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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2000-02-24

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 The University  of  British  Columbia
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF FEBRUARY 23, 2000
Attendance
Present: President M. C. Piper, Vice-President B. C. McBride, Dean F. S. Abbott, Dr. P. Adebar,
Mr. R. Affleck, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dr. R. W. Blake, Dean J. Blom, Mr. P. T. Brady, Mr. P. T. Burns,
Dr. H. M. Burt, Dean J. A. Cairns, Ms. E. J. Caskey, Mr. T. C. Y. Chan, Mr. A. Chui, Dr. D.
Fisher, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Dr. R. Goldman-Segall, Dr. D. Granot, Dean F. Granot,Mr. E.
Greathed, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Rev. T. J. Hanrahan, Dr. P. E. Harding, Dr. J.
Helliwell, Ms. L. Hewalo, Dr. D. D. Kitts, Dean M. Klawe, Dr. B. S. Lalli, Dr. V. LeMay, Ms. P.
Liu, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Dr. D. M. Lyster, Dr. M. MacEntee, Mr. S. MacLachlan, Dr. P. L. Marshall,
A/Dean J. A. McLean, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Ms. V. G. Mirehouse, Ms. L. Morton, Dr. P. N.
Nemetz, Mr. V. Pacradouni, Dr. G. N. Patey, Dr. W. J. Phillips, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon, Mr. H.
Poon, Mr. A. Potluri, Dean M. Quayle, Ms. C. Quinlan, Dr. V. Raoul, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten,
Dean N. Sheehan, Prof. A. F. Sheppard, Dr. D. Sjerve, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Ms. K. Sonik, Ms. L.
M. Sparrow, Dr. B. Stelck, Dr. R. Tees, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Mr. D. Tompkins, Mr. J. Tsui, Dean
pro tem. A. Tully, Mr. D. R. Verma, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky, Dean E. H. K.
Yen.
Regrets: Dr. W. L. Sauder (Chancellor), Ms. J. Dennie, Mr. E. Fidler, Mr. H. D. Gray, Ms. J.
Hutton, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. C. Fillings, Dr. S. B. Knight, Mr. J. Kondopulos, Mr. R. W. Lowe,
Dr. W. R. McMaster, Dean D. Muzyka, Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Dr. J. Perry, Dr. K. Schonert-Reichl,
Dr. C. Shields, Mr. J. E. Sookero, Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr.
Senate Membership
The President introduced two new members:
1. Mr. Ajay Potluri, student representative from the Faculty of Dentistry; and
2. Ms. V. Grace Mirehouse, appointed by the Lieutenant Governor in Council.
Vol. 1999/2000 12317
 Vancouver Senate 12318
Minutes of February 23,2000
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
The following corrections were made to the Minutes of the meeting of January 19, 2000:
1. p. 12284: delete "Dr. R. A. Yaworsky" from list of attendees; and
2. p. 12301, para. 1: amend second sentence to read: "...the Institute for European
Studies had received endowment support, including funds from the European
Union, and that the Institute for European Studies was the only institute in a
Western University to receive funding from the European Union."
Dr. Slonecker l        That the minutes of the meeting of January 19,
Dr. Gilbert J        2000 be adopted as amended.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
MASTER OF ARTS (EUROPEAN STUDIES) (PP. 12300-2)
Dr. Berger, as chair of the Curriculum Committee, recalled that the motion to approve the
Master of Arts (European Studies) had been defeated at the January 19, 2000 meeting of
Senate. The Budget Committee and the Committee of Deans had since reviewed the
proposed new program. Dr. MacEntee, as chair of the Budget Committee, stated that the
discussion at the January meeting of Senate had revealed some confusion about the
approval process for new programs. The Budget Committee and the Committee of Deans
customarily review a letter of intent in order to verify that it is suitable to go forward to
the provincial government. Once the provincial government approves and returns the
letter of intent, the proposers may proceed to fully develop the program and courses,
which are then reviewed by the Curriculum Committee.
Dr. MacEntee stated that three proposed programs, the Master of Arts (Women's Studies
and Gender Relations), the Master of Arts (Asia Pacific Policy Studies), and the Master of
Arts (European Studies), had circumvented the usual process, in that they had come to
Senate for approval before their letters of intent had been forwarded for provincial
government review. In conducting its review of the letters of intent, the Committee had
found no major problems with
 Vancouver Senate 12319
Minutes of February 23,2000
Business Arising from the Minutes
the proposals, although some members had raised concerns about funding sustainability
for the Master of Arts (European Studies). Although the Budget Committee was willing to
grant approval of the letters of intent, it was apparent from the Minutes of Senate that
two of the three programs had already received Senate's final approval. Dr. MacEntee
drew attention to the fact that this did not comply with the October 1996 motion
regarding letters of intent. He reported that the Budget Committee had been working to
clarify and revise the approval process, particularly with regard to collaboration between
the Budget Committee and the Committee of Deans. Once the proposed revisions were
finalized, the Committee planned to bring them to Senate for approval.
Dr. Berger gave notice that the following motion was to appear on the agenda for the
March 22, 2000 meeting of Senate:
"That Senate approve the Master of Arts (European Studies)."
LIBRARY CONSULTATION
See 'Appendix A: Master of Arts (European Studies) Library Consultation Form'.
Dean Granot filed with the Secretary of Senate a curriculum consultation form completed
by the University Library concerning Master of Arts (European Studies). Dean Granot
stated that, contrary to the statements made by the University Librarian at the January
19, 2000 meeting (see Minutes of Senate, p. 12301), the form showed support for the new
program and did not indicate the need for additional library resources.
 Vancouver Senate 12320
Minutes of February 23,2000
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL BUDGETS
The President reported that the federal government was to deliver its 2000/01 budget on
Monday, February 28, and described the budget as "important for Canadian
universities." President Piper identified the following critical areas of interest:
1. Transfer payments to the provinces. The President was optimistic that the
federal government would begin to reinstate transfer payments to the
provinces, and to include post-secondary education as a possible use for this
funding. The amount of the transfer payments and any limitations on spending
these funds would have implications for UBC's ability to seek funding at the
provincial level.
2. The 21st Century Chairs for Research Excellence program. The President was
hopeful that a total of 2000 chairs would be funded over the following three to
four years.
3. Other major research initiatives, including the Canadian Foundation for
Innovation, Genome Canada, and the Tri-university Meson Facility, among
others.
Delivery of the provincial budget for 2000/01 was expected in late March 2000 at the
earliest, due to recent leadership and cabinet changes. President Piper reiterated that BC
universities would be working very aggressively over the following weeks to promote their
collective budget submission, in which they had requested a five percent increase to
operating funds as well as a research infrastructure grant in the amount of 15 cents for
every dollar of funding from federal research granting councils.
Admissions Committee
Dr. Lyster presented the reports, as chair of the Committee.
PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT
The following report had been circulated.
 Vancouver Senate 12321
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
Prior Learning Assessment
Enabling individuals to gain academic credit for what they already know has received
considerable attention by educational scholars, particularly since the 1970's. However,
prior learning assessment (PLA) has remained a marginal issue for universities.
Recently in Canada the Canadian Labour Force Development Board pressed for
enhanced PLA. British Columbia has gained a reputation as a leader in PLA post-
secondary implementation, with the strong support of the BC Ministry of Advanced
Education, Technology and Training (MAETT) and the Centre for Curriculum,
Transfer and Technology (C2T2).
Recommendations:
1. That UBC accept course credits earned through PLA from other recognized
post-secondary institutions.
2. That PLA transfer credit be noted as such on the UBC student record.
3. That UBC create a part-time position for a PLA coordinator (using funding
available from the province).
4. That the wording currently in the Calendar (p. 42) be changed as follows:
Current Calendar Entry
Challenge Credit
"Courses that have been successfully "challenged' at other institutions will be useful to
provide advance placement at the University, but credit for such courses will not be
given toward a degree. The University of British Columbia will grant credit on transfer
only where the course concerned is recognized by the University as suitable for
transfer credit and is taken in the normal way by the student."
Proposed Calendar Entry
Credit Earned via Prior Learning Assessment or Challenge
"Credits earned via prior learning assessment (PLA), challenge credit, or the
equivalent, at another recognized post-secondary institution are accepted at UBC, so
long as the course to which those credits apply is recognized by the University as
suitable for transfer credit. The University only accepts PLA credits which are assigned
to specific courses."
Rationale:
PLA is increasingly widespread in the BC post-secondary system and students are
applying to UBC who have received some credit via PLA. We need a policy for
students who are requesting PLA transfer credit.
PLA already has a small but significant presence at UBC. Although UBC admits the
vast majority of students on the basis of marks attained in Grade 12 (or equivalent),
there are some exceptions to this practice which are relevant to PLA.
 Vancouver Senate 12322
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
First, there are instances where we give students credit for university level work, even
though they have not taken the UBC courses to which that credit is attached. Students
who pass a calculus challenge examination (a form of PLA) can receive credit for Math
100 (Calendar, p. 38). The UBC Calendar (p. 35) also notes that:
" advanced placement, and in many cases advanced credit, may be given in appropriate
subjects where high academic achievement has been attained. This provision applies
particularly to the Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate (Higher Level),
and General Certificate of Education (Advanced Level) programs."
Second, there are instances where we recognize, for specific purposes, learning that occurs
outside the formal education system. Currently mature students are admitted to the
university who "have pursued interests and activities that have contributed to an
intellectual maturity" (Calendar, p. 43) although they receive no academic credit for such
work. Furthermore, although academic grades are the sole bases of admission for the
majority of applicants offered admission, our admission policies recognize that
"additional criteria may be used in some programs in the selection of a limited number of
qualified students." This broader based admission policy mechanism is used currently in
Forestry and Applied Science.
Just as we recognize the learning that has occurred when students take other courses at
other institutions, we should recognize the credits which other institutions award to
students via PLA (so long as those credits are granted for course work which transfers to
UBC). We also should note such recognition on the student record so that we can track
the awarding of PLA transfer credit at UBC. The BC post-secondary system has a well-
developed PLA protocol. The Ministry has targeted some funding to facilitate PLA and we
should use this funding to appoint someone in the Registrar's office to act as a PLA coordinator (this person might have other duties in addition to PLA).
Background
At the request of the Committee of Deans, UBC created a Prior Learning Assessment
Committee in 1997 to discuss issues of PLA and to help provide direction for policy. This
was in response to a province-wide initiative to introduce PLA into British Columbia's
post-secondary system. A PLA Forum was held on the UBC campus on November 19,
1998. The above recommendations flow out of the work of that committee and from
discussions at the Committee of Deans.
A working definition of PLA is: the achievement of course credits through the formal
assessment of competencies that have been acquired through formal or informal learning.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the recommendations of
Mr. Podersky-Cannon      J       the Admissions Committee with respect to
Prior Learning Assessment.
Mr. Podersky-Cannon emphasized the importance of prior learning assessment, but
reminded members of Senate that the recognition of courses by the University "as suitable
for transfer
 Vancouver Senate 12323
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
credit" was an active process. He further suggested that the issue could be referred to the
Committee on Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions for review at some point in the
future.
The motion was
put and carried.
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
The following report had been circulated.
Students with Disabilities
It is proposed that an addition be made to the first paragraph of the current entry on
Students with Disabilities in the Policy on Admissions section of the Calendar.
Current 1999/2000 Calendar Statement, page 35, 2nd column
"Academically qualified students who have physical, sensory or specific learning
disabilities are encouraged to attend the University of British Columbia. The University
has a wide variety of services, including several forms of special assistance, designed to
accommodate the needs of students challenged by their disability.
Students with disabilities are encouraged to contact the Disability Resource Centre (see
"Disability Resource Centre' on page 67) for a description of the services available and to
arrange access to them."
Proposed Addition to Calendar Statement (in bold)
"Academically qualified students who have physical, sensory or specific learning
disabilities are encouraged to attend the University of British Columbia. The University
has a wide variety of services, including several forms of special assistance, designed to
accommodate the needs of students challenged by their disability.
The University will ensure that applicants are not denied admission as a result of their
disability and that, where appropriate, accommodation will be made with respect to
admissions criteria.
Prospective applicants and students with disabilities are encouraged to contact the
Disability Resource Centre (see "Disability Resource Centre' on page 67) for a description
of the services available and to arrange access to them."
Rationale:
The added statement will inform prospective applicants with a disability that
consideration will be given on an individual basis to their application for admission as
outlined in University Policy #73, Academic Accommodation for Students with
Disabilities, approved by the UBC Board of Governors in May 1999. The policy states
"The University will provide academic accommodation to students with disabilities in
accordance with the Human Rights Code (BC) and the Canadian Charter of Rights and
Freedoms. Provision of academic accommodation shall not lower the academic standards
of the University. Academic accommodation shall not remove the need for evaluation and
the need to meet essential learning outcomes."
 Vancouver Senate 12324
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
Under "Definitions' the policy defines Student as either a registered student OR a person
who has formally applied to the University as a prospective student.
Under "Responsibilities of the University Towards Students with Disabilities' the policy
notes two responsibilities which are specific to prospective students. These are the
responsibility to:
• ensure that persons are not denied admission on the basis of their disability
• accommodate students with disabilities, where appropriate, with respect to
admissions criteria.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the recommendations of
Dean Quayle i        the Admissions Committee with respect to
students with disabilities.
Carried.
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: ADMISSION DIRECTLY
FROM SECONDARY SCHOOL
The following proposal had been circulated. The proposal was to be effective for the 2001
Winter Session.
Admission Directly from Secondary School
Present Calendar entry:
"Admission from BC Grade 12
Graduates from grade 12 (or the equivalent) or grade 13 in any Canadian province are not
admissible directly to the Faculty. Applicants with such standing should apply for
admission to first year university."
New Calendar Entry Proposal:
"Admission from BC Grade 12 or Equivalent
The Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration will admit into Year 1 of the
B.Com. program a limited number of first year students on the basis of a Grade 12
average calculated on English 12, Principles of Mathematics 12 and two other approved
examinable Grade 12 courses."
Rationale:
This proposal is aimed at attracting high quality domestic and international students to
UBC and to Commerce. Many business schools including Queen's, the University of
Toronto, and the University of Western Ontario, have in place an admission policy that
admits high school students directly into their program or guarantees their admission
based on their high school academic performance. Commerce believes that we are
potentially losing strong candidates for the B.Com. program by not permitting direct
entry.
 Vancouver Senate 12325
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
This proposal does not directly affect other faculties as the students will continue to take
the same pre-requisite courses in either the Faculty of Arts or Science, which include 6
credits of English, Economics and Math and 12 credits of electives. Commerce is
considering allowing Year 1 B.Com. students to take one or two Commerce 3-credit
courses presently in the second year of the program e.g. Accounting, Organizational
Behaviour or Marketing. These students will then replace these credits with non-
Commerce electives in their second year. Students admitted in Year 1 B.Com. will be
promoted based on the following new Commerce promotional rules.
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposal for direct entry to the
Dr. Hamilton J        Bachelor of Commerce program from
secondary school be approved.
In response to a question from Mr. Podersky-Cannon, Dr. Hamilton stated that the
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration had not set a minimum secondary
school grade point average for direct entry into the Bachelor of Commerce program. The
Faculty intended to select approximately 40 high quality students for direct entry.
The motion was
put and carried.
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: NEW PROMOTION
REQUIREMENT RULES
The following proposal had been circulated.
New Promotion Requirement Rules
Present Calendar entry:
"Unsatisfactory Performance
Students whose performance in the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration is
unsatisfactory will be required to discontinue study in the Faculty for at least one year.
Students who have failed to meet the promotion requirements of the University will be
 Vancouver Senate 12326
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
considered to have failed the year and will be required to discontinue study in the
University for a least one year.
1. Students will be required to discontinue study in the Faculty for at least one year if
they:
a. pass all courses in which they are registered but achieve an average below
55% or
b. fail one or more of the courses in which they are registered and obtain an
average below 60% in the courses passed.
2. Students will be considered to have failed the year and will be required to
discontinue study at the University for at least one year if:
a. they are registered in 30 or more credits and receive a failing grade in 12 or
more credits, or
b. they are registered in less than 30 credits and receive a failing grade in one-
third or more credits."
Proposed Calendar entry:
Represents changes to sections numbered 1 & 2
"Unsatisfactory Performance
Students whose performance in the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration is
unsatisfactory will be required to discontinue study in the Faculty for at least one year.
Students who have failed to meet the promotion requirements of the University will be
considered to have failed the year and will be required to discontinue study in the
University for a least one year.
Students will be required to discontinue study in the Faculty for at least one year if they
are:
a. Enrolled in a minimum of 27 credits and the average in all courses including any
failures is below 60% or,
b. Enrolled in a minimum of 27 credits and fail in 12 or more credits.
c. Enrolled in 12-26 credits and fail one-third or more of those credits.
d. Enrolled in 11 (or fewer) credits and fail in half or more of those credits."
Rationale:
Increasing the required pass percentage for all students would ensure that only students
who have academically proven themselves are promoted to more advanced material. In
addition, Commerce considers the new rules to be more clear to students and allow for
easier implementation by the faculty.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the proposed promotion
Dr. Berger i        regulations for the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12327
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: MINIMUM GRADE FOR
PRE-REQUISITE ENGLISH
The following proposal was to be implemented in the 2001 Winter Session.
Minimum Grade for Pre-requisite English
Present Calendar entry:
"Admission from Another Faculty
Students who have completed a first-year university program of at least 27 credits may
apply for admission to the Commerce program. Applicants must have completed ENGL
112 plus one of ENGL 110, 111, 120, 121 (Arts One or minimum 16 credits of
Foundation is acceptable), ECON 100, MATH 104 and 105 (MATH 100 and 101, 102,
103, or 102 and 121 are acceptable alternatives); and 12 credits of electives."
New Calendar Entry Proposal
"Students who have completed a first-year university program of at least 27 credits may
apply for admission to the Commerce program. Applicants must have completed ENGL
112 plus one of ENGL 110, 111, 120, 121 (Arts One or minimum 16 credits of
Foundation is acceptable), with a minimum grade of 60% for each of the two required
English courses; ECON 100, MATH 104 and 105 (MATH 100 and 101, 102, 103, or
102 and 121 are acceptable alternatives); and 12 credits of electives."
Rationale:
To be successful in the Bachelor of Commerce program and in business, students must
meet a minimum level of competency in several pre-requisites including English. English
composition and language skills are key to success in analytical learning, specifically in the
group work, presentations, essays and industry projects, which are all central to the
B.Com. program.
As can be seen dramatically in Exhibit 4-8 (from the Commerce Undergraduate Program
Review, not included in the Minutes), although the average GPAs of Commerce students
are higher in all three areas, the difference is most pronounced in Calculus and Economics.
However, in English courses, the effect is not as pronounced. Nonetheless, Commerce
students do better than their cohorts in Arts and Science, especially in the 68% to 79%
range of average GPAs.
Three important points should be kept in mind concerning these data. First, these data
exclude grades for students who did not subsequently enrol in second year Arts, Science or
Commerce in the fall of 1998. Second, the students in second year Arts and Science are
mainly continuing (advancing), whereas second year Commerce students are newly
admitted. As a consequence, Commerce has no students with failing grades in these
courses. Third, these data only include students who completed these courses at UBC.
Students taking any of these courses elsewhere are not in the sample, and these omitted
students account for approximately 25% of second year Commerce students.
These results confirm that the overall grades in Economics and Mathematics (Calculus)
seem to be positively skewing overall Core Grade Point Averages used for admission.
 Vancouver Senate 12328
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
As overall core averages (English, Mathematics and Economics) are currently used to
assess applications, students who are marginal in English, but do well in Calculus and/or
Economics, will still gain entry into Commerce. Commerce is recommending that minima
be placed on English courses.
"''Note: Hard copies of the graphs are available the Registrar's Office, file binder 19-50-06.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the proposal for a
Dr. Hamilton J       minimum grade of 60% in pre-requisite
English courses for admission to the Bachelor
of Commerce.
Carried.
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY: COMMUNICABLE DISEASES
The following report had been circulated.
Calendar Entry Change, DMD and IDDCP Programs
This motion involves one change and the insertion of new information.
Faculty Council approved a change in the title of the current paragraph entitled
"DEPOSIT", (left Column of page 168 of the 1999/2000 Calendar) to "ACCEPTANCE".
The current statement in this paragraph dealing with the issue of the deposit fee amount
and timing is to be retained.
Faculty Council approved the insertion of the following new statements relating to
communicable diseases, the potential effect on the progression of a student should a
student have any of the conditions mentioned and the recommendation that students have
disability insurance. The new statements read:
"A health record which evidences immunizations (Tetanus/Diphtheria-Toxoid, Polio,
MMR, Chickenpox, Hepatitis B) and a negative TB skin test (if the test is positive, a chest
x-ray is required) must be submitted to the University Student Health Services.
Immunizations are available from your family doctor, Public Health Department and
Student Health Services at UBC. Being a carrier of any one of the conditions may restrict
both your educational opportunity to attain competency for graduation, and your practice
as a dentist. Counselling is available to individuals who have, or are carriers, of
communicable diseases.
Disability may result from practicing dentistry. Included are exposure to infectious
diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and even the possibility of physical assault.
Injury during the time of training may preclude a student from continuing through and
practicing Dentistry. While the Faculty of Dentistry makes efforts to minimize such risks,
it does not provide any insurance to protect students from loss of future income. We
strongly recommend that students purchase disability insur-
 Vancouver Senate 12329
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
ance while they are students and continue coverage during postgraduate training and
practice."
Rationale:
The practice of dentistry does carry a risk of acquiring a communicable disease. The intent
here is to identify the diseases currently involved, the requirement to be vaccinated and
some of the potential implications of either having the disease or being a carrier. The
admissions process cannot ask an applicant if they have a disease or use that information
in our selection process. We must select based upon our published criteria. If an accepted
student has a disease or is a carrier, then we have to provide specific counselling with the
appropriate medical expertise. This will be coordinated through Dr. M. Boyd in her
capacity as Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the Faculty of Dentistry. Counselling will
be to advise a student that they can stay in the program, have their program modified or
to suggest an alternate career.
Disability insurance should be taken out by students and maintained, less anything happen
to a student that might affect their ability to graduate and protect them from loss of future
earnings or possibly protect against tuition fee loss. This might be of value to our
international students with such large fees and domestic students should the current fee
structure change.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate concur with the recommendation
Dean Yen J        of the Admissions Committee in approving the
proposed statement on communicable diseases
and the study and practice of dentistry.
In response to a question from Mr. Greathed, Dean Yen stated that students would be
required to submit health records after having been admitted to the program, as the
Faculty cannot require applicants to submit this information.
The motion was
put and carried.
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY: PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION
The following report had been circulated.
Professional Association
Faculty Council approved a motion to insert a new sentence in the current section entitled
"Professional Association "(left column, p 171 of the 1999/2000 Calendar). This section
deals with the practice of Dentistry and refers graduates to the College of Dental Surgeons
of BC in this regard. The intent of this motion is to notify prospective applicants and
graduates that the College of Dental Surgeons of BC conducts a criminal records review as
part of the licensing procedure in BC.
 Vancouver Senate 12330
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
Insertion of the sentence in bold.
"The possession of a dental degree does not automatically confer the right to practice
dentistry in any province of Canada. Each province has a licensing authority which grants
the license to practice. In British Columbia, inquiries should be directed to: Registrar,
College of Dental Surgeons of BC, 1765 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver BC, V6J 5C6, Tel:
(604) 736-3621 Fax: (604) 734-9448 or their counterparts in other provinces. For
clarification of their ability to obtain a license to practice dentistry in British Columbia
before beginning studies, persons convicted of a criminal offense including a conviction
for an offense which resulted in a conditional or absolute discharge, and who are
considering a career in dentistry, should write to the Registrar of the College. Most
provinces will accept for registration the certificate issued by the etc."
Rationale:
For informational purposes only to advise prospective applicants that a criminal record
review is conducted by the College in BC as part of the procedure for licensure in this
province.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the proposed changes to
Dean Yen J        the Calendar entry entitled "Professional
Association."
Carried.
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY: REGISTRATION AND ORIENTATION
The following report had been circulated.
Registration and Orientation
Faculty Council approved the deletion of the last paragraph in the section entitled
"Registration and Orientation," (right column, p. 168 of the 1999/2000 Calendar)
The last paragraph of this section currently reads:
"A successful applicant may be required to submit a health record to the University
Health Service at the time of acceptance. The approved form will be included in the
acceptance package. A certificate from a licensed dentist attesting to the applicants oral
health is also requested."
The request is to delete the above paragraph.
Rationale:
This section is now redundant following the new statement on communicable diseases and
the study and practice of dentistry. The issue of a certificate of oral health from a dentist is
viewed by the Council as desirable, but we would anticipate difficulty enforc-
 Vancouver Senate 12331
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
ing it. We will suggest in our promotional literature that applicants should have good oral
health.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the proposed paragraph
Dean Yen J        deletion.
Carried.
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY: INTERNATIONAL DENTAL DEGREE COMPLETION
PROGRAM
The following report had been circulated.
IDDCP Program
The Faculty currently requests a deposit of $5,000 to secure a place, which deposit is
offset against tuition and is non-refundable. We do indicate that this deposit is required in
promotional literature, but it is not in the Calendar. The necessity for a health record and
immunizations also applies to international students, so the second part refers them to the
relevant section in the DMD section.
Faculty Council approved the insertion, after the section entitled Assessment and
Interview, of a new paragraph, right column, on p. 168 of the 1999/2000 Calendar,
entitled DEPOSIT.
"Deposit:
The successful applicant must submit a deposit of $5,000 within two weeks of notification
of acceptance by the University. This deposit is non-refundable and will be applied
towards the tuition of the first term of third year. Please refer to the section on Acceptance
on page 168 dealing with immunizations and disability, which also apply to this
program."
Rationale:
To advise applicants of what the deposit fee is and when it is payable. The requirements
for immunizations apply to international students as well as to domestic students.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the proposed changes to
Dean Yen J        the International Dental Degree Completion
Program Calendar entry.
Carried.
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES: MASTER OF ARTS (WOMEN'S STUDIES AND
GENDER RELATIONS)
The following report had been circulated.
 Vancouver Senate 12332
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
Proposed Calendar Statement:
"M.A. in Women's Studies and Gender Relations
Administered by the Centre for Research in Women's Studies and Gender Relations
(Faculty of Graduate Studies), the M.A. in Women's Studies and Gender Relations allows
qualified students to undertake graduate work in the field of Women's Studies and Gender
Relations. Issues related to women, gender analysis, or related topics will be presented in
feminist frameworks. Candidates are selected by an Advisory Committee representing a
range of relevant research areas, which assesses the availability of appropriate courses and
faculty to provide supervision. The 30 credit M.A. is available on a full-time or part-time
basis. There are two options, with thesis or without a thesis. Non-thesis students complete
a shorter extended essay or research project. To be eligible to be considered for admission,
students must: 1) Hold a B.A. or equivalent degree from a recognized university, in an
area deemed relevant to Women's Studies by the Advisory Committee. 2) Have obtained
at least a B+ (or equivalent) average in the last two years of undergraduate study with
first-class standing in a minimum of 12 credits of relevant course work. 3) Demonstrate
adequate preparation in feminist theory and methodology, or be willing to take extra
courses, as required, to gain such preparation. 4) Submit a writing sample (e.g. essay), and
a statement explaining why s/he wishes to do graduate work in Women's Studies. The
student may describe relevant non-academic experience, and explain any discrepancies in
the academic record. This statement should also specify the areas of most interest to the
applicant, to enable us to ascertain the likelihood of an appropriate research supervisor
being available if the thesis option is preferred. 5) Arrange to have three letters of
reference sent directly to us, commenting on the student's suitability for the program. 6)
Fulfill all general requirements for admission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies (e.g.
TOEFL score).
About 50 faculty members from many departments and several Faculties are Associates of
the Centre. Students complete required core courses in Methodology and Theory, and
interact with Visiting Scholars at the Centre through a year-long seminar. There is
considerable flexibility in the selection of other courses. Options may include a Practicum
or Internship in the local community or abroad. For further information, contact the
Director, UBC Centre for Research in Women's Studies and Gender Relations, 1896 East
Mall, Vancouver V6T 1Z1, or check our web-page: <www.wmst.ubc.ca>."
Dr. Lyster pointed out that much of this material had been approved at the January 2000
meeting of Senate, when the Master of Arts (Women's Studies and Gender Relations) was
first presented by the Curriculum Committee. The Admissions Committee proposed to
add the material in bold.
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions statement for the Master
Mr. Brady J        of Arts (Women's Studies and Gender
Relations) be approved.
 Vancouver Senate 12333
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
In response to questions from Mr. Brady, Dr. Raoul described feminist theory as an
approach to research and teaching which includes women, and questions approaches
which exclude gender analysis. The practicum or internship portion of the program was
to take place at one of an extensive list of community organizations. Dr. Raoul described
the intended learning outcome as the recognition of the relevance of theory to real life
situations and to policies made in the community. The academic component to the
practicum would include regular meetings with faculty as well as assignments and a major
research paper.
Dr. Lalli noted that the Department of Sociology offered a graduate program in gender
and feminist studies, and asked how the new M.A. (Women's Studies and Gender
Relations) would relate to that Department's activities. Dean pro tem. Tully agreed that
many programs overlap, and stated that he viewed this as an expression of strength rather
than as a contradiction. Dr. Tees pointed out that Senate had been asked to consider
admission requirements only.
The motion was
put and carried.
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES: MASTER OF ARTS (ASIA PACIFIC POLICY
STUDIES)
The following report had been circulated.
Proposed Calendar Statement:
"Master of Arts (Asia Pacific Policy Studies)
The program provides advanced training in research and analysis on policy issues relevant
to the Asia and Pacific regions, to graduate students preparing for positions in government
departments, non-profit organizations, private sector enterprises and as preparation for
academic doctoral programs. The program will be administered in accordance with the
Policies and Procedures of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Applicants to the program must satisfy the admissions requirements of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. Applicants also must have a sufficient background in area studies
and/or social sciences to permit advanced research and analysis of policy issues relevant to
the Asia and Pacific regions. Preference will be given to applicants who have received
formal training in one or more languages (other than English) of the standard set by the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. Admission of the candidate is not complete until
 Vancouver Senate 12334
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
the application has been accepted and the course of study has been approved by the
Institute of Asian Research and the Faculty of Graduate Studies."
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the admissions statement
Dr. Fisher J       for the Master of Arts (Asia Pacific Policy
Studies).
In response to a query from Mr. Tompkins, Dr. Tees confirmed that the name of the
degree had been changed to Master of Arts (Asia Pacific Policy Studies). Some of the
circulated materials showed an earlier rendition of the degree name.
Making reference to earlier discussion about the approval of letters of intent, Prof. Burns
asked for clarification about the status of both the Master of Arts (Asia Pacific Policy
Studies) and the Master of Arts (Women's Studies and Gender Relations). Dean Granot
replied that the letters of intent for both new programs had been circulated and that the
Office of the Vice-President, Academic and Provost was collecting responses. Vice-
President McBride clarified that he had not yet forwarded the letters of intent to the
provincial government, and that the programs would only be made available to students
after provincial government approval.
The motion was
put and carried.
FACULTY OF MEDICINE: ADVANCEMENT
The following report had been circulated.
Advancement
Present Calendar Entry (1999/2000), page 263, column 2:
"The Faculty will determine the student's fitness for promotion at the end of each session.
A student whose academic standing is unsatisfactory may be required either to withdraw
from the Faculty or to repeat the entire work of the year.
If the progress of a student has been unsatisfactory in any given session, the Faculty may
permit a supplemental examination in the subject failed, provided that attendance has
 Vancouver Senate 12335
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
been satisfactory, more than two subjects have not been failed, and an average of at least
60% in the work of the year including the failed subjects has been obtained.
The department or departments concerned may direct such work as will be necessary to
prepare for the supplemental examination. It is the responsibility of the student to consult
the heads of the departments concerned about such arrangements. If the student satisfies
the requirements of the departments concerned and passes each supplemental examination
with a mark of at least 65% he or she will be promoted.
A student in the first year who fails to be promoted will not be permitted to repeat the
year except under special circumstances.
A student will not be permitted to repeat more than one year except under special
circumstances.
A student who repeats a year is required to attain a mark of at least 65% in the
examination in each subject.
Although satisfactory academic performance is prerequisite to advancement it is not the
sole criterion in the consideration of the suitability of a student for promotion or
graduation. The Faculty reserves the right to require a student to withdraw from the
Faculty if considered to be unsuited to proceed with the study or practice of medicine."
Proposed Calendar Entry (Changes in bold)
"Advancement
The Faculty will determine the student's fitness for promotion at the end of each session.
A student whose academic standing is unsatisfactory may be required either to withdraw
from the Faculty or to repeat all or part of the academic work for the year."
Delete the remaining 6 paragraphs and replace with:
"If the progress of a student has been unsatisfactory in any given term, the Faculty may
permit a supplemental examination in the course(s) failed, provided that attendance has
been satisfactory and no more than two courses have been failed. The Supplemental
Examination Program is offered to students who have failed one or more core components
within a course (e.g., in-class assessment or the comprehensive examination). A course
failure is formally and permanently noted on the student's transcript, as is the grade they
achieve on their supplemental work (which must be 65% or better). The course director(s)
or block chair(s) concerned will direct such work as will be necessary to prepare for the
supplemental examination. It is the responsibility of the student to consult the course
director(s) concerned about such arrangements. If the student satisfies the requirements of
the course(s) concerned and passes each supplemental examination with a mark of at least
65%, he/she will be promoted. If the student does not pass the supplemental examination
program, he/she may be required to withdraw from the program or to repeat a portion or
the entire work of the year.
Although satisfactory academic performance is pre-requisite to advancement, it is not the
sole criterion in the consideration of the suitability of a student for promotion or
graduation. The Faculty reserves the right to require a student to withdraw
 Vancouver Senate 12336
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
from the Faculty if considered to be unsuited to proceed with the study or practice of
medicine."
Rationale:
The wording in the present Calendar entry needs to change to reflect "the courses during
the first two years of the new curriculum are interdisciplinary and not offered by
individual departments." This wording precisely outlines the advancement process that is
presently in place.
Effective: September 1, 1999
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the revised advancement
Mr. Greathed J       regulations for the Faculty of Medicine.
Carried.
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION SCIENCES: OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
The following report had been circulated.
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy
Present 1999/2000 Calendar Entry (page 305, column 1):
Under the heading: Degree Requirements
"Prerequisites
(3rd bullet)
• Sociology or Anthropology, three to six credits at 100- or 200-level (Archaeology
courses will not be accepted as meeting the requirement)."
Proposed Calendar Entry:
"Degree Requirements
Prerequisites
(3rd bullet)
• SOCI 100 or equivalent, effective year 2000 admissions, with flexible policy for
that year."
Rationale:
The current pre-requisite allows for any anthropology or sociology course. With the
introduction of a new social science and occupational therapy course into second year, it
would be preferable that all students have a common background to sociology concepts.
The pre-requisite for other sociology and health courses at the 400-level is SOCI 100 or
SOCI 300. (Credit is granted for only one).
 Vancouver Senate 12337
Minutes of February 23,2000
Admissions Committee
Therefore, SOCI 100 was identified as the appropriate pre-requisite, and was most likely
to be available at virtually any college or university.
Effective Date: September 1, 2000
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposed changes to the admission
Dean Cairns J       requirements for the Bachelor of Science in
Occupational Therapy be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF SCIENCE: JOINT UBC-BCIT HONOURS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
BIOTECHNOLOGY
The following report had been circulated.
Honours Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology
Proposed Calendar Entry (1999/2000 Calendar p.333, column 1) to be located
after existing Honours programs:
"The Department of Microbiology and Immunology of the University of British Columbia
and the Biotechnology Program at the British Columbia Institute of Technology offer a
five-year joint degree Co-operative Education program that integrates academic study at
both institutions with related and supervised work experience. Enrollment is limited.
Entry into the program is at the second year level, is by application and requires
completion of the first-year prerequisites listed below with at least the minimum
admission average set by the UBC Faculty of Science for transfer into second year.
Applicants will also be judged on suitability for cooperative work experience by the UBC
and BCIT Co-operative Education coordinators. Applications and detailed information
are available from either the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, #300 - 6174
University Boulevard, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z3, telephone (604) 822-3308 or the BCIT
Biotechnology Program, 3700 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, B.C., V5G 3H2, telephone
(604) 432-8324. The deadline for applications is March 1.
The first year of the program is a first-year science program that can be taken at UBC or
another institution. The second and third years (taken at BCIT) include two four-month
work terms along with academic and technical studies. The fourth and fifth years (taken
at UBC) include two four-month work terms and advanced studies. Maintenance of an
average of 75% in second and subsequent years is required to continue in the program.
Completion of the requirements for the first three years of the program earns a Diploma
of Technology in Biotechnology. Completion of the requirements for the entire five-year
program earns an Honours B.Sc. in Biotechnology. The credentials are awarded jointly by
UBC and BCIT.
Students who fail to maintain the required average in their fourth or fifth year could ask
to have their BCIT courses evaluated on a course-by-course basis for potential UBC
credit."
 Vancouver Senate 12338
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appeals on Academic Standing Committee
Dr. Lyster stated that, although Senate had already approved the majority of this
material, the Admissions Committee wished to clarify that the program was to be offered
at two different sites by adding the phrases in bold.
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposed changes to the Calendar
Dr. Berger i        entry for the Honours Bachelor of Science in
Biotechnology be approved.
In response to a query from Mr. Brady, Dr. Berger confirmed that the diploma portion of
the program had not been reviewed by the Continuing Studies Committee. He added that
this diploma was to be an undergraduate credential, which conformed more to UBC's
definition of a certificate program. The two institutions would jointly issue the diploma.
The President confirmed that both the diploma and the degree had been approved at the
January 2000 meeting of Senate. Dr. Lyster reminded members of Senate to submit
admissions and advancement material to the Admissions Committee as early as possible,
so that both the Admissions and Curriculum Committees might avoid confusion by
reporting on a given item at the same meeting.
The motion was
put and carried.
Appeals on Academic Standing Committee
See Appendix B: Appeals on Academic Standing Committee Report to Senate
Prof. Sheppard, as chair of the Committee, presented the report for the information of
members of Senate. He thanked Dr. Yaworsky for writing the report, and Ms. Lisa
Collins and Ms. Karminie de Silva of Secretariat Services for their assistance in collecting
the data. Prof. Sheppard invited Dr. Yaworsky to speak to the report. Dr. Yaworsky
apologized for the lateness of the report, and expressed the hope that Senate could come
to expect more regular reporting from the Committee than once every eight years.
 Vancouver Senate 12339
Minutes of February 23,2000
Continuing Studies Committee
In order to provide appellants with more information about the Committee's procedures
and to make the process less intimidating, he encouraged the Registrar's Office to provide
a copy of the report to each appellant or prospective appellant.
Dr. Yaworsky extended thanks on behalf of the Committee to the many members of
Senate who had served on the Committee over the years, particularly its two past chairs:
Dr. D. J. MacDougall and Prof. P. L. Bryden.
Continuing Studies Committee
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY: CERTIFICATE IN ORAL MEDICINE AND ORAL
PATHOLOGY
See Appendix C: Certificate in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology
Dean Yen presented the report, as chair of the Committee. In accordance with the
Guidelines for the Establishment of Certificate Programs (Minutes of Senate, March 20,
1996, pp. 11391-8), the proposal was presented for information only.
Library Committee
FUNDING FOR LIBRARY FACILITIES
Dr. Rosengarten, as chair of the Committee, gave notice that the following motion was to
appear on the agenda for the March 22, 2000 meeting of Senate:
" That in recognition of the crisis facing the University Library, Senate urges the
University Administration to give special consideration to the renovation and
upgrading of the Library's current facilities, and that new facilities be made a major
priority in the next fund-raising campaign."
 Vancouver Senate 12340
Minutes of February 23,2000
Nominating Committee
Nominating Committee
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Dr. Williams, as chair of the Committee, presented the Committee's recommendation.
Dr. Williams l        That the Associate Vice-President, Academic
Prof. Burns i        Programs, be appointed an ex-officio member
of the Curriculum Committee.
Carried.
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
A CHOICE OF TRANSFORMATIONS FOR THE 21ST-CENTURY UNIVERSITY
Note: The text of this article is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Manager, Secretariat Services.
Vice-President McBride had circulated for information copies of an article entitled A
Choice of Transformations for the 21st-century University, by James J. Duderstadt from
the Chronicle of Higher Education, issue dated February 4, 2000. Vice-President McBride
commented that the article contained interesting concepts about the structure and focus of
universities.
ACADEMIC PLAN
(Note: The text of the Academic Plan is not included in the Minutes. Please see the
URL http://www.oldadm.ubc.ca/apac/. Copies are also available from the Manager,
Secretariat Services)
Vice-President McBride    l        That Senate endorse the Academic Plan.
Dr. Tees J
Vice-President McBride presented highlights of the Academic Plan. He recalled that
Senate had discussed a draft version of the document in October 1999. The core goals of
the planning process had been to acknowledge strengths, to identify needs, and to
recognize our unique contribution to society. Although UBC is already home to many
outstanding world-class research and
 Vancouver Senate 12341
Minutes of February 23,2000
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
teaching activities, he explained that the Plan would identify ways to improve research,
scholarship, and the teaching and learning environments. The Academic Plan was to form
a framework for realizing the Trek 2000 vision, and would also assist units in developing
their academic plans.
The development of an academic plan was one of the instructions in Trek 2000. The
process began in October 1998 with a discussion paper about future directions for UBC.
Toward an Academic Plan elicited a great deal of discussion. The Academic Plan
Advisory Committee (APAC) met with over 2000 people, and adjusted the Plan
dramatically as a consequence of those discussions. Toward an Academic Plan was also
discussed at Senate in the fall of 1999. More ideas and criticisms were generated and later
incorporated.
The Vice-President stated that the Plan would improve communication and coherence at
all levels of the university. He made the following comments about specific areas of the
document.
Retention and Renewal of Faculty and Staff
All members of the UBC community are aware of the difficulties in recruiting and
retaining faculty and staff in an intensely competitive environment. It has become
critically important to make the right hiring decisions, especially considering that many
people remain at UBC for approximately 30 years.
The Learning Environment and Research Excellence
Some people have been critical of the large amount of space occupied by the "Learning
Environment" section, especially as compared to the section on "Research Excellence."
Research is already very strong at UBC, and the necessary improvements in this area are
relatively straight forward. There is more room for substantial improvement in the
teaching and learning environment. The Academic Plan focuses on flexibility in the
curriculum and how credits are assigned, and emphasizes active learning and the
integration of research in the learning environment.
 Vancouver Senate 12342
Minutes of February 23,2000
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Links with Community
Universities can no longer sit in isolation, but must seek integration with the community.
Both the university and the community benefit from such integration. In addition to a
Downtown Eastside presence, the Academic Plan also addresses UBC's involvement in
other areas of the community. Academically focused community service is to be
considered with regard to promotion and merit.
Effective Governance
Although UBC's Faculty and department structure serves the University well, this
structure can also inhibit creativity and collaboration in course development and research
activities. The Academic Plan suggests ways to remove or reduce these structural barriers.
The intent is not to denigrate departments or disciplines, but to maximize the tremendous
strength in those disciplines, and to study the exciting areas that come together on the
boundaries of disciplines. This section also contains suggestions for streamlining the
curriculum approval process.
Unit-Based Academic Plans
Unit based academic plans will form the basis for implementation of the Academic Plan.
Criticism has focused on how units are defined, and whether a different definition of
"unit' will denigrate departments as they currently exist. Vice-President McBride expressed
the opinion that the reverse may, in fact, be true. Areas of interest will be emphasized
over organizational structures. One example of such an area is Asian studies. The
Department of Asian Studies, the Institute of Asian Research and the many other
departments making appointments in this area may wish to coordinate their hirings and
to make the most effective use of their programs. Hiring plans will develop from the unit-
plans.
 Vancouver Senate 12343
Minutes of February 23,2000
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Vice-President McBride stated that Senate would be directly involved in decisions about
implementation of the Academic Plan.
Resource Allocation
Addressing the issue of resources for both existing and new programs, Vice-President
McBride stated that new resources were to become available to the university. He
presented the following projections, adding that the release of the upcoming federal
budget would change these estimates. All figures are in millions.
Assured   Anticipated   Requested
New Opportunities
20.7
CFI
Other
51.2
160.0
Total CFI
71.9
160.0
21st Century Chairs Program
13.5
9.0
Research Overhead
9.0
15.0
'Closing the Gap'
5.0
20.0
Total Recurring
13.5
23.0
35.0
Prof. Burns asked how much of the one-time funding would be available to the
humanities and social sciences. He expressed concern that, although Vice-President
McBride had presented the funding as benefiting the entire institution, this new funding
would be restricted to the sciences. Vice-President McBride responded that the CFI funds
would be used to support the library, which would benefit the entire university, and that
there were three or four CFI proposals pending in the humanities or social sciences. He
added that additional funding secured by the sciences would free resources for use in
other areas. The Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) had recently expanded
its mandate to include the social sciences, and it is also hoped that proposals from the
social sciences would receive funding through the 21st Century Chairs for Research
Excellence program.
 Vancouver Senate 12344
Minutes of February 23,2000
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Setting the context for discussion, the President reminded members of Senate that the
motion under consideration was to "endorse" the Academic Plan. She suggested that
members focus their discussion on the Plan in its entirety, rather than on proposing
specific amendments.
Mr. Podersky-Cannon expressed the opinion that the Academic Plan contained few
conclusions relative to the lengthy planning process. He added that the Plan reflected the
sense that UBC should be "all things to all people," and stated that no institution in the
modern world could hope to attain that goal. Mr. Podersky-Cannon pointed out that the
Plan did not contain a significant discussion about which cuts would be taken during
implementation, and how those decisions would be made. Vice-President McBride
responded that unit-plans would be a critical part of setting priorities. Faculties would
have open discussions as the unit-plans and hiring plans come together. Decisions with
academic ramifications would clearly be brought to Senate for approval.
Dr. Fisher stated that the authors had made some improvements in the clarity of the
language in this version of the Plan. He applauded the APAC for their focus on changing
the curriculum, and for the international context. He pointed out, however, that the vote
by the Faculty Association signalled concern by more than two hundred people. He raised
the following criticisms:
1. Vague language. Even though the format had been revised to sentences as
opposed to bullets, there was still no clear way to identify the key priorities;
2. "Effective Governance' should contain an explicit reference to the Senate;
3. The concept of differentiated staffing ought to be expanded and explained;
4. UBC should consider determining minimum thresholds for all faculty in the
areas of research, teaching and service.
While in agreement that individuals would wish to make changes to the Academic Plan,
Dr. Blake spoke in support of the document as a whole. Because the Plan is meant to be a
"living" document, it would allow for the rearrangement of priorities as new
opportunities present them-
 Vancouver Senate 12345
Minutes of February 23,2000
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
selves. He also expressed support for the Vice-President's statement that Senate would be
involved in the process that changes the document, and encouraged his fellow senators to
vote for endorsement.
Dr. Goldman-Segall, speaking in support of the document, stated that the Academic Plan
served to legitimate what the Faculty of Education had been doing for at least a decade.
The Faculty had always promoted interdisciplinarity as outlined in the Plan. Learning,
teaching and research had been treated almost as a sacred trilogy, each informing the
other. She complimented Vice-President McBride and the members of the APAC, adding
that the Plan had evolved because a large number of people had worked together to
bridge new connections.
Dr. Goldman-Segall expressed the opinion that, in order to become leaders in
communications and information technology as outlined in Trek 2000, UBC must create
a climate where faculty have the intellectual freedom to focus on different paths at
different times in their careers. As the discoveries made by faculty enter the public
domain, a climate of greater understanding would be created, and UBC would enhance its
ability to attract larger scale funding.
Mr. Affleck described this version of the Plan as "bordering on excellent." He agreed
with Mr. Podersky-Cannon, stating that the Plan should not try to do everything that is
"fashionable in education." He pointed to resource problems that would inhibit the
University's ability to succeed in certain areas, including broadening the student age
profile and providing social space.
Prof. Sheppard stated that, although this version showed a great improvement over
previous drafts, the document could be further improved by the explicit recognition that
every recommendation would require additional resources. He suggested the addition of a
statement to this effect to the introduction.
 Vancouver Senate 12346
Minutes of February 23,2000
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Dr. Berger spoke in favour of endorsing the plan, referring to the document as a
"marvellous resource kit for units to use as a base to develop their own plans." He stated
that the Plan contained guidelines that would apply in all fiscal climates, and that the
level of detail would be enhanced through the creation of unit-plans at the grass roots
level.
Dr. MacEntee drew attention to the fact that his question about the need for a plan had
been answered at the end of the document (p. 15, para. 3). Referring to the statement that
unit-plans would assist in "avoiding the misdirection and lack of focus than can result
from decisions made incrementally," he stated that, in reality, units were faced with
decisions on a daily basis. These decisions were necessarily incremental. He cited the
recent 21st Century Research Chairs for Excellence proposal process as one example.
Dr. MacEntee stated that if the Academic Plan was a blueprint for individual units to
address their academic futures, then it became a different document than what it
purported to be. He expressed concern that units could be pushed into wasting time on
creating elaborate mission statements as a result of the Plan. He asked what the central
administration would do differently if the Plan were to be endorsed. Vice-President
McBride responded that a plan would result in integrated decision making. Past decisions
had been ad hoc and incremental because they had not been placed within a larger
framework. The Vice-President emphasized that the individuality of units must be
respected and built into the plan. He clarified that, although he did not expect units to
develop mission statements, he did expect every unit to be able to articulate its priorities.
Prof. Burns stated that he had experienced four planning processes during his tenure at
UBC, and that this document was the best that UBC could expect given the diversity of
opinion on campus. This version of the Plan satisfied the criticisms he raised in October
1999. As a living and open-textured document, the Academic Plan would set out
principles upon which a collective could gen-
 Vancouver Senate 12347
Minutes of February 23,2000
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
erally agree. The Plan described academic initiatives as "bottom-up,1 and stated clearly
that the senior administration shall implement these initiatives to the extent that it can.
He urged the Senate to adopt the document, but also to maintain vigilance about how it
would be implemented.
Dean Quayle stated that, as a planner and designer by profession, she had often wondered
why UBC did not have a plan. She stated that the answer to that question was, in part,
that planning problems were not easily solved and that the process was sometimes
chaotic. She expressed pride that UBC had the courage to collectively embark upon the
planning process, which signals that UBC is determined to improve its service to society.
The implementation of the Plan will cause us to have to move beyond our comfort zones.
While UBC may applaud the excellence of its current programs, it must also look ahead
and create the new, and the Plan would help us through this challenging process. Dean
Quayle described the transparent planning process as healthy for the university
community. As the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences worked to transform itself, it had
been helpful to have the larger planning process happening at the same time. The Dean
stated that the Plan would require monitoring and the development of an operational
schedule. It would be up to the members of the community to evolve and mature the Plan.
Dean Quayle expressed her thanks to Dr. Michael Goldberg, Associate Vice-President
Neil Guppy, Dr. George Spiegelman, Ms. Jeananne Robertson, and all the APAC
members.
Dean pro tem. Tully agreed with Prof. Burns, in that a collective cannot expect complete
agreement with any plan. He stated that both engagement in this debate and the outlining
of a planning process had been valuable. He urged senators to see the "promise in the
possibilities" in the Plan, and to seize the challenge to put it into effect. He added his
thanks to the Committee and expressed pleasure in participating in this important
decision.
 Vancouver Senate 12348
Minutes of February 23,2000
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Dr. Tees reminded members of Senate that Mr. Gray had stated in October that UBC
should discard the plan after the process had been completed. He stated that the planning
process had engaged everyone in an important way. He described the document as a
"snap shot" of a plan that would change over time. Factors influencing this change were
to include the 21st Century Chairs for Research Excellence program, government funding
levels, and Budget Committee discussions about implementation costs. He emphasized the
importance of vigilance in continuing to shape the Academic Plan.
Dr. Patey expressed concern that the Plan's ambiguity would doom UBC to be planning
forever. He expressed the opinion that teaching and research should be equally addressed
in the Plan. With respect to differentiated roles for faculty, he stated that he would be
opposed to any weakening of the requirement that faculty do both research and teaching.
He concluded by stating that, although many people had worked very hard on this
process, he was not convinced of the necessity of an overarching plan.
Dean Klawe stated that, though the creation of the Plan had been beneficial, the process
had been painful. She expressed the opinion that discussions about the Academic Plan
had led her to better understand the departments within the Faculty of Science, and to
become a better dean in a better Faculty. She stated that the 21st Century Chairs proposal
process was "wonderful" because the planning process had led people to work together.
The Dean expressed pride in the end result of the planning process, and indicated that she
would vote to endorse the Plan.
Mr. MacLachlan had examined the Plan from a student's perspective, and reported that
he found only positive possibilities for students. He stated that the Plan would serve to
improve the educational process at UBC, with or without added resources. He expressed
the belief that the students of UBC shared his support.
 Vancouver Senate 12349
Minutes of February 23,2000
Other Business
Dr. Sjerve stated that the document was much improved over the last version, and
thanked the authors for their efforts in rewriting it. He expressed the opinion that the
Plan was a good one, but that it did not border on excellence. He pointed out that every
page of the document reflected the need for additional resources. As an example of a
prospective use for new funding, Dr. Sjerve cited Virginia Tech's new Math Emporium.
The new 58,000 square-foot building boasts 500 state of the art computers and
workstations, a lecture room, and a student lounge. Open 24 hours per day, it is staffed
14 hours per day by teaching assistants, technicians, faculty, etc.
The motion was
put and carried.
Vice-President McBride thanked the members of the APAC for their tremendous work,
and specifically mentioned the following people: Dr. Michael Goldber, Dr. Richard
Cavell, Ms. Joanne Archibald, Dr. George Spiegelman, Ms. Jeananne Robertson,
Associate Vice-President Derek Atkins, Associate Vice-President Neil Guppy, and Dr.
Brian Ellis. Members of Senate applauded. The President added her thanks to the APAC
and to Senate. She described the endorsement of the Plan as an important decision, and
stated that she would look forward to working with the Senate to begin implementation.
Other Business
BRITISH COLUMBIA FORESTS EXCELLENCE AWARDS
Acting Dean McLean announced that Forests Minister David Zirnhelt and Forest
Renewal BC chair Roger Stanyer had recently announced the winners of the fourth
annual British Columbia Forests Excellence Awards. One of the winners was the
Silviculture and Forest Engineering Institute of BC. The institute is allied with UBC's
Faculty of Forestry, and offers post-graduate educational programs for professional
foresters and forest engineers.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of February 23,2000
12350
Tributes Committee - in camera
Tributes Committee - in camera
HONORARY LL.B. DEGREE
Dr. Helliwell, as chair of the Committee, proposed that an honorary LL.B. degree be
granted to Herbert Griffin. Five years earlier, Senate had marked the 50th anniversary of
the Faculty of Law by approving the granting of honorary LL.B. degrees to a group of
approximately 20 lawyers who had been called to the bar before the creation of the
Faculty. The Faculty had recently discovered that Mr. Griffin had been inadvertently
overlooked.
Dr. Helliwell
Dean Blom
That Senate approve the conferral of an
honorary LL.B. degree on Herbert Griffin.
Carried.
EMERITUS STATUS
Dr. Helliwell presented the following candidates for emeritus status.
Name
Suzanne Buckley
Jerrold Coombs
James Ferris
David Matheson
Peggy Ross
Maelor Vallance
Name
Jean Hugill
Oleg Litwinow
Duncan Murray
Donelda Parker
Proposed Rank (effective December 31, 1999)
Clinical Associate Professor Emerita of Paediatrics
Professor Emeritus of Educational Studies
Professor Emeritus of Pathology
Associate Professor Emeritus of Paediatrics
Clinical Associate Professor Emerita of Anaesthesia
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry
Proposed Rank (effective June 30, 1999)
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Anaesthesia
General Librarian Emeritus
Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing
Dr. Joseph Sladen    Clinical Professor Emeritus of Surgery
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of February 23,2000
12351
Adjournment
Name
Proposed Rank (effective June 30, 1998)
Dr. Melville Shaw     Clinical Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Dr. Helliwell
Dr. Rosengarten
That Senate concur with recommendations of
the Tributes Committee with respect to
emeritus status.
Carried.
HONORARY DEGREE PROCEDURES
Dr. Helliwell stated that, in response to the discussion in the fall of 1999 about the
awarding of honorary degrees, the Tributes Committee had decided to make the
documentation on prospective candidates available for viewing by members of Senate for
a short period of time prior to the Senate meeting. He reminded members of Senate to
assist the Committee in generating the best possible field of nominees.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, March 22 at 8:00 p.m.
 Vancouver Senate 12352
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appendix A: Master of Arts (European Studies) Library Consultation Form
Appendix A: Master of Arts (European Studies) Library Consultation Form
Note: The following was transcribed from a paper form filed with the Secretary of Senate
by Dean Frieda Granot, Faculty of Graduate Studies.
UBC CURRICULUM CONSULTATION REQUEST
To:
Dept./School: Koerner Library
From:
Name: Sima Godfrey
Dept./School: Inst, for European Studies
Phone: 822-8723 or 822-1452
E-mail: ies@interchg.ubc.ca
We are proposing curriculum changes for the following courses or programs as detailed
on the attached form(s).
New Programme - MA in European Studies
We anticipate that you may have some interest in these proposals and we would
appreciate receiving your comments on this form. Please respond no later than: April 26,
1999
Response
<box checked>We support the Proposal.
Comments (please type or print):
Library needs are addressed in this document.
Respondent
Name: <signed> Jocelyn Godolphin, Head
Humanities and Social Sciences
Koerner Library
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of February 23,2000
12353
Appendix B: Appeals on Academic Standing Committee Report to Senate
Appendix B: Appeals on Academic Standing Committee Report to Senate
Senate has delegated to the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing the
authority to hear and dispose of appeals from students from decisions of Faculties on
matters of Academic standing - however, the Committee has no jurisdiction where the
sole question raised in an appeal turns on the exercise of academic judgement by a
Faculty. The decision of the Committee on an appeal is the final disposition of that
appeal.
The Committee shall allow an appeal where it is decided that the decision of the Faculty
was arrived at through improper or unfair procedures, and that as a result, a wrong
decision on the merits has or may have been arrived at. By "allowing an appeal", the
Committee may reverse the decision of the Faculty, and grant such academic standing as
the Committee deems appropriate, or the Committee may quash the decision and send the
matter back to the Faculty to be dealt with in accordance with proper procedures.
The Committee is required to make annual reports to Senate. The annual report shall
state the number of appeals heard, their disposition, and the general nature of the appeals.
On this matter the Committee must request Senate's indulgence, as the current members
of the Committee have ascertained that the last report made to Senate was on January
15th, 1992, relating to the 1990/91 academic year. Therefore, this "annual" report
presents the Committee's activities for the following eight academic years: 1991/92;
1992/93; 1993/94; 1994/95; 1995/96; 1996/97; 1997/98; and 1998/99.
The following is a summary of the number of appeals heard and their disposition:
Academic
Year
Number of
Appeals Heard
Disposition of the Appeal
Dismissed the Allowed the Other Disposition
Appeal Appeal
1991/92
4
2
2
0
1992/93
7
3
3
1 dismissed for lack of
jurisdiction
1993/94
8
7
0
1 appeal withdrawn.
1994/95
10
8
1
1 appeal withdrawn.
1995196
6
6
0
0
1996/97
5
3
2
0
1997/98
6
1
5
0
1998/99
5
2
3
0
 Vancouver Senate 12354
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appendix B: Appeals on Academic Standing Committee Report to Senate
In the sixteen cases where the Committee " allowed the appeal", the Committee either sent the
decision back to the Faculty, or granted such standing as was deemed appropriate.
At the risk of what may seem to be only a brief and general overview of the substance and the
nature of the appeals, in eight cases where the appeal was allowed, the decision was sent back to
the Faculty to be dealt with in accordance with proper procedure. In these instances the
Committee:
• Ordered a recalculation of standing in accordance with an appropriate formula (there were
conflicting interpretations as to the weight of the final examination towards the final grade);
• Ordered a review of an assigned standing in accordance with customary practice within the
Faculty (the Faculty may not have considered information that ought to be considered);
• Referred the matter back to the Faculty to be dealt with in accordance with proper procedures
(the Faculty may not have considered information that ought to be considered);
• Referred the matter of two course marks back to the Faculty to be dealt with in accordance
with proper procedure (the Faculty should review a mark awarded in a course having regard
to an allegedly misleading question, and conduct a review based on all accessible materials by
an independent reviewer);
• Allowed completion of a degree upon successful completion of the outstanding elements of the
original degree requirements (degree requirements and grading practices had changed and the
student received wrong advice);
• Provided an opportunity for the appellant to submit additional information to the Faculty,
and the Faculty to reconsider the request for removal of a grade from a transcript (there may
have been relevant medical information that was not before the Faculty, and a
misunderstanding related to the opportunity to submit additional information);
• Referred the matter of a medical deferment back to the Faculty to be dealt with in accordance
with proper procedures (the full range of relevant considerations were not taken into account
by the Faculty);
• Reversed a failed standing in a course and referred the matter back to the Faculty to be dealt
with in accordance with proper procedures (evaluation criteria were changed and a clear
pattern of expectations upon which students could rely were not re-established);
In eight other cases the Committee allowed the appeal and granted such academic standing as
deemed appropriate. In these cases the Committee:
• Ordered a recalculation of standing in accordance with a defined formula accounting for a
missing assignment;
• Modified the credit requirements and granting of transfer credits towards degree requirements
(the Faculty did not give appropriate consideration to the adequacy of the advice provided to
the student);
• Removed a mark of "F" from the student's transcript for a course (the Faculty had not given
sufficient consideration to the unusual and medical circumstances involved in the appeal);
 Vancouver Senate 12355
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appendix B: Appeals on Academic Standing Committee Report to Senate
• Granted readmission to a program of study (the Faculty had not given sufficient weight to the
circumstances surrounding the original withdrawal);
• Removed a failed standing from the student's transcript for a course and allowed the student
to repeat the course (the Faculty had improperly removed the student from the course prior to
completion);
• Changed three grades from "F" to "W" (a medical condition lead to a failure in
communication related to withdrawals);
• Deemed that the student had satisfied the requirements for the purposes of graduation (there
was a mistaken belief regarding the qualification of a course for the purposes of fulfillment of
a graduation requirement);
• Required an explanatory notation on the transcript (a medical condition lead to special
conditions which contributed towards the failure of a course).
In the thirty-two other cases the appeal was dismissed.
• In five of these dismissed cases, students appealed a failed standing in the Faculty of
Education's Extended Practicum. The circumstances varied but generally the appellants felt
they received ambiguous feedback; or insufficient feedback; or there were differences in
opinion among the assessments; or the Teacher Education Program Handbook was not
precisely followed. In these cases the Committee felt the Faculty's decision was not improper
or unfair.
• In thirteen of these dismissed cases, students appealed the requirement to discontinue studies
for one year consequent upon a failed year or the requirement to withdraw from the Faculty.
Circumstances varied but generally the appellants felt they should be exempt from the
regulations for reasons of hardship; or financial or personal difficulties; or by applying new
regulations retroactively; or because they perceived they were treated differently from other
students. In these cases the Committee felt the Faculty's decision was not improper or unfair A
• In two of these dismissed cases, students appealed the decision by the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to reject their thesis. In these cases the Committee felt the Faculty's decision involved
the exercise of academic judgement and was not arrived at through improper or unfair
procedures.
• In three of these dismissed cases, students appealed the decision of their Faculty that they not
be allowed to write a final examination nor a retroactive deferred examination. Circumstances
varied but generally the appellants felt they should be exempt from the regulations for reasons
of hardship; or personal difficulties or medical circumstances brought to the attention of the
Faculty retroactively; or because they perceived that standards were applied unevenly; or they
were unaware of Faculty regulations related to eligibility to write the examinations. In these
cases the Committee felt the Faculty provided adequate notice of regulations and the Faculty's
decision was not arrived at through improper or unfair procedures.
• In seven of these dismissed cases, students appealed the decision of their Faculty concerning an
assigned mark or marks. Circumstances varied, but generally the appellants felt that the
method of determining the final mark was unfair; or alleged errors in the marking papers or
assignments; or requested consideration of medical certificates submitted retroactively only
 Vancouver Senate 12356
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appendix B: Appeals on Academic Standing Committee Report to Senate
after final marks were known; or they perceived they were treated differently from others in
the course; or assessment criteria were vague; or Faculty appeal procedures were unfair. In
these cases the Committee felt the Faculty's decisions were not arrived at through improper or
unfair procedures.
• In one of these dismissed cases, a student appealed the decision of a Faculty not to waive a
requirement related to completion of a degree. The appellant felt the requirement had been
waived by a Faculty advisor. In this case the Committee felt that although erroneous advice
had been provided, the Faculty was entitled to correct such an error in a timely manner, and
the Faculty's decision was not arrived at through improper or unfair procedures.
• In one of these dismissed cases, a student appealed the decision of a Faculty not to grant full
credit for time towards a required internship. The appellant felt the Faculty did not give
proper consideration to all available information, and that the decision was arbitrary. In this
case the Committee felt the Faculty's decision was not arbitrary nor arrived at through
improper or unfair procedures.
 Vancouver Senate 12357
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appendix C: Certificate in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology
Appendix C: Certificate in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology
POSTGRADUATE RESIDENCY LEADING TO A CERTIFICATE IN ORAL MEDICINE AND
ORAL PATHOLOGY
Faculty: Dentistry
Contacts: R. Priddy (Program Director)
822-5902 rpriddy@interchange.ubc.ca
A. Hannam (Assoc.Dean Grad/Postgrad Studies, Dentistry)
822-3750 ahannam@interchange.ubc.ca
Type of Proposal:     New
Course Level: Postgraduate
Proposed Calendar Description:
Certificate in Oral Medicine and Pathology
The Faculty of Dentistry offers a Certificate in Oral Medicine and Pathology. This
accredited program is a three-year, hospital-based, clinical residency for students seeking
specialty recognition by the Royal College of Dentists of Canada, and/or Provincial
licensure in the specialty of Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology. It offers alternative paths
for residents specializing in either or both disciplines.
Admission Requirements:
Applicants must have a dental degree from a recognized dental school. Admission
requirements include at least five years of prior, full-time education in English in Canada
(or the equivalent in another country). Alternatively, a score of at least 600 (old scale) in
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required. The TOEFL should be
taken not more than two years prior to application. Note that residents must be Canadian
citizens or landed immigrants in Canada to be eligible for service-based stipends.
Program Requirements:
The program requires three years of full-time residence, whichever pathway is selected.
Residents wishing to take advanced training in both Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology
require four years to complete their program.
The following core courses are taken by all residents: DENT 540, DENT 561, DENT
734, DENT 741, DENT 743, DENT 744, DENT 752, DENT 753, and DENT 756.
In addition, residents electing to take the Oral Medicine path are required to complete
DENT 541 in the third year of the program. Residents in the Oral Pathology path are
required to complete PATH 700 and PATH 701 in the first year of the program.
 Vancouver Senate 12358
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appendix C: Certificate in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology
Course Content:
All the courses which comprise the new program are presently offered either by the
Faculty of Dentistry or by the Department of Pathology. They are:
DENT 540 (6) Research Methods and Seminars in Oral Biology
A didactic course intended to develop the resident's ability to evaluate medical and dental
literature critically. Emphasis on evidence-based diagnosis and treatment of oral disease.
DENT 541 (6) Craniofacial Biology
Seminars in orofacial neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, the craniomandibular
musculoskeletal system, taste and oral sensation. Emphasis on acute and chronic orofacial
pain.
DENT 561 (2-6) Directed Studies in Dental Sciences
Introduction to research methodology, including literature reviews, field-work and clinical
trials. Participation in a study, and authorship of a published paper.
DENT 734 (0) Clinico-Pathological Conferences
Training in case presentations to peers in the Medical Round format. Clinical,
radiological, laboratory, histological and treatment aspects of disorders in oral medicine
and pathology.
DENT 741 (0) Specialty Rotations
Provision of clinical services. Diagnosis and treatment of oral disease in patients with
systemic infectious diseases, cancer (including bone marrow cancer) bone-marrow
transplantation, mucosal disease and oral manifestations of systemic disease.
DENT 743 (0) Seminars on Hospital Dentistry
Diagnosis and treatment of oral mucosal disease, salivary-gland disease, oral oncology,
oral infectious disease, pharmacology and therapeutics.
DENT 744 (0) Directed Studies in Hospital Dentistry
Training in hospital-based dental service. Diagnosis and treatment of dental emergencies.
Assessment and management of in-patients with oral manifestations of systemic disease,
or other oral disorders affecting medical care.
DENT 752 (0) Oral Surgical Pathology
Oral surgical pathology rotation. Case reviews. Course includes basic oral tissue
microscopy and histological laboratory procedures. Emphasis on the principal
histopathological features of oral diseases.
DENT 753 (0) Clinical Oral Medicine
Seminars on pharmacotherapeutics, the oral manifestations of systemic disease, and
metabolic disorders, including diseases of bone, mucosal disease, tumours of the head and
neck, diseases of the para-oral structures and upper airway.
 Vancouver Senate 12359
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appendix C: Certificate in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology
DENT 756 (0) Oral Radiology
Case-based seminars addressing the diagnostic imagery associated with oral-maxillofacial
disease. Interpretation of radiographic results, and application of diagnostic information
in treatment planning
PATH 700 (0) Pathology Conference
PATH 701 (0) Surgical Pathology
These courses are offered by the Department of Pathology, and introduce the basic
principles of pathology, laboratory procedures and disease processes. Residents undertake
microscopic reviews, and cover all human diseases. They participate in prosection and
autopsy procedures, and take part in a specific dermatopathology rotation. Residents also
attend lectures, slide reviews and pathology rounds comprising a normal anatomic
pathology rotation.
Academic Rationale:
Presently, the Faculty of Dentistry offers independent Combined-M.Sc. degree programs
in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology. Both require an original research thesis.
Until now, Oral Medicine has not been recognized as a clinical specialty in Canada. The
Canadian Dental Association and the Royal College of Dentists of Canada recently
established a new, combined specialty in Oral Medicine and Pathology. Accordingly, the
Faculty of Dentistry proposes to replace the two combined-degree programs it presently
offers with a single, hospital-based, accredited Residency leading to a Certificate in Oral
Medicine and Pathology. It is expected that the combined-degree programs would then be
discontinued. The new program is similar to the Residency programs offered by the
Faculty of Medicine. It provides pathways for postgraduate residents wishing to specialize
in either or both Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology.
Students who become licensed specialists in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology normally
pursue their professions in University or Hospital settings. The new program concentrates
on the professional training needed to achieve the specialty Fellowship status required in a
hospital environment. The Faculty of Dentistry considers the intense clinical exposure
now required for licensure precludes the completion of a meaningful M.Sc. research-based
thesis within a three-year clinical training program. Residents contemplating a university
career will be encouraged to pursue research training at the Ph.D. level. A Ph.D. program
in Oral Biology is already offered by the Faculty of Dentistry.
Strong interest in the new program has already been expressed by prospective applicants.
UBC is presently in a unique position to lead the way towards developing an ideal
training environment for this new and innovative Canadian Specialty.
Status of Proposed Program Confirmed By:
Chair, Faculty of Dentistry Committee for Graduate/Postgraduate Studies;
Dean, Faculty of Dentistry.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of February 23,2000
Appendix C: Certificate in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology
Consultation Form:
Date: January 25, 2000
Faculty Abbreviation: DENT
Program: Certificate in Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology
Consultants' Report:
12360
1 Name
Department
Faculty
Response 1
BM
McManus
Pathology
Medicine
Yes
GBJ Mancini
Medicine
Medicine
Yes
JB Epstein
Division of Oral Medicine and
Clinical Dentistry
Vancouver General
Hospital
Yes
When the reports from Drs. Mancini and Epstein were requested, the program was
provisionally entitled a "Professional MSc" degree. This title appears on their reports.
The Faculty later renamed the program more appropriately. The program itself was not
changed.
Library Consultation:
No change in Library needs are anticipated. The program replaces (without increased
student enrolment) the Combined MSc programs presently offered in the two respective
disciplines. Enrolment in these programs will be discontinued.
Budget and Space Needs:
The proposal has no additional budgetary or space implications. It replaces (without
increased student enrolment) the Combined MSc programs presently offered in the two
respective disciplines. Enrolment in these programs will be discontinued.
Effective Date: September 2000

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