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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2000-12-13

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 The University  of  British  Columbia
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF DECEMBER 13, 2000
Attendance
The Fourth Regular Meeting of the Senate of the University of British Columbia for the Session
2000/01 was held on Wednesday, December 13, 2000 at 8:00 p.m. in Room 102, George F.
Curtis Building.
Present: President M. C. Piper (Chair), Vice President B. C. McBride, Dr. P. Adebar, Mr. R.
Affleck, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dean J. Blom, Mr. P. T. Brady, Mr. P. T. Burns, Dr. H. M. Burt, Ms. E.
J. Caskey, Ms. T. Chung, Dr. D. Fisher, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Dean F. Granot, Mr. E. Greathed,
Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Ms. M. Hassen, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Rev. T. J. Hanrahan, Dr. P. E. Harding,
Dr. J. Helliwell, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. C. Jillings, Dean M. M. Klawe, Dr. S. B. Knight, Dr. B. S.
Lalli, Dr. V. LeMay, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Ms. Y. Lu, Dr. D. M. Lyster, Mr. M.
MacEntee, Dr. P. L. Marshall, Dr. W. R. McMaster, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dean D. Muzyka, Dr.
P. N. Nemetz, Ms. J. Parry, Dr. J. Perry, Dr. W. J. Phillips, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon, Mr. H.
Poon, Dean M. Quayle, Ms. C. Quinlan, Dr. V. Raoul, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten, Dr. C. Shields, Dr.
C. E. Slonecker, Dr. R. C. Tees, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dean R. J. Tierney, Dean A. Tully, Mr. D.
R. Verma, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky.
By invitation: Dr. N. Guppy, Dr. D. Holm.
Regrets: Dr. W. L. Sauder (Chancellor), Dean F. S. Abbott, Dr. R. W. Blake, Ms. E. Blewett, Dean
J. A. Cairns, Mr. T. C. Y. Chan, Ms. J. Dennie, Ms. K. Gammon, Dr. R. Goldman-Segall, Dr. D.
Granot, Mr. H. D. Gray, Ms. J. Hutton, Ms. S. Iwagami, Dr. D. D. Kitts, Mr. J. Kondopulos, Ms.
P. Liu, Ms. V. G. Mirehouse, Dr. G. N. Patey, Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Ms. K. Riecken, Dean J. N.
Saddler, Dr. K. Schonert-Reichl, Mr. A. F. Sheppard, Dr. D. Sjerve, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. B.
Stelck, Mr. D. Tompkins, Mr. D. Visser, Mr. B. Warren, Ms. K. Wilker, Dr. R. J. K. Wilson,
Dean E. H. K. Yen.
Senate Membership
The President welcomed the following new members of Senate:
1.   Ex officio
Dr. John N. Saddler
Dean, Faculty of Forestry
Vol. 2000/01 12521
 Vancouver Senate 12522
Minutes of December 13,2000
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
2.  Student Representative
Ms. Jennifer M. Parry, Faculty of Applied Science.
Members of Senate responded with a round of applause.
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
The following corrections were made to the Minutes of the meeting of November 15,
2000:
1. Page 12487: delete Dr. M. MacEntee from the list of members present;
2. Page 12504: move the notation "(2 opposed)" from the results of the motion to
refer to the results of the motion to approve.
Dr. Tees l        That the Minutes of the meeting of November
Dean Tully J        1$> 2000 be adopted as corrected.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
ENROLMENT 2000/01 (PP. 12508-9)
Referring to the report on enrolment circulated by the Registrar at the November 2000
meeting, Dr. Williams drew attention to the fact that the percentage of male enrolment in
UBC programs had been steadily decreasing, perhaps as part of a national trend. The
percentage of total male enrolment had been 47% in 1992, 46% in 1995, 44% in 1999,
and 43% in 2000. He cited engineering as the only area where a high percentage of males
was consistently enrolled, while nursing (5.6%) and education (31%) enrolled the lowest
numbers of male students.
LECTURE START-TIME CHANGE PROPOSAL (PP. 12496-504)
Mr. Brady pointed out that the proposal to change lecture start times had included two
possible changes to the Thursday 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. break between classes: moving
it to 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m., or shortening it to 90 minutes and scheduling it between
12:30 p.m. and 2:00. Mr. Brady asked which option the Senate had approved. The
Registrar responded that Senate had not
 Vancouver Senate 12523
Minutes of December 13,2000
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
yet approved either arrangement, but that a proposal was to come forward from the
Academic Policy Committee.
Dr. Knight l        That the Vice President Academic prepare and
Mr. Brady i       present a progress report related to the Lecture
Start-Time Change Proposal for consideration
at the November 2001 Senate meeting.
Carried.
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
VISIT TO TORONTO
The President described a recent visit to Toronto by a UBC delegation including the
President and many of the Deans. The group hosted an alumni event attended by both
Alan Fotheringham and John Turner. A President's Circle event for major donors was
held in the evening. The group also met individually with a variety of constituents having
interest in UBC. The President remarked that such visits assist in raising UBC's profile in
Central and Eastern Canada.
ROB SON SQUARE CAMPUS
The President reported that the University had recently signed a ten-year lease for
approximately 80,000 square feet of space in the Convention Centre area of Robson
Square. Renovations were to begin in the near future, with the intent that programs
would be offered at the downtown campus beginning in September 2001. Participants
were to include the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, Continuing
Studies, and the Women's Resources Centre. The President invited proposals that would
lend themselves well to the UBC presence in Robson Square. The President thanked Barry
McBride, Jane Hutton, Stanley Hamilton, Doug McArthur, Derek Atkins, and Daniel
Muzyka, who had all been instrumental in securing this space.
 Vancouver Senate 12524
Minutes of December 13,2000
Academic Policy Committee
MAJOR GIFTS TO UBC
The President reported on two recent gifts to UBC. The first, from the Royal Bank, was a
significant gift to the Department of Economics to sustain its professors. The President
remarked that this gift is particularly appropriate considering UBC's goal to retain its
faculty members. The President thanked John Helliwell for his work in securing this gift.
The second gift was from the Chapman Family. The gift included a donation to help
create the Learning Commons in the Main Library, as well as a $1 million endowment in
support of Trek 2000 volunteers working on the Downtown East Side. The President
thanked Catherine Quinlan for her hard work and extraordinary vision.
Academic Policy Committee
CHANGES TO THE CALENDAR ENTRIES ON EXAMINATIONS, ACADEMIC
CONCESSION AND GRADING POLICY
Dr. Tees presented the following report as Chair of the Committee.
Following discussion with the Associate Deans for Student Services, I recommend a number of
changes to entries in the Academic Regulations section of the Calendar. These changes will:
• clarify the intent and application of the academic concession policy
• require instructors to give written guidelines at the start of each course, outlining how
grades will be assigned and explaining what students should do if they are unable to do
assigned work because of illness or for other reasons
• clarify what students and instructors should do when students are unable to complete
assigned work or miss tests, other than the formal exams scheduled in December and
April.
The relevant entries in the current Calendar are:
Examinations (Calendar, page 46, on the web at:
http://www.student-services.ubc.ca/publications/pub/calreg/049.htm#l 115345)
Grading Practices (page 47, on the web at:
http://www.student-services.ubc.ca/publications/pub/calreg/0410.htm#l 111351)
Academic Concession entry (page 49, on the web at:
http://www.student-services.ubc.ca/publications/pub/calreg/0416.htm#l 110912)
 Vancouver Senate 12525
Minutes of December 13,2000
Academic Policy Committee
The recommended changes are:
1. Revise the first paragraph of Examinations as follows:
Formal examinations are held in most courses. These are scheduled in official
examination periods in December and April for Winter Session courses. Other tests are
held at the discretion of the instructors and faculties concerned. All prescribed
examinations are mandatory. Students who miss an examination, or are unable to
complete other tests or graded work, because of medical, emotional or other problems,
should follow the procedures for requesting Academic Concession (see Academic
Concession) as soon as possible.
2. Add the following to Grading Practices, immediately after the table of percentage and
letter grades:
Instructors are responsible for providing written guidelines to all students at the start
of each course, outlining how the final grade for the course will be arrived at, and
including any related policies such as arrangements that may be made for students who
are unable to complete tests or other graded work because of short term illness or for
other reasons. Guidelines made available on the Web meet this requirement (students
who are unable to access the Web should ask their instructor to provide these
guidelines in an alternate format).
3. Revise the first paragraph of Academic Concession as follows:
The University encourages all students to complete their course work and degree
programs. Students who are suffering from medical, emotional or other problems
which adversely affect their attendance or performance in a course or program should
follow the procedures below, and should notify the Office of their dean or director, or
their instructors, as soon as possible if they intend to request academic concession.
4. Add a new second paragraph to Academic Concession:
Students absent from final examinations held in the official examination periods must
request academic concession from the Office of their dean or director. Students who
are absent at other times, or are unable to complete tests or other graded work because
of short term illness or for other reasons, should normally discuss with their
instructors how they can make up for missed work, according to written guidelines
given them at the start of the course (see Grading Practices). Instructors are not
required to make allowance for any missed test or incomplete work that is
 Vancouver Senate 12526
Minutes of December 13,2000
Academic Policy Committee
not satisfactorily accounted for. Students also have the right to request academic
concession from their dean or director's office.
5. Change the first sentence of the present second paragraph (new third paragraph) of
Academic Concession, as follows:
Students who wish to request academic concession from the office of their dean or
director must apply to the office as close as possible to the time their attendance is
adversely affected.
6. Revise the last sentence of the second paragraph as follows:
The academic concessions that may be granted include the following: permission to
drop or withdraw from a course after the normal deadlines (see Change of
Registration), Aegrotat standing or Deferred standing (see Grading Practices), and
withdrawal from the University (see Withdrawal).
7. Revise the third paragraph to read:
If permission is given to drop or withdraw from a course, any refund of fees will be
in accordance with normal policy (see Refund of Fees).
8. Delete the last two paragraphs of the present Academic Concession entry.
The proposed changes make the wording in the Examinations, Grading Practices
and Academic Concession entries consistent (e.g. the wording "tests or other
graded work" is used consistently in each entry). They require clear guidelines in
every course, outlining how final grades will be arrived at and how short term
absences, missed or late assignments, etc. are handled. They provide for a
discussion between the student and instructor after a student is absent, or misses a
test, assignment, lab etc., as part of the academic concession process. They give
students who are not able to reach an agreement with the instructor the explicit
right to request academic accommodation from their dean or director's Office. The
reference to "permission to drop a course" has been expanded to include
withdrawal, and clarified by a reference to the normal deadlines.
A complete version of the Academic Concession entry, with the proposed revisions, follows:
Academic Concession
The University encourages all students to complete their course work and degree
programs. Students who are suffering from medical, emotional or other problems which
adversely affect their attendance or performance in a course or program should follow the
procedures below, and should notify the office of their dean or director, or their
instructors, as soon as possible if they intend to request academic concession.
Students absent from final examinations held in the official examination periods must
request academic concession from the office of their dean or director. Students who are
absent at other times, or are unable to complete tests or other graded work because of
short term illness or for other reasons, should normally discuss with their instructors how
they can make up for missed work, according to written guidelines given them at the start
of the course (see Grading Practices). Instructors are not required to make
 Vancouver Senate 12527
Minutes of December 13,2000
Academic Policy Committee
allowance for any missed test or incomplete work that is not satisfactorily accounted for.
Students also have the right to request academic concession from their dean or director's
office.
Students who wish to request academic concession from the office of their dean or director
must apply to the office as close as possible to the time their attendance is adversely
affected. The University, in considering these requests or any appeals of decisions on
academic concession, will not normally take into account untimely notifications. When a
student requests academic concession, he or she will be asked to provide such evidence as
is deemed appropriate. If there is a medical problem, the student should submit a
Statement of Illness obtained from the Student Health Service or the attending physician.
The student may be asked to provide additional information. Academic concessions are
granted only by the dean or director and are a privilege not a right. The academic
concessions that may be granted include the following: permission to drop or withdraw
from a course after the normal deadlines (see Change of Registration), Aegrotat standing
or Deferred standing (see Grading Practices), and withdrawal from the University (see
Withdrawal).
If permission is given to drop or withdraw from a course, any refund of fees will be in
accordance with normal policy (see Refund of Fees).
Students in good academic standing who are permitted to withdraw from the University
may apply to re-enrol in the program from which they withdrew. Application to re-enrol
must be made by the published application deadline for the program. A student permitted
to withdraw may be told the time period during which an application to re-enrol will be
permitted. A medical certificate may be required to satisfy the University that the student
is ready to continue studies.
Dr. Tees l        That the proposed revisions to the Academic
Dr. Berger J        Concession and Grading policies be accepted.
In response to a query from Mr. Greathed, Dr. Tees clarified that students who were
unable to complete their coursework due to illness should first approach their instructor.
Students who are not satisfied with the instructor's proposed solution may then approach
their respective Dean or Director.
There was a discussion about the presentation of policy revisions to the Senate. Mr.
Podersky-Cannon suggested that, where possible, both the present and proposed policies
be circulated to members of Senate for purposes of comparison. Dr. Tees stated that he
would accommodate this request where possible.
 Vancouver Senate 12528
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
In response to a query from Dr. Adebar, Dr. Tees explained that all instructors would
become responsible for distributing written documentation on their academic concession
policies at the beginning of each course. Instructors would be under no obligation to
accommodate students who had not satisfactorily followed those policies.
The motion was
put and carried.
Admissions Committee
Dr. Lyster presented the reports, as Chair of the Committee.
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES: B.SC. (FOOD NUTRITION AND HEALTH), DIETETICS
MAJOR
Present Calendar Entry 2000/2001 in web version only at: http://www.student-
services.ubc.ca/publications/pub/calreg/1220.htm
Admission to the Dietetics major is limited to students who have completed 30 credits of
university or college coursework, which must include English (3 credits), Biology 121, and
Chemistry 111/112 or 121/122, or their equivalents. Six credits in Social Science (PSYC 100
or SOCI 100 or equivalent) are recommended. Admission is based on an academic standing of
at least 70% calculated on 30 credits of university or college courses including pre-requisite
courses. Due to enrolment limitations, the academic standard required for admission may be
higher than the published minimum.
Proposed Calendar Entry: (Changes in Bold)
Admission to the Dietetics major is limited to students who have completed 30 credits of
university or college coursework, which must include English (3 credits), Biology 121, Biology
140 and Chemistry 111/113 or 121/123, or their equivalents. Six credits in Social Science
(PSYC 100 or SOCI 100 or equivalent) are recommended. Admission is based on an academic
standing of at least 70% calculated on 30 credits of university or college courses including prerequisite courses. Due to enrolment limitations, the academic standard required for admission
may be higher than the published minimum.
Rationale:
This change is essentially an editorial one. When the admission statement for this program
was submitted last year as part of the changes in the Faculty's programs, we attempted to
reflect the changes that were being made in the Biology program. As such, the former Biology
120 was changed to Biology 121. However, with this change in Biology, the laboratory
became a separate course (Biology 140). It was always the intent to have the equivalent to the
former Biology 120, which now is Biology 121 PLUS Biology 140.
In our own information this correction has been reflected.
 Vancouver Senate 12529
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
Effective Date: As soon as possible
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposed change to the admission
Dean Quayle J       statement for the B.Sc. (Food, Nutrition and
Health), Dietetics major be approved.
Carried.
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES: BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (GLOBAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS)
Present Calendar Entry (2000/2001 Calendar, page 104, column 2, paragraphs 3 and 4)
Admission to the International Resource Systems (IRS) program is restricted. To be considered
for admission, students are required to have a minimum academic standing of at least 70%.
However, achievement of this minimum does not guarantee admission if the number of
applicants exceeds the number of places available. The average will be calculated on the best
21 credits of post-secondary courses required by the IRS program.
Students can apply to the program after completing 21 credits from the first year courses (or
their equivalent) listed below.
Note: UBC Senate has approved the change of name from International Resource Systems to
Global Resource Systems, and has approved the change of degree from B.Sc. (Agr.) to B.Sc.
(GRS).
Present Calendar Entry (web: www.student-services.ubc.ca/publications/pub/
calreg/12121.htm)
Admission
Students should refer to Undergraduate Admission. Students may gain admission directly from
secondary school or transfer from a recognized university or college with a minimum of 24
credits, or as mature students.
For admission to the Bachelor of Science in Global Resource Systems program, students from
Grade 12 British Columbia schools must meet the general University admission requirements
and must have completed English 11 and 12; Social Studies 11; an approved language 11;
Mathematics 11 and 12; at least two of Biology 11, Chemistry 11 and Physics 11; one of
Chemistry 12, Physics 12, Biology 12, Geology 12; a course chosen from among the approved
examinable Grade 12 courses.
To be considered for admission to the Global Resource Systems (GRS) program students are
required to have an academic standing of at least 70%, calculated on the best 21 credits of
courses required by the GRS program, due to enrolment limitations, the academic standard
required may be higher than the published minimum.
Students can apply to the program after completing 21 credits from the first year courses (or
their equivalent) listed below.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Students can apply to the GRS program after completing 24 credits of first year university-
level courses. To be considered, students are required to have a minimum academic standing
of at least 70% (or 2.80 on a 4-point scale). Achievement of this minimum,
 Vancouver Senate 12530
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
however, does not guarantee admission if the number of applicants exceeds the number of
places available. Students are advised to complete first year requirements as listed below.
Rationale:
The former IRS program was an option within the B.Sc.(Agr.) degree. As such, admissions to
IRS were carried out within the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. However, with the
replacement of this option by the new B.Sc. (GRS) degree, admission to the GRS program will
be carried out by UBC Admissions. This necessitates a streamlining of the former admission
practice. The proposal has the following advantages:
1. It removes the references to direct admission from BC secondary schools, because
admission cannot occur until after first year of university level courses.
2. It changes the first year credits required for applying from 21 to 24, which is the UBC
standard for transfer students.
3. It removes the statement that "The average will be calculated on the best 21 credits of
post-secondary courses required by the IRS program." For some courses, it was not
clear whether they were required by the program or not. The implication of removing
this statement is that the average for students applying to GRS will be calculated on all
post-secondary courses taken, which is the UBC standard for transfer students.
Effective Date: November 24, 2000
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposal to adapt admission
Dean Quayle J        requirements for the B.Sc. (Global Resource
Systems) be approved.
Carried.
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES: TRANSFER FROM ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES DIPLOMA
(LANGARA COLLEGE) TO BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (GLOBAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS)
Present Calendar Entry (page 104, columns 1-3)
UBC Senate has approved the change of name from International Resource Systems to Global
Resource Systems, and has approved the change of degree from B.Sc. (Agr.) to B.Sc. (GRS).
Proposed Calendar Entry: (changes in bold)
Students who successfully complete the Environmental Studies Diploma program at Langara
College, and gain admission to UBC and the Global Resource Systems (GRS) undergraduate
program, will receive transfer credit for 60 credits into the GRS program if they have (1)
satisfied first year requirements of the GRS program in biology, chemistry, economics, English
and mathematics; (2) completed UBC course AGSC 250 or equivalent; and (3) completed 6
credits of language relevant to the regional specialization. They will be able to finish the GRS
program with the further 61 credits required.
 Vancouver Senate 12531
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
Rationale:
Environmental Studies (ES) is a highly recognised two-year diploma program offered by
Langara College. The program includes courses in applied ecology, environmental law,
contemporary environmental issues and a field school with emphasis on practical techniques.
Sixty credits are required for the diploma. All courses taken in the program carry university
transfer credit.
Royal Roads University allows holders of the ES diploma (with at least five of seven electives
taken in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Statistics) full block transfer into third year of
the Bachelor of Science Degree.
Students who successfully complete the ES diploma program with high grades will be ideal
candidates to continue at UBC and pursue the Bachelor of Science in Global Resource Systems
degree. To facilitate this, the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences will grant students who gain
admission to UBC and the GRS program a block transfer of 60 credits into the GRS program.
This block transfer will be formalized in a MOU between the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences,
UBC and the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies, Langara College.
Note that this proposal is not for a block transfer to UBC for ES diploma holders. That
effectively already exists, although UBC Admissions uses a course by course transfer. The ES
diploma holder will end up with 60 credits transferred to UBC because all courses in the ES
diploma program are university transfer.
This proposal is for a block transfer of 60 credits to the Global Resource Systems
undergraduate program in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. This will make it feasible for
an ES diploma holder to complete the requirements for the B.Sc. (GRS) degree in two
academic years as a UBC student.
Effective Date: October 10, 2000
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposed Calendar entry on Transfer
Dean Quayle J       from the Environmental Studies Diploma
(Langara College) to the UBC Global
Resource Systems program be approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12532
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: UNSATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE
Change - Unsatisfactory Performance - Undergraduate Level
Present Calendar Entry under the heading "Unsatisfactory Performance" (2000/01 Calendar,
page 174-175):
1.   Students will be required to discontinue study in the Faculty for at least one year if
they are:
a. enrolled in a minimum of 27 credits and the average in all courses including
any failures is below 60%, or
b. enrolled in a minimum of 27 credits and fail in 12 or more credits, or
c. enrolled in 12 to 26 credits and fail one-third or more of those credits, or
d. enrolled in 11 (or fewer) credits and fail in half or more of those courses.
Proposed Calendar Entry under the heading "Unsatisfactory Performance" (Changes in Bold)
Students will be required to discontinue study in the Faculty for at least one year if:
a. The average in all courses taken in any year, including any failed courses, is below
60%.
In addition, students admitted to the first year in Commerce through Direct Entry will be
required to discontinue study in the Faculty for at least one year if:
b. The grade in either of the two required first year English courses is below 60%, or
c. The average in the two required first year Math courses is below 60%, or
d. The average in the two required first year Economics courses is below 60%.
Rationale:
Changes to correct misprint in the Calendar, to simplify the rules, and to accommodate Direct
Entry into Commerce in first year (which will be implemented in Sept. 2001).
Effective Date: September 2001
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposal regarding unsatisfactory
Dean Muzyka J        performance be approved.
Carried.
COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: ELECTIVES
Change - Electives - Undergraduate Level
Present Calendar Entry (2000/01 Calendar, page 175 column 3):
Electives
Electives are chosen to complement the choice of option as well as to broaden the student's
general education. Many senior level courses require junior prerequisites so students should
select lower level electives carefully. At least nine credits of 300- or 400-
 Vancouver Senate 12533
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
level electives must be taken in a faculty other than Commerce and Business Administration in
the third and fourth years combined. Eighteen of the 24 elective credits in the third and fourth
years, whether Commerce or non-Commerce, must be at the 300-level or higher. Any
exceptions must be approved by the Commerce Undergraduate Program Office. Students
should refer to the Commerce Undergraduate Program Guide to verify which electives are
appropriate.
Proposed Calendar Entry: (Changes in bold)
Electives
Electives are chosen to complement the choice of option as well as to broaden the student's
general education. Many senior level courses require junior prerequisites so students should
select lower level electives carefully. At least nine credits of 300- or 400-level electives must be
taken in a faculty other than Commerce and Business Administration in the third and fourth
years combined. At least twelve of the 24 elective credits in the third and fourth years, whether
Commerce or non-Commerce, must be at the 300-level or higher. Any exceptions must be
approved by the Commerce Undergraduate Program Office. Students should refer to the
Commerce Undergraduate Program Guide to verify which electives are appropriate.
Rationale:
Many Commerce students want to study languages, computer science and math. The current
policy prevents students from doing so, since these often require more than 6 credits at the
200 level as pre-requisites for 300 and 400 level courses. The proposed change will give
students more flexibility to study in their area of choice when selecting electives.
Effective Date: September 2001
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposal regarding electives be
Dean Muzyka i       approved.
Carried.
COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: DEAN'S HONOUR ROLL
Change - Dean's Honour Roll - Undergraduate Level
Present Calendar Entry (2000/01 Calendar, page 174 column 3):
Dean's Honour Roll
The words "Dean's Honour Roll" will be placed on a student's transcript if an average of
80% or better has been achieved in the program of an academic year of at least 30 credits in
second year and 27 credits in third and fourth years. To qualify, a student must pass all
courses.
Proposed Calendar Entry: (Changes in Bold)
Dean's Honour Roll
 Vancouver Senate 12534
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
The words "Dean's Honour Roll" will be placed on a student's transcript if an average of
80% or better has been achieved in the program of an academic year of at least 30 credits in
second year, 27 credits in third and fourth years. Students in a co-operative education
program who are registered at UBC for only one term in Winter Session because of a co-op
placement must be in a program of 15 credits for that term. To qualify, a student must pass all
courses.
Rationale:
The current policy pre-dates co-op programs in the Faculty of Commerce, and excludes any
students in a coop program from eligibility for the Dean's Honour Roll. The change will allow
co-op students to be included in the Dean's Honour Roll based on their one academic term
each year.
Effective Date: September 2001
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposal regarding the Dean's
Dean Muzyka J        Honour Roll be approved.
Carried.
SCIENCE: DOUBLE MAJOR IN SCIENCE AND ARTS
Addition of Double Major in Science and Arts
Present Calendar Entry (page 351, col. 1):
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Double Major. This program involves specialization in two fields. Students in this program
will have to complete the degree requirements of two departments. It may lead to graduate
study if sufficiently high standing is obtained.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Double Major. This program involves specialization in two fields. Students in this option will
have to complete the degree requirements of two programs in Science or one in Science and
one in Arts. It may lead to graduate study if sufficiently high standing is obtained.
Present Calendar Entry (page 352, col. 2-3):
REGISTRATION AND PROGRAM APPROVAL
Second, Third and Fourth-Year Students
Students entering second and subsequent years must select a Major, Honours, General or
Integrated program (and a Minor program if they choose this option) as outlined by the
Faculty of Science. Students seeking admission to the Integrated Sciences Program (ISP) must
submit a formal application after completing 60 credits. For more informa-
 Vancouver Senate 12535
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
tion on the ISP, see "Integrated Sciences Program" on page 374. Students intending to do a
Double Major must select one of the Majors upon entry into their second year and the other
before the start of their third year. Unless students are registered in a specific program their
academic records cannot be adjudicated for graduation. Program specialization codes are
provided with the description of the program requirements. Students not meeting the academic
standing required for compulsory courses in a given program may be required to withdraw
from that program. In many instances changes from one program to another are possible in
later years. Changes in program may result in lengthening the time to complete the Bachelor of
Science. Returning students are encouraged to obtain program advice before the end of Term
2. All study programs are subject to approval by the department(s) concerned. With the
approval of the Dean, departments may require, as a prerequisite for entering a program, that
a student obtain at least 60% in a specified first-year course basic to the field of the Major,
unless special permission is received from the head of the department.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Students entering second and subsequent years must select a Major, Honours, General or
Integrated program as outlined by the Faculty of Science.
Students seeking admission to the Integrated Sciences Program (ISP) must submit a formal
application after completing 60 credits (see "Integrated Sciences Program" on page 374).
Students intending to do a Double Major in Science must select one of the Majors upon entry
into their second year and then obtain approval for the other before the start of their third
year. A form is available from the Dean's Office for this purpose; it requires approval of
advisors in both Major areas and of the Dean.
Students intending to do a Double Major in Science and Arts must obtain approval from the
Dean of Science in their first year and then select their Science Major upon entry into second
year and their Arts Major upon entry into third year (see Program Requirements on page
356). Interested students are encouraged to plan first- and second-year courses so as to meet
the prerequisite requirements for the desired Major areas concurrently (see pages 131-162 for
Arts, pages 351-386 for Science).
Students intending to do a Minor in Science or Arts must obtain approval before the start of
their third year. A form is available from the Dean's Office for this purpose; it requires
approval of advisors in the Major and Minor areas and of the Dean. Students intending to do
a Minor in Commerce must apply in second term of their second year (see Minor Programs on
page 358).
Unless students are registered in a specific program their academic records cannot be
adjudicated for graduation. Program specialization codes are provided with the description of
the program requirements.
Students not meeting the academic standing required for compulsory courses in a given
program may be required to withdraw from that program. In many instances changes from
one program to another are possible in later years. Changes in program may result in
lengthening the time to complete the Bachelor of Science. Returning students are
 Vancouver Senate 12536
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
encouraged to obtain program advice before the end of Term 2 (Winter Session). All study
programs are subject to approval by the department(s) concerned.
With the approval of the Dean, departments may require, as a prerequisite for entering a
program, that a student obtain at least 60% in a specified first-year course basic to the field of
the Major, unless special permission is received from the head of the department.
Present Calendar Entry (page 354, col. 2):
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
An Honours or...credits.
A Minor program...specialisation.
A Double Major program...two years.
In order to graduate...programs.
Students are...involved.
A student who...Science.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Change the third paragraph:
A Double Major in Science program...two years.
Add a new paragraph after the Double Major in Science:
A Double Major in Science and Arts requires a minimum of 120 credits, but in most cases will
require more. Students who are in the Double Major program must satisfy all degree
requirements for a Bachelor of Science Major in one area. As far as the Arts Major is
concerned a student need only satisfy any remaining Faculty of Arts and program
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Major. Courses may satisfy requirements for both
programs. Students should endeavour to satisfy lower-level course prerequisites for both
programs in their first two years.
Present Calendar Entry (page 356, col. 1-2):
SECOND, THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR REQUIREMENTS
Proposed Calendar Entry:
The section is being renamed " Program Requirements" as part of a larger change. The
relevant change here is the addition of a new paragraph after "Double Major Program"
(which becomes "Double Major in Science Program").
Double Major in Science and Arts Program
Students must satisfy all degree requirements for a Bachelor of Science Major in one program,
including all Faculty of Science requirements. As far as the Arts Major is concerned a student
need only satisfy any remaining Faculty of Arts and
 Vancouver Senate 12537
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
program requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Major. Courses may satisfy requirements for
both programs. Students should endeavour to satisfy lower-level course prerequisites for both
programs in their first two years.
Students in the following B.Sc. Major programs may not complete a B.A. Major in the same
subject: Geography, Mathematics, Mathematical Sciences, Psychology.
Rationale:
The Faculty of Science wishes to cooperate with the Faculty of Arts to broaden the degree
options for students in both faculties. Currently it is possible for a student to fulfill the
requirements for a Major in Science and another Major in Arts within 120 credits in certain
limited combinations of Majors and within 129 credits for many more combinations. This
proposal recognizes the value of removing barriers between our disciplines and makes possible
the listing of two Majors in different faculties on the student's transcript. There is some
duplication of information but it is deemed necessary to clearly delimit this new option from
the existing similar option.
Effective date: May 1, 2001
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions changes from the Faculty
Dr. Tees J        of Science be approved.
Carried.
REPORT OF THE TASK FORCE TO REVIEW EXCHANGE ABROAD PROGRAMS
Exchange Abroad Programs
The Senate Admissions Committee struck a task force having the following mandate:
To propose to the Senate Admissions Committee recommendations regarding the procedures
for the formal establishment of new exchange agreements, the ongoing administration of
approved agreements, and the review of existing agreements. The committee should consider
other issues it deems relevant and should pay particular attention to the Richards' report on
EAP. The Senate Admissions Committee is looking for recommendations that speak more to
the operation of the program as opposed to the philosophy of the program.
Committee Membership: Neil Guppy (Chair), Katherine Beaumont, Paul Harrison, Larry
Sproul, Margaret Nicholson, Polina Hristov, Robert Dies
I.    Establishment of New Exchange Agreements
Issues: New exchange agreements are not being approved because the Senate Admissions
Committee needs clarification on the three issues:
1. The criteria for assessing new exchange partnerships
2. The information provided on potential partner institutions
3. A process of reviewing existing agreements
Issues related to points 1 and 2 on new exchange agreements are clarified below.
 Vancouver Senate 12538
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
Two types of exchange agreements are possible: i) encompasses the whole University, and
ii) restricted to very distinguished individual programs. Prior to recommending that Senate
approve a new exchange agreement, the Senate Admissions Committee must be satisfied
that the potential partner institution meets a substantial subset of the following general
criteria:
1. Criteria for assessing exchange partnerships
• Partners are academically rigorous peer institutions with international reputations
which complement UBC
• Partners demonstrate values consistent with UBC principles and policies
• Partners have strong support from their leadership/administration for student
exchange
• Partners demonstrate commitment to international education as evidenced by faculty
research and areas of work, programs of study and student services
• Partners offer complementary academic programs (matching academically what UBC
can offer students or complementing UBC offerings to add academic value to student
experience)
• New partners add value to current exchange opportunities by offering to UBC students
a new or expanded geographic area in which to study, a new or expanded discipline(s)
of study, or a strong combination of work and study abroad
• Potential exists for a reciprocal flow of students between the partners
• Agreement requires clear terms of implementation, expansion/contraction and review
• The partnership complements other international arrangements of both institutions.
These criteria are intended to ensure that all students, faculty, and staff at both institutions
will find the partnership mutually beneficial.
2. Information on partner institutions / exchange partnerships
In light of the above criteria, material prepared for the consideration of the Senate
Admissions Committee when proposing a new exchange partnership should include the
following:
• Background / history of development of the proposed agreement
• Rationale for agreement
• Specific details / conditions of implementation (dates, number of students, etc.)
• Evidence of the quality of Partner Institution
• Summary of the range of academic programs offered by Partner Institution (i.e.,
Faculties, Schools and Institutes)
• Evidence of Partner Institution's support for exchange students (Exchange Office,
Housing, etc.)
• Language of Instruction / Requirements for exchange students
 Vancouver Senate 12539
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
• Testimony on the proposed partnerships from colleagues who are knowledgeable
about the partner institution, whether in person to the Senate Admissions Committee,
or in writing
The UBC International Liaison Office " Checklist for Linkage Agreements" may be helpful
to colleagues wishing to propose exchange partnerships.
Implications of signing an exchange agreement include:
• UBC accepts most course work successfully completed at partner schools for credit
toward UBC degree requirements
• UBC accepts incoming exchange students as nominated by the Partner University who
have been briefed on UBC standards
• Partners will work from mutual trust ensuring positive, appropriate images of each
other and clear communication paths
II.   On-going Administration of Exchange Programs
The committee agreed that there was a need to increase communication and co-operation
among the various key players in the administration of Exchange Programs. To clarify the
processes for the administration of Exchange Programs and Partnerships, and acknowledging
that some of the major responsibilities overlap units and will require co-operation and coordination, the Committee suggests the following roles for various groups.
Admissions
• Transfer credit (varying levels of Faculty involvement, in consultation with SEP)
Faculties/Faculty Members
Selecting outbound students in partnership with SEP
Advising / approving outbound students' academic programs
Reviewing transfer credits / course equivalencies as necessary
Facilitating and promoting exchange opportunities for students
Assisting incoming students with course selections
Student Exchange Program (SEP)
Selection of incoming / outgoing students in partnership with Faculties
Orientation, advising, preparation and support of incoming and outbound students
Promotion of Exchange Program(s)
Co-ordination / administration of Exchange Programs
 Vancouver Senate 12540
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
• Input into preparation of Exchange partnership proposals (suitability of partners,
partner support of Exchange Programs, specific details / conditions of implementation,
etc.)
• Review of agreements and programs
Exchange Abroad Programs Advisory Committee
• Policy and practice advice to Assistant Director (Student Exchange), International
Student Services (SEP)
International Liaison Office (ILO)
• Liaison with potential international partners, UBC faculty, and SEP regarding
initiation and negotiation of exchange partnerships
• Co-ordination and development of proposals for exchange partnerships in consultation
with SEP
• Bring forward proposed Exchange Agreements to Senate Admissions Committee for
approval
• Involvement as appropriate in monitoring and evaluating agreements, and in helping
to resolve any policy or practical problems which may arise
• Co-ordination and maintenance of information on UBC's international linkages and
exchange agreements (i.e., signing, distributing and archiving agreements, database of
partnerships, web site)
Senate Admissions Committee
• Review proposed exchange agreements / partnerships
i.    Recommend approval to Senate
ii.   Request additional information / refinement of agreement
• Advise on exchange programs where appropriate
• Receive an annual summary report of the outcomes of review for that year
III. Process for reviewing agreements
We need to review existing agreements at the following times and in the following ways.
1. All students who return from an exchange program must complete an assessment of their
study abroad experience. A key question on this assessment ought to be something like
"Knowing what you now know about this institution, would you choose to study there
again if the opportunity arose? If not, why not?" In the annual review of these
assessments, the UBC Student Exchange Office will monitor negative responses and bring
any sustained negative assessment to the attention of the ILO.
2. Any faculty member who has concerns about academic standards upon assessing transfer
credit for courses that students returning from exchange have taken should report these
concerns to the Associate Dean responsible for EAP within the Faculty. The Associate
Deans should, on their judgement, ensure the information is relayed
 Vancouver Senate 12541
Minutes of December 13,2000
Admissions Committee
to the Chair of the Senate Admissions Committee and the Assistant Director (Student
Exchange), International Student Services.
3. Other units on campus (e.g., Admissions, Awards and Financial Aid, International House,
Housing) having concerns about exchange students should ensure these are relayed to the
Student Exchange Office. As appropriate, these concerns ought to be noted in the files of
partner institutions.
4. On a regular basis, (i.e., every three to five years), the Assistant Director (Student
Exchange), International Student Services should systematically review the student
assessments, the partner institution files, and credit transfers for particular institutions.
Any problems should be identified and resolved, with the assistance of the ILO if
necessary. Unresolved issues should be reported to the Chair of the Senate Admissions
Committee or the EAP Advisory Committee, as appropriate.
5. When reviewed, agreements will be examined with respect to the criteria set out in 1-1.
Agreements not conforming to the criteria will be dropped.
6. If no UBC students have studied at a particular partner institution over a five-year period,
that exchange agreement should be dropped from our partnership list unless there are
compelling reasons to retain the partnership. The ILO will handle this process, after
review by the Senate Admissions Committee.
7. Any action involving a substantial change to an exchange agreement, or the ending of an
exchange agreement, must be done in consultation with the International Liaison Office
because this office has the responsibility to monitor the multifaceted agreements that many
institutions have with UBC.
8. Receive an annual report.
Dr. Lyster explained that the Admissions Committee would begin to review exchange
abroad programs under these new criteria. New programs would be brought to Senate for
approval.
Mr. Brady offered congratulations to the Task Force, particularly for establishing a
process for reviewing exchange agreements. He asked for clarification about the statement
that partners should "demonstrate values consistent with UBC principles and policies."
Dr. Guppy responded that desirable exchange partners would share UBC's focus on
research, would value international experience for students, would share UBC's learning
principles, and would have adequate course support for UBC students. In response to this
discussion, the Senate agreed to amend the statement to read, "Partners demonstrate
academic values consistent with UBC principles and policies."
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 13,2000
12542
Curriculum Committee
There was some discussion about whether the report of the Task Force should be received
by Senate for information, or presented for approval.
Dr. Lyster
Mr. Brady
That the Report of the Task Force to Review
Exchange Abroad Programs be accepted with
the amendment noted above.
Carried.
Curriculum Committee
Please see 'Appendix A: Curriculum Summary.'
Dr. Berger presented the reports, as Chair of the Committee.
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Dr. Berger
Mr. McNulty
That the curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF LAW
Dr. Berger
Dean Blom
That the curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Law be approved.
Carried.
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Dr. Berger explained that the proposal would address the second term of the fourth year
in the revised M.D. program.
Dr. Berger
Mr. Greathed
That the curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Medicine be approved.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 13,2000
12543
Student Awards Committee
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Dr. Berger outlined each of the proposals. In response to a query from Ms. Lu regarding
course requirements for Biochemistry, Dr. Berger responded that there was some
provision for accommodating students transferring into the program who had difficulty
meeting the specific course requirements. Often such students would be required to do
extra work.
Dr. Berger
Dean Klawe
That the curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Science be approved.
There was some discussion about the proposed course ISCI 448. Dr. Williams asked
whether it was necessary to have a directed studies course with an ISCI subject code, or
whether students could be accommodated under existing directed studies courses in the
Faculty of Science. Ms. Lu added that, as an Integrated Sciences student, she would prefer
the ISCI subject code.
Dr. Knight asked whether the Faculty of Law had been consulted regarding the proposed
new course ISCI 411: Risk. Dr. Berger responded that the title of this course had been
changed editorially to "Risk and Scientific Uncertainty" to denote its much narrower
focus as compared to courses taught in the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration.
Carried.
SCHOOL OF HUMAN KINETICS
Dr. Berger l
Dean Klawe J
That the proposals from the School of Human
Kinetics for new minors in Arts and Science be
approved.
Carried.
Student Awards Committee
Please see 'Appendix B: New Awards.'
 Vancouver Senate 12544
Minutes of December 13,2000
Tributes Committee
Dr. Thompson presented the new awards for approval. He stated that the awards listed
represented $200, 000 per year for UBC students.
Dr. Thompson i        That the awards listed be accepted and
Dr. Rosengarten J       recommended for approval by the Board of
Governors, and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried.
Tributes Committee
ACADEMIC REGALIA
Dr. Helliwell presented the following proposals for academic regalia.
1. School of Library, Archival and Information Studies
a. Joint Master of Archival Studies/Master of Library and Information
Studies
Hood of cadmium yellow lining with blue and silver twisted cord;
b. Master of Arts in Children's Literature
Hood of university blue lining with cadmium yellow cord.
Rationale:
The Master of Library and Information Studies degree is distinguished by a gown
lined by cadmium yellow. The Master of Archival Studies is complemented by a
gown lined with university blue accompanied by a silver and cadmium yellow
twisted cord. The recommendations noted above will provide a common thread
among the School's four programs.
2. Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
a. B.Sc. (Agroecology)
Hood of maize lining with gold and green twisted cord.
b. B.Sc. (Food, Nutrition and Health)
Hood of maize lining with gold and white twisted cord.
c. B.Sc. (Global Resource Systems)
Hood of maize lining with gold and blue twisted cord.
Rationale:
Earlier this year, the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences developed three new degree
programs. Senate, and more recently, the NPRC approved them.
 Vancouver Senate 12545
Minutes of December 13,2000
Tributes Committee
Dr. Helliwell l        That the recommendations of the Tributes
Mr. Burns J        Committee concerning academic regalia be
approved.
Carried.
MEMORIAL MINUTES
Dr. Helliwell presented the following memorial minutes for members of Senate who had
recently passed away.
Joseph E. Kania
1901 -2000
Dr. Joseph Kania immigrated to British Columbia from Vienna in 1913 prior to WWI.
His family settled in the Rossland/Trail region and he began working at Cominco in
1916. He was encouraged to take up Engineering by a group of the UBC students that
worked in the smelter. Dr. Kania received his B.A.Sc in geological engineering in 1926
and his M.A.Sc in 1928. He completed his Ph.D at MIT in 1930.
He began an academic career at the University of Illinois (Urbana) but was required to
return to Vancouver in 1932 because of U.S. Immigration Laws. He was employed by
Pemberton Securities where he created and headed a research office. Dr. Kania soon
became a top salesman and stayed with that company for 44 years. He taught Engineering
Economics to graduating engineering students at UBC from 1945-1958. Dr. Kania also
served as a member of the UBC Senate for 17 years and was Chair of the Alumni Higher
Education Committee.
He was an active community supporter for the YMCA, Vancouver Board of Trade, and
the BC Chamber of Commerce. He was also a dedicated supporter of UBC and regularly
attended university events over the past 50 years.
Michael Smith
1932-2000
Michael Smith was born in Blackpool, England. He received his undergraduate and
graduate education at the University of Manchester and immigrated to Canada as a
research fellow in 1956. He joined the Department of Biochemistry at UBC in 1966 as a
Career Investigator of the Medical Research Council of Canada. His research in Nucleic
Acids and Genetics led to the development of a research technique - site directed
mutagenesis. This technique is used in understanding the functions of genes and proteins
in medical and biological research and in modifying genes and proteins to
 Vancouver Senate 12546
Minutes of December 13,2000
Report from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
create new products in the biotechnology industry. For this innovative work, Michael
Smith was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1993.
Dr. Smith's academic career entailed excellence in research, graduate education,
leadership in innovation, and a commitment to human welfare and scientific education.
He founded the UBC Biotechnology Laboratory in 1987 and was its Director until 1996.
He was also a founding Scientific Leader of the Protein Engineering Network of Centres
of Excellence and the Director of the Genome Sequence Centre at the BC Cancer Agency.
His scientific leadership and collegial nature attracted many outstanding scientists to UBC
and established this University as one of the leading centres for genomic research in North
America.
Michael Smith was also an ardent supporter of other causes in science and society. He
was committed to the support of the Schizophrenia Society of Canada, the Canadian
Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia, the Society for Canadian Women in Science and
Technology, and a program for elementary school teachers provided by Science World
BC. He also served UBC in many capacities beyond his research activities including a
three-year term in the UBC Senate from 1981-84.
In addition to his Nobel Prize, he received many awards and honours, including:
Companion of the Order of Canada, Order of British Columbia, Gairdner Foundation
International Award, University Killam Professor, Peter Wall Professorship, Royal Bank
Award, Fellowships in the Royal Societies of Canada and London, and a Foreign
Associate of the National Academy of Sciences, USA. His international recognition and
prestige honour his contributions to science, academia and human welfare. UBC's
reputation as a research university was markedly enhanced by Michael Smith's
contributions to our academic community. We shall be eternally grateful for his life and
work at UBC.
Dr. Helliwell l        That the memorial minutes for Joseph E.
Dr. Rosengarten i        Kania and Michael Smith be entered in the
Minutes of Senate.
Carried.
Report from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
UPDATE ON TEACHING QUALITY, EFFECTIVENESS AND EVALUATION
Vice President McBride circulated the following report for the information of members of
Senate. He recalled that the Report of the ad hoc Committee on Teaching Quality,
Effectiveness and Evaluation had been received by the Senate one year earlier. The Report
had generated considerable discussion, and a number of the recommendations were sent
back to the Committee of
 Vancouver Senate 12547
Minutes of December 13,2000
Report from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Deans for further discussion. Vice President McBride had been asked to report back to
Senate on how the Deans planned to implement the recommendations in the report.
The greatest concern among Deans was that UBC should not adopt a "one size fits all"
approach to teaching evaluation. Vice President McBride emphasized that useful and
effective teaching methods are very diverse across the Faculties, and that this diversity is
reflected in how UBC evaluates teaching principles and practices.
Update on Teaching Quality, Effectiveness and Evaluation
The Report of the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching Quality, Effectiveness, and
Evaluation was discussed at the December 1999 meeting of Senate. The following motion was
passed:
Moved by Dr. Gilbert; seconded by Dean Klawe
"That Senate accept recommendations 3, 4, and 7 - 12, and; that Senate instruct the Deans
to report to the Vice-President, Academic and Provost with respect to the possible
implementation of Recommendations 1, 2, 5, and 6, and; that the Vice-President,
Academic report back to Senate."
I am reporting back to Senate at this time, as the motion requested. Recommendations 1, 2, 5,
and 6 have been discussed at the Committee of Deans and the following actions have resulted:
1. That the " Common elements on Student Evaluation of Teaching Forms" (Appendix B
of the original report) should be included on all appropriate UBC evaluation forms
(Action: VP Academic and Provost).
As the Ad Hoc Committee noted in its original report, the majority of teaching evaluation
forms currently used at UBC contain a common set of questions. It was felt that the extent of
shared questions was sufficient. It was also felt that the diversity of teaching and learning
formats across the university suggested that a more decentralized method of evaluation would
be more sensitive to the issues of relevance in particular units. As well, as Senate pointed out,
the Ad Hoc committee had not considered the financial costs of this change.
2. That "Effective Teaching Principles and Practices" (Appendix C in original report) be
adopted by Faculties as the basis for their criteria of effective teaching (Action: Deans).
" Effective Teaching Principles and Practices" was intended as a basis for establishing criteria
of effective teaching. Deans agreed to refer the document to colleagues at the Department/
School/Division level, or to the Faculty as a whole. These Principles and
 Vancouver Senate 12548
Minutes of December 13,2000
Report of the University Librarian
Practices are also available on the Web site of the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth.
5. That a short diagnostic evaluation of teaching (for the instructor's own purposes) be
given to students after about 25% of a course is completed (Action:
Deans/Heads/Directors).
It was agreed that Deans would encourage colleagues to use some form of mid-term course
evaluation. This form of evaluation ought to be very flexible and meet the needs of both
students and instructors.
6. That academic units, alone or in combination, have or use existing credit courses on
effective teaching for graduate students, and especially for graduate student teaching
assistants (Action: Deans)
It was agreed that Deans would encourage this as part of any new curriculum changes. Such
courses are available through the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth and, for
international students, through Continuing Studies. For many years the Faculty of Education
has offered College and University Teaching [EPSE 506 (3)]. Several Departments and
Faculties have introduced courses on effective teaching for graduate students over the past
several years (e.g., Mathematics, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences) and many other units have
similar types of seminars and workshops, although on a non-credit basis.
Report of the University Librarian
[Note: the text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from the
Manager, Secretariat Services.]
Ms. Quinlan presented the Report of the University Librarian to the Senate for the
1999/2000 year, and highlighted four of the Library's activities over the previous year.
STRATEGIC PLAN
The Library had developed a strategic plan that was circulated widely on campus. Further
Learning and Research: A Strategic Plan for the UBC Library was available on the
Library's website (http://www.library.ubc.ca/home/planning.html). The Library had
moved into the implementation phase, and Ms. Quinlan stated that the Library was
determined to move forward on the issues identified in the Plan, and that an update on
the implementation would be circulated in the near future.
 Vancouver Senate 12549
Minutes of December 13,2000
Report of the University Librarian
THE WALLACE B. AND MADELINE H. CHUNG COLLECTION
Ms. Quinlan drew attention to the spectacular donation of the Wallace B. and Madeline
H. Chung Collection, which had since been designated as a national treasure by the
Canadian Culture Property Export Review Board. The Library was very proud to receive
this gift on behalf of UBC, and had planned an official opening to take place in April
2001.
CASE STATEMENT FOR A UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTRE
The Library had developed a case statement for a University Learning Centre and
enhanced Library space in July 1999. A portion of the gift from the Chapman Family, as
mentioned by the President under "Chair's Remarks and Related Questions," had been
designated to assist with the development of the Learning Commons, one of the
components of the University Learning Centre. Ms. Quinlan hoped that the University
Learning Centre would become a focal point not just for the Library, but also for the
entire campus.
ACCESS TO ELECTRONIC RESOURCES
Ms. Quinlan reported that UBC had signed a number of licenses for access to electronic
resources which restrict such access to UBC students and staff. For many years, people at
teaching hospitals have not had access due to license restrictions. A recent agreement with
three members of the Council of University Teaching Hospitals had extended access to
this group of users as a pilot project. Nearing the end of the pilot project, there was
interest in extending and expanding the project.
RESEARCH AND THE LIBRARY
The Librarian stated that she had recently met with Associate Deans, Research to discuss
the impact of UBC's growing research programs on the Library. There was great interest
in ensuring
 Vancouver Senate 12550
Minutes of December 13,2000
Report from the Registrar
that, as research programs expand, the Library is recognized as an important part of
research infrastructure.
In response to a query from Mr. Greathed, Ms. Quinlan stated that UBC alumni have
access to the Library through an agreement with the Alumni Association. Users who are
not affiliated with UBC are welcome to use most resources within the Library, but may
not sign out materials or have access to some licensed electronic resources.
Report from the Registrar
[Note: the text of this report is not included in the Minutes. It is available at the following
URL: http://students.ubc.ca/publications/academicyeardraft/.]
Dr. Spencer presented the draft dates for the 2001/02 academic year for the information
of members of Senate. There was some discussion about the relatively short break
between the end of examinations on December 20, 2001 and the beginning of Term 2
classes on January 2, 2002. Some members of Senate felt that students would prefer a
longer break between the two terms, even if this meant shortening the one-week midterm
break scheduled in February. Dr. Spencer explained that Senate had discussed this issue at
its September 1994 meeting, when two scenarios had been presented: the first scenario
was to lengthen the break between the two terms, while the second scenario was to
lengthen the February midterm break to one full week. Senate had approved the second
scenario, which results in an early start in two of every seven years.
[Note: In response to this discussion, the start date for Term 2 in January 2002 has been
changed from Wednesday, January 2, to Thursday, January 3, 2002.]
 Vancouver Senate 12551
Minutes of December 13,2000
Other Business
Other Business
DR. RICHARD A. SPENCER, REGISTRAR
The President announced that Dr. Spencer was attending his last meeting of Senate as
Registrar. Dr. Spencer served as a representative of the Faculty of Applied Science from
1981 to 1988, and as Registrar and Secretary of Senate from 1988 to 2000. The President
thanked Dr. Spencer for his nearly 20 years of dedicated commitment to the Senate, and
presented a certificate of appreciation along with a gift. Members of Senate offered a
standing ovation.
Dr. Spencer responded that it had been a pleasure to have served as both a member of
Senate and as the Secretary. He thanked members of Senate for expressing their
appreciation.
Tributes Committee - in camera
EMERITUS STATUS
Please see 'Appendix C: Candidates for Emeritus Status.'
Dr. Helliwell had circulated a list of candidates for emeritus status, which had been
approved by the Tributes Committee.
Dr. Helliwell l        That Senate approve the recommendations of
Dr. Nemetz J        the Tributes Committee with respect to
emeritus status.
Carried.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, January 17, 2001 at 8:00
p.m.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 13,2000
12552
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary
CATEGORY 1 CHANGES FOR SENATE APPROVAL
Commerce and Business Administration
New courses:
Law
Program changes:
Medicine
Course deletion:
New courses:
Program changes:
Science
New courses:
Course deletions:
Course changes:
COMM 336, 435, 464.
Reinstatement of LAW 470 as a compulsory upper year
course, and changes to the Part-time LL.B. Program.
INDE 452.
INDE 450, 453.
Phase VI of the MD Program.
CHEM 113, 123, 233, 235, EOSC 110, 112, ISCI 411, ISCI
448, MATH 180, 184, 361, 462, MICB 203, 404, 406, 412.
BIOL 130,CHEM 352.
BIOL 140, BIOL 426 (becomes BIOL 465 and 466), CHEM
201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 251, 304, ENVR 200, 300, ENVR
400 (becomes 449), MATH 100, 102, 104, 120, 121, 335,
MICB 322, 323.
 Vancouver Senate 12553
Minutes of December 13,2000
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary
Program changes:
Faculty of Science Regulations
1. p. 106-7: delete Bachelor of Science Nutritional Sciences Major;
2. p. 351: add Double Major Program in Science and Arts to Double Major
Entry;
3. p. 352: add new paragraph on broader based admission, changes to
Admission entry;
4. p. 354: replacement of sections on Failed Standing, Required to
Discontinue, and Required to Withdraw with a new section entitled
Continuation Requirements;
5. p. 354: replace entry on Academic Concession;
6. p. 354: revise Degree Requirements, Graduation Requirements;
7. p. 354: revise English Requirement;
8. p. 355: replace First-Year Requirements with Lower-Level Requirements;
9. p. 356: replace Second, Third and Fourth Year Requirements with Program
Requirements;
10.p. 356: revise Promotion Requirements.
Biochemistry
1.  Revise Major (0244): Biochemistry (BIOC).
Biology
1.  Revise First Year Course Options.
Computer Science
1. Add Honours and Combined Honours;
2. Revise enrolment restriction information.
Earth and Ocean Sciences
1. Delete Major (0073) Geological Sciences (GEOL);
2. Delete Major (0001) Geophysics (GEOP);
3. Delete Major (1083) Oceanography (OCGY) Geophysics (GEOP);
4. Insert Major: Earth and Ocean Science.
Environmental Sciences
1.  Revise admission statement.
School of Human Kinetics
Program changes: New Minor in Arts and new Minor in Science.
 Vancouver Senate 12554
Minutes of December 13,2000
Appendix B: New Awards
Appendix B: New Awards
ASSOCIATION of B.C. Professional Foresters Graduating Prize in Forestry-Prizes totalling $500
have been endowed by the Association of B.C. Professional Foresters FORESTRUST. The award
is made to an undergraduate student with the best graduating thesis and/or the best graduating
essay in the Faculty of Forestry. The award may be split to provide $300 for the best thesis and
$200 for the best essay. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry.
(Partial funding available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
ASSOCIATION of B.C. Professional Foresters Scholarship in Forestry-A $1,500 scholarship has
been endowed by the Association of B.C. Professional Foresters FORESTRUST. The award is
made to an undergraduate student who is entering second year in the Forest Resources
Management program. It is awarded to a student who exhibits a combination of academic
achievement and extracurricular involvement and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Forestry. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
BULL Housser & Tupper Prize in Business Law-A $1,250 prize is offered by Bull Housser &
Tupper to a student with high standing in an advanced course in Business Law. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
BULL Housser & Tupper Prize in Corporations II-A $1,250 prize is offered by Bull Housser &
Tupper to a student with high standing in Corporations II. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
BULL Housser & Tupper Prize in Technology Law-A $1,250 prize is offered by Bull Housser &
Tupper to a student with high standing in a course in Technology Law. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
BULL Housser & Tupper Prize in Torts-A $1,250 prize is offered by Bull Housser & Tupper to a
student with high standing in Torts. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Jennifer Forest CADHAM Memorial Award-A $1,000 award is offered by Fred J. Cadham and
family in memory of Jennifer Forest Cadham to a student completing first year of the LL.B.
program who has demonstrated a commitment to criminal law and social justice. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Stuart CLYNE Prize in Labour Law-A $500 prize is offered by Harris & Company, Barristers and
Solicitors, to a student with high standing in Labour Law. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
George and Julie DE LANGE Bursary in Medicine-Bursaries totalling $800 have been endowed
through a bequest by Dorothy Adele de Lange. The awards are offered to third year students in
the M.D. program in the Faculty of Medicine. (Partial funding available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
ENGINEERING Physics 50th Anniversary Scholarship-Scholarships totalling $1,200 have been
endowed to commemorate Engineering Physics 50th Anniversary. The awards are offered
 Vancouver Senate 12555
Minutes of December 13,2000
Appendix B: New Awards
to students in Engineering Physics and are made on the recommendation of the Director of
Engineering Physics. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
JENKINS Marzban Logan Scholarship in Law-A $1,000 scholarship is offered by Jenkins
Marzban Logan, Barristers & Solicitors, to an outstanding student entering first year Law. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
D.C. & H.L. KNIGGE Scholarship in Nursing-Three scholarships of $1,000 each have been
endowed by D.C. and H.L. Knigge for undergraduate students entering each of second, third and
fourth year Nursing. The awards are made on the recommendation of the School of Nursing.
(Partial funding available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
David MACAREE Memorial Scholarship in English-A $3,800 scholarship has been endowed by
Mary Macaree for a student in Eighteenth Century English studies who is entering the Ph.D.
program or who is admitted to candidacy. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Department of English in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
MARIA-HELENA Foundation Bursary-Bursaries totalling $680 have been endowed in memory of
Mara (Maria) Mahovlic and Helena Fast by their families and friends. The awards are offered to
students in any program and year or study. (Partial funding available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
NATIONAL Education Initiative Gerhard Kress Memorial Scholarship-Scholarships totalling
$870 have been endowed by the members of the National Education Initiative in memory of
Gerhard Kress. The awards are offered to undergraduate students in the Wood Products
Processing program with preference given to students from outside of the province of British
Columbia. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry (Partial funding
available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
William, Sadie and Edwin ROWAN Bursary in Medicine-Bursaries totalling $80,000 have been
endowed through a bequest by Edwin Rowan. The awards are offered to students in the Faculty
of Medicine. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
William, Sadie and Edwin ROWAN Scholarship in Medicine-Scholarships totalling $40,000 have
been endowed through a bequest by Edwin Rowan. The awards are offered to students in the
Faculty of Medicine and are made on the recommendation of the Faculty. (Available 2000/2001
Winter Session.)
St. John's College Itoko Muraoka Fellowship-Fellowships totalling $16,000 have been endowed
through a bequest by Itoko Muraoka. The awards are offered to students in the Faculty of
Graduate Studies who are residents of St. John's College and are made on the recommendation of
the Faculty. Recipients are known as St. John's Scholars. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
St. John's College George Shen Fellowship- A fellowship of $15,000 has been endowed in honour
of George Shen. The award is offered to a student in the Faculty of Graduate Studies who
 Vancouver Senate 12556
Minutes of December 13,2000
Appendix B: New Awards
is a resident of St. John's College and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty. Recipients
are known as St. John's Scholars. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Ed SHUTER Scholarship-A $1,200 scholarship has been endowed by the family of Ed Shuter and
is offered to a student entering second year of graduate studies in the Department of Chemistry.
The scholarship is made on the recommendation of the Department in consultation with the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Partial funding available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Norma SIGURDSON Memorial Bursary-Bursaries totalling $3,000 have been endowed by her
husband Harold Sigurdson in memory of Norma Esther Sigurdson (nee Benson), a Canadian of
Icelandic descent who maintained a life-long interest in matters Icelandic. The bursaries are
offered to students in any year or faculty who are making satisfactory progress in their studies.
(Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
STIKEMAN Elliott Scholarship-A $1,000 scholarship is offered through the law firm of Stikeman
Elliott to a student in the LL.B. program who achieves high academic. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Jon STROM Bursary in Pharmaceutical Sciences-Bursaries totalling $1,500 have been endowed
by Jon Strom for students in Pharmaceutical Sciences. (Partial funding available 2000/2001
Winter Session)
Andy and Julie SUN Scholarship in Asian Studies-Scholarships totalling $1,500 have been
endowed by Andy and Julie Sun for students in Asian Studies. The awards are made on the
recommendation of the Department of Asian Studies and, in the case of graduate students, in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Partial funding available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
VANCOUVER Sun David Baines Scholarship in Journalism-A $3,800 scholarship has been
endowed by Vancouver Sun reporter, David Baines, for a student in the Master of Journalism
program specializing in business journalism. The award is made on the recommendation of the
School of Journalism in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001
Winter Session)
WARD-ESSOP Scholarship-Scholarships totalling $3,200 have been endowed through a bequest
by Joyce M. Kulpa in memory of her sister, Frances Lucy Ward, and of her sister's husbands,
Joseph Essop and Danny Ward. The scholarships are offered to undergraduate students in any
year or faculty. (Partial funding available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
J.K. ZEE Memorial Fellowship in Electrical and Computer Engineering-A $12,000 fellowship has
been endowed in memory of J.K. Zee by family and friends. The award is offered to a graduate
student in Electrical and Computing Engineering. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Available 2001/2002 Winter Session)
Approved by Senate Committee on Student Awards
November 14, 2000
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 13,2000
12557
Appendix C: Candidates for Emeritus Status
Appendix C: Candidates for Emeritus Status
The Tributes Committee recommends that the following people be granted emeritus
status.
Name
Proposed Rank (effective December 31, 1995)
Head, Ivan
Professor Emeritus of Law
Name
Proposi
SKlHaRfllaHJil! Wm     ml
Bass, Frederic
Clinical Associate Professor Emeritus of Heath Care and
Epidemiology
Boone, John
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Name
Proposed Rank (effective December 31, 2000)
Ace, Merle Eugene
Associate Professor Emeritus of Commerce and Business
Administration
Alldritt, Keith
Professor Emeritus of English
Anzarut, Andre
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Asante, Kwadwo
Clinical Assistant Professor Emeritus of Paediatrics
Baird, Robert
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Calvert, Stephen E.
Professor Emeritus of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Chiarenza, Marguerite
Professor Emerita of French, Hispanic and Italian Studies
Friesen, Joyce D.
Administrative Librarian Emerita
Gillam, Shirley
Professor Emerita of Pathology
Hogarth, John
Professor Emeritus of Law
Hogg, James C.
Professor Emeritus of Pathology
Holdaway, Richard G.
C.
Assistant Professor Emeritus of French, Hispanic and Italian
Studies
Jackson, Stewart M.
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Kilburn, Douglas G.
Professor Emeritus of Microbiology
Kirkley, M. Harriet
Assistant Professor Emerita of English
Kubicek, Robert V.
Professor Emeritus of History
Muratorio-Posse,
Blanca
Associate Professor Emerita of Anthropology and Sociology
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of December 13,2000
12558
Appendix C: Candidates for Emeritus Status
Name
Proposed Rank (effective December 31, 2000)
Overmyer, Daniel Lee
Professor Emeritus of Asian Studies
Perler, Zelick
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Sheehan, Nancy
Dean Emeritus of Education
Soroka, Allen H.
General Librarian Emeritus
Suedfeld, Peter
Dean Emeritus of Graduate Studies and Professor Emeritus of
Psychology
Tyers, G. Frank O.
Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Ulrych, Tadeusz Jan
Professor Emeritus of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Wales, Terence J.
Professor Emeritus of Economics
Waters, William G.
Professor Emeritus of Commerce and Business Administration

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