serve on Senate. He stated that the problem arose because of
circumstances themselves which were unfortunate in that another election had to be held
to elect a single member. He noted that out of seven nominees for that election the
winning candidate obtained only 34 votes; the total number of votes cast being 157,
which was a lamentable percentage of the 1,876 eligible voters.
Dr. Kelsey felt that part of the problem may have been that the time line for voting was
too short and that possibly some people were, in fact, disenfranchised. He stated that the
call for voting arrived in his mailbox four days before the end of the time for voting.
Some other people, who were out of town at a conference, got back to find that the
election was over and they had only been away for four days.
Dr. Kelsey thought that the process had been complicated by the introduction of what
ought to be an excellent new tele-voting system. He said that the problem with the tele-
voting system is not only its novelty for some people, but that it requires one to identify
oneself by an archane series of digits called an employee I.D. number, which exists for
most people only on one corner of a pay slip which is received and tucked away in the
back of a drawer somewhere, and it was therefore very difficult to vote without going
home to find your payslip.
Dr. Kelsey asked if the Registrar would look into this matter with a view to coming up
with some guidelines about the number of days which should be allowed for voting, and
also with a view to seeing if the employee I.D. number can be replaced as a means of
identifying the voter.
The Registrar responded that he would be happy to look into the matter.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of April 17,1996
11422
Report of the Tributes Committee (in camera)
Report of the Tributes Committee (in camera)
EMERITUS STATUS
Dean McBride, chair of the committee, presented a report recommending that the
following be offered emeritus status:
Dr. G. R. Brown
Associate Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Mr. H. Burndorfer
Administrative Librarian Emeritus
Dr. S. G. Ciccone
Professor Emerita of Hispanic and Italian Studies
Dr. K. G. Dawson
Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Dr. H. P. Gush
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Dr. N. A. Hall
Professor Emeritus of Commerce and Business Administration
Dr. B. Heldt
Professor Emerita of Russian
Mr. L. Karpinski
General Librarian Emeritus
Dr. R. Krell
Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry
Dr. W. MacDonald
Associate Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Dr. D. J. McClure
Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry
Professor A. Mular
Professor Emeritus of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
Dr. F. Pieronek
Associate Professor Emerita of Language Education
Dr. G. Reith
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry
Dr. R. A. Restrepo
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Dr. V. C. Runeckles
Professor Emeritus of Plant Science
Dr. F. B. St. Clair
Assistant Professor Emeritus of French
Dr. C. Staab
Associate Professor Emerita of Language Education
Prof. F. A. Tickner
Professor Emeritus of Music
Dr. S. Venkataraman
General Librarian Emeritus
Prof. W. W. Wood
Associate Professor Emeritus of Architecture
Prof. G. G. Young
Associate Professor Emeritus of Forest Resource Management
Dean McBride
Dean Goldberg
That the recommendations of the Tributes
Committee concerning emeritus status, be
approved.
Carried.
Adjournment
The meeting adjourned at 9:00 p.m.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, May 15, 1996.
 Vancouver Senate 11423
Minutes of April 17,1996
 Vancouver Senate 11424
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix A
Appendix A
COURSE AND CURRICULUM PROPOSALS
Faculty of Arts
Anthropology & Sociology
Program changes - add Minor in Sociology
Change Sociology 449 - change credits from (12) to (6)
Asian Studies
Change Chinese 410 - change in title, description and prerequisite
New courses        Chinese 412 (6) Twentieth-Century Chinese Literature
Korean 410 (3/6)d Modern Korean Short Fiction
Korean 411 (3/6)d Advanced Readings in Korean Non-Fiction
Korean 415 (3/6)d Korean Conversation and Composition
Korean 440 (3/6)d Supervised Study in the Korean Language
Economics
New courses       Economics 210 (3) Microeconomic Policy
Economics 211 (3) Macroeconomic Policy
Linguistics
Changes Linguistics 319 - change credits, description, prerequisite
Change in program requirements for the Major in Linguistics
Change in program requirements for the Honours in Linguistics
New Major in First Nations Languages and Linguistics
New courses       FNLG 100 (6) First Nations Language
FNLG 200 (6) First Nations Language
Science Studies
New Interdisciplinary Major in Science Studies
Women's Studies
New Minor in Women's Studies
Changes WMST 422, 424 - change in prerequisites
 Vancouver Senate 11425
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix A
Faculty of Law
Calendar statement on Examinations
Courses will be evaluated by final examination in December or April, unless an
additional or alternative method of evaluation is deemed appropriate. In certain
circumstances, as set out below, a student is entitled to a re-evaluation in a particular
course after the regular evaluations for the year are completed.
The minimum passing grade in an individual course is 50%. In order to pass the year,
a student must obtain a passing grade in every compulsory course taken in the year
and a weighted average over all courses taken in the year of not less than 55%. The
ranking of students in the top 10% of the class will be printed on the transcript.
A student is entitled to a re-evaluation in a course under the following circumstances:
(1) If as a result of the regular evaluations has failed one or two, but not more than
two, courses (whether compulsory or not) and achieved a weighted average of at least
55% in the courses that were passed, the student is entitled to a re-evaluation in the
courses that were failed. (2) If as a result of the regular evaluations a student has
passed every course but has achieved a weighted average of less than 55% over all
courses taken in the year, the student is entitled to a re-evaluation in the two courses
in which the lowest grades were received. If the grade received on the re-evaluation is
sufficient, the final grade for a course in which the student is re-evaluated will be
raised to 50% or whatever higher grade is necessary to yield a weighted average of
55% over all courses taken in the year. Otherwise, the original grade will stand.
Faculty of Science
Change in Faculty of Science Calendar Statement:
Students who are in the Double Major Program must satisfy all degree requirements of
one department, including all course, breadth and faculty requirements. As far as the
second department is concerned a student need only satisfy all departmental
requirements at the 300 or higher level. Students contemplating the Double Major
should endeavour to satisfy course prerequisites for both departments in their first two
years.
Double Major - This program involves specialization in two fields. Students in this
program will have to complete the degree requirements of two departments.
Students intending to do a double major must select one of the majors upon entry into
their second year and the other major before the start of their third year.
A double major program requires a minimum of 120 credits, but in most cases will
require more. The exact number of credits required will depend on the particular
choices of the majors.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of April 17,1996
11426
Appendix A
Students intending to major in two areas should consult departmental advisors before
the beginning of their third year. All double major programs need the approval of
both departments and a senior faculty advisor. Students should be aware that in most
cases it will not be possible to complete a double major in four years.
Biology
Program changes
Computer Science
Change
Geology
Deletions
Marine Science
Changes
New courses
Mathematics
Changes
New courses
Statistics
Deletion
Change
CPSC 152 - change in description
GEOL 358, 436, 439
Marine Science 400 - change credits and description
Marine Science 415 (3) Structure and Function in Marine Animals
Marine Science 425 (3) Ecological Adaptations of Seaweeds
Marine Science 437 (3) Population and Community Ecology of
Marine Organisms
Marine Science 480 (3) Seminars and Papers in Marine Science
MATH 152, 345 - change title, description, hours
MATH 335 - change description
MATH 256 (3) Differential equations
MATH 266 (3) Vector calculus and complex variables
STAT 405
STAT 404 - change title, description, prerequisite
 Vancouver Senate 11427
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix B
Appendix B
NEW AWARDS RECOMMENDED TO SENATE
Alexander J. COHEN Memorial Award in Law U An award of $500 has been
endowed in memory of Alexander J. Cohen, and is offered to the graduating LL.B.
student who best exemplifies U.B.C.'s commitment to advancing knowledge through
critical inquiry. Candidates must have demonstrated excellence in fundamental
research and scholarship which explores law in its social context. The recipient is
selected by the Dean of Law.
 Vancouver Senate 11428
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix C
Appendix C
REPORT OF THE AD HOC COMMITTEE TO STUDY POSSIBLE INVOLVEMENT OF
THEOLOGICAL COLLEGES IN GRADUATE EDUCATION
Introduction
Early in 1995 the Dean of Graduate Studies struck an Ad Hoc Committee to study the
relationship between the Theological Colleges and the Graduate Faculty at UBC, giving it
the following terms of reference:
1. To review the history of relationships between UBC and its affiliated theological
colleges as they have affected graduate students and programs.
2. To look at arrangements at other Canadian and U.S. universities whereby affiliated
theological colleges participate in graduate education.
3. To explore the advantages and disadvantages of different models of involvement
4. To make recommendations on whether or not any change should be undertaken which
would lead to greater sharing of resources in graduate education.
The Dean appointed Dr. M. Chandler (Psychology), Dr. M. Crowhurst (Language
Education), Dr. R.C. Harris (Chair, Geography), Dr. G. Johnson (Anthropology and
Sociology), Dr. E. Kruk (Social Work), Dr. W. W. Pue (Law), and Dr. W.A. Tully
(History) to the committee.
Since its first meeting on February 22nd, 1995, the Ad Hoc Committee:
• added Dr. P. Mosca (Religious Studies) to its number
• met with the principals of St Mark's, Regents College, and the Vancouver School of
Theology
• met with the Dean of Arts (Dr. Marchak) and the former Dean of Arts (Dr. Will)
• met with all university faculty who wished to talk with the committee and were
available to do so
• received written submissions from some faculty who were unable to meet with the
committee
• written to and received replies from the Graduate Deans and Heads of Schools of
Theology in other North American universities.
The chair of the Ad Hoc Committee has also met with Dr. A. McClean, Associate VP
Academic; with Dr. D. Paterson, Associate Dean, Faculty of Arts; and with Dr. B.J.
Fraser, Dean of St. Andrewls College and a professor of church history at VST.
On the basis of these meetings and correspondence, and the discussions that ensued from
them, the Ad Hoc Committee submits this unanimous report. Essentially, it is based on
the realizations that, by any academic measure, there is talent in the theological colleges
relevant to the critical study of religion at the graduate level, and that the relationship
between the Theological Colleges and the University is a matter that has long elicited
deeply-held and divergent views about the essence of a university. We will not pronounce
on these essences, but we do conclude that the Graduate Faculty should proceed
cautiously towards closer relations with the academic talent in the Theological Colleges in
ways that safeguard the university's position, now and in the future.
 Vancouver Senate 11429
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix C
The History of the Relationship between the Colleges and the University
Anglican Theological College and Union College (United Church) have been on the Point
Grey campus and affiliated with UBC since 1927. St. Mark's College (Roman Catholic)
was affiliated with UBC in the early 1950s and, after a considerable debate, Regent
College (Evangelical) in 1972. In practice, affiliation has meant relatively little: faculty
and students at the colleges have access to the UBC library, the colleges each have a
representative on the UBC Senate. There has been only one period of formal pedagogic
cooperation. In 1955, with the encouragement of Dr. MacKenzie, President of UBC,
students in the Faculty of Arts and Science at UBC were allowed to take up to six units of
credit in religious studies courses taught by professors from the theological colleges.
Courses were screened by the Faculty of Arts and Science and approval was given for one
in church history and another on the Old Testament. This arrangement ended after the
creation at UBC, in 1964, of the Department of Religious Studies. Before this department
could be created the Province had amended Section 99 of the University Act. In the
sentence, "The University shall be strictly non-sectarian in principle, and no religious
creed or dogma shall be taught," the word "taught" was replaced with "inculcated."
At present formal relations between the colleges and the Graduate Faculty are awkward,
to say the least. A graduate student at UBC can take a course at one of the colleges for
UBC credit only with the Graduate Dean's approval. To this end the student's supervisor
must write to the dean, making the case both for the relevance and rigour of the proposed
course and for the absence of any close equivalent in the university. These procedures
virtually close college courses to graduate students at UBC. Faculty at the colleges may
not serve on thesis committees at UBC without obtaining a similar approval, a procedure
that effectively excludes them. Relations in the other direction are somewhat more open.
Students at the theological colleges take graduate courses at the university, paying the
fees, and from time to time university faculty serve on thesis committees in the theological
colleges. Faculty from the theological colleges have often taught sessionally in the
university, usually as leave replacements.
Informally, relations between the colleges and university are much more lively. The
Department of Religious Studies and the colleges, for example, have shared colloquia and
non-credit seminars for years, cooperated in library acquisitions to maximize coverage
and avoid duplication, and shared visiting lecturers. Individual faculty in the Department
of Religious Studies have frequently given lectures and seminars to classes in the colleges,
and vice versa. Faculty in Asian Studies, English, History, and several other departments
have participated in similar arrangements.
Relationships Elsewhere
Although, in detail, there are as many different arrangements as there are universities and
theological studies, in general North American universities have adopted one of two
models:
1) The Harvard, Yale, Chicago model in which theology is located in a divinity
faculty within the university, and
 Vancouver Senate 11430
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix C
2)  The Princeton model in which theology is in a separate theological seminary
independent of the university although affiliated with it.
There are many variations on these models. Current arrangements at UBC comprise an
extreme form of the latter.
At the Canadian universities we have contacted the situation is approximately this:
The University of Toronto:
Current arrangements are governed by a Memorandum of Agreement between the
University of Toronto and the Toronto School of Theology signed in 1978 and recently
renewed. Students from the TST may take graduate courses at the U of T at the discretion
of the units offering the courses and academic advisors at TST, and graduate students
from the U of T have similar access to courses at TST. Some TST faculty are cross-
appointed to graduate departments of the U of T. The U of T and the member schools of
TST jointly award Th.M. and Th.D. degrees. The U of T nominates one examiner to each
Th.D. final oral examination.
John D. Baird (Associate Dean of Humanities, U of T)
"There is no doubt that the University's Department for the Study of Religion and
its graduate wing, the Graduate Centre for the Study of Religion, have been
strengthened by the presence of the TST schools and their libraries, especially by
the opportunity to cross-appoint selectively from the TST faculty. The Centre has
been able to avoid a major imbalance of faculty and offerings towards Christianity;
a significant consideration in an age, and a city, of great religious diversity. There
would be definite hazards in attempting a shared doctoral program with TST, and
I sense no wish at the University to go that route"
Jean-Marc Laporte S.J. (Director TST)
"Theology schools have as one of their missions the preparation of personnel for
positions of ministry within various churches, and it is clear that in hiring
professors one can require the type of competencies that are required for this
preparation to take place. At the same time theology is an academic discipline to be
pursued in a critical fashion, and this has always been part of our self-
understanding. Thus the TST member institutions are willing to offer their
professors the same guarantees offered by the University of Toronto with regards
to the security of their tenured appointments. This matter was thoroughly
discussed and the University has satisfied itself that the member institutions in their
statutes and by-laws respect academic freedom in a satisfactory way. The issues are
delicate ones and required long discussion. As I recall, one of the crucial elements
is a distinction between what professors believe or hold, which is a personal matter
which cannot be made a requirement for them to maintain their teaching position,
and their demonstrated competence in teaching the areas for which they are
academically responsible, a matter of public record which can if needed be
adjudicated according to normal procedures involving peer judgement. May I add
that no contentious issues have arisen since we reached this agreement."
 Vancouver Senate 11431
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix C
McMaster University:
Courses at McMaster Divinity College (Baptist) are open to all university students and
McMaster University confers degrees and monitors the College's academic programme
through its Undergraduate Council. The Divinity College is treated as a professional
undergraduate school closely associated with the university. William H. Brackney
(principal, McMaster Divinity College) points out that "Core courses in classical
theological disciplines (biblical studies, theology proper, ethics, church history, and
languages) are taught from the same perspectives and texts that the Department of
Religious Studies would use. Our expectations and standards are the same as those in the
University." There does not, however, appear to be a relationship between McMaster
Divinity College and the Graduate Faculty of McMaster University.
McGill University:
In 1948 the Theological Colleges at McGill were incorporated as the Faculty of Religious
Studies which, in turn, is part of McGill university (the Harvard model in pure form). The
FRS functions as a department of the Faculty of Graduate Studies for the purposes of
administering the graduate programme. Those faculty members of the theological colleges
whom the FGS recognizes as qualified to teach and supervise at the graduate level receive
part-time academic appointments in the faculty. The academic study of theology, church
history, etc, is treated, at the graduate level, as any other graduate study.
Donna Runnalls (Dean, Faculty of Religious Studies)
"We operate on the premise that theology and religious studies are disciplines which,
like law, have been central to the development of the humanities in the Western
university. For many social and political reason the continuing critical study of
religion, which is a primordial phenomenon of human experience and history, is as
important today as it has been at any time in the past....
The teaching program of the Faculty of Religious Studies is designed to introduce
students to the great tradition of thought and practice which have shaped many of the
world's cultures; to explore the diversity of symbolic and material expressions of
human religiosity; and to challenge students to reflect on their commitments and
values by exploring the histories that have molded those "received notions" which
powerfully shape personal and public lives. In general we wish students to acquire
knowledge that will enable them to live richly and critically in the pluralistic society of
contemporary Canada, and to accept responsibility as reflective moral subjects. In the
past half century we have come to recognize the need to develop leaders who are
equipped on the basis of an Enlightenment criticism which goes beyond the pursuit of
knowledge which is innocent as to its end. The University is the appropriate location
for the development of the critically tutored subjectivity which is basic to such
leadership."
Relevance of Different Models to UBC
The Ad Hoc Committee does not suggest that UBC move towards the Harvard model.
UBC is a non-sectarian university, as defined by the Universities Act, and there is no
interest in the university or theological colleges in merging the latter with the former. If
 Vancouver Senate 11432
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix C
there were, we would oppose it, not least on the grounds of tradition, harmony (the
debate would be rancorous and divisive), and efficiency (there are simpler means to
achieve useful, limited results). Nor do we favour a joint Ph.D. programme, again, most
simply, for the practical reasons that neither the teaching and supervisory capacity nor
demand for its graduates appears to exist.
On the other hand, as things now stand affiliation between the theological colleges and
UBC is virtually an empty concept. Some have told the committee that the relationship
should either be strengthened or ended. We favour a modest strengthening to increase the
Graduate Faculty's access to the very considerable academic resources within the colleges,
but done in such a way that the university and its values control the arrangements for its
graduate students.
Recommendations
1. That a committee of the Graduate Council (proposed by the Nominating
Committee in the normal way) be struck to review courses and faculty at the
Theological Colleges and to compile lists of a) those courses in the colleges that the
colleges wish to open to UBC students and that meet the academic standard for
graduate credit at UBC, and b) those faculty in the colleges who have the academic
credentials to offer such courses and to serve on the committees of UBC graduate
students.
2. That the list of courses then be submitted to the Graduate Curriculum and New
Programmes Committee for its consideration. This committee will then report to
the Graduate Council in the usual way.
3. That, subject to departmental approval, a graduate student at UBC may elect to
take a maximum of 6 credits of courses from this list.
4. That the list of faculty be submitted to the Dean of Graduate Studies, and be
understood to comprise those faculty at the theology colleges who, with
departmental approval, may serve on the committees of UBC graduate students.
5. That the committee established in # 1 above briefly consider recommended changes
each year, and make recommendations about courses to the Graduate Curriculum
Committee and about faculty to the Dean of Graduate Studies.
6. That the following statement be added to the UBC Calendar on p. 223:
Graduate courses at the affiliated theological colleges (see p. 79)
A limited number of graduate courses at the theological colleges may be taken for
graduate credit at UBC. For a list of such courses and their instructors consult the
Faculty of Graduate Studies.
7. That graduate students at the Theological Colleges be permitted, with the consent
of the instructors and the Departments involved, to take graduate courses at UBC.
 Vancouver Senate 11433
Minutes of April 17,1996	
Appendix C
8. That, subject to the approval of the Board of Governors, UBC not charge fees for
UBC graduate courses taken by graduate students at the Theological Colleges on
the condition that the Colleges not charge UBC students for graduate courses taken
in the Colleges.
9. That in the fifth year of these arrangements the Graduate Dean strike a committee
of UBC faculty to review all these procedures and make recommendations to the
Graduate Council. Among other matters, this committee should pay attention to
fees, considering changes in the arrangement suggested above if the student flows
between the Colleges and the University are not approximately equivalent, and
should recommend whether the committee established under #Is 1 and 5 above
should become a Standing Committee of Graduate Council.
Rationale
This arrangement would enrich the Graduate Faculty at UBC by giving its students access
to appropriate academic courses and faculty at the Theological Colleges without the
logistical stress that now discourages most such connections. It would allow the university
to monitor the arrangements, making its own decisions, based on its own criteria, about
what is appropriate for its graduate students at the colleges. The university is losing a
valuable asset if it does not recognize the outstanding academic credentials of appropriate
College courses and faculty.
The question of bias will be raised. We agree with Jean-Marc Laporte (Director, TST)
that a distinction can and should be made between a professor's personal beliefs and her
or his demonstrated academic competence, which is a matter of public record and can be
adjudicated by accepted procedures. We also agree with Donna Runnalls (Dean, FRS,
McGill) that education is not so much a matter of shielding students from bias as of
enabling them to weigh the biases they will inevitably encounter, at UBC as anywhere
else, and this not with the end of creating a body of knowledge that is "innocent as to its
ends" but of cultivating their own maturing "critically tutored subjectivity." A course on
the Reformation taught at Regent College or St Mark's should not be expected to be the
same course; and it is the difference between such courses, both of which meet rigorous
academic standards, that is a good part of the opportunity the Colleges present.
If, in the future, the Faculty of Graduate Studies were to consider its relationship with
courses and faculty from other religious institutions, the procedures outlined above might
provide a useful guide. They would seem to enable the Graduate Faculty to reach out to
relevant opportunities while protecting its own character and interests.

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