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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1994-05-18

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 THE   UNIVERSITY    OF   BRITISH    COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF MAY 18, 1994
Attendance
Present: President D. W. Strangway (Chair), Vice President D. R. Birch, Mr. S. Alsgard, Dr. A. P.
Autor, Dr. S. Avramidis, Dr. J. Barman, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dean C. S. Bindley, Dr. A. E. Boardman,
Dean pro tem M. A. Boyd, Mr. P. T. Brady, Dr. D. M. Brunette, Ms. L. Chui, Dr. D. H. Cohen, Dr. T.
S. Cook, Dr. M. G. R. Coope, Ms. S. Y. Dawood, Mr. K. A. Douglas, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Mr. E. B.
Goehring, Dean M. A. Goldberg, Dr. J. Gosline, Dean J. R. Grace, Dr. S. E. Grace, Rev. J. Hanrahan,
Dean M. J. Hollenberg, Mr. B. B. M. Horner, Dr. M. Isaacson, Dr. J. G. T. Kelsey, Professor V. J.
Kirkness, Dr. S. B. Knight, Dr. M. Levine, Mr. C. Lim, Professor P. T. K. Lin, Dr. D. J. MacDougall,
Dr. M. MacEntee, Dr. R. T. A. MacGillivray, Mr. K. R. MacLaren, Dean M. P. Marchak, Dean B. C.
McBride, Dean J. H. McNeill, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Mr. R. L. de Pfyffer, Mr. D. B. Preikshot, Mrs. M.
Price, Mr. A. A. Raghavji, Dr. D. J. Randall, Professor R. S. Reid, Professor J. A. Rice, Dean J. F.
Richards, Dr. R. A. Shearer, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Dean C. L. Smith, Ms. C. A.
Soong, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. L. J. Stan, Mr. S. C. S. Tam, Dr. R. C. Tees, Dr. S. Thorne, Dr. W.
Uegama, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Mr. D. R. Verma, Dr. D. A. Wehrung, Dr. E. W. Whittaker, Dr. R. M.
Will, Dr. D. LI Williams, Mr. E. C. H. Woo.
Regrets: Chancellor R. H. Lee, Mr. J. A. Banfield, Mr. J. Boritz, Dr. D. G. A. Carter, Mr. P. G. Chan,
Dr. G. W. Eaton, Mr. A. G. Heys, Mr. J. A. King, Mr. H. H. F. Leung, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Mr. R. W.
Lowe, Dr. D. M. Lyster, Dean A. Meisen, Dr. R. J. Patrick, Rev. W. J. Phillips, Professor M. Quayle,
Dr. H. B. Richer, Mr. B. B. Telford, Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr.
Minutes of the previous meeting
Dr. Tees l        That the minutes of the eighth regular meeting
Dean McBride i        of Senate for the Session 1993-94, having been
circulated, be taken as read and adopted.
Dr. Shearer drew attention to page 10784 of the minutes and the statement that the role
and nature of the Faculty of Graduate Studies was near the bottom of a list of things
suggested to the Ad Hoc Committee on University Organization. Dr. Shearer stated that
although it was not at the top of the list it was not at the bottom.
The motion was
put and carried.
10785
 Vancouver Senate 10786
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Business arising from the minutes
Business arising from the minutes
SENATE NOMINATING COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP (P. 10777)
In accordance with established procedures, two student vacancies on the Senate
Nominating Committee had been declared at the previous meeting. Mr. Azim A. Raghavji
and Mr. Emile C. H. Woo were nominated to fill the vacancies. There being no further
nominations, Mr. Raghavji and Mr. Woo were declared elected.
MOTION BY DR. KELSEY (P.10784)
It was explained in the material circulated that the report of the Senate Ad Hoc
Committee on Teaching Evaluation (1990) was received by Senate in September, 1991. At
that time, Senate approved all fourteen recommendations which were contained in the
report. Recommendation 13 read as follows:
That during the term of the Senate of 1993-96 there be established an Ad hoc
committee to review the progress made following these Recommendations.
The proposed motion invites Senate to act upon that recommendation. By resolving at the
May meeting of Senate to establish the necessary committee, Senate will ensure that the
membership of the committee can be approved early in the 1994-95 academic year and it
can begin its work within a time frame which
has allowed enough time since the implementation of the original recommendations
for progress to be reviewed, and
makes completion of its task feasible during the life of the current Senate.
Dr. Kelsey l        That Senate establish an Ad Hoc Committee
Dr. Gilbert J       for ^e purpose of reviewing the progress made
following the adoption of the
recommendations of the Senate Ad Hoc
Committee on Teaching Evaluation (1990).
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 10787
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Chair's remarks and related questions
Chair's remarks and related questions
MEMBERS OF SENATE
President Strangway expressed thanks and appreciation to Dean Pro tern Marcia Boyd,
Dr. Richard Tees and Dr. Donald Wehrung who were attending their last meeting.
ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF SENATE
Dr. Will noted that this was the 25th anniversary of Fran Medley's service to the Senate.
Members of Senate joined Dr. Will in a round of applause.
Candidates for Degrees
Dean McBride l        That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Dr. Tees i       as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chair of
Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried.
Scholarships and Awards
A list of scholarships, medals and prizes awarded to students in the graduating classes was
circulated for information. Dr. Cook informed Senate that the recipient of the Governor-
General's Silver Medal in Arts, Caroline Pond, and the recipient of the Governor-
General's Silver Medal in Science, Stephen Gustafson, had entered UBC from a B.C. high
school and were recipients of major entrance scholarships. In addition, of the other 26
winners of awards, 12 entered UBC directly from B.C. high schools, 7 from B.C. colleges,
3 from other B.C. universities, and 7 from other Canadian universities. Dr. Cook noted
that all of the heads of the graduating class went to secondary school in Canada, and the
majority entered directly from B.C. institutions.
 Vancouver Senate 10788
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Faculty of Education
Faculty of Education
CHANGE IN DEPARTMENTAL STRUCTURE
Dean Sheehan explained that over the past three months the Faculty of Education had
debated the issue of reorganization. The challenge presented to the Faculty was to
examine how it might continue to offer quality programs, maintain its current student
numbers, respond to the changing provincial educational scene, and do excellent research
with fewer faculty and less resources. Administrative efficiency and academic effectiveness
were key to the ongoing debate. A process was put in place and a time limit established.
Dean Sheehan stated that she believed that the reduction in the number of departments
and the merging of units which have overlapping research and program interests will save
resources and in time improve the programs and research. Dean Sheehan noted that the
motions before Senate were approved by the Faculty of Education with an overwhelming
majority (there were only 7 negative votes) in the spirit of goodwill and positive
expectations for the future.
Dean Sheehan
Mr. Brady
That a new Department of Educational Studies
be created by merging the present Department
of Administrative, Adult and Higher Education
and the Educational Studies component of
Social and Educational Studies. (Effective July,
1994.)
That a new Department of Curriculum Studies
be created by merging the present Departments
of Mathematics and Science Education and
Visual and Performing Arts in Education, the
Social Studies group from the Department of
Social and Educational Studies, and the
Physical Education Teacher Education
members of the School of Human Kinetics as
either full or associate members. (Effective July
1, 1994.)
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 10789
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Faculty of Graduate Studies
GRADUATE COUNCIL CURRICULUM AND NEW PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
It was explained in the material circulated that the mandates of the Graduate Council
Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Council New Programs Committee overlap
significantly, with the result that it is often difficult to determine which committee is
appropriate for a given proposal. Over the past several years, redundant review has been
one result. In many other instances, attempts to divide the responsibility for a single file
has caused confusion and delay. The two committees believe that the work can be
efficiently combined without a loss of rigour in review.
Dean Grace l        That the Graduate Council Curriculum
Dean Goldberg i        Committee and the Graduate Council New
Programs Committee be joined into a single
committee to be called the Graduate Council
Curriculum and New Programs Committee.
Carried.
PROPOSAL TO ESTABLISH AN INSTITUTE FOR HEARING ACCESSIBILITY RESEARCH
Dean Grace presented the proposal. He explained that the proposal involved people from
Medicine, Education, Applied Science, Arts, Graduate Studies, the Disability Resource
Centre and the off-campus community. The institute would be unique in that it is not
focussing on deafness but on hard of hearing and on helping those who are fully hearing
people to have better access in classrooms and work settings.
The following objectives were outlined in the proposal:
to create an academic environment that actively supports interdisciplinary studies in
hearing impairment and hearing accessibility;
to establish a framework in cooperation with the professional, industrial, and
consumer sectors, leading to consultation and to new research initiatives both inside
and outside the University;
 Vancouver Senate 10790
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Faculty of Graduate Studies
to encourage research that leads to new understanding, methods, technologies, and
policies that will improve, facilitate and promote hearing accessibility;
to create research opportunities for, and provide guidance to, graduate students in any
of the relevant disciplinary areas and in interdisciplinary studies;
to seek funding sources and to coordinate funding applications for specific research
projects;
to assist in the development of new educational objectives for professionals involved in
hearing issues;
to provide community liaison in hearing accessibility awareness, education and
consumer advocacy; and
to stimulate the communication of hearing accessibility issues and research results.
It was also stated that the work of the institute will be performed by Associates and
Affiliates, and a core group consisting of a Director and Administrative Staff. The
governance of the institute will be assisted by a Steering Committee, a Coordinating
Committee, and an Advisory Committee.
Associate appointments will be based on criteria that include substantial interest and
commitment to research and other activities relevant to the Institute's mission and
objectives. Associates will be required to actively contribute to the interdisciplinary work
of the institute. Faculty who meet these criteria will be eligible for appointment as
Associates. Professionals, practitioners, and other workers in hearing impairment and
hearing accessibility will be named as Affiliates. Hard of hearing volunteers with
substantial involvement will also be made Affiliates.
The Director of the Institute will report to the Dean of Graduate Studies who will be
assisted by a Steering Committee. This will consist of the Deans whose Faculties
contribute to the membership: the Deans of Applied Science, Arts, Education, Law,
 Vancouver Senate 10791
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Medicine and Science will be invited to serve, together with the Dean of Graduate Studies
who will act as Chair.
The Director should be a distinguished faculty member who works in some aspect of
hearing accessibility, with at least a half-time appointment to the institute. The Director
will receive advice from the Steering, Coordinating and Advisory Committees and will be
responsible for coordinating and developing the institute's activities. The appointment of
the Director will be for a five-year term, which will be renewable but normally not
beyond a second term.
Dean Grace l        That the proposal to establish an Institute for
Dr. Gilbert i        Hearing Accessibility Research be approved.
Carried.
Reports of Committees of Senate
BUDGET COMMITTEE
Dr. Wehrung, Chair of the committee, presented the following report which had been
circulated:
Since its last report to Senate in May 1993, the Committee has met 19 times to discuss a
wide variety of issues. In its role to assist the President in the preparation of the University
budget the Committee has undertaken the following activities over the past year:
Identification and Prioritization of Issues for Budget Committee Deliberations
Each Fall Committee members are asked to suggest issues for the year's deliberations.
These issues are ranked by each member individually and then a Committee-wide ranking
is established. The results of this ranking are indicated by the items discussed in this
report.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
10792
Final Motion on President's Proposed 1993/94 Operating Budget
On 7 July 1993, the Committee unanimously passed the following motion which was
published in the 1993/94 Budget and Planning Narrative:
"The Committee endorses the President's 1994/94 budget strategy with the following
observations:
1. The Committee supports the President's revenue enhancement strategies, but
continues to provide the advice that the University should not accept new sources
of funding that impose significant additional costs on the operating budget that are
not directly funded unless there is a clear understanding of how these additional
costs will be met.
2. The Committee reaffirms its long-held view that budgetary increases, reallocations,
and reductions should reflect priorities across the University's activities and these
priorities should be reflected in differentiated reallocations - both among the vice-
presidential areas of responsibility and among the units reporting to each vice-
president rather than across-the-board reallocations. The Committee recognizes
that the President has differentiated both within and across vice-presidential areas
of responsibility, and in the proposed 1993/94 budget this differentiation is greater
than in prior years. The proposed changes in the 1993/94 core base general
purpose operating budget for each vice-presidential area of responsibility are as
follows:
Percentage change before
Budget
Percentage change after
adjustments
adjustments
adjustments
VP Administration & Finance
3.0% reduction
$197,972
3.0% reduction
VP Student & Acad. Services
2.9% reduction
$227,000
2.8% reduction
President
1.8% reduction
$0
1.8% reduction
VP Academic & Provost
2.6% reduction
$2,118,085
2.0% reduction
VP External Affairs
4.0% reduction
$340,561
0.9% reduction
VP Research
0.0%
$5,000
0.3% increase
Other
0.0%
$2,290,426
5.5% increase
The Committee believes that this proposed differentiation across vice-presidential areas of
responsibility only partially reflects the first priority of the University, namely to maintain
the strength and quality of its teaching and research programs. In its report to Senate, the
Committee recommended that, to the extent budget reductions were necessary, they be
made on a greater percentage basis in units that report to the Vice-President
Administration & Finance and the Vice-President External Affairs than in units that
report to the Vice-President Academic & Provost, Vice-President Research, and Vice-
President Student & Academic Services. Compared with this recommendation, the
proposed percentage reduction for the VP External Affairs is too low and the proposed
percentage reduction for the VP Student & Academic Services is too high. The Committee
notes that there is to be a decentralization of fund raising activities as the World of
Opportunity Campaign winds down, and that this decentralization will have budgetary
implications. The Committee recommends that the Budget Committee of the new Senate
study the fund raising plans and their budgetary implications.
 Vancouver Senate 10793
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
The Committee's concern is to protect as much as possible those activities which are
closest to the teaching and research programs of the University.
3. We are pleased to see that the President, with appropriate consultation, is planning
to review administrative organization and costs within all units of the University.
The Committee notes that the Senate has established upon its recommendation an
ad hoc Committee on University Organization and Economy to advise the
President on restructuring and/or consolidating both among and within Faculties
and Departments into fewer units that are coherent and have less overhead than at
present.
4. The President recommended a significant reduction in the operating budget of the
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences in the 1992/93 budget which was not fully
implemented in that year. The reduction recommended in the 1993/94 budget for
this Faculty is 3.75% which does not fully incorporate the unmet reduction in
1992/93 as well as the Faculty's share of the 1993/94 reduction."
The Committee notes that these reductions generated in part monies to fund salary
increases and prior commitments, and that the budget adjustments cited in item 2 above
include commitments that had been made prior to 1993/94 but were unable to be funded.
Review of Selected Individual Faculties, Academic Service Units, and Administrative Units
Rather than reviewing all budgetary units within the University individually, the
Committee has focused its efforts on providing more in-depth discussion of selected
Faculties, academic service units, and administrative units. Since the Committee's last
report to Senate, it has met with the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and the
administrative heads of Plant Operations and Financial Services to discuss the activities of
their units and their budgetary implications. The purpose of examining particular units is
to provide a greater understanding of the relationship between the activities of the unit
and its funding levels. An extensive list of questions from Committee members was sent to
each administrative head before the meetings. These meetings have been valuable to the
Committee in understanding aspects of budgetary units that cannot be fully reflected in
statistical summaries. It is the intention of the Committee to review the presentations it
has received in the near future and make recommendations if appropriate.
Actual Versus Budgeted Expenditures
A prior Budget Committee passed a motion "That a comparison of budget with actual
performance be provided to the Senate Budget Committee before the end of the calendar
year in each fiscal year." This comparison was provided to the Committee and discussed
for fiscal year 1992/93 in December 1993. To be of greatest use to the Committee such
comparisons need to be provided prior to the end of the fiscal year after the third quarter's
actual expenditures have been recorded (i.e. 31 December). Where there are material midyear adjustments, these are normally discussed with the Committee.
 Vancouver Senate 10794
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Principles and Process
Members of the Committee suggested a number of changes which were incorporated
into the Operating Budget 1994/95 Principles and Process document. This attached
document plays an important part in the preparation of the annual budget.
International Student Fee Proposal
The Committee discussed the fiscal implications of the proposal to increase the
number of international students in undergraduate programs and graduate
professional programs by charging market tuition. This proposal was first considered
by the Senate Committee on Academic Policy. At the end of the discussion the
following motion was approved:
"The Senate Budget Committee recommends that, before the Administration
chooses whether to proceed with a proposal to the Board for full cost tuition fees
for international students, a proposal be brought forward from a specific Faculty
to enable the Senate Budget Committee to provide advice within the context of a
plan."
The Committee was informed that the Academic Policy Committee is of the same
view.
Budget Implications of New Capital and Academic Programs
The Committee reviewed a report on the recurring operating cost of new building
space for capital projects completed from 1989/90 to 1996/97. This report was
restricted to the operating costs of heat, light, power, and cleaning. The Committee
asked that estimates be prepared for the one-time cost of furnishing and equipping a
new building if that cost is not fully covered in the capital grant.
In addition to the operating costs of new buildings, the Committee intends to look at
the budgetary implications of the University fund-raising plans.
Streamlining Management of Administrative, Academic, and Service Units and
Simplifying Organizational Structures and Administrative Processes
In last year's report to Senate, the Budget Committee recommended "that the
President, in consultation with an appropriate committee of Senate, receive
independent advice on effective ways of reducing the size and cost of management in
all units of the University." In response to this recommendation, the President
appointed Professor Stefan Dupre to review the administrative units of the University.
The Committee met with Professor Dupre to discuss the terms of reference that he had
been given by the President and to inform him of member views about the scope of
inquiry intended in this recommendation. These views suggested that significant
savings were possible throughout the University by streamlining the management of
administrative, academic, and service units, simplifying organizational structures and
administrative processes, reducing the size and cost of management6 within all units
of the University, and restructuring and/or consolidating both among and within
faculties and Departments into fewer units.
 Vancouver Senate 10795
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
The Dupre report has recently been released along with a covering letter from the
President that endorses all recommendations in the report. The Dupre report was not
discussed with the Budget Committee prior to its release, and the Committee has not yet
had the opportunity to discuss the report in detail.
In last year's report to Senate the Committee also recommended that Senate "in
consultation with the President, appoint an ad hoc or standing committee to advise the
President on restructuring and/or consolidating both among and within Faculties and
Departments into fewer units that are coherent and have less overhead than at present." In
response to this recommendation Senate established an Ad Hoc Committee on University
Organization to study administrative issues in the organization of the academic side of the
University. When this committee's report is received, it will be discussed by the Budget
Committee.
The Committee remains very interested in the prospect that significant savings may be
found in administrative units throughout the University. It looks forward to the findings
of the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on University Organization and to additional
independent advice beyond the Dupre report that the President can obtain regarding
effective ways of reducing the size and cost of management in all units of the University.
Alternative Calculations of Operating Budget Entitlement across Faculties
For the past several years budgetary allocations across Faculties have been compared on
the basis of dollars of general purpose operating budget per weighted full-time equivalent
student. This indicator was adopted because weighted full-time equivalent students
partially reflected the load borne by each Faculty. This indicator reflects to some degree
the teaching load required of each Faculty. The research workload is reflected indirectly in
the weighting of graduate students.
The Committee discussed alternative models of operating budget entitlement across
Faculties that better reflect the research requirement of each Faculty. These models
attempt to reflect in part the research component by incorporating the actual amount of
research funding obtained by each Faculty from research grants (i.e. NSERC, SSHRC,
MRC) and contracts. An analysis based on one model of operating budget entitlement was
reported in the 1993/94 Budget and Planning Narrative.
Improving Teaching Space
The Budget Committee reviewed the report of the President's Advisory Committee on
Teaching Space and discussed with the Advisory Committee Chair the actions taken to
date by the Committee and its plans for the future. The Committee applauds the
significant expenditures that have been made during 1993/94 on improving teaching
space.
The Committee passed the following motion:
"The University's administration should examine the issue of conference-generated
revenues with a view to considering diversion of a portion of them to classroom
facility enhancement. As part of this examination, the University's administration
should also examine the quality of instructional facilities to be set aside for
conferences, as well as policies relating to the booking of classrooms for conferences."
 Vancouver Senate 10796
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee's Terms of Reference
At the request of the Senate Nominating Committee the Budget Committee
unanimously recommended a change in its terms of reference as follows (change in
bold):
1) To meet with the President and assist him in the preparation of the University
budget. In advising the President on the University budget, the Senate Budget
Committee may request information on any of the fund accounts of the
University.
2) To make recommendations to the President and to report to Senate concerning
academic planning and priorities as they relate to the preparation of the
University budget.
This recommendation was sent to the Senate Nominating Committee.
Dr. Wehrung i        That the report be accepted.
Mr. Woo i
Carried.
CONTINUING EDUCATION
Dr. Vanderstoep, Chair of the committee, spoke briefly to the report on the Review of
Continuing Education at UBC, which had been circulated for information. Dr.
Vanderstoep noted that the administration of Continuing Education had undergone some
changes since the last report to Senate in 1991. As a result of various studies, the
Associate Vice President of Continuing Studies, Dr. Uegama, had been appointed. In
response to the studies carried out on campus a reorganization had taken place, the
details of which are outlined in the report. Dr. Vanderstoep also drew Senate's attention
to the growth in enrolment which had gone from 2,089 FTE's in 1990-91 to 2,453 in
1992-93. He also noted that UBC Access GIS data shows a similar growth with a 64%
increase.
Dr. Vanderstoep l        That the report be received.
Dr. Uegama J
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 10797
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE (SEE APPENDIX B)
Dr. Berger, Chair of the committee, presented the report.
Faculty of Applied Science
With the exception of ELEC 283 and 383, the committee recommended approval of
curriculum proposals from the Faculty of Applied Science, subject to editorial changes.
Faculty of Arts
With the exception of the following, the committee recommended approval of curriculum
proposals from the Faculty of Arts:
1. proposed change in credits for Family Science 316
2. proposals from the School of Social Work which have been withdrawn.
3. Proposed requirement of at least 68% in six credits of 200-level English courses
for admission to the English major program.
Faculty of Education
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the Faculty of
Education, subject to the following:
ENED 226 the credit value should read: (3/6)d, and the hours should be listed as [1-5-
3] or [l-5-3;l-5-3].
ENED 478 delete words "...may not have been...instructor." and insert "Prerequisite
must have been taken within the last five years, or may be corequisite with consent of
instructor."
SCED 380 re-word the second sentence to read: "Field experiences are normally part
of the course; transportation and living expenses will be borne by the student."
Faculty of Graduate Studies
The Committee recommended approval of new courses and curriculum changes, subject
to title changes for the new FISH courses and editorial changes to the curriculum
proposals. It was also noted that the title of Geography 521 had been changed to
Philosophy, Social Theory, and Human Geography.
 Vancouver Senate 1079 8
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Berger noted that satisfactory information had now been received concerning the
graduate courses listed as being withheld in the committee's report, and the committee
therefore recommended approval. Dr. Berger explained that implicit in the Education
proposals was the deletion of EADM 510, 511, SCED 601 and MAED 601.
The committee also recommended approval of a Ph.D. Program in Counselling
Psychology. Dr. Will informed Senate that the admission requirements for the program
were still before the Senate Admissions Committee. He stated that approval of the
program should go forward but that an amended Calendar statement on admissions
would be brought to Senate in the fall. Dr. Will also noted that the proposed Calendar
statement concerning Graduate Programs in Education on page 1 of the proposal should
be deleted as that section had already been changed and was correct in the 1994-95
Calendar.
Faculty of Law
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the Faculty of Law,
with the exception of LAW 340 and 366 which have been withdrawn.
School of Nursing
The Committee recommended approval of changes in hours for Nursing 202 and 304. It
was noted that the hours for Nursing 304 should read: (0-0-0; 3-0-0).
 Vancouver Senate 10799
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Faculty of Science
With the exception of the proposed deletion of MATH 111, which has been withdrawn,
the committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the Faculty of
Science, subject to editorial changes.
Dr. Berger l        That the proposals of the Faculties of Applied
Dr. Autor i        Science, Arts, Education, Graduate Studies,
Law, Nursing, and Science be approved.
Dean Marchak questioned the committee's decision not to recommend approval of the
Faculty of Arts proposal to require at least 68% in six credits of 200-level English courses
for admission to the English major program. It was explained that, first, the committee
felt that it would be difficult to implement the requirement given the limitations of the
Telereg system and, second, if the objective was to limit enrolment it was not an
appropriate way to deal with the problem. A third reason given was that students from
other Faculties might be prohibited from taking English courses.
Dean Marchak explained that the requirement would apply only to students entering the
English major program and would not therefore affect other students. As far as
implementing the requirement was concerned, Dean Marchak stated that the English
Department would be able to handle this manually if necessary. She informed Senate that
at present there were over 600 students in the English major program and that it must be
limited. That being the case, the department would like to limit admission to students
who are particularly talented in English literature. Also, the Faculty felt that there were
other less heavily enrolled areas into which students could go if they did not qualify for
admission to the English major program.
 Vancouver Senate 10800
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
It was agreed that the recommendation of the committee to withhold approval of the
proposal be withdrawn.
The motion was
put and carried.
1
LIBRARY COMMITTEE
Dr. Gilbert, Chair of the committee, presented the following report which had been
circulated:
In presenting the Library Committee's year end report to Senate, and having reviewed
the reports of previous Committees, I am reminded of the line, usually attributed to
Yogi Berra, that what will be reported may seem like "deja vu all over again".
The SLC is pleased to report that the Collection is not only intact but continues to
grow. Through the course of eight meetings this academic year the SLC has yet again
wrestled with the ongoing problems of the cost of serials and the general disposition of
the collection.
With careful analyses of cost by the librarians, and here I should mention particularly
Janice Kreider and Ann Turner, we have set in place procedures for monthly
monitoring of serials and for a continuous process of evaluating the serials collection
through the various Library Advisory Committees.
Professor Sherrill Grace captured the many factors which impinge on the University's
ability to maintain and develop its serial holdings in her report to Senate last year. To
reiterate, the most important factors are: ever increasing publication costs, changes in
currencies most closely associated with this form of publishing, the increasing number
of journals themselves, and the pressures on faculty to produce more papers.
During 1993/94, these costs combined for an overall increase of 10.2% in the serials
budget, part of which was offset by the library stabilization fund. The ultimate loss to
the serials budget was $200,000. 785 serials were cancelled, of which 28% were
duplicates.
For 1994/95 the Library's projected increase in costs will be 15% of the Library's base
budget for serials which is at present $4,831,860. This increase will result in serials
cancellations of approximately $400,000. Reviewing Professor Sherrill Grace's report
to Senate of April 1992,1 notice that we are almost on the target figure she predicted
would need to be cut in 1994/95 if the Library's acquisition budget continued the
erosion noted at that time. That erosion continues despite the implementation of a
special funding formula as set out in Professor Grace's report to Senate of March 17,
1993.
 Vancouver Senate 10801
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Financing the serials collection is now directly affected by emergent and emerging
information delivery technologies. Because it is imperative to maintain a balance
between serials and monographs, this matter continues to be of concern to the
committee. The SLC recognizes the impact such technologies have and will have on
the Collection, and in keeping with a recommendation in Professor Sherrill Grace's
1993 report, established a Sub-Committee on Serials and Technology. This committee
has met three times and is examining a number of matters relating to serials, scholarly
publishing, computing infrastructure and ways in which technology will affect the
scholarly activities of both faculty and students. It is already clear that the links
between the University Computing Service and the Library will need to be extended
and strengthened, given the symbiotic relationship between both units in their
respective roles for delivering information.
During the past year, Netlnfo was handed off to the Library, together with a
promissory note for an additional $700,000 for "electronic" media. The Library is
happy to have extra funding for a rapidly emerging part of its mandate i.e. electronic
materials. Unfortunately, there was no consultation with the SLC before this move
was made. Since an action of this kind holds profound implications for academic
responsibilities invested in the Library, the SLC was greatly disturbed that it was not
consulted about what may ultimately prove to be a costly venture. Senate should be
aware that of the $1,000,000 assigned to the Electronic Library, $300,000 is rebated
immediately back to UCS for operating Netlnfo, and that in two years the remaining
$700,000 will be substantially committed to subscriptions to "electronic" forms of
information media. In 1993/94 approximately 18% of the $200,000 was spent on
non-subscription, non-recurring expenditures.
During the year the committee has toured a number of different areas of the Library
and received oral reports on the Data Library, the Canadian Cooperative Preservation
Project, the UBCLib system and staff training and development. To increase the
committee's awareness of Library issues, we shall continue these information sessions
in coming years.
Communication with users continues to be a high priority and we are attempting to
establish a mechanism for more productive liaisons with the various Library Advisory
Committees.
Finally, in November 1993 we were pleased to finally have the sod-turning ceremony
for Phase I of the new library. Unfortunately, we have yet to see any further
constructive action on digging a foundation. I recall the impassioned plea for a new
building from a former Chair of this committee (Professor Jonathan Wisenthal) in
1986, and read Professor Phil Resnick's plea for urgency in his report of 1990-91. We
can only hope that even though the mills of our Library god are grinding exceedingly
slow and small - that this eventually turns out to be a Good Thing.
The SLC is pleased to report that we have moved back up the ladder of the American
Research Libraries. Unfortunately, as noted by previous Chairs of the
 Vancouver Senate 10802
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
committee, the Library's acquisition budget continues to be eroded. Carrying this
news each year from Ghent to Aix is, it seems, proving to be a fruitless horse ride.
Without an administration's deep understanding of, and true commitment to, the
extraordinary value of a multi-faceted University library, it is difficult to see erosion
not continuing.
Finally, in her March 17, 1993 report, Professor Grace suggested that Senate establish
a sub-committee to examine the complex issues associated with academic publishing. I
believe that such a committee would serve the academic exercise and that her
suggestion should be acted on.
Dr. Gilbert spoke briefly to the report, highlighting various aspects. In particular, Dr.
Gilbert drew attention to the suggestion in last year's report that Senate establish a
committee to look at the complex matter of academic publishing and urged Senate to take
action on this matter.
Dr. Gilbert expressed thanks and appreciation to members of the Senate Library
Committee for their hard work, and acknowledged the tremendous support received from
the librarians.
Vice President Birch drew attention to the paragraph concerning Netlnfo, and explained
that the project grew out of a task force on the appropriate use of information technology
which recommended universal student, staff, and faculty access to network information.
In September 1993 as a result of a motion by the Board of Governors requiring the
University improve the Library's ranking by the Association of Research Libraries, $1
million of continuing funding was earmarked for the Library for network information.
$700,000 of that was transferred from Computing Services, $300,000 of it was from
unfilled positions within the Library committed to this purpose. Of the $700,000
transferred half of it is to cover expenses of operating and developing Netlnfo services
and half to enhance the Library's collection in electronic format.
 Vancouver Senate 10803
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
There are now 600 students who are registered users of Netlnfo and have round the clock
access to a tremendous wealth of information that is also available to 20 million other
users of InterNet, including many library catalogues from around the world, and
thousands of interactive news groups. It is a tremendous source of information and very
directly tied into the mission of the Library and to a statement reflected in the preface of
the University Librarian's report. Vice President Birch felt that the tone of the paragraph
on Netlnfo and the lack of information could lead the reader to misunderstand the role of
the Library's Netlnfo system and the service which it is providing to students, faculty and
staff, accessible from computers on campus or at home which, he stated, is a tremendous
source of electronic information and an integral part of the functions of the Library
today. He stated that the advisory committee connected with this project included, among
others, the Chair of the Senate Library Committee.
Student senator, Mr. Emile Woo, commented on the Netlnfo service stating that it was an
excellent move which enabled UBC students to have access to a wider electronic
community.
In response to a query, Dr. Gilbert explained that the amount of $200,000 referred to one
time purchases.
Dr. Gilbert responded to Vice President Birch's comments, stating that it was his
understanding that the Senate Library Committee was not consulted prior to the
acquisition of Netlnfo. He stated that it presented a tremendous number of academic
problems which the committee was only now beginning to grapple with; one of those
 Vancouver Senate 10804
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
problems being that of serials and technology and how it fits into the world of Netlnfo.
The committee felt that it should have been consulted prior to any action being taken.
While agreeing that the "information highway" certainly presents opportunities for
searching many kinds of interesting data, Dr. Gilbert stated that a student's Basic Netlnfo
account does not buy complete access to the Internet. Extended services necessary to
obtain most of the information described by Dr. Birch can only be obtained by purchasing
an additional UNIXG account. At the present time, Basic Netlnfo provides UBC students
with free access to networked information for 20 minutes a day; the primary use of that
time appears to be for E-mail. The Senate Library Committee questions whether the
Library should be in this business. The committee certainly agrees that electronic media,
and access to electronic information via Internet should be part of the Library's function.
The committee simply suggests that, given the wide academic implications of assuming
Netlnfo as part of the Library's mandate, consultation prior to implementation might
have been expected. The committee has discussed (and will continue to discuss) the
relationship between the Library and the University Computing Services.
STUDENT AWARDS
New awards (see Appendix A)
In presenting the report Dr. Cook drew Senate's attention to the Edward W. Bassett
Memorial Scholarship in Reforestation, stating that Mr. Bassett was a member of a longtime pioneer British Columbia family who spent his entire adult life in the forest service.
Mr. Bassett became Deputy Minister in the 1950s and served in that position for a period
of about 16 years. Dr. Cook also drew attention to the Albert Laithwaite Memorial
Bursary. Albert Laithwaite served in the School of Physical Education and Recreation
(now the School of Human Kinetics) for a period of 33 years.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Cook
Prof. Reid
10805
That the awards (listed in Appendix A) be
accepted and forwarded to the Board of
Governors for approval and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
Carried.
Proposed policy change
}
Dr. Cook
Prof. Reid
That the policy known as "the 150% rule"
pertaining to the linked distribution of the
University Scholarships Program and the
Recommended Awards Program be
discontinued.
It was explained in the material circulated that the University Scholarship Program,
initiated in 1977-78, is funded primarily from the general purpose operating budget. At
present it provides scholarship funds of $1,800 (top 2%) and $1,500 (next 2%) by year
and faculty for continuing undergraduate students. The Recommended Awards Program
is funded through donor supported endowments (for which the University is trustee) or
through annual gifts. These awards are assigned to continuing undergraduate students on
Departmental or Faculty recommendation.
In 1980-81 the Senate Awards Committee recommended and Senate passed "the 150%
rule" to be put into practice for a two year trial period. This rule linked the USP with the
RAP so that students could receive scholarship funding from both university programs.
Through the application of the 150% rule, students receiving recommended awards in
excess of the minima specified for the USP were eligible for USP funding if they placed
within the designated percent range at year end. The amount received from the University
Scholarship Program was determined based on a
 Vancouver Senate 10806
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
calculation of 150% of the base value for the category in which they would normally
have been eligible. For example using the current base value, if the student placed in the
top 2% of year and Faculty and was recommended for $1000 in endowed or annually
funded awards, he or she could receive an additional $1700 from the University
Scholarship Program. (The base value in the category for which the student is eligible is
$1800; 150% of $1800 = $2700; $2700 - $1000 = $1700 in USP funds).
Having reviewed the application of the rule for a two year period, the Senate Awards
Committee recommended it be discontinued in 1982-83. A motion to not re-introduce
"the 150% rule" was brought to Senate in January 1984; it was lost. A subsequent
motion to retain the 150% rule was put and carried. The 150% rule has been in
continuous use since 1984.
Calculations to link the USP and RAP are complex, administratively time consuming and
result in extremely late notification to student award recipients. Ranked lists by year and
Faculty are available in late June but historically it has taken until December for some
Faculties to forward their Recommended Awards. Until both the USP and the RAP
information is received, the Awards Office cannot apply the "150% rule", notify
students, or release their scholarship funds.
The prime advantage of discontinuing the Rule is enhanced and more timely service to
students. Without the requirement of linking the USP and the RAP, students in the top
4% by year and Faculty could receive notification of their USP's
 Vancouver Senate 10807
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
by July. All scholarships through the RAP could be quickly processed by the Awards
Office upon receipt of Faculty or Departmental recommendation.
The Senate Awards Committee is developing monitoring guidelines by which the USP will
be administered and will report to Senate in the spring of 1996 on the uncoupling of the
two scholarship programs.
The motion was
put and carried.
1
AD HOC COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATION (SEE APPENDIX C)
Dr. Shearer, Chair of the committee, presented the report, which had been circulated.
Dr. Shearer It-,,, , ,
_,    _ \       That the report be received.
Dr. Tees J
Carried.
Dr. Shearer noted that the committee had been established in response to a proposal by
the Senate Budget Committee concerning administrative costs at the University. The terms
of reference approved by Senate extended the committee's mandate to considering both
efficiency and academic effectiveness.
The committee came to the conclusion that it would have to focus not only on explicit
expenditures on administrative activities but also on implicit administrative costs,
particularly the time faculty members spend on administrative activities which could
otherwise be spent on academic activities.
 Vancouver Senate 10808
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
In considering the existing number of Faculties at UBC, the committee looked at the
Guidelines for the Establishment of a Faculty which contain suggestions on the nature of
a Faculty, and the appropriate size and complement of Faculties.
The committee was strongly of the view that there were too many Faculties at UBC. It
was felt that a smaller number of Faculties would be less costly and more effective and
would give rise to a smaller, more influential and effective Committee of Deans. The
committee was also of the opinion that it would be highly desirable to consolidate some
Faculties in a way that will significantly reduce the inequality in the relative sizes of
Faculties. However, the committee had not made any recommendations at this time.
Dean Hollenberg stated that, in his opinion, there were other ways of reducing
administrative costs than reducing the size of departments and Faculties.
Mr. Brady was not convinced that fewer Deans would result in each Dean having a
stronger voice in deliberations, as was argued in the report. Mr. Brady queried the
statement that fewer Faculties would result in a more representative Senate. Dr. Shearer
responded that although some faculties were no larger than departments they had exactly
the same representation on Senate as larger Faculties. In the committee's opinion this did
not ensure a representative Senate.
Dean Grace drew attention to Table 1, stating that there were other ways of measuring
Faculty size whereby the Faculty at the bottom of this list could come out either first or
second.
In response to a query by Dr. Cohen, Dr. Shearer explained that although the committee
had not defined academic effectiveness and administrative effectiveness, the issue of the
effectiveness of departments as administrative and academic units was discussed in the
section of the report that deals with department size.
 Vancouver Senate 10809
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
In section IV of the report, which deals with departments, Dr. Shearer stated that the
committee had attempted to set out its notion of the role and importance of a department
as far as students, faculty, the academic community and the community at large are
concerned. He stated that departments are important institutions in the University and
that the committee was not challenging the existence of departments. It was, however,
making the observation that the concept of a department as an administrative unit within
the University can be separated from the academic programs and the research activity of
faculty members in a department.
The committee looked at the department as an administrative unit and observed that
department size was a very important consideration in terms of costs involved in stipends
for heads, administrative leave for heads, costs of external reviews, which are quite
substantial, costs of external searches, and the implicit costs in time taken away from
teaching and research to carry on administrative activities. The committee concluded that
a disproportionate amount of time of faculty members is engaged in administrative
activities of one sort or another. The committee expressed concern about problems of
budget flexibility in small departments as well as questions of costs, issues of problems
that arise when faculty members go on leave and when staff members get sick, and
problems of students and the public trying to contact a department where the office is
only open part time. Several such issues were raised, which led the committee to the
conclusion that a useful and important administrative reform in the university would be
to combine small departments into larger administrative units. The committee therefore
recommended that Senate establish a minimum size for departments and that Deans be
asked to reorganize departments within their Faculties, and in some cases, conceivably,
across Faculties.
 Vancouver Senate 10810
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
In recommending a minimum size of 15 full time faculty members for departments, Dr.
Shearer stated that the committee recognized that this was not the only possible measure
of the size of departments and had therefore introduced the qualification that
consideration would be given to a variety of other concerns in particular cases. Any
exceptions to the minimum size as a result of this qualification would, of course, be
reported to Senate.
Referring to the provisions for administrative stipends and administrative leave for
department heads, Dr. Shearer stated that the committee took the view that both of these
provisions are justified and essential for the recruitment of administrators. The
committee's concern, as it studied the structure of administrative stipends, was that there
was no distinction made between the heads of small departments and large departments
with respect to administrative leave, but there were cases where the head of a large
department received a smaller stipend than the head of a very small department. The
committee thought that more care should be taken in considering administrative stipends
and leave arrangements and that they should be graduated depending on department size.
Based on its discussions, the committee made the following recommendations:
1. Senate establish a minimum size for departments, schools and divisions that
have department-like responsibilities.
2. The minimum size for departments, schools and divisions be 15 full-time
faculty members in the department.
3. Deans be asked to arrange for consolidations of relevant departments, schools
and divisions to conform with the minimum size and to report regularly to the
Vice President Academic and Provost on progress. The Vice President Academic
and Provost be asked to report to Senate on the results of these
reconfigurations by December 1995.
 Vancouver Senate 10811
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
4. Exceptions to the minimum size should be rare and should be permitted only
on the basis of special circumstances which must be made explicit.
5. All exceptions to the minimum size approved by the Vice President Academic
and Provost, be reported to Senate.
6. Provisions for administrative stipends and administrative leave for department
heads be graduated depending on department size.
Dr. Shearer l        That recommendations 1 through 6 be
Mr. Horner i        adopted.
While speaking in support of the purpose of the recommendations, Dr. Will stated that
there was more emphasis on saving money than on the academic implications. He
questioned the lack of recognition of the academic implications in relation to the
provision that exceptions to the minimum size should be permitted only on the basis of
special circumstances. He suggested that "special circumstances" ought to be defined in a
way that would ensure that such exceptions make academic sense and that the academic
integrity of the respective departments would be maintained. Dr. Will also took issue with
the specific recommendation that there be a minimum size of 15 full time faculty members
for departments, stating that this immediately creates uncertainty in the 46 departments
that would be affected by this rule. He felt that this should have been avoided in the first
instance.
As far as the issue of the cost of administrative stipends and administrative leave is
concerned, Dr. Will stated that five years ago the University did not have administrative
leaves and that stipends were not as large. This was introduced to accommodate some of
the large departments where administrative leave was clearly needed to allow a head
 Vancouver Senate 10812
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
to get back onto the academic track. It was also granted to heads of smaller departments
where the head possibly spent less time on administration and may well have continued
teaching and research. Dr. Will stated that the University had the option of considering
alternatives to this arrangement to make sure that if it is a small department it does not
cost as much as a large department on some of the overhead aspects that appeared to be
generating many of the recommendations contained in the report.
Dr. Will suggested that the minimum size of 15 full time faculty members would have
been better as a guideline in view of the fact that such a specific number would inevitably
involve the grouping of departments which might not be compatible.
Dean Marchak agreed that restructuring was essential and stated that the report would
prove useful to the Faculties in their efforts to find improved ways of administering
themselves, particularly in relation to costs. At this point, however, Dean Marchak felt
that it would be better not to recommend a minimum size for departments. She suggested
that Faculties should have the opportunity to discuss this proposal prior to its
implementation.
Dr. Shearer responded that the number of 15 was not absolutely rigid in that there was
provision for exceptions. Referring to Dean Marchak's comments, Dr. Shearer stated that
these issues had been with the University for a long time. He noted that although action
had been taken in the Faculty of Education, the University was not moving along as
quickly as it should in trying to resolve the problem of administrative costs within
Faculties and elsewhere in the University. The committee felt that a very strong statement
from the Senate at this time would move the process along.
 Vancouver Senate 10813
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Shearer stated that administrative stipends and administrative leaves were not the
only concerns about very small departments. He stated that the problems could not be
solved simply by recasting those provisions, and emphasized the fact that a number of
other concerns were set out in the report.
Mr. Brady spoke in favour of the recommendations, quoting from the report some of the
positive aspects of combining small departments into larger groupings.
Dean Hollenberg complimented the committee on bringing forward such a provocative
report on topics long overdue for discussion in the Senate. He stated, however, that, in his
opinion, departments should be discontinued for academic reasons, not academic costs.
He felt that it was possible to achieve administrative savings by combining the
administration of several departments rather than combining the actual departments.
Dean Hollenberg referred to the definition of a department given in the report stating that
departments should be established or discontinued based on that definition and not on
size.
Referring to the reasons given for amalgamating departments, Dr. Coope stated that the
report gives the impression that it is a rather Procrustean bed that is being created. She
was not convinced that there would be any savings in combining small units together as
far as administrative costs are concerned.
Dean McBride spoke in favour of the recommendations, commenting that although
arguments could always be made for preserving the status quo one only had to look
through Calendars of other universities to find different configurations which seem to
work.
 Vancouver Senate 10814
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dean McBride felt that the recommended size of 15 for a department was a good target,
but he had difficulty with the recommendation that exceptions would be permitted on the
basis of special circumstances rather than on the basis of a strong academic rationale for
maintaining a unit that was smaller than 15.
Dr. Shearer responded that what the committee had in mind was that there would have to
be strong explicit academic justification for exceptions and that all such exceptions would
be reported to Senate.
Dean Binkley informed Senate that out of three external reviews of the Faculty of Forestry
last year, two suggested that the departments be rearranged to make one of them smaller
so that it would be more effective and more focussed on its academic role. However, he
supported the recommendations stating that it was important that these matters be
examined.
Dean Goldberg also spoke in favour of the recommendations stating that the University
should go back to some of the root disciplines with a view to examining how they might
be recombined in order to become more administratively effective.
Dean Sheehan supported the recommendations, noting that the Faculty of Education had
already undertaken a review and reorganization.
Dr. Tees reminded Senate that the committee was charged with examining the academic
side of the house and coming up with a set of recommendations, and that on the other
side of the house the Senate Budget Committee had proposed, with the agreement of
Senate, that the President would look at the non-academic side of the house to examine
what could be done in terms of administrative effectiveness and structure.
 Vancouver Senate 10815
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Tees stated that the proposed recommendations provided a challenge to departments
and Faculties to re-examine what they do. He felt that the Deans were capable of
reporting in a timely fashion on departments in their domain, making reasoned academic
arguments that the minimum size recommended is either appropriate or inappropriate,
and whether exceptions should be made in the case of their Faculty.
In response to a query, Dr. Shearer stated that the issue was not the average size of units
within a Faculty but the cost of administrative and academic problems that arise with
very small units. The committee wanted simple criteria which was clearly understood, one
from which there could be exceptions where appropriate.
Father Hanrahan stated that if this process was to be undertaken, he hoped that small
groups of different disciplines would not be crammed into an arrangement that is
fundamentally established as a disciplinary kind of structure. He felt that it would be
better to look at gathering several departments into a fairly large unit with a structure
that was different to that of a department.
Dr. Wehrung stated that the committee thought that the best way to proceed was for
units to see what savings they could effect individually. The recommendations showed
what could be done from an academic standpoint without sacrificing academic
effectiveness.
The motion was
put and carried.
Dr. Shearer presented the following recommendations for streamlining curriculum
procedures:
 Vancouver Senate 10816
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
7. The Senate Curriculum Committee be instructed to study the process of
curriculum revision and to bring recommendations to the Senate not later than
November 1994 for the simplification of the process.
8. As guidelines, the Senate Curriculum Committee be invited to
a. Establish a broad category of minor changes that can be made by
departments, schools or non-departmentalized faculties without further
consultation except notification of the appropriate curriculum review
officer (who might be the chair of the Senate Curriculum Committee),
who will be responsible for ensuring that the change is indeed "minor"
and that no other academic program is likely to be adversely affected.
This category might include, at a minimum, changes in course numbers,
course names, prerequisite requirements and editorial changes in course
descriptions.
b. Establish a narrow category of major changes that require consultation
and full review by faculties and the Senate. This category might include
new programs, new courses, deletion of courses and changes that affect
requirements for student programs in other departments.
c. Consider the possibility that proposals for major changes in graduate
courses and programs go directly to the Faculty of Graduate Studies
from departments, schools and non-departmentalized faculties for full
review before being sent to Senate for review and approval.
Dr. Shearer l        That recommendations 7 and 8 be adopted.
Dr. Isaacson J
Dr. Berger, Chair of the Senate Curriculum Committee, agreed that the curriculum
approval process was quite cumbersome and supported the proposals, with the exception
of recommendation 8c. He felt that there were good reasons for having graduate
curriculum proposals go through the budget Faculty prior to approval by Graduate
Council.
Dr. Autor explained that faculty, space, and budgetary implications could accompany
new course proposals or major changes in courses, therefore, it was essential that these
issues be considered at the individual budget Faculty level.
 Vancouver Senate 10817
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Shearer stated that these were guidelines for consideration by the Senate Curriculum
Committee and that Senate was being asked to approve a recommendation that the
committee consider these issues.
The motion was
put and carried.
j
In presenting recommendation 9, Dr. Shearer referred to the Dupre report in which
concern was expressed about use of the valuable time of deans. The committee noted that
deans were heavily involved in the Senior Appointments Committee and its activities and
understood the reasons for this involvement, albeit at a very heavy cost in terms of time.
The committee therefore recommended that the President review the constitution of the
Senior Appointments Committee.
Dr. Shearer l        That Senate ask the President to review the
Dr. Goldberg i        constitution of the Senior Appointments
Committee, with a view to removing deans
from that committee and with a view to
strengthening its ability to represent high
university-wide standards of excellence and
objectivity.
Dr. Will stated that the Senior Appointments Committee was one of the most important
committees in that it is the place where the standards for Faculties are established. Dr.
Will stated that it was also a personnel committee where decisions are made with respect
to retention, promotion and advancement, and that, in his opinion, deans ought to be
involved in these decisions.
Dr. Shearer stated that the committee was concerned about the time involved, and also
about the whole procedure concerning appointments, promotion and tenure, although
most of those issues are covered by the collective agreement.
 Vancouver Senate 10818
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Speaking in support of the motion, Dr. Randall commented on data recently distributed
by Vice President Webber in which he looked at the decisions made by faculty and the
decisions made by the Senior Appointments Committee, and over a ten-year period there
were very few differences in the decisions made by these two bodies. However, a great
deal of time was being spent by the Senior Appointments Committee to confirm the
opinions of faculty.
The motion was
put and carried.
Dr. Shearer presented the following recommendations with respect to teaching and
research in natural resources:
10. Senate endorse the idea of a reconfiguration of some existing faculties and
other academic units to create a new faculty with a mandate to develop and
intensify the university's commitment to teaching and research relating to
natural resources and the natural environment.
11. The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to establish a task force to
develop plans for the establishment of the new faculty. The task force should be
asked to develop proposals for arrangements that will induce some relevant
faculty members and academic units to transfer from other faculties to the new
faculty, will encourage the active participation in the new faculty of relevant
faculty members who prefer to retain their appointments in other faculties, and
will encourage the cooperation of relevant academic units in other faculties.
12.The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to submit a progress report
to Senate on plans to establish a new faculty concerned with natural resources,
no later than January 1995.
13.The task force proposed in Recommendation 11 above be asked to consider the
proposed merger of the departments of Geography and Soil Science in the
context of their deliberations on the reconfiguration of teaching and research
on natural resources.
Dr. Shearer reiterated points made in the report stating that this was a field of study
which was very important, both to UBC and to the province.
 Vancouver Senate 10819
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
Dr. Shearer noted that there were very strong professional programs in Forestry and in
Agricultural Sciences which the committee felt ought to be promoted. As well as being
related to each other they were related to a much broader range of issues in the University
relating to natural resources and the environment. The committee felt that the resources
of these Faculties were under-utilized from the perspective of the rest of the University,
and that to some extent this has arisen because of the boundaries that exist between
Faculties. The committee came to the conclusion that it should propose that the Vice
President Academic establish a task force charged with studying the alternatives proposed
by the committee.
Dr. Shearer l        That recommendation 10, 11, 12 and 13 be
Dr. Wehrung J        adopted.
Dean McBride commended the committee for raising the thorny issue of Faculty
reorganization. He stated that it was appropriate that the committee had focussed on the
Faculties of Forestry and Agricultural Sciences which represent 4% of the undergraduate
FTE's and 5.5% of the graduate FTE's. However, Dean McBride said that he had serious
difficulties with recommendations 10, 11 and 12, stating that they were too specific at
this stage of the deliberations. He felt that the point which must be addressed, given the
budgetary context in which the University operates and the difficulties this presents, is
whether the University can afford to do the things it has done in the past. He stated that
there was no sense of that in the report. In fact the report stated that all the professional
programs must be retained.
Dean McBride stated that within the year there would be degree granting institutions in
three rich agricultural areas in B.C. Citing the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences as an
 Vancouver Senate 10820
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
example, Dean McBride stated that the University should be considering whether it is
appropriate to move some of its activities in this field to areas where they would be in
close contact with a very active agricultural community. He stated that fundamental issues
such as this should be addressed before creating a new Faculty of Natural Resources,
which, in his opinion, was simply a re-shuffling of the debt and perhaps the addition of
even more responsibilities. Although he was strongly opposed to the recommendations as
are set out in the report, Dean McBride said he would support a recommendation that
asked the proposed task force to look at Forestry and Agricultural Sciences in a broader
context, with the proviso that the issue of teaching and research in natural resources also
be addressed.
Dr. Shearer emphasized that the committee was not charged with the task of
recommending whether the University should discontinue teaching in some fields. It was
asked to consider a reorganization of programs, and what the committee proposed was
something much broader than the existing programs in Agricultural Sciences and Forestry
in that it recommended a re-focussing of the University's energies and talents on issues
connected with natural resources and the environment.
Mr. Goehring drew attention to recommendation 13 concerning the proposed merger of
the departments of Geography and Soil Science. He stated that consensus had not been
reached within the departments concerned, particularly since Geography has a number of
areas of study, such as the arctic, that do not involve soil.
A motion to extend the meeting
beyond the 10:30 p.m. deadline
was put and carried.
 Vancouver Senate 10821
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
In commenting on the report, Dean Richards stated that members of the Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences who had had the opportunity to interact with the committee in the
course of its deliberations were supportive and enthusiastic about the concepts and ideas
presented in the recommendations. He stated that the report was timely and that its
recommendations offered the opportunity to establish an appropriate broad contextual
basis in which to place the various activities of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and
perhaps some other related academic units.
The Faculty of Agricultural Sciences has been delivering programs at UBC since its early
inception. They are unique professional programs but with a very strong disciplinary base
and a very large number of interfaces with many different aspects of the University. In fact
those linkages with other parts of the University have grown and strengthened over the
years and are absolutely critical and vital to the programs that Agricultural Sciences
delivers, particularly those at the graduate level involving research but also at the
undergraduate level. The Faculty requires the context of a vital operating research
university for success and considers itself to be a critical part of such an institution. He
agreed that the task force should take a broad look at the whole of the natural resources
area to see how programs would fit together in this area, including programs offered in
faculties other than Agricultural Sciences and Forestry.
Mr. Lim spoke in support of the idea of introducing this new field whether or not it was
in the form of a new Faculty.
Dean Marchak commented on recommendation 10, stating that if the idea was to take
people out of other units to create a new Faculty it would weaken units which are very
strong at the moment. Dean Marchak was particularly concerned about the effect the
proposals could have on the Department of Geography.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18,1994
10822
Reports of Committees of Senate
Considerable discussion of the recommendations followed, during which it became clear
that members of Senate felt that the task force should examine alternatives to the creation
of a new Faculty.
In amendment:
Dr. Williams
Dean McBride
That recommendation 10 be amended to read:
That Senate endorse the idea of a
reconfiguration of some existing faculties and
other academic units to develop and intensify
the university's commitment to teaching and
research relating to natural resources and the
natural environment.
That recommendation 11 be amended to read:
That the Vice President Academic and Provost
be asked to establish a task force to develop
plans for the achievement of this end.
That recommendation 12 be amended to read:
The Vice President Academic and Provost be
asked to submit a progress report to Senate no
later than January 1995.
Carried.
The motion, as amended,
was put and carried.
AD HOC COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY RESIDENCES
Dr. Brunette, Chair of the committee, presented the following report which had been
circulated:
The committee first met in April 1991 as part of Senate's response to the concerns
expressed about the environment in university residences that were reported by the
Committee on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline (Cariboo House incident). The
terms of reference of the Committee were to determine:
1.  What measures have been taken to improve the atmosphere in residences
following the disagreeableness revealed in the report of the Committee on
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline?
 Vancouver Senate 10823
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
2. What training do housing advisors have and how are they selected?
3. What continuing steps might be taken to improve the quality of academic life in
the student residences?
The Committee advertised widely for comment on the academic environment in
residences. We received submissions from the undergraduate students, graduate
students, and resident advisors. In addition the Committee met with individuals
in UBC units that were directly concerned with the academic environment in
the residences including Ms. Mary Riseborough, Director of Housing; the
Residence Life Managers; Ms. Margarita Hoeck, Sexual Harassment Policy
Office; Ms. Penny Lusztig, Women Students' Office; Dr. Sharon Kahn, Director
of Employment Equity; Dr. Joan Anderson, Director of Multicultural Liaison
Office; Vice-President A. J. McLean; and Mr. John Schneider, Student
Counselling. The Committee held five open meetings with residents of Totem
Park and Place Vanier as well as a meeting open to resident advisors from any
residence. The Committee also examined exit surveys of students leaving
residences and reports on various aspects of residence life. It is noteworthy that
complaints from students on the academic environment were rare and the
general feeling among students was that additional rules and regulations were
not needed.
First Term of Reference:
"What measures have been taken?"
The Department of Student Housing responded with several immediate measures
specific to the Cariboo House incident.
1. The sexual harassment policy office held a "females only" session to explain
the office's function and the rights of students. Private counselling was made
available to any student who requested it.
2. A mediation session was held where both men and women affected by the
incident had a public forum to express their views. Because some of the male
students involved were from the Faculty of Science, this session was attended
by Dean McBride who clearly expressed the University's position that
harassment is unacceptable.
3. The residents primarily responsible for the incident were evicted.
4. An additional staff person at the rank of assistant advisor was assigned to
Cariboo House (the residence of the disciplined students).
There were also changes made over a longer term. The training of residence advisors
was enhanced. The staff development and residence life programs
 Vancouver Senate 10824
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
responded to the issue of sexual harassment by scheduling sessions on sexual assault
awareness, providing information on sexual harassment to counsellors as part of the
staff development program, providing every floor on Place Vanier and Totem Park
residences with videos on sexual assault awareness issues, and instituting a sexual
assault awareness week at Totem Park. In this regard the Department of Student
Housing found that it had been assisted by the establishment of the Sexual
Harassment Policy for the campus community and by the Sexual Harassment Policy
Office. Overall the Committee felt that Housing has an ongoing commitment to train
its advisors on individual and group rights and responsibilities, and that resident life
managers and advisors are well informed and diligent in promoting a respectful
environment.
Second Term of Reference:
" What training do housing advisors have and how are they selected?"
Each residence has a residence life manager (RLM) who supervises the residence
advisors and is responsible for all aspects of student residence life. Residence advisors
are responsible for particular floors or houses of residence, and their function is to
promote an environment that is (a) safe and secure; (b) conducive to academic
pursuits; and (c) conducive to personal growth and learning.
Residence advisors receive approximately ten days of training before the first term
begins plus additional sessions throughout the year. The training includes sessions on
peer counselling, sexual harassment, first aid and fire safety. Tours are arranged of the
various resource centres to which advisors can refer students with particular problems
such as Student Counselling, the Women's Students' Office and the School and
College Liaison Office. Advisors are presented with case studies that present problems
the advisors might encounter varying from a messy lounge to breaking up a fight.
Experienced (i.e. returning) advisors receive more advanced training on specialized
topics such as "Cross cultural awareness", "Ethnoviolence on the University
Campus", and "Chilly Climate for Women at Universities".
The selection of advisors is a multi-step process that is intended to select high
achievers who are sensitive and interested in helping people. The positions are highly
sought after not only because they entail a financial benefit of up to $6500 but also
because they confer considerable social status. The positions are advertised widely and
typically about 400 students apply for the 105 positions. About one third of these are
screened out on the basis of their written applications and the remainder receive a
first-round structured interview conducted by a house advisor and several floor
advisors. The interview team is selected so that its members have no relationship with
the interviewees. About one third of the applications are eliminated at this stage and
the successful candidates pass to a second-round interview which is conducted by the
RLM and two or three senior staff and results in the elimination of about one third of
the remaining candidates.
 Vancouver Senate 10825
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
The individuals who obtain positions typically have high grades and considerable
experience in leadership. The ratio of males to females is 52:48 and visible minorities
constitute eleven percent of the residence advisor group. Twenty-four percent have an
originating address from the Greater Vancouver region, fifty percent are from other
areas of B.C., twenty-one percent from Canada outside B.C., and five percent from
outside Canada. Fifty-six percent have had four or more years experience in post-
secondary institutions; only twelve percent are in their second university academic
year.
Third Term of Reference:
" What continuing steps...?"
A. The Residents
1. Academic Performance
Perhaps the most direct means of assessing the academic environment of the
student residences is the academic performance of the residents. Studies in other
Universities have indicated that students living in University residences fare better
academically than non-residents, and it would be of interest to determine if the
same pattern occurs at UBC as an overall indicator of the academic environment in
residences.
Recommendation One
The Registrar or designate should report on the academic performance of
the residents of Student Housing and compare the performance to the
marks and completion rates of UBC students not in residence.
2. Contracts
The Committee noted the length and complexity of the legal contract between the
University and the resident. Although lengthy, the contract is incomplete in that it
fails to fully specify resident responsibilities, breaches of standards and penalties
for breaches. A handbook exists on these matters but it is not readily available to
the residents.
Recommendation Two
That the contract between the University and the student as tenant be
simplified and shortened and that a revised and complete handbook be
developed to accompany the contract.
Providing each potential tenant with a complete handbook prior to entering into a
contract with the University will, we believe, serve to improve the standards of
conduct, the supervision of the residences and bring an increased perception of
fairness to the process of imposing penalties for breaches of standards.
 Vancouver Senate 10826
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Reports of Committees of Senate
3.   Orientation
Each residence unit offers an orientation program for its residents at the beginning
of the term. These programs vary in complexity dependent on the unit and the
residents it serves. We note that the University administration has not been
included in these programs.
Recommendation Three
That the President (or designate) be invited to participate in the various
orientation programs and that his address reinforce the standards of
conduct required of residents to ensure a safe and secure living environment
appropriate for academic life.
B.  The Advisors
1. Selection
Housing is aware that the policy for the selection of advisors has been criticized.
However, the current process for selection of advisors is effective and does attract
some outstanding students to the positions.
2. Advisor Training
The Committee supports the attention recently given to Advisor training on the
topics of sexual harassment, date rape, multicultural issues, race relations and peer
counselling. The current programs are clearly effective but more attention to these
topics is indicated.
Recommendation Four
That further efforts to recruit a wider pool of candidates for residence
advisors be encouraged. For example Housing might consider advertising in
newsletters published by organizations such as International House, the
Graduate Students' Association and the Disability Resource Centre.
Recommendation Five
That initial and ongoing advisor training on these topics be continued and
enhanced and that arrangements be made to ensure the involvement of
professional staff members from the following campus offices in the training
sessions: Student Counselling and Resources, Multicultural Liaison, Sexual
Harassment Policy, Women Students' and Employment Equity.
Through increased and enhanced training on these topics it is expected that
advisors will develop a deeper understanding of individual and group rights and
responsibilities, awareness of the availability of campus resources to assist them,
and greater confidence to identify and refer students with serious problems to
appropriate professionals.
 Vancouver Senate 10827
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Other business
3.  Extension of Programs To Other Groups
We believe that it would be beneficial to offer some of the effective programs
developed by Housing to others in the University Community. Programs that
might be considered are those dealing with individual and group rights and
responsibilities as well as pragmatic matters such as time management and study
skills. One group that might be specifically targeted for inclusion in the advisor
training programs is the student leaders in residences who often later become
advisors themselves.
Recommendation Six
That consideration be given to inviting members of the various Resident
Association Councils to attend the in-term advisor training sessions.
Recommendation Seven
That consideration be given to inviting non-resident students to the
education sessions offered by residence staff members on such topics as
study skills, time management and assertiveness.
Dr. Brunette l        That the report and the set of
Dr. Cook J        recommendations be adopted.
Carried.
Other business
DESIRABLE CHARACTERISTICS OF A UBC GRADUATE
A list of desirable characteristics of a UBC graduate was circulated at the meeting for
information. The list arose from discussions by the Deans and Vice Presidents of the need
for the University to articulate such a statement as an institutional philosophy and as an
aid to assessing new and existing first degree programs. The committee responsible for the
list is continuing to refine it with a view to formally referring it to Senate for
consideration in September.
 Vancouver Senate 10828
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Adjournment
PETER WALL CHAIRS
Dr. Birch i        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Goldberg J        Peter Wal1 Chairs.
Vice President Birch explained that the Peter Wall endowment resulted from an
extraordinary gift of approximately $15 million to the University. The proposal was to
establish a number of chairs that would be funded at an adequate level from endowments,
the intention being that the Nobel Laureate Michael Smith will be the first holder of the
Peter Wall Chair.
The motion was
put and carried.
Adjournment
The meeting adjourned at 11:15 p.m.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September 14, 1994.
 Vancouver Senate 10829
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix A
Appendix A
AWARDS RECOMMENDED TO SENATE
Grace Torchy Stewart ADAMSON Memorial Scholarship in Nursing - A scholarship of
$3,000 has been endowed by family, friends, and colleagues in memory of Grace (Torchy)
Stewart Adamson, who graduated from VGH School of Nursing (1950) and received a
B.Sc.
N. from UBC (1951). The award is offered to a student entering the Masters programme in
Nursing and is based on academic excellence and practical experience. It is made on the
recommendation of the School of Nursing in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. (Available 1994/95 Winter Session).
ASSOCIATION of BC Professional Foresters Graduating Prize - A $500 prize is offered by
the Association of B.C. Professional Foresters FORESTRUST. The award is made to an
undergraduate student with the best graduating thesis in the Faculty of Forestry. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
ASSOCIATION of BC Professional Foresters Norman B. Crist Memorial Prize - A $750
prize is offered by the Association of B.C. Professional Foresters FORESTRUST in memory
of Norman B. Crist and in recognition of the admirable personal and professional qualities
he displayed throughout his career. The award is made to an undergraduate student in the
Faculty of Forestry, and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty. (Available
1993/94 Winter Session).
ASSOCIATION of BC Professional Foresters Scholarship - Three $1,375 scholarships are
offered by the Association of B.C. Professional Foresters FORESTRUST. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry to students who exhibit a
combination of academic achievement and extra curricular activities. Three awards are
available annually one each for a student completing first year, second year and third year.
(Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
ASSOCIATION of BC Professional Foresters Scholarship for Technical School Graduates -
A $1,375 scholarship is offered by the Association of B.C. Professional Foresters
FORESTRUST. The award is made to an undergraduate student who has completed first
year in the Faculty of Forestry, who has a diploma in forestry from a technical school, and
who exhibits a combination of academic achievement and extracurricular involvement.
The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry. (Available 1993/94
Winter Session).
AVENOR Inc. Entrance Scholarship - Scholarships totaling $9000 have been endowed by
Avenor Inc. and the Province of British Columbia. Awards are offered to first year students
entering the University of British Columbia from secondary schools in Canada. The award
is made primarily on the basis of the student's scholarly achievements. ($4,800 Available
1994/95).
Edward W. BASSETT memorial Scholarship in Reforestation - A scholarship of $3,000 has
been endowed in memory of Edward W. Bassett for graduate research in the field of
reforestation. The award is offered to a graduate student in the Faculty of Forestry on the
recommendation of the Faculty, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
(Available 1994/95 Winter Session).
 Vancouver Senate 10830
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix A
BEAVERS Dental Bill Scott Prize - A $300 prize has been endowed by Beavers Dental in
recognition of Dr. Bill Scott's lifetime of contribution to the dental profession. The award
is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Dentistry to a graduating student who
achieves high standing in operative dentistry and embodies attributes of professionalism.
(Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
Abtar BERAR prize in Finance - A $300 prize has been endowed by Abtar Berar for
students in the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration. The award is offered to
a student exhibiting academic excellence in the area of finance and is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty and in the case of graduate students, in consultation with
the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
Wallace BERRY Memorial Prize in Music Theory - A $550 prize has been endowed by
family, friends and colleagues of Professor Wallace Berry and is offered to a student
specializing in music theory. The prize is made on the recommendation of the School of
Music and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
Hugh M. BROCK Education Abroad Scholarship - Scholarships totaling $112,000 have
been endowed through the estate of Hugh M. Brock. The awards are made on the
recommendation of the Education Abroad Program Committee in consultation with the
Director of Awards and Financial Aid to students selected to participate in the Education
Abroad Program. (Available 1994/95).
Hugh M. BROCK National Entrance Scholarship - Scholarships of $26,000 payable at
$6,500 per year are offered to outstanding students entering undergraduate programs from
secondary schools in Canada. The award is based primarily on the student's scholarly
achievement. A minimum of four awards is offered annually. Renewals are subject to
maintenance of satisfactory scholarship standing. The awards are endowed through the
estate of Hugh M. Brock. (Available 1994/95).
CANADIAN Society of Hospital Pharmacists Prize - A $1,000 prize is offered by the
Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists, B.C. Branch. The award is made to the
graduate student in the Pharm. D. program with the highest standing in Pharmacy 501.
The award is made on recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
CGA Education Foundation Doctoral Fellowship - An $8,000 fellowship has been made
available by the CGA Education Foundation. The award is available to Doctoral students
pursuing a degree in accounting or a related discipline and is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration in consultation with the Faculty
of Graduate Studies. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
Dr. Jay C. CHENG Memorial Medical Education Foundation Prize - A $700 prize has
been endowed in memory of Dr. Jay C. Cheng, a former UBC faculty member and the
founding president of the Chinese Canadian Medical Society of British Columbia. The
award is offered to a fourth year medical student who has demonstrated academic
excellence in Psychiatry. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Medicine. (Available 1994/95 Winter Session).
 Vancouver Senate 10831
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix A
CROWN Life Insurance National Entrance Scholarship - A $3000 scholarship has been
endowed by Crown Life Insurance Company and the province of British Columbia for a
first year student entering the University of British Columbia from a secondary school in
Canada. The award is made primarily on the basis of the student's scholarly achievement.
($1,200 available 1994/95).
DOLMAN Prize in Microbiology and Immunology - A prize of $500 has been endowed by
Claude E. Dolman, Ph.D., F.R.C.P. Professor Emeritus (1971), Head of the Department of
Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine (1936-1951), Head of the Department of
Microbiology and Immunology (1951-1961). The prize is awarded on the recommendation
by the Faculty of Science to the student with the highest standing in the final year of B.Sc.
with a major or honours in Microbiology and Immunology. (Available 1994/95 Winter
Session).
FERRIS Ladner McColl Memorial Prize in Law - Three prizes of $400 each have been
endowed by friends and colleagues in memory of Mr. Boyd Ferris, Mr. Hugh Ladner and
Mr. Justice Bruce McColl, highly accomplished and prominent members of the legal
profession of B.C. who passed away in the same short period in the early 1990's. One prize
for Advocacy, one for Labour Relations, and one for Alternative Dispute resolution is
available for students who demonstrate excellence in the respective field. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
FORTY-FIRST Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference Scholarship - A $3,000
scholarship has been endowed by the 41st Canadian Chemical Engineering Conference
held in Vancouver in 1991 and by matching funds. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Department of Chemical Engineering to an outstanding student
entering third year. The scholarship may be shared with an outstanding student entering
second year. (Available 1994/95 Winter Session).
Bob HINDMARCH Award - Two or more awards of $1,500 each are offered in honour of
Bob Hindmarch for his service to UBC as Director of Athletics and Sport Services. The
Awards are offered to students in good academic standing with outstanding athletic
abilities and are made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards
Committee. (Available 1994/95 Winter Session).
Peter JEPSON-YOUNG Bursary - A $1,000 bursary is offered by the B.C. Medical
Association in memory of Dr. Jepson-Young and in recognition of his contribution to the
public awareness of persons with AIDS. The award is offered to an undergraduate student
in the Faculty of Medicine who is a member of the B.C. Medical Association. (Available
1994/95 Winter Session).
JUMPSTART Scholarship Society Bursary in Environmental Sciences - Two bursaries of
$2,000 each are offered by the Jumpstart Scholarship Society to graduate students in the
field of environmental sciences. (Available 1994/95 Winter Session).
 Vancouver Senate 10832
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix A
Albert LAITHWAITE Memorial Bursary - A $450 bursary has been endowed by family
and friends in memory of Albert Laithwaite in recognition of his 33 year tenure in the
School of Physical Education and Recreation at UBC, and as Head Coach of the UBC
Thunderbird Rugby team. The bursary is offered to a second or third year Human Kinetics
student with preference given to a student involved in the Rugby program (coach, manager
or player). (Available 1994/95 Winter Session).
Sheri MESCANIUK Memorial Bursary in Psychiatry - A bursary of $700 has been
endowed by family and friends in memory of Sheri Mescaniuk. The bursary is offered to a
student enrolled in psychiatry courses within the Faculty of Medicine. (Available 1994/95
Winter Session).
MCCARTHY Tetrault Prize in Torts - A $750 prize is offered by the law firm of
McCarthy Tetrault to a student who achieves high standing in Law 207 (Torts). The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. The award may be shared at
the discretion of the Faculty. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
Harold NAUGLER Memorial Prize - A $350 prize has been endowed by friends and
family in memory of Harold Naugler. The award will be given to a student achieving
excellence in the study of electronic records. The award is made on the recommendation of
the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, in consultation with the Faculty
of Graduate Studies. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
ODLUM Brown Limited Bursary in Commerce - Bursaries to a total of $2,250 have been
endowed by Odium Brown Limited. The bursaries are offered to undergraduate and
graduate students in the Faculty of Commerce, with preference given to students
participating in the Study Abroad and Exchange Program. (Available 1994/95 Winter
Session).
OSGOODE Society Legal History Prize - A prize of two books is offered by the Osgoode
Society which promotes the study of Canadian Legal History, to a law student who has
achieved excellence in the field of legal history. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Law and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1993/94 Winter Session).
Ernest PETERS Prize - A $1,000 prize has been endowed by the friends and colleagues of
Professor Ernest Peters, to recognize his significant contributions in the fields of
hydrometallurgy and materials processing. The prize is made to a graduating student on
the recommendation of the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering. (Available
1993/94 Winter Session).
RAYROCK Yellowknife Resources Inc. Entrance Scholarship - Scholarships totalling
$13,500 have been endowed by Rayrock Yellowknife Resources Inc. and the Province of
British Columbia for students entering first year at the University of British Columbia from
secondary schools in Canada. The award is based primarily on the student's scholarly
achievement. ($6,000 available 1994/95).
 Vancouver Senate 10833
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix A
Alex SUTHERLAND Memorial Bursary - A bursary of $600 endowed in memory of Alex
Sutherland, is offered to an undergraduate student in any year and faculty. (Available
1994/95 Winter Session).
David L. VAUGHAN, Q.C. Memorial Scholarship - A $800 scholarship has been endowed
by family and friends in memory of David L. Vaughan, Q.C, a friend, colleague and
teacher. The award is offered to a graduate student in Law who has demonstrated
excellence in the fields of Corporate or Commercial Law and is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. (Available 1994/95 Winter Session).
REPLACEMENT AWARDS
APOTEX Pharmacy Leadership Award in Pharmacy - A $1,000 award is offered by
Pharmacy & Apotex Continuing Education (PACE) to a student in the graduating class of
the B.Sc.
(Pharm) degree program who has made significant professional contribution to the student
body of the faculty; demonstrated a strong potential for continued contribution to the
profession of pharmacy; maintained a strong academic average over four years of the
program. The award is made on the recommendation of the faculty. (Available 1993/94
Winter Session). (Replaces Award #3746 Apotex Prize in Pharmaceutical Sciences).
MCCARTHY Tetrault Diane Mason Memorial Prize in Contract Law - A $500 prize has
been endowed by the law firm of McCarthy Tetrault in memory of Diane Mason. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law to a student who achieves
excellence in Law 209 (Contracts). (Available 1993/94 Winter Session). (Replaces Award
#2855 - McCarthy Tetrault Prize in Contracts).
 Vancouver Senate 10834
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
Appendix B
COURSE AND CURRICULUM PROPOSALS
Faculty of Applied Science
Civil Engineering
New Course - CIVL 200 (3) Engineering and Sustainable Development
Deletion - CIVL 205
Change - CIVL 230 - add corequisite; CIVL 315, 316 - change in description, credits,
hours
Additional regular program changes to Second and Third Years:
Second Year - Add CIVL 200, Drop CIVL 205; Add footnote to CIVL 200
Third Year-Add STAT 251
Chemical Engineering
Changes in program
Fourth and fifth Years - Chemistry Honours
Geological Engineering
Changes in program
Third Year - Core
Fourth Year - Option 1A (Fuels)
Fourth Year - Option lb (Minerals)
Faculty of Arts
Classics
Changes CLST 315 - deleted and replaced by:
CLST313 (3) Greek Epic
CLST 314 (3) Latin Epic and Ancient Prose Fiction
CLST 316 - deleted and replaced by:
CLST 317 (3) Classical Tragedy
CLST 318 (3) Classical Comedy
CLST 436 - deleted and replaced by:
CLST 336 (3) Greek Philosophy and Literature from Homer to
Sophocles
CLST 337 (3) Greek Philosophy and Literature in the
SophistsPlato and Aristotle
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18,1994
10835
Appendix B
GREK 402 - deleted and replaced by:
GREK 420 (3
GREK 421 (3
GREK 405 -
GREK 422 (3
GREK 423 (3
deleted and replaced by:
Greek Epic
Greek Lyric and Elegiac Poetry
GREK 407
GREK 416 (3
GREK 417 (3
deleted and replaced by:
Greek Philosophy
Greek Oratory
GREK 408 -
GREK 411 (3
GREK 412 (3
deleted and replaced by:
Early Greek Historians
Later Greek Historians
LATN 403 - deleted and replaced by:
LATN 420 (3
LATN 421 (3
LATN 418 (3
LATN 419 (3
LATN 416 (3
LATN 417 (3
LATN 411 (3
LATN 412 (3
LATN 413 (3
LATN 414 (3
Greek Drama I
Greek Drama II
Latin Lyric Poetry
Latin Elegiac Poetry
LATN 404 - deleted and replaced by:
Latin Comedy
Latin Satire
LATN 405 - deleted and replaced by:
Lucretius
Vergil
LATN 407 - deleted and replaced by:
The Roman Historians, I
The Roman Historians, II
LATN 408 - deleted and replaced by:
Prose of the Roman Republic, I
Prose of the Roman Republic, II
LATN 425 - change in number, credits (formerly 410)
GREK 425 - change in number, credits (formerly 410)
CLST 210 - change in description
CLST 332 - change in credits
Change to Arts Literature Requirement
Change to Classical Studies program descriptions
Change to Major in Classical Studies - Third and Fourth Years
Change to Honours in Classical Studies - First, Second, Third and Fourth Years
 Vancouver Senate 10836
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
Changes to Requirement for the B.A. Degree
Honours in classics, Third and Fourth Year
Changes to Arts List B
Other program changes:
Medieval Studies
Philosophy - Requirements for the B.A. Degree
Major Third and Fourth Years
History - Requirements for the B.A. Degree
Major Third and Fourth Years
Change in Departmental Name to:
Classics (Greek and Roman Studies)
All Classical Studies courses to be called Greek and Roman Studies
Major in Classical Studies to become Major in Greek and Roman Studies
Honours in Classical Studies to become Honours in Greek and Roman Studies
Abbreviation for Greek and Roman Studies courses to be GRST
(Note: No change for Honours in Classics, M.A. in Classics, Ph.D. in Classics, M.A.
in Classical Archaeology)
English
Change to program description:
Requirements for the B.A. Degree
Admission:
At least 68% in six credits of 200-level English courses required for admission to the
English major program.
Hispanic and Italian Studies
Change ITAL 401, 415 - change in credits, hours;
ITST 310, 330 - change in credits, hours
Linguistics
Change LING 445 - change in description
Change in program requirements
Major in Speech Sciences - First and Second Years
Add Note 2
 Vancouver Senate 10837
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
Philosophy
New - PHIL 316 (3) Modern Philosophy
Psychology
Change PSYC 333 - change in title
PSYC 334 - change in title, prerequisite
New PSYC 350 (6) Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (available
only at Okanagan College)
New Interdisciplinary Major Program
Major in Religion and Literature
Religious Studies
New RGLT 371 (3) Seminar in Religion and Literature;
RGLT 471 (3) Advanced Seminar in Religion and Literature
Theatre and Film
Change of program description
Requirements for the B.F.A. Degree
Change FILM 333, 435, 437, 439 - change in description
Family and Nutritional Sciences
Change FMSC 200 - change in description, credits
FMSC 350 - change in hours
FMSC 310 - change in number (formerly 410)
Music
Change of program description
Requirements for the B.A. Degree
Major
Major in General Studies - Third and Fourth Years
Major in Voice - Second Year
Major in General Studies: Secondary Education Stream
 Vancouver Senate 10838
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
Faculty of Education
Visual and Performing Arts in Education
New VPAE 426 (3) Art Education, and Cultural Diversity
Change MUED 405 - change in description, credits
Language Education
New ENED 360 (3) Language, Education and Gender Special Topics in
English Education
Change ENED 226 - change in credits;
ENED 478 - change in prerequisites;
LANE 382, 389 - change in designation, description (formerly LIBE)
Mathematics and Science Education
New SCED 413 (3) Conceptions of the Natural World: Implications for
Science Education
Change SCED 380 - change in title, description
Teacher Education
Change - EDUC 316 - change in grading to P/F
Faculty of Graduate Studies
New FISH 500 (2) Issues in Fisheries Research: Seminars - Fisheries
Management;
FISH 501 (2) Issues in Fisheries Research: Freshwater;
FISH 502 (2) Issues in Fisheries Research: Marine;
FISH 503 (2) Issues in Fisheries Research: Policy
Ph.D. Program in Counselling Psychology
New CNPS 669 (6) Research Approaches in Counselling Psychology;
CNPS 688 (6) Supervision of Counselling Practice;
CNPS 698 (6) Pre-doctoral Internship
Change CNPS 678 - change in title, description
 Vancouver Senate 10839
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
Classics
New GREK 547 (0) Major Essay;
CLST 547 (0) Major Essay;
LATN 547 (0) Major Essay
Geography
Change GEOG 521, 537 - change in title, description
New GEOG 522 (3) Feminism and Geography
Deletion GEOG 533
Hispanic and Italian Studies
New SPAN 500 (0) Seminar in Hispanic Studies
Deletion SPAN 541, 542
Philosophy
Change of program description
Graduate Studies
New INDS 501 (0) Instructional Skills Workshop
Law
New LAW 518 (2-4)d Feminist Legal Studies: Key Themes and Current
Debates
Change LAW 520 - change in number, title
Geological Sciences
Change GEOL 565 - change in title, description, prerequisites;
GEOL 566 - change in credits
Physics
Deletion PHYS 506, 544
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18,1994
Appendix B
10840
Change
PHYS 502, 523 - change in title, description, credits;
PHYS 503, 525 - change in title, description, credits, prerequisites;
PHYS 509, 512 - change in description, credits;
PHYS 511 - change in title, credits, prerequisite;
PHYS 516 - change in description, credits, prerequisites;
PHYS 518-change in title;
PHYS 521 - change in credits, prerequisite
Physiology
Deletion - PHYL 510
Education
New EDUC 500 (0) Research Methodology in Education;
EDUC 510 (3) Video Ethnography in Educational Research: Culture,
Technology and Interpretation;
EDUC 512 (3-6)d Education Action Research Administrative, Adult
and Higher Education
Change AAHE 508 - change in title, description, prerequisite;
AAHE 531, 532 - change in number, title description (formerly
EADM 510, 511 respectively);
AAHE 601 - change in credits;
AAHE 602 - change in credits (to be graded "P/F")
Change ADED 508 - change in title, description;
EADM 508 - change in title, description
Deletion EADM 510, 511, SCED 601, MAED 601
Counselling Psychology
Change CNPS 579 - change in title, description, credits, hours, pre-Requisite
Language Education
New LANE 601 (3-12)c Doctoral Seminar
Mathematics and Science Education
New
MSED 558 Master's Seminar;
MSED 565 (3-6)D Special Course in Subject Matter Field;
MSED 699 Doctoral Thesis;
 Vancouver Senate 10841
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
BUED 508 - change in title, description, credits;
CSED 508 - change in credits;
HMEC 508 - change in title, description, prerequisite;
MAED 508 - change in title, description, credits, prerequisite;
MSED 601 - change in title;
SCED 508 - change in title, description, credits, prerequisite;
TSED 508 - change in title, description, credits, prerequisite
Deletion HMEC 561
Visual and Performing Arts in Education
Change - MUED 508 - change in title, description, credits
Proposed Calendar Change: Time Limits for Admission to Candidacy for Doctoral
Students
2) Admitted to Candidacy
a) Student normally will be Admitted to Candidacy when they have completed
the residency period, completed all required coursework, and passed the
comprehensive examination and their research supervisor has certified that
their thesis proposal has been approved.
b) The Faculty expects that a typical doctoral student will be Admitted to
Candidacy on completion of a two-year residency period. A student who is
not Admitted to Candidacy within a period of three years from the date of
initial registration will be required to withdraw from the program.
Extension of this period may be permitted by the Dean under exceptional
circumstances.
Faculty of Law
New LAW 491 (4) Law Students Legal Advice Program Credit
Change LAW 474, 488, 490 - change in description
New courses - all courses are designated "LAW".
307 (3) Introduction to Feminist Legal Studies
308 (2-4)d Feminist Legal Theory
309 (2-4)d Topics in Feminist Legal Studies
318 (2-4)d Marine Resources Law
319 (2-4)d International Human Rights
320 (2-4)d Indigenous Peoples in Comparative and International Law
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18,1994
10842
Appendix B
321
2-4)
326
2-4)
327
2-3)
329
2-4)
330
2-4)
334
2-3)
335
2-4)
339
2-4)
341
2-4)
347
2-4)
351
2-4)
355
2-4)
356
2-4)
358
2-4)
363
2-4)
364
2-4)
365
2-4)
367
2-4)
368
2-4)
369
2-4)
371
2-4)
378
2-4)
380
2-4)
381
2-4)
382
2-4)
383
2-4)
385
2-4)
387
2-3)
388
2-4)
391
2-4)
396
2-3)
402
2-4)
406
2-4)
410
2-3)
411
2-4)
413
2-4)
416
2-4)
419
2-4)
426
2-4)
429
2-4)
430
2-4)
433
2-4)
439
2-4)
446
2-4)
448
2-4)
449
2-4)
)d International Law of South-North Relations
)d Topics in conflict of Laws
)d International Trade Law
)d International Commercial Disputes
)d Cultural Property and Law
)d Introduction to Asian Legal Systems
)d Advanced Asian Legal Studies
)d Human Rights in Asia
)d European Community Law
)d Fundamental Freedoms
)d Topics in Human Rights
)d First Nations and the Administration of Justice
)d First Nations and Economic development
)d Topics in First Nations Law
)d Racism and Law
)d Topics in Race and Law
)d Law, Family and Gender
)d Reproduction and Law
)d Sexuality and Law
)d Law and Aging
)d Topics in Law and Social Relations
)d Issues in Immigration and Refugee Law
)d Government Liability
)d Disabilities and Law
)d Law and Medicine
)d Mental Health Law
)d Social Welfare Law
)d Environmental Law
)d Environmental Law in Practice
)d Topics in Environmental Law
)d Fisheries Law
)d Juvenile Justice Seminar
)d Topics in Criminal Justice
)d International Taxation
)d Tax Policy
)d Topics in Taxation Law
)d Human Rights and Labour
)d Individual Employment Law
)d Topics in Law and Technology
)d Advanced Legal Information Systems
)d Advanced Legal Research
)d Personal Injury Law
)d Construction Law
)d Problems in Commercial Law and Transactions
)d Sports Law
)d Media and Entertainment Law
 Vancouver Senate 10843
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
450 (2-4)d Topics in Sports, Media, Entertainment and Communications
Law
461 (2-4)d Corporate Transactions
464 (2-4)d Theory of the Corporation
471 (2-4)d Rules of Evidence and the Process of Proof
473 (2-4)d Appellate Advocacy
476 (2-4)d Psychology and Litigation
478 (2-4)d Alternative Dispute Resolution
479 (2-4)d Mediation
Changes in courses
In the following courses the previous number is shown in parenthesis. Courses marked
with an asterisk (*) also have change in prerequisite(s) to correspond with new
numbers of previous prerequisite(s) courses.
Change in number
338 (393), 372 (302), 374 (303), 392 (356), 400 (307), 437 (310), 440 (316), 451
(338), 453 (341), 456 (313), 469 (380), 470 (379), 486 (399)
Change in number, title
316 (386), 345 (309), 346 (301), 484 (406)
Change in number, title, description
301 (373), 302 (371), 303 (376), 312 (461), 350 (454), 352 (367), 458 (433), 460
(326)
Change in number, title, description, credits, hours
304 (370), 305 (374), 322 (474), 353 (456), 354 (455), 384 (488), 389 (452), 401
(424), 403 (490), 409 (333), 417 (446), 418 (448)% 424 (416), 457 (435)% 462
(431)*
Change in number, title, description, credits
428 (486)
Change in number, description, credits, hours
317 (388), 337 (482), 414 (398), 436 (343), 441 (319)% 459 (325)
Change in number, description
313 (395), 315 (484), 324 (472), 325 (390), 328 (476), 332 (391), 333 (480), 336
(481), 342 (478), 343 (412), 344 (308)% 349 (413), 360 (350)% 362 (441), 373
(414), 375 (304), 376 (420), 377 (368), 393 (362)% 394 (359)* 395 (358)*, 397
(361)*, 398 (450), 399 (306), 405 (422), 407 (330)*, 408 (331), 415 (353), 421
(444), 422 (345), 423 439), 432 (426), 435 (427), 438 (311), 443 (317)*, 444 (430),
447 (428), 452 (339)*, 455 (437), 467 (429), 468 (383), 474 (405)*, 481 (465), 482
(463), 483 (300), 485 (407), 488 (400)*, 489 (401)*, 490 (402)*
 Vancouver Senate 10844
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
Change in number, description, credits
310 (397), 427 (487), 463 (328)*
Change in number, credits, hours
477 (469)
Deletions
312, 314, 321, 325, 387, 403, 418, 458, 467, 477, 492
School of Nursing
Changes NURS 202, 304 - change in hours
Faculty of Science
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Change in program
Combined Biochemistry and Chemistry Honours
Biology
Change BIOL 201, 210, 433, 452 - change in hours
Chemistry
Change in program
Chemistry Honours (Environmental Option)
Chemical Engineering - Chemistry Honours
Computer Science
Change last sentence in last paragraph in general notes
Geological Sciences
Deletion GEOL 419
Change GEOL 303 - change in description, prerequisite;
GEOL 368 - change in title, description;
GEOL 403, 420 - change in title, description, prerequisites;
GEOL 442 - change in description
New GEOL 439 (3) Geological Fluid Dynamics
 Vancouver Senate 10845
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix B
Mathematics
Deletion MATH 205
Microbiology and Immunology
Change in Preamble to Course Listing
New Program
Cooperative Education Program; Biotechnology in Microbiology and Immunology
New MICB 398**(0) Co-operative Work Placement I;
MICB 399**(0) Co-operative Work Placement II;
MICB 498* *(0) Co-operative Work Placement III;
MICB 499**(0) Co-operative Work Placement IV
Psychology
Change in Honours program
Change in Major program
Statistics
Deletion STAT 205
Change in course listing preamble
Change STAT 203 - change in title
New Program:
Co-operative Education Program: Statistics
New STAT 398**(0) Co-operative Work Placement I;
STAT 399**(0) Co-operative Work Placement II;
STAT 498**(0) Co-operative Work Placement III;
STAT 499**(0) Co-operative Work Placement IV
 Vancouver Senate 10846
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
Appendix C
FIRST REPORT OF THE SENATE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY
ORGANIZATION MAY 1994
I. INTRODUCTION
Terms of Reference
At its May 1993 meeting Senate approved the following motion of the Senate Budget
Committee:
That Senate, in consultation with the President, appoint an ad hoc or standing committee
to advise the President on restructuring and/or consolidating both among and within
Faculties and Departments into fewer units that are coherent and have less overhead than
at present.
Thus, the concern that brought the committee into existence was in substantial degree
budgetary. At a subsequent meeting (15 September 1993) Senate approved the following terms
of reference for an ad hoc committee:
To examine and report on the administrative structure for the delivery of academic
programs of the University and where appropriate recommend changes, with a view to
improving efficiency and academic effectiveness, consistent with the pursuit of the
University's goals and objectives and its Mission Statement.
While limiting the committee's mandate to "the administrative structure for the delivery of
academic programs," the terms of reference extend the Committee's mandate to considering
both "efficiency" and "academic effectiveness." The committee interprets its scope ("academic
programs") to encompass both teaching (including continuing education) and research. A
separate committee was established by the President as a steering committee for an external
consultant's review of the "non-academic" aspects of university administration. A report on a
limited range of administrative issues has been received from the consultant and widely
circulated with a covering letter from the President.J The steering committee has not published
a report.
Scope of the Report
The work of the Committee is on-going. In this initial report, we first describe the procedures
of the Committee and the principles that underlie our review and proposals for reform of the
administrative structure of the academic side of the University. We then turn our attention to
substantive issues and recommendations. We have solicited and received suggestions for
administrative restructuring and/or consolidation from many people in diverse parts of the
university community over the past 8 months. The range of possible reforms is considerable.
Rather than attempting to consider all simultaneously, the Committee chose to confine its
attention initially to a small number of proposals and to move on to others as
recommendations are formulated on the first ones. In this report we have chosen to limit our
analysis to issues relating to the number and relative sizes of faculties, department size, some
aspects of Senate and University procedures with respect to important academic decisionmaking, and the organization of teaching and research on natural resources and the
environment. It is the intention of the Committee to continue study of a number of other
proposals, and to produce a second report in the fall. At that time, the Senate may wish to
consider the future of the Committee.
S. Dupre, Administrative Organization and Processes at The University of British Columbia. March 1994.
 Vancouver Senate 10847
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
II. SOME BASIC PRINCIPLES
Criteria
The committee approached its review of university organization with three criteria in mind:
• academic effectiveness
• administrative cost
• administrative effectiveness
We interpret administrative cost and administrative effectiveness as components of
"efficiency" in the committee's terms of reference.
To the extent that our work has been directed by cost considerations, the Committee's
concern has been only the "administrative cost" of delivering academic programs We have not
been directly concerned with the non-administrative costs of academic programs, although,
inevitably, considerations of total costs have at times entered our deliberations.
It is also important to note that our recommendations are not predicated solely on the
reduction of administrative cost. Although reductions in administrative cost are possible, and
over time may amount to considerable sums of money, it is unlikely that the administrative
reforms that we are proposing will result in large savings in the operating budget of the
university in the short run. We are also concerned with both administrative and academic
effectiveness. In some cases there are reforms that could result in important enhancements to
academic or administrative effectiveness even though there may be little or no administrative
cost savings. In some cases we think the university should be prepared to accept the risk of
some small, temporary reduction in academic effectiveness where there are important gains to
be made in administrative effectiveness or reductions in administrative cost that will add to the
resources available to enhance academic effectiveness throughout the university.
The Concept of Administrative Cost
The committee construes the concept of administrative costs in a broad sense. Some costs are
obvious, involving explicit expenditures on administrative activities, such as expenditures on
• salaries of administrative support staff
• administrative stipends and honoraria for deans, associate deans, assistant deans,
directors, department heads and some other administrative officers of departments and
faculties
• administrative leave for deans, associate deans, assistant deans, directors and department
heads
• external searches for new deans, directors and department heads
• external reviews
• administrative travel
• retreats
• external meetings of deans, directors and heads.
 Vancouver Senate 10848
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
However, there are also implicit administrative costs that do not involve explicit expenditures
for administrative purposes but nonetheless divert scarce resources from alternative uses,
particularly teaching and research. These include:
released time from teaching responsibilities for department or division heads and other
academic administrators within departments or divisions
faculty time devoted to committee work and administrative tasks (time that could
otherwise be devoted to teaching and research)
space devoted to administrative activities (space that could otherwise be used for other
academic activities).
time devoted to internal and external searches for new deans, directors and department
heads
time wasted as a result of the duplication of functions and activities at various levels of
administration and/or overlap in administrative duties
time wasted as a result of unnecessarily repetitive, overlapping and multiple demands for
information from higher levels of administration
time wasted as a result of administrative inefficiencies in the processing of information.
While most (if not all) of these administrative activities are important to the functioning of the
university, we must be concerned about the total explicit and implicit administrative cost. In
general and within limits, fewer administrative positions would involve smaller aggregate
expenditures on administrative activities and less administrative time and other scarce
resources devoted to administrative activities and their coordination.
Consultation
The Committee decided as a basic principle that widespread consultation is essential both to
understand the existing administrative structure and to develop sensible proposals for
reorganization. However, it was also apparent to the committee that the only feasible method
of consultation was through the existing administrative structure. The time that members of
the committee could devote to this task, the resources available to the committee, and the
perceived urgency of proceeding with the review did not permit us to consult directly and
widely with individual faculty members and students. We anticipated, however, that deans,
directors and heads would engage in such consultations on specific questions posed by the
committee, and we are pleased to note that a substantial amount of such consultation has
occurred.
The importance that we assign to consultation is also reflected in our recommendations for
implementation of proposed administrative reorganizations.
The Committee's Procedures
The Committee felt that the first important task was to attempt to develop an understanding
of the complex administrative structure for academic programs in the university. In September
1993 we wrote to all deans, directors and department heads asking for information about
existing administrative arrangements, problems with and impending changes in those
arrangements, suggestions for reform and different administrative models elsewhere with
which they were familiar and that we might consider. The committee also read reports on
restructuring at several other universities.
 Vancouver Senate 10849
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
The results of this survey were helpful to the committee in clarifying our thoughts about issues
to be studied. We drew up a long list of potential issues, and based on our preliminary
deliberations we agreed on an order of priority for study and decided to consider initially:
1. establishing a minimum size for departments
2. reforming certain Senate and University procedures
3. reorganizing teaching and research in natural resources
4. uniting the study of soil sciences and geography
With respect to the suggestion of a minimum size for academic departments, we wrote to the
deans of each faculty with formal academic departments or divisions, seeking information on
explicit and implicit administrative costs of departments and divisions, and inviting
submission of other information about the reorganization of the departmental or divisional
structure of each faculty, with a view to reducing administrative costs and enhancing both
administrative and academic effectiveness. All deans cooperated in providing information,
although the degree of useful detail provided was variable.
With respect to the suggestion that teaching and research in natural resources be reorganized,
we sought advice from the Deans of Agricultural Sciences, Forestry and Graduate Studies on
the feasibility and desirability of creating a new faculty with this broad mandate, and from the
Dean of Applied Science on the merits of a reconfiguration that would include much of the
Faculty of Applied Science.
With respect to the proposed merger of Geography and Soil Science we sought advice from the
heads of the affected departments and their deans.
This report reflects our deliberations based on the advice that we received on these issues, and
contains our recommendations for action by the Senate.
As background for much of our deliberations we found it necessary to consider the nature,
role and number of faculties. Before turning to the issues listed above and our
recommendations with respect to them, we wish to explain our general perspective on
Faculties at UBC.
III. FACULTIES
At its meeting in May 1993, on the recommendation of the Academic Policy Committee,
Senate adopted nine " Guidelines for the Establishment of a Faculty." These guidelines are
reproduced as an appendix to this Report [not included. See Senate Minutes, pp. 10536-551].
While specifically addressed to the establishment of new faculties, the guidelines provide an
important starting point for reviewing the existing complement of faculties in the university.
The Role of the Committee of Deans
The Committee is strongly of the opinion that on all academic matters the appropriate
primary advisory body for the President, within the formal administrative structure of the
university, is the Committee of Deans, meeting together with the Vice-President Academic and
Provost and the Vice-President
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18,1994
Appendix C
10850
Research. This Committee ought to be a central and influential body in academic governance.
However, it is the perception of the committee that the importance of the Committee of Deans
as an advisory body in major decisions has declined in recent years as the number of vice-
presidents and associate vice presidents has expanded. This is a perception that is difficult to
document without intensive research, but it is a perception that is widely held within the
university.2 It is a matter of deep concern to the Committee.
Relative Size of Faculties
Guideline 6 of "Guidelines for the Establishment of a Faculty" expresses concern about the
relative weighting of different parts of the university within the committee of deans.
We agree that there is a striking imbalance in the relative sizes of faculties, whether measured
by operating budget, the number of full-time equivalent faculty or the number of full time
equivalent students in the faculty (Table 1). As a result, there is also an imbalance between
science-based (including medical science) and humanities and social science based disciplines.
To the extent that decisions are taken by vote, this imbalance is so severe as to be wholly
inappropriate and to impair the credibility of the Committee of Deans as a representative
advisory body. Even when decisions are not taken by vote, there is a corresponding imbalance
in the voices heard in the deliberations of the Committee of Deans. For this reason, the
Committee is of the opinion that it would be highly desirable to consolidate some faculties in a
way that will significantly reduce the inequality in the relative sizes of faculties in the
University.
Table 1      Full Time Faculty
and Student Enrollment,
by Faculty,
1992-93
Number
Percent
of Total
Faculty
Faculty
Members
FTE
Undergrad
Students*
FTE
Graduate
Students*
Full Time
Faculty
Members
FTE
Undergrad
Students*
FTE
Graduate
Students*
Arts
468
7307
1039
25.3
33.6
21.5
Medicine
375
1823
382
20.3
8.4
7.9
Science
309
4764
897
16.7
21.9
18.5
Education
187
2423
819
10.1
11.1
16.9
Applied Sc.
167
2130
700
9.0
9.8
14.5
Commerce
105
1177
351
5.7
5.4
7.2
Agricultural Sc.
64
516
191
3.5
2.4
3.9
Law
44
685
32
2.4
3.1
0.7
Forestry
38
347
153
2.1
1.6
3.2
Pharmaceutical
Sciences
35
351
57
1.9
1.6
1.2
Dentistry
30
246
15
1.6
1.1
0.3
Graduate
Studies#
27
9
206
1.5
0.0
4.3
Total**
1851
21778
4842
100
100
100
 Vancouver Senate 10851
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
* Course enrollees
* * Total full time faculty members includes 2 faculty members not recorded in a Faculty.
* Includes only faculty members and student enrollees in administrative units within the Faculty
of Graduate Studies.
Sources: UBC Fact Book, 1992; Institutional Research, Office of Budget and Planning.
Number of Faculties
Quite apart from the question of the relative sizes of faculties, a reduction in the number of
deans should increase the effectiveness of the Committee of Deans within the governance
structure. In general, the influence of any particular voice in deliberations depends on the
number of people " at the table." A smaller committee of deans, working with the Vice-
President Academic and Provost and the Vice-President Research, should be more cohesive,
with each dean having a stronger voice in deliberations. For this reason also, the Committee
considers it important to consolidate some faculties and reduce the number of deans.
If some of the smaller faculties were to become schools associated with a larger faculty, there
would be considerably less pressure to departmentalize such small "faculties."
Under the University Act (Section 34), the existence of each faculty adds four members to
Senate — a dean, two faculty members and one student. Fewer faculties would also mean a
smaller, more effective and more representative Senate.
Administrative Cost and the Number of Faculties
It has been asserted repeatedly to the committee that the cost saving from reducing the number
of faculties and deans will be minor. This is true if the same administrative structure remains
in place, only called by different names (schools with directors rather than faculties with
deans). It seems clear that some savings are possible through streamlining administration and
sharing of facilities and administrative personnel in ways that are not encouraged when units
are organized into separate faculties, and many small cost savings can add up to significant
sums. In any case, our observations about the number of faculties and deans are predicated
primarily on improvements in administrative effectiveness - on reducing the inequalities in the
representation of various parts of the university in the Committee of Deans, and on enhancing
the role of the Committee of Deans in the governance structure.
Recommendations
At this time, no specific recommendations for Senate action emerge from this section of our
report. However, our conclusions about the number of faculties and deans underlie our search
for possible consolidations and reorganizations of existing faculties that have the potential to
enhance academic effectiveness.
 Vancouver Senate 10852
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
IV. DEPARTMENTS
The Nature and Role of the Department
The academic department or school (or in some cases the division)2 is the basic administrative
unit in the university. It is the administrative "home" for almost all faculty members. The
department, through the head and committees, normally makes the initial recommendations
regarding appointments, promotion, tenure, salary, teaching and research prizes, etc., reviews
performance, and makes the administrative arrangements for most aspects of faculty academic
activities (office space, secretarial assistance, supplies, etc.). The department supports and
houses the faculty who are engaged in expanding and transmitting knowledge. Thus, it is a
scholarly community, promoting scholarship and research and continuing scholarly contact
among individuals engaged in related areas of research. The department is also responsible for
the development, operation, assessment and revision of most undergraduate and graduate
curriculums, including making most of the necessary administrative arrangements (instructors,
timetable, room bookings, advising, etc.). The department is usually the academic "home" for
students. It is generally the place where students pursue enquiries about academic programs,
seek advice, find their academic identity and, both formally and informally, participate in
program review and development. The department also provides an interface with the
profession or industry and an important link with the international community of scholars
who carry out work in a defined area of inquiry. It is generally a formal and easily
recognizable point of contact for the world outside the university.
Many departments are coincident with the representation of a " discipline," somehow defined,
among faculty members and in the teaching programs of the university. However, this is not
necessarily the case. Some departments encompass more than one "discipline" or provide
more than one program, and increasingly faculty members of the same " discipline" can be
located in different departments or schools. Moreover, new and interdisciplinary modes of
enquiry and teaching often transcend traditional departmental boundaries. We note, for
example, that there are many interdisciplinary programs, centres and institutes in the Faculty
of Graduate Studies. At times the formal departmental structure can interfere with
interdisciplinary innovations in teaching programs. It is also important to note that informal
groupings of scholars for research purposes often do not coincide with departmental
boundaries. Many departments contain well defined research groups within them, and many
research groups include people in several departments and indeed from outside the university.
Such research groupings are flexible, forming and reforming quite independently of the
university's departmental structure.
It is also worth noting that the scope of services provided by the department can and does
vary. In some cases, the provision of secretarial services is arranged through the dean's office,
and there are examples of administration (e.g., the management of stores) for several
departments with similar laboratory requirements on a "building" rather than a "department"
basis. It is possible that a careful reconsideration of which services should be provided
centrally and which provided on a decentralized basis would reveal significant improvements
in efficiency.
For brevity we will refer to all such units as departments.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18,1994
10853
Appendix C
Our major point is that while departments may be the basic unit in the university for certain
administrative purposes, USC's existing departmental structure, with more than 90
departments and schools, is not essential for effective pursuit of the central tasks of the
university, teaching and research. Other configurations are possible. With a will to make them
work, other configurations would not only be feasible but would have the potential of
enhancing both academic and administrative effectiveness, with smaller administrative costs.
In this context we note the reconfiguration that is occurring in the Faculty of Education. While
the Committee has not been involved in this process, we have been informed about it, and we
applaud the initiative of the Dean of Education to undertake such a large-scale review and
reorganization.
Department Size
Table 2 provides a distribution of departments by size, with size measured by the number of
full time faculty members in the department. The committee is well aware that the relative
number of full time faculty members does not fully reflect the differences in the range of
administrative responsibilities among departments and for this reason it is an imperfect
measure of department size. There are significant differences among departments of similar
size in the scope of graduate and undergraduate programs, the degree of laboratory work
involved in teaching and research, the employment of clinical and other auxiliary teaching
staff, and interaction with professional bodies. These are factors that will have to be taken
into account in refining and implementing our proposals. Nonetheless, while imperfect as a
measure of " size," the number of full time faculty members provides a useful starting point for
comparisons among departments. In any case, by any measure that one might use, UBC has
many departments that are very small.
Table 2
Distribution of Departments by Size, September 1993
Size
Percentage
Distribution
Cumulative
Distrib
Percentage
iution
Number of Full
Time Faculty
Number of
Departments
Number of Full
Time Faculty
Departments
Faculty
Members
Departments
Faculty
Members
0-4.99
4
13
4.3
0.7
4.3
0.7
5-6.99
5
26
5.4
1.4
9.8
2.1
7-8.99
7
52
7.6
2.8
17.4
4.9
9-10.99
9
83
9.8
4.5
27.2
9.4
11-12.99
9
104
9.8
5.6
37.0
15.0
13-14.99
12
165
13.0
8.9
50.0
23.9
15-16.99
11
170
12.0
9.2
62.0
33.1
17-19.99
8
146
8.7
7.9
70.7
41.0
20-29.99
14
369
15.2
19.9
85.9
60.9
30-69.99
13
585
14.1
31.6
100.0
92.5
Not in Depts.
138
7.5
100.0
Total
92
1851
100.0
100.0
Sources: UBC Fact Book, 1992; Institutional Research, Office of Budget and Planning.
 Vancouver Senate 10854
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
Administrative Effectiveness and the Size of a Department
In a large faculty, small departments imply a large number of departments. Some of the same
considerations that arise in considering the number and relative sizes of faculties also apply in
considering the number and relative sizes of departments. The committee of department heads
should play a central role in the academic governance of the faculty. It should be a forum for
the free and open discussion of academic policy and hence for advice to the dean. However, it
should not be a forum in which there are significant inequalities in the number of faculty
members represented by a single voice and a single vote. Moreover, in general, the larger the
number of participants in the debate, the less effective is any particular voice. While it is
important to have representation from the diverse sectors of the faculty, it is also desirable to
do so economically. Within limits, a smaller committee is to be preferred to a larger one.
There are many reasons to be concerned about the large number of small departments. For
example:
• Not all faculty members are suitable as department heads. Administrative talent is scarce
even in a large department. While there will always be exceptions, in very small
departments the problem of the availability of administrative talent is magnified.
• A major function of a department is the assessment of the performance of faculty members
in teaching, research and administration. The Committee is concerned about the quality
and objectivity of such assessments in very small departments with very few individuals
participating in the assessment process. The problem is compounded if there are few senior
faculty members.
• With a small group of faculty members to choose from, it is difficult to structure
committees. Indeed, some faculty members may be involved in almost all departmental
committees. The spreading of the committee load that is familiar in larger departments
cannot occur.
• Small departments also have less budget flexibility than large departments. The loss of any
faculty member or a member of the support staff for whatever reason can have unusually
serious consequences. Indeed, a faculty member's being on sabbatical leave can create a
serious problem, and on occasion this has limited the ability of some faculty members to
use the sabbatical leave provision to improve their capacity as teachers and researchers.
It is also important to note an important implicit cost when there are many small departments.
That is the time and energy that must be devoted by the dean's office and other senior
administrative offices to consultations with departments and to the supervision and
coordination of departmental activities. These costs increase with the number of departments
in the faculty.
 Vancouver Senate 10855
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
Administrative Cost and Department Size
Small departments have been established for diverse reasons, and many have a long history.
They came into existence for various reasons. In some cases they were once larger departments
that have contracted. In other cases they were established as small departments responsible for
an academic program that was initiated as part of a larger department or an institute. The
normal justification for a small department is "academic." In varying degrees emphasis is
placed on the uniqueness of the program offered by the department, on the ability of an
autonomous department to develop graduate and/or undergraduate programs that might be
stifled if they were part of a larger department with other primary interests, and on the sense
of academic community developed among the members of the autonomous department.
We are sympathetic to these concerns and we recognize that members of small departments
generally have intense commitment to the autonomy of the department. As a result, the
process by which small departments are merged into larger units may not be painless. There
may be strong resistance by members of small departments because of apprehensions
associated with an altered and unknown environment, perceptions that their field of study
may not thrive in a larger, more diverse department, and a sense of loss of power over
important decisions. However, with the will to make a new configuration work, these are
difficulties that can be overcome.
In considering the future of small departments at UBC, we must also give careful consideration
to administrative effectiveness and administrative cost (implicit as well as explicit).
Some administrative costs vary directly with department size. However, not all administrative
costs vary proportionately with department size and some are independent of department size.
Space
Normally each department has a departmental office. Combining two or three small
departments into a single department should permit some reduction in the space devoted to
this function. Space is a valuable resource at UBC.
Administrative Leave
Under current UBC policy, a department head is entitled to one year of administrative leave, at
full salary and benefits, at the end of a five year term as head.3 This administrative leave
substitutes for the study leave for which the head would otherwise be eligible to apply given
the same period of service as a faculty member. The net cost of the administrative leave, then,
is the difference between the salary and benefits received on administrative leave and the
salary and benefits that would otherwise be received on study leave. This may be 25% or 40%
of the head's
Six months of leave if the head is continuing for a second term.
 Vancouver Senate 10856
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
salary, depending on whether the leave is taken after 4 or 6 years of service since the previous
leave. However, experience shows that only a third to a half of those eligible for study leave in
any year are able to take study leave. By contrast, it seems highly unlikely that someone
eligible for a full year of leave at full salary would decline that opportunity. Thus a simple
calculation based on formal study leave provisions will likely understate the cost of our
administrative leave provisions.
The Committee is not opposed to the principle of administrative leave. Indeed, we regard the
leave provisions as essential. Long service in an administrative position can have very
deleterious effects on a person's scholarship, currency in the field and capacity to teach at the
frontiers of the discipline. It is important that administrators have an opportunity to refresh
and retool, to enhance the contribution that they can make to the university. We also observe
that it is increasingly difficult to persuade suitable faculty members to assume administrative
responsibilities. The availability of administrative leave, can help reduce the sacrifice imposed
on someone who assumes a headship, thereby improving our chances of persuading
appropriate people to serve.
In the present context, however, the important point is that provisions for administrative leave
do not vary by size of department (and hence by the complexity of the administrative
responsibilities). Two or three small departments will be more expensive in this respect than a
combined larger department.
Administrative Stipends
Policy with respect to stipends for academic administrators varies among faculties. In some
cases, there is a difference between the stipends paid to heads of small departments and to
those of large departments. However, this is not universal; and in general the differences that
exist are not proportionate to differences in the sizes of departments.
Again, the Committee is not opposed to the principle of administrative stipends. They are
often important in order to induce suitable people to accept administrative responsibilities.
However, present USC practice does not differentiate sufficiently between stipends for
administrators of large units and those for administrators of small units, (this applies to
faculties as well as departments).
Released Time
A similar observation can be made about released time from teaching for academic
administrators. Policy varies among faculties and among departments,4 and there is no
centralized compilation of information on released time. Our enquiries suggest that in many
cases there is a differential between the released time for heads of large and small departments.
However, this is not universal; and in general the differences in released time are not
proportionate to differences in the sizes of departments.
4 In some faculties, departments have considerable autonomy in arranging for released time for
academic administrators, including administrators other than department heads.
 Vancouver Senate 10857
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
The "Efficiency" of Small Departments
We have been told repeatedly that small departments are " efficient" because their
administrative expenditures are very small. Typically, small departments do not have
administrative assistants, have smaller secretarial staff, and may have a departmental secretary
only part time (and in at least one case shared with another department). In some cases the
department office is effectively open only part time.
In this context, we do not regard small expenditures on administration as "efficient." Indeed,
the material supplied to us suggests that a disproportionate share of administrative activities in
small departments is performed by faculty members whose time would be much better devoted
to the central tasks for which they are employed, teaching and research. It seems apparent also
that the faculty and students in these departments are deprived of administrative services that
are normal in larger departments. It is also worth noting that public and student access to the
department is restricted by departmental offices that are staffed only part time.
Very Large Departments
Very small departments are relatively costly. We have not explored the economics of very
large departments. It is possible that very large departments, and particularly departments
with several programs, are also relatively costly. For example, they often require program
coordinators or other faculty-administrators with released time and occasionally honorariums,
positions that are not common in smaller departments. However, it is not necessary to create
very large departments with complex administrative structures. It is possible to organize a
smaller number of medium sized departments in place of the large number of very small
departments. In some cases the reconfiguration may take the form of a merger of small
departments; in some cases it may involve a small department joining a larger department; and
in other cases it may involve a more complex rearrangement of faculty members and
programs.
Academic Effectiveness and Department Size
The case in favour of small departments usually emphasizes academic arguments. Even on
academic grounds, however, we have concerns about very small departments.
Small departments generally find it difficult to mount a comprehensive graduate program, and
often are forced by the shortage of faculty to adopt a very restrictive definition of the " core"
of the discipline. These problems in turn affect their ability to attract and retain excellent
graduate students and to survive reviews of graduate programs. They have few faculty
members available to serve on graduate student committees. New imaginative and innovative
undergraduate and graduate student programs that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries
can be one of the important results of combining small departments into larger groupings. We
would reemphasize in this context the serious consequences for the integrity of academic
programs in a small department from the loss of a single faculty member or a faculty member
going on sabbatical leave.
 Vancouver Senate 10858
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
A Minimum Size for Departments?
The committee's consideration of small departments at UBC leads us to the conclusion that
there are strong arguments for establishing a minimum size for a group to have departmental
status. What should that minimum be?
We could pretend to have a scientific answer to that question. We do not. It is the opinion of
the committee, however, that a minimum size of 15 full time faculty members would be
appropriate to provide a unit with the faculty resources to provide academic programs of
adequate depth and breadth and to spread the administrative burdens fairly. It should also
provide a balance of faculty members in various ranks to staff personnel committees, provide
supervision for graduate students, and permit faculty members to take advantage of sabbatical
leave provisions.
It is true that if no exceptions were made, the data in Table 2 suggest that this rule would
affect 46 departments, about half of the departments at UBC. However, a considerably smaller
proportion of the full time faculty (24%) would be affected. It is the opinion of the committee
that this degree of disruption is manageable and, given the benefits in academic and
administrative effectiveness and the reduction in administrative cost, well worth undertaking.
Moreover, the potential cost saving is substantial. A rough calculation based on the size
distribution of departments in Table 2 suggests that for each department headship that we can
eliminate, the savings from the administrative stipend, administrative leave and released time
would amount to between $22,900 to $ 52,900 annually?5 If 46 departments could be
consolidated into 29 departments of 15 faculty members each, the annual saving to the
university from these factors alone would be in the range $ 389,000 to $ 900,000. To these
savings must be added the substantial savings in implicit and explicit costs from fewer head
searches, fewer external reviews, the reduction in space devoted to administrative tasks, etc.
We recognize that there may have to be exceptions to the minimum size rule. As we noted
above, the number of FTE faculty members is an imperfect measure of the administrative
responsibilities of some departments. However, we are also of the opinion that if a minimum
size is established it should be an effective floor. Exceptions to it should be rare and should
require special justification.
Process
It is one thing to specify a minimum size for departments. It is another to specify which
programs and departments should be reorganized in the process of achieving that minimum.
In general, a committee of Senate is not an appropriate body for making these choices and
conducting the consultations and negotiations that will be necessary in the reconfiguration
process. The Committee is of the opinion that these are tasks that must be performed by the
deans. However, we are also of the opinion that the Vice-President Academic and Provost
must take responsibility for ensuring that the spirit of the policy is adhered to and that Senate
must maintain a watching brief on the process.
5 This assumes an annual administrative stipend of $5,600 (the 1992-93 average for heads of departments
smaller than 15 full time faculty members); annual net cost of administrative leave of $4300 (25% of the
average salary for heads of small departments, spread over five years [5% per year]); and annual cost of
released time from teaching (and reduced time for research) of between $13,000 and $43,000 (16% to 50%
of a normal load, priced at the average salary for heads of small departments). The Faculty of Medicine has
been excluded from these calculations.
 Vancouver Senate 10859
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
Recommendations:
Based on the preceding discussion, the Committee recommends that:
1. Senate establish a minimum size for departments, schools and divisions that have
department-like responsibilities.
2. The minimum size for departments, schools and divisions be 15 full-time faculty members
in the department.
3. Deans be asked to arrange for consolidations of relevant departments, schools and
divisions to conform with the minimum size and to report regularly to the Vice President
Academic and Provost on progress. The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to
report to Senate on the results of these reconfigurations by December 1995.
4. Exceptions to the minimum size should be rare and should be permitted only on the basis
of special circumstances which must be made explicit.
5. All exceptions to the minimum size approved by the Vice President Academic and Provost,
be reported to Senate.
6. Provisions for administrative stipends and administrative leave for department heads be
graduated depending on department size.
V. SENATE AND UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES
As part of its review of the administrative structure for the delivery of academic programs the
committee gave careful consideration to a number of Senate and University procedures
affecting academic decisions. We wish to make recommendations about two of them.
Curriculum Revision
The present process for revisions to the curriculum is complicated and cumbersome. The
principle appears to be to make curriculum revision almost "fail safe" in terms of avoiding
overlap in courses in different departments and minimizing the invasion of departmental
teaching fields by members of other departments. Even the most minor of changes can require
widespread consultation, extensive paper work, and deliberations by three or four committees,
by one or two (and occasionally more) faculties and by the Senate. Of course, the procedure
can only control changes in the Calendar description of courses; it cannot prevent hidden
curriculum changes within existing Calendar descriptions, with the result that Calendar
descriptions in some cases no longer reflect course content. Innovation in courses and
programs is discouraged, and departments are discouraged from making even minor revisions
to the Calendar because of the cumbersome procedure.
The resources devoted to the process of curriculum revision are excessive. It is the opinion of
the committee that the benefits of the present procedure do not justify the cost. We must be
willing to accept a higher degree of risk in our curriculum revisions, so that cost of the process
of curriculum revision can be reduced.
 Vancouver Senate 10860
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
Recommendations
The Committee recommends that:
7. The Senate Curriculum Committee be instructed to study the process of curriculum
revision and to bring recommendations to the Senate not later than November 1994 for
the simplification of the process.
8. As guidelines, the Senate Curriculum Committee be invited to
a. Establish a broad category of minor changes that can be made by departments,
schools or non-departmentalized faculties without further consultation except
notification of the appropriate curriculum review officer (who might be the chair
of the Senate Curriculum Committee), who will be responsible for ensuring that
the change is indeed "minor" and that no other academic program is likely to be
adversely affected. This category might include, at a minimum, changes in course
numbers, course names, prerequisite requirements and editorial changes in course
descriptions.
b. Establish a narrow category of major changes that require consultation and full
review by faculties and the Senate. This category might include new programs, new
courses, deletion of courses and changes that affect requirements for student
programs in other departments.
c. Consider the possibility that proposals for major changes in graduate courses and
programs go directly to the Faculty of Graduate Studies from departments, schools
and non-departmentalized faculties for full review before being sent to Senate for
review and approval.
Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Procedures
Procedures for appointments and for the generation and review of recommendations for the
granting of promotion and tenure are different in principle from those for curriculum revision.
For the University there is the fundamental consideration of obtaining the very best faculty
possible; for the individuals involved there are fundamental considerations relating to career
development and personal and family disruptions. It is important that all major deliberations
involve the best university-wide professional standards and evaluation procedures, that
deliberations be conducted in a fair and professional manner, and that safeguards ensure a fair
hearing of all pertinent evidence. However, it is also important that the procedures not involve
unnecessary administrative cost.
We note that a new agreement on Conditions of Appointment has been signed by the Faculty
Association and the University after prolonged negotiation. While this
 Vancouver Senate 10861
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
agreement appears to generate new administrative costs with respect to recommendations on
promotion and tenure, we are not yet in a position to assess whether those additional costs are
warranted by commensurate improvements in the effectiveness of the process. We must wait
and see.
There is, however, one aspect of the appointments, promotion and tenure process that is
outside the Agreement on Conditions of Appointment. That is the Senior Appointments
Committee. The Senior Appointments Committee is an important committee, responsible for
ensuring that the advice received by the President on the granting of tenure, promotions and
appointments to senior ranks reflects high standards of excellence in teaching and research
that are reasonably consistent throughout the university. We are of the opinion that significant
changes could be made in the composition and procedures of the Senior Appointments
Committee that would reduce administrative costs without impairing the integrity of its review
process.
At present the senior appointments committee is large, comprised of 12 deans, 12 faculty
members broadly representative of the university and a non-voting chair, with an Associate
Vice President Academic as non-voting secretary. It is the opinion of the committee that the
Senior Appointments Committee does not have to be this large to ensure broad representation
and to ensure careful and fair review of all cases.
It is important that the broadly representative nature of the committee be maintained.
However, in our opinion it is neither necessary nor desirable that deans of faculties be
members of the committee. We recognize the advantage of having deans on the committee: It
is an important forum through which the deans develop an understanding of the requirements,
standards and personnel problems of other faculties and new deans learn about the university
and their fellow deans. However, their regular participation in the frequent (through much of
the academic year, weekly) meetings of the Senior Appointments Committee and the
associated " homework", consumes a vast amount of expensive and scarce administrative
talent. It is our opinion that this administrative cost is not justified by the presumed benefits of
having the deans as members of the committee. Even if the number of faculty members on the
committee had to be expanded slightly to ensure representativeness, the removal of deans from
the committee would reduce implicit administrative costs.
Recommendation
The constitution of the Senior Appointments Committee is beyond the powers of Senate.
However, we recommend that:
9.   Senate ask the President to review the constitution of the Senior Appointments Committee,
with a view to removing deans from that committee and with a view to strengthening its
ability to represent high university-wide standards of excellence and objectivity.
 Vancouver Senate 10862
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
We note that the Dupre report recommends minor changes to the procedures of the Senior
Appointment Committee that would reduce the number of cases reviewed by the whole
committee. We support these changes.
VI. THE ORGANIZATION OF THE STUDY OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Teaching and research about natural resources and environmental issues occurs in many parts
of the university and in the process the perspectives of diverse disciplines are brought to bear
on important common problems. The Committee regards this diversity as an important
feature of UBC and one which we wish to encourage and promote.
However, in the opinion of the committee, the issues in the management of natural resources
and the natural environment are of such vital importance to British Columbia and Canada
that the University of British Columbia should take a major step forward in facilitating and
accentuating integrated approaches to the study of these issues. In recent years, there have
been significant interdisciplinary initiatives for the study of environmental issues, particularly
in research and in graduate studies, but also in undergraduate teaching. Nonetheless, Faculty
and departmental regulations place significant barriers in the way of full development of
interdisciplinary teaching programs, particularly at the undergraduate level, and to the full
utilization of the extensive resources of the university in these fields. Science programs in life
sciences are seriously over-enrolled while valuable faculty resources in agricultural sciences
and forestry are not as intensively involved in such teaching.
It is the opinion of the committee that there are possible organizational changes that would
enhance the study of the management of natural resources and the natural environment at
UBC, would improve the effective use of faculty resources in this field and permit some
budgetary savings.
In considering the possible organization of studies in natural resources and environmental
issues, the Committee considered various options. Three alternatives were considered:
1. amalgamation of Forestry and Agricultural Sciences;
2. a reconfiguration involving Engineering, Agriculture and Forestry;
3. the creation of a new Faculty of Natural Resources.
The Committee agreed that the first proposal was too narrow to achieve the objective of
enhancing and developing scholarship and teaching on natural resources and environmental
studies at UBC. Each of the other proposals has attractive features. A majority of the
committee is of the opinion that the third alternative provides the best chance of a vigorous,
exciting expansion of this field of study at UBC. A substantial minority is of the opinion that a
reconfiguration involving engineering is a more realistic approach to achieving such an
expansion of teaching and research in this field.
 Vancouver Senate 10863
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
Whatever the form of reorganization, it is apparent that it must involve Forestry and
Agricultural Sciences. It is important to emphasize, however, that little by way of advancement
of the field of study will be accomplished if all that happens is the combination of these two
faculties into one. There must be a commitment to a broader expansion of the field, and ways
must be found to including individuals and possibly whole units from other faculties in the
new venture.
In thinking about a reconfiguration of studies in natural resources, several considerations must
be kept in mind:
• the approach should be "comprehensive" and interdisciplinary. Without stifling teaching
and research on natural resource and environmental issues in other departments and
faculties, the new faculty should have a broad, interdisciplinary base, including elements
from social sciences and humanities as well as sciences. The curriculum and research
activities should include the analysis of issues of relevant values and social and private
policy as well as issues of scientific interest.
• while not precluding significant revisions of existing programs in agricultural sciences and
forestry (including the possibility that some programs might be shifted from
undergraduate to graduate programs), there should be no lessening of the university's
commitment to professional programs in forestry and agricultural sciences.
• cooperation must be obtained from many parts of the university, in some cases through
the shifting of positions to the new faculty, in some cases through joint appointments, and
in many cases through a willingness to assist in the development of teaching and research
programs.
Process
A Senate committee is not the appropriate body to develop specific plans for the
reconfiguration of the administrative structure for teaching and research in natural resources.
That process requires a specialized task force under the direction of the Vice President
Academic and Provost. That task force must consult widely and intensively to obtain sound
advice and widespread cooperation. We urge that the task force consider both alternatives 2
and 3. Given the interest and enthusiasm that we have detected for these proposals, we think
that the work of the task force can be completed relatively quickly. For this reason, we
recommend that the Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to report to Senate on
progress no later than January 1995.
Recommendations
The Committee recommends that:
10. Senate endorse the idea of a reconfiguration of some existing faculties and other academic
units to create a new faculty with a mandate to develop and intensify the university's
commitment to teaching and research relating to natural resources and the natural
environment.
 Vancouver Senate 10864
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
11. The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to establish a task force to develop
plans for the establishment of the new faculty. The task force should be asked to develop
proposals for arrangements that will induce some relevant faculty members and academic
units to transfer from other faculties to the new faculty, will encourage the active
participation in the new faculty of relevant faculty members who prefer to retain their
appointments in other faculties, and will encourage the cooperation of relevant academic
units in other faculties.
12. The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to submit a progress report to Senate
on plans to establish a new faculty concerned with natural resources, no later than January
1995.
VII. GEOGRAPHY AND SOIL SCIENCES
One of the proposals that was given careful consideration by the committee is for a merger of
the Departments of Geography (Faculty of Arts) and Soil Science (Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences). Such a merger has strong support in both departments, and, considered on its own
merits, appears to be academically justifiable and feasible, with appropriate budgetary
arrangements. The Committee is sympathetic to the proposal. However, a reorganization of
studies in natural resources could have a profound effect on the merits of the proposal.
The Committee recommends that:
13. The task force proposed in Recommendation 11 above be asked to consider the proposed
merger of the departments of Geography and Soil Science in the context of their
deliberations on the reconfiguration of teaching and research on natural resources.
VIII. ISSUES FOR FURTHER STUDY
Several important issues remain on the Committee's list of issues to be studied. In accordance
with the Committee's usual procedures, we do not wish to reveal those issues until preliminary
consultations have occurred through the administrators responsible for the affected units. On
one issue such consultations have occurred. The Committee has under active consideration a
proposal to bring together in one faculty academic units in diverse parts of the university that
have a common interest in health care. We anticipate making a report on our deliberations
and conclusions in the fall of 1994.
SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS
The Committee recommends that:
With respect to department size:
1.   Senate establish a minimum size for departments, schools and divisions that have
department-like responsibilities.
 Vancouver Senate 10865
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
2. The minimum size for departments, schools and divisions be 15 full-time faculty members
in the department.
3. Deans be asked to arrange for consolidations of relevant departments, schools and
divisions to conform with the minimum size and to report regularly to the Vice President
Academic and Provost on progress. The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to
report to Senate on the results of these reconfigurations by December 1995.
4. Exceptions to the minimum size should be rare, be permitted only on the basis of special
circumstances which must be made explicit.
5. All exceptions to the minimum size approved by the Vice President Academic and Provost,
be reported to Senate.
6. Provisions for administrative stipends and administrative leave for department heads be
graduated depending on department size.
With respect to University and Senate procedures:
7. The Senate Curriculum Committee be instructed to study the process of curriculum
revision and to bring recommendations to the Senate not later than November 1994 for the
simplification of the process.
8. As guidelines, the Senate Curriculum Committee be invited to
a) Establish a broad category of minor changes that can be made by departments,
schools or non-departmentalized faculties without further consultation except
notification of the appropriate curriculum review officer (who might be the chair
of the Senate Curriculum Committee), who will be responsible for ensuring that
the change is indeed "minor" and that no other academic program is likely to be
adversely affected. This category might include, at a minimum, changes in course
numbers, course names, prerequisite requirements and editorial changes in course
descriptions.
b) Establish a narrow category of major changes that require consultation and full
review by faculties and the Senate. This category might include new programs, new
courses, deletion of courses and changes that affect requirements for student
programs in other departments.
c) Consider the possibility that proposals for major changes in graduate courses and
programs go directly to the Faculty of Graduate Studies from departments, schools
and non-departmentalized faculties for full review before being sent to Senate for
review and approval.
 Vancouver Senate 10866
Minutes of May 18,1994	
Appendix C
9. Senate ask the President to review the constitution of the Senior Appointments Committee,
with a view to removing deans from that committee and with a view to strengthening its
ability to represent high university-wide standards of excellence and objectivity.
With respect to teaching and research in natural resources:
10. Senate endorse the idea of a reconfiguration of some existing faculties and other academic
units to create a new faculty with a mandate to develop and intensify the university's
commitment to teaching and research relating to natural resources and the natural
environment.
11. The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to establish a task force to develop
plans for the establishment of the new faculty. The task force should be asked to develop
proposals for arrangements that will induce some relevant faculty members and academic
units to transfer from other faculties to the new faculty, will encourage the active
participation in the new faculty of relevant faculty members who prefer to retain their
appointments in other faculties, and will encourage the cooperation of relevant academic
units in other faculties.
12. The Vice President Academic and Provost be asked to submit a progress report to Senate
on plans to establish a new faculty concerned with natural resources, no later than January
1995.
13. The task force proposed in Recommendation 11 above be asked to consider the proposed
merger of the departments of Geography and Soil Science in the context of their
deliberations on the reconfiguration of teaching and research on natural resources.
Respectfully submitted,
R.A. Shearer, Chair
D.G.A. Carter
L. Chui
G.W. Eaton
C.L Greentree*
S.E. Grace
M. Isaacson
J.G.T. Kelsey
R.T.A. McGillivray
D.J. Randall
D.LI. Williams
D.R Birch
R.C. Tees
D.A. Wehrung
* B. Horner replaced C.L. Greentree on the Committee in May 1994 but did not participate in
the deliberations for this Report.

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