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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2000-11-15

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 The University  of  British  Columbia
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF NOVEMBER 15, 2000
Attendance
The Third Regular Meeting of the Senate of the University of British Columbia for the Session
2000/01 was held on Wednesday, November 15, 2000 at 8:00 p.m. in Room 102, George F.
Curtis Building.
Present: President M. C. Piper (Chair), Vice-President B. C. McBride, Dean F. S. Abbott, Dr. P.
Adebar, Mr. R. Affleck, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dr. R. W. Blake, Ms. E. Blewett, Dean J. Blom, Mr. P.
T. Brady, Dr. H. M. Burt, Dean J. A. Cairns, Ms. E. J. Caskey, Mr. T. C. Y. Chan, Ms. T. Chung.
Ms. J. Dennie, Dr. D. Fisher, Ms. K. Gammon, Dr. R. Goldman-Segall, Dr. D. Granot, Dean F.
Granot, Mr. E. Greathed, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Rev. T. J. Hanrahan, Dr. P. E.
Harding, Dr. J. Helliwell, Ms. J. Hutton, Dean M. Isaacson, Ms. S. Iwagami, Dr. D. D. Kitts, Dr.
S. B. Knight, Mr. J. Kondopulos, Dr. V. LeMay, Ms. P. Liu, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Ms. Y. Lu, Dr. D.
M. Lyster, Dr. P. L. Marshall, A/Dean J. A. McLean, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Ms. V. G. Mirehouse,
Dr. P. N. Nemetz, Ms. J. Parry, Dr. G. N. Patey, Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Dr. J. Perry, Dr. W. J.
Phillips, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon, Dean M. Quayle, Ms. C. Quinlan, Ms. K. Riecken, Dr. H. J.
Rosengarten, Dr. K. Schonert-Reichl, Dr. C. Shields, Dr. D. Sjerve, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Dr. B.
Stelck, Dr. R.C. Tees, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dean R. J. Tierney, Dean A. Tully, Mr. D. Visser, Ms.
K. Wilker, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky.
Regrets: Dr. W. L. Sauder (Chancellor), Mr. P. T. Burns, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Mr. H. D. Gray,
Ms. M. Hassen, Dr. C. Jillings, Dean M. M. Klawe, Dr. B. S. Lalli, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Dr. M.
MacEntee, Dr. W. R. McMaster, Dean D. Muzyka, Mr. H. Poon, Dr. V. Raoul, Mr. A. F.
Sheppard, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Mr. D. Tompkins, Mr. D. R. Verma, Mr. B. Warren, Dr. R. J. K.
Wilson, Dean E. H. K. Yen.
Senate Membership
NEW STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
1. Ms. Tiffany Chung, Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration;
2. Ms. Sakura Iwagami, Faculty of Dentistry;
3. Ms. Erica J. Blewett, Faculty of Education.
The President welcomed each of the new members to Senate.
Vol. 2000/01 12487
 Vancouver Senate 12488
Minutes of November 15,2000
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Dr. Tees l        That the Minutes of the meeting of September
Dean Cairns J        13, 2000 be adopted as circulated.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
CORRECTION TO PRELIMINARY ENROLMENT FIGURES
Dr. Spencer circulated an amended version of a table entitled "2000-2001 Domestic
Undergraduate Enrolment as at September 8, 2000." He stated that there had been an
error in the version of the document that was circulated at the September 13, 2000
meeting of Senate.
[Note: Copies of this document are available from the Manager, Secretariat Services.]
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
TRIP TO BC INTERIOR
President Piper described a trip she had taken to the BC Interior, including Kelowna and
Kamloops, in late September 2000. The President visited high schools, hosted alumni
gatherings, visited a winery affiliated with the BC Wine Research Centre, and officiated at
the opening of a new dairy research centre.
TRIP TO ASIA
President Piper reported that a recent visit to Asia had been quick, but very successful.
Stops included Korea, Singapore and Hong Kong. Alumni divisions in these areas were
reported as growing in stature and enthusiasm. Alumni gatherings in each of Seoul,
Singapore and Hong Kong attracted between 100 and 200 people. The President met with
representatives from key universities: Korea University, Seoul National University,
National University of Singapore, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Dean
Quayle, Dean Granot, and delegates from the Insti-
 Vancouver Senate 12489
Minutes of November 15,2000
Financial Statements
tute of Asian Research joined the President for parts of the visit. President Piper reported
that she felt very privileged to represent UBC in this important part of the world.
NOVEMBER 2000 CONGREGATION
The President reminded members of Senate that congregation ceremonies were to be held
on November 23rd and 24th. Approximately 2335 students were to graduate in eight
ceremonies: 711 graduate students, and 1624 undergraduate students. The President
encouraged members of Senate to take part in this exciting event, and added that it was
important for graduates, their families, and their associates to witness the support of the
academic community.
Financial Statements
President Piper invited Mr. Terry Sumner, Vice President, Administration and Finance, to
present the University's Financial Statements for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2000.
Mr. Sumner introduced Ms. Dana Merritt, Director of Budgets, and Mr. Ian Burgess,
Controller.
BACKGROUND
The Financial Statements had been approved by the Board of Governors in June 2000,
and had been subsequently distributed across the University community, to government
officials, to libraries and to other universities. The University's Annual Report,
reproduced in the Vancouver Sun, published highlights of the Financial Statements.
Highlights were also presented at the UBC Annual General Meeting held at the Chan
Centre for the Performing Arts in October 2000.
The Auditor General had provided an unqualified opinion, which confirmed that the
University's Financial Statements "present fairly in all material respects the financial
position and results of its operations and its cash flows in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles."
 Vancouver Senate 12490
Minutes of November 15,2000
Financial Statements
HIGHLIGHTS
Total revenues were approximately $836 million, representing an increase of $94 million
over the previous year. The increase included additional investment income ($37 million),
government grants and contracts ($30 million), "other," including credit and non-credit
fees ($8 million), and non-government grants and contracts ($12 million).
The operating grant from provincial government had increased from $276 million to
$280 million. The majority of this increase ($3.4 million) resulted from UBC's admission
of 486 additional students. Research awards had risen significantly, from $141 million to
$166 million. The University ended the year with a net operating surplus of
approximately $2 million, reducing the accumulated deficit to $2.3 million.
Net assets were valued at $713 million. Cash and short-term investments, as a measure of
UBC's liquidity, were reported at $68 million. Long-term debt, which was primarily
related to ancillary businesses, was reduced from $65 to $59 million. Market value of
UBC's endowments was $640 million at year-end.
REVENUES
The Government of British Columbia provided UBC with approximated $317 million, or
38% of its total revenues. This included the University's operating grant, as well as capital
and research monies, and non-research contract-type money. Sales and services,
conducted mostly through UBC's ancillary enterprises, totalled $163 million. Credit and
non credit tuition fees totalled $106 million, which represented 13% of total revenues.
 Vancouver Senate 12491
Minutes of November 15,2000
Financial Statements
RESEARCH FUNDS
The Faculty of Medicine attracted $67 million in research funding, which represented
41% of total research revenues. This represented a $9 million increase over the previous
year. The next largest portion of research funding came to the Faculty of Science, with
$39 million. The Faculty of Arts attracted $8 million, or 5% of research revenues. This
represented an increase of $2 million over the previous year.
EQUITY
As of March 31st 2000, the University held $14.8 million in equity in approximately 38
companies formed as a result of university research. Given market volatility, this amount
is subject to frequent fluctuation. Royalty income amounted to $1.2 million annually.
ENDOWMENTS
The total market value of UBC's endowment funds was $640 million, invested in a
balanced portfolio. Income from these investments for 1999/2000 was $71.8 million. Of
this income, $31 million was expended on student awards and academic and research
programs as specified by donors, and $40.8 million was reinvested in the endowment
fund.
The President thanked Vice President Sumner, as well as Mr. Burgess and Ms. Merritt.
 Vancouver Senate 12492
Minutes of November 15,2000
Candidates for Degrees
Candidates for Degrees
Mr. Brady l        That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Dean Isaacson i        as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, effective November 2000,
and that the Registrar, in consultation with the
Deans and the Chair of Senate, be empowered
to make any necessary adjustments.
Carried.
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations: subject, where
applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented without formal
reference to the President, and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new programs
be asked to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
i. Recognition of the Advanced Materials and Process Engineering Laboratory
(AMPEL) as a research laboratory of the University of British Columbia (pp.
12481-2)
Admissions Committee
Dr. Lyster presented the Admissions Committee reports, as Chair of the Committee.
ASSOCIATE DEGREES AND UBC ADMISSION POLICIES
The following statement should be added to the UBC 2000/01 Calendar, page 42, in the
section on Undergraduate Admission: Applicants from a College or University. Insert in
the third column immediately following the first paragraph ending " credit may not
satisfy."
"Associate Degrees
Students with Associate Degrees of Arts or Science from a recognized College or
University College in British Columbia or the Yukon, if admitted to the Faculty of Arts or
the Faculty of Science, are guaranteed full transfer credit (60 credits) for the work done
for their Associate Degree. Students must still meet all 100 and 200 level course
requirements for specific degree programs (e.g., majors, honours, faculty-level
requirements) and this may require students to take more than 120 total credits to earn
their degree. Students admitted with Associate Degrees must meet the competitive
admission average for the program to which they apply if this average is above the
published minimum."
 Vancouver Senate 12493
Minutes of November 15,2000
Admissions Committee
Rationale:
• Clarifies access to UBC for transfer students who have Associate Degrees
• Positions UBC better as a responsible partner in the BC post-secondary system
• Emphasizes the coherence of programs of study in the first two years of university.
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposed policy on Associate Degrees
Dr. Fisher i       an^ UBC Admissions Policies be approved.
Carried.
ARABIC 11 AS AN APPROVED GRADE 11 LANGUAGE
Proposed Calendar Entry: (page 38, column 2)
Add Arabic 11 to the list of Approved Grade 11 Language Courses on page 38 of the UBC
Calendar.
Rationale:
The BC Ministry of Education has approved the Integrated Resource Package (IRP) for
Arabic and has asked us to approve Arabic 11 as satisfying the Language 11 admission
requirement and Arabic 11 and 12 as satisfying the second language requirement for the
Faculty of Arts undergraduate degree programs. Dr. Hanna Kassis (UBC Professor
Emeritus) reviewed the package favorably and agreed that Arabic 11 should satisfy the
admission requirement.
Effective Date: September 2001
Dr. Lyster l        That Arabic 11 be accepted as an approved
Dean Blom i        Grade 11 language course for admission to
Faculty of Arts undergraduate degree
programs.
Approved.
FACULTY OF LAW: PART-TIME LL.B. PROGRAM ADMISSIONS STATEMENT
Present Calendar Entry (page 284, column 2):
Half-time Program and 60% Program
To be eligible for the half-time or 60% program, students must demonstrate special needs
resulting from such factors as family responsibilities, financial or health problems. A
maximum of ten students per year will be admitted on this basis. Students admitted in the
categories of the National Committee, Advanced Standing, Transfer or Visiting (Letter of
Permission) are ineligible for this program.
Ordinarily students on this program must complete half the normal course load for full-
time students in each academic year. They cannot access upper-year courses until first
 Vancouver Senate 12494
Minutes of November 15,2000
Admissions Committee
year has been completed. However, in order to facilitate access to funding programs,
students may be permitted, at their option, to take 60% of the normal full-time number of
credits per Winter Session. Students who have completed 60% of the first-year program in
their first Winter Session shall, in addition to the remainder of the first-year program, be
permitted to take in their next Winter Session such credits from the upper-year offerings
as may be required to bring the student's load up to 60% of the normal load (i.e., 18
credits). The choice of such additional credits shall be subject to the approval of the
Associate Dean.
Once they have completed all the requirements of first-year Law, students in the program
may transfer to full-time status provided their academic requirements are met. Similarly, a
full-time student in second or third year and in good standing may, for compelling
reasons, be permitted by the Admissions Committee to transfer to the half-time program
provided the maximum number of half-time and 60% students will not be exceeded.
Proposed Calendar Entry to replace the present text and title/heading: (changes in bold)
Part-Time LL.B. Program
The part-time program enables students to take a reduced course load. In first year, the
student may opt for a part-time course load that ranges from 16 to 26 credits instead of
the 32-credit full-time course load. In the upper years, a part-time student may select a
course load ranging from 14 to 27 credits. To be eligible for the part-time program, a
student must demonstrate special needs. A maximum of ten students per year (30 students
in total) will be admitted on this basis. Students admitted in the categories of the National
Committee, Advanced Standing, Transfer or Visiting (Letter of Permission) are ineligible
for this program.
Ordinarily students on this program must complete not less than 50% of the normal
course load for full-time students in each academic year. In first year, 50% of the normal
course load is 16 credits. In the upper years, 50% of the normal course load is 14 to 17
credits. However, in order to facilitate access to funding programs, housing or to complete
the LL.B. program sooner, students may at their option take from 60% to 80% of the
normal full-time number of credits per Winter Session. Part-time students are ineligible for
scholarships that are based on ranking in the year or class. However, part-time students
are eligible for course prizes and other scholarships.
At the commencement of the first or second term of the Winter Session, students in the
program may transfer to full-time status with the approval of the Associate Dean for the
LL.B. program. Similarly, a full-time student in good standing may for compelling reasons
transfer to the part-time program provided the maximum number of part-time students
will not be exceeded, and subject to the approval of the Associate Dean for the LL.B.
program.
Rationale:
Early this spring, the Faculty of Law's Curriculum Committee met with the Law Faculty's
Equity Committee and members of the staff to hear representations from students for a
more flexible part-time LL.B. Emerging from this discussion, the proposal would
 Vancouver Senate 12495
Minutes of November 15,2000
Student Awards Committee
enable part-time students at their option to take not less than 50% nor more than 80% of
the full-time load. Mature and disabled students in particular requested more flexibility in
the requirements to complete the LLB program on a part-time basis. The change would
allow part-time students to tailor their course loads to accommodate their particular
circumstances without compromising the quality of the program. However, the Faculty of
Law's Committee is mindful that the change imposes additional administrative burdens on
faculty and staff. Nevertheless, the Committee regards the change as consistent with the
UBC Academic Plan's concern for restructuring course credits to accommodate a more
diverse cohort of learners. At its meeting on September 26, the Faculty Council
unanimously approved this proposal.
Effective Date: January 1, 2001
Dr. Lyster l        That the revised admissions statement for the
Dean Blom J        Part-Time LL.B. Program in the Faculty of
Law be approved.
Carried.
Student Awards Committee
Please see 'Appendix A: New Awards.'
As Chair of the Committee, Dr. Thompson presented the new awards for approval. He
remarked that the proposed awards represented a total value of $66,000. Two corrections
were made to the circulated list:
1. DOUGLAS Symes & Brissenden Prize in Trusts: award was withdrawn;
2. SWINTON & Company: award name was changed to reflect new company
name of MILLER Thomson, LLP.
Dr. Thompson i        That the awards listed be accepted, with the
Dean Isaacson i        above amendments, and recommended for
approval by the Board of Governors, and that
letters of thanks be sent to the donors.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12496
Minutes of November 15,2000
Tributes Committee
Tributes Committee
Please see 'Appendix B: Memorial Minute for Loring (Jack) Goodwin Mitten.'
Dr. Helliwell l        That the memorial minute for Loring (Jack)
Dr. Slonecker i        Goodwin Mitten be recorded in the Minutes of
Senate.
Carried.
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
LECTURE START-TIME CHANGE PROPOSAL
Vice-President McBride presented the following report for the approval of Senate. Mr.
Gordon Lovegrove, Director, Transportation Planning, and Ms. Kelly Simmons,
Coordinator, Classroom Services, were in attendance to assist in answering questions
from members of Senate.
Background
On July 25, 1997,the University and the Greater Vancouver Regional District entered into a
Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) concerning implementation of the Official
Community Plan (OCP) for the UBC area. Development of UBC lands facilitates many of the
strategies contained in the TREK 2000 Vision and Academic Plan.
In the MoU, UBC is committed to pursue a 20% reduction in Single Occupant Vehicle (SOV)
traffic to/from campus, and a complementary 20% increase in transit ridership. Keys to
achieving these transportation targets include the development of a UBC Strategic
Transportation Plan (STP), which was approved by the UBC Board of Governors on
November 18, 1999, and collaboration with stakeholders (students, staff, faculty, the City of
Vancouver, TransLink, and surrounding communities). A UBC Transportation Advisory
Committee (TAC) has been meeting regularly since 1997 throughout this process, with bimonthly status reports to the Board of Governors.
In implementing the UBC STP, the MoU also commits UBC to investigate the possibility of
changing class scheduling, in conjunction with transit scheduling, to reduce peak flows in the
long term. Initial reviews in 1999 revealed this was a feasible possibility, and would help
minimize costs of a universal transportation pass program (U-TREK Card) for students, staff,
and faculty. A Class Start-Time Shift (STS) planning and consultation process has been
underway since January 2000 to gauge support for and administrative requirements of
possible implementation in September 2001, at the same time the U-TREK Card is launched.
The staff committee working on this project
 Vancouver Senate 12497
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
includes: Director of Transportation Planning (chair), Director of Classroom Services, and
Associate Registrar of Student Services.
The purpose of this report is to present the results of planning and consultation to date for the
information of the Senate, and to receive any comments. Based on input received, a report is
being prepared for consideration of the UBC Board of Governors to implement changes to
class-start times in September 2001.
Transit Needs
To solve existing bus over-crowding problems, and to meet future UBC transportation targets,
TransLink needs to add significant transit service. Existing campus arrival and departure
patterns reveal a higher and "peaked' demand for arrivals in the morning versus departures in
the afternoon. The peak hour currently is 7:45 am to 8:45 am, which also conflicts with the
peak demand for buses elsewhere in the region, meaning there are no other buses available to
serve this demand. Consequently, UBC students, staff, and faculty are regularly vpassed-by' by
over-crowded, full buses, leading to delays and complaints accessing the campus. Translink
have stated that it will take at least five years to add buses to address existing over-crowding
problems on buses coming to UBC.
Compounding this problem are UBC OCP/MoU commitments, which obligate UBC to
implement the STP and U-TREK Card, which is forecast to add over 30% more ridership
demand onto UBC bus routes by September 2001. There will need to be new buses bought to
serve this additional future morning peak demand to UBC. Current estimates are that UBC
would need over 30 additional buses serving UBC as of Fall 2001 for the U-TREK Card
launch.
A joint review by UBC and TransLink has confirmed that this number could be reduced
(avoiding over $1 million in annual transit costs) by shifting UBC class start times by 30
minutes, to reduce and spread out the demand. If the class start time shift is not implemented,
TransLink have taken the position that UBC must pay for the additional buses, meaning
higher U-TREK Card prices and/or Parking costs.
Class Start Times
After reviewing a number of different scenarios, the only way to accomplish this "spread-out'
would be to shift approximately two-thirds of class starts from 8:30 am to 9:00 am, and one-
third from 8:30 am to 8:00 am. All classes throughout the day would also shift 30 minutes,
putting UBC on an on-the-hour class (i.e. lectures and labs) schedule. The last daytime lecture
would end at 6 pm (formerly 5:30 pm).
Specific course schedules in each department/faculty will be the subject of more discussion
within and between departments. Some faculties (e.g. Science) may wish to shift all classes
together, at least initially, to avoid conflicts between lectures and lab schedules. This could be
accommodated by having enough courses in other faculties (e.g. Arts) shift the other way to
create the desired balance. The Registrar's Office has detailed information on the classes and
students by faculty, by schedule, and will play an important feedback and coordination role
throughout this process initially.
Discussions with representatives from Science, Applied Science, and Arts faculties indicates
that the shift to on-the-hour class starts could be accommodated with a mini-
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of November 15,
12498
2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
mum of disruption in the first year by having all Science / Ap.Sc. lectures and labs move 30
minutes earlier, and all Arts lectures move 30 minutes later. The shift direction for other
faculties would also be similarly coordinated so that the overall effect on arrivals to UBC
'spreads out' as per that desired.
AM Peak Pwiod Tran«il Arrival* « UBC
.9-
5
riON 0 • 8.30 CUK tun
■■       OPTION 1 -8 00/9:00 OMS CUrt
• - -   OPTION 2 • 8:00/8:30 ctoM tfart
— -OPTION 3 • 8:30/3:00 t*>» 5Urt
- —OPTION t -9:00 dmUxt
Consultation
Consultation has been ongoing over the last year, both as part of the development of the STP,
and since January 2000 with establishment of a staff working group on this particular issue.
Initial consultations with students, staff, and faculty as part of the STP process suggested that
it is supported and doable, with potential classroom utilization benefits, subject to a
comprehensive review. The UBC Board of Governors authorized TREK to pursue further
consideration of shifting class start times in November 1999, with the adoption of the UBC
Strategic Transportation Plan.
Since January 2000, meetings have been held with the following groups to discuss this
proposed class start-time shift: AMS, Associate Deans, Deans, SIS Advisory Committee,
Timetable representatives, Faculty Business Administrators, UBC Housing & Daycare, Food
Services, Human Resources, Parking & Security, MADHU, Faculty, Union, AAPS, and various
departmental and faculty Curriculum committees. Although not unanimous, comments
received generally reflect earlier support for the recommended schedule changes, as follows:
• Increased transit capacity to UBC at no cost, means less crowded buses
• Increases available seat-hours in existing classrooms by 5 to 10%, due to extra hour in the
day
• Should occur in any case, regardless of whether or not the U-TREK Card occurs, as it
improves transit service to UBC and increases available classroom seat-hours.
 Vancouver Senate 12499
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
• Helps UBC to implement TREK 2000 vision and OCP commitments
• Helps get the U-TREK Card launched, reduces the cost of the U-TREK Card
• Although some pedagogical concerns over early classes (i.e. sleepy students), Dentistry
Faculty is already at an 8 a.m. start and initial comments are positive
• The Civil Engineering Department in the Faculty of Applied Science have sent a letter of
unanimous support
• Other than daycare (possible extra staff required), and the initial re-scheduling process (i.e.
timetable reps), support staff impacts would be minimal (i.e. the proposed 30 minute shift
is small enough that it can be accommodated within most existing support staff
shifts/schedules.)
• At their Council meeting on September 13th, 2000, the AMS approved a motion of
support for this class start-time shift proposal by over two-third majority.
Daycare
UBC Daycare Services operate from 8 am to 5 (toddler) or 5:30 pm (3-5 year old), Monday
to Friday. Its clientele include: students (40%, mostly grad students), faculty (20%), staff
(15%), and alumni/community (25%). They also operate a school-age program, between 7:15
am and 6 pm, of which 65% of children come from UBC student families. Consultation with
representatives of the parents group indicates little concern. The current daycare hours do not
cover the current UBC day-class hours. Most student clients being grad students would not
have 8 am class starts. With the current daycare hours not covering the entire school day,
faculty with children are already required (and have been doing so) to schedule their classes in
consultation with their individual faculty schedulers, to suit their family needs and daycare
hours. Other UBC support staff hours (e.g. Student Services, 8:30 to 4:30) do not cover the
entire day class hours either; no change is anticipated.
Daycare administration staff have indicated that there could be the need to add additional
daycare shifts to provide required caregiver: child coverage ratios over the extended hours,
depending largely on demand and individual clientele needs. Depending on the demand and
shift configuration, this ongoing cost might be in the range of $50,000 to $80,000 per year.
This could be partially funded from the U-TREK Card program, and/or other sources (e.g.
annual daycare fee increases). Daycare administration are concerned that any increase in
daycare fees might impact jeopardize other current daycare funding. Staff will consult with
daycare staff on an ongoing basis to address this concern.
Implementation Guidelines
As each department / faculty controls schedules its own lectures / labs, this will require careful
coordination initially to achieve the intended effect. The staff working group would work with
timetable representatives and the Registrar's office on the initial launch, utilizing a number of
guiding principles for reference, as follows:
• On average across the entire university, a maximum 33% of classes formerly starting at
8:30 am, would need to be "shifted' to start at 8 am
 Vancouver Senate 12500
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
The remaining majority of classes formerly starting at 8:30 am would be "shifted' later to 9
am
These 'shifts' can occur across entire faculties, or by departments within faculties, or just
by individual courses offered within each faculty - the critical factor is that the overall
UBC average show the 33/67 start-time shift noted above
The Registrar's Office will continue to provide central coordination services, to ensure
overall coordination and achievement of the 33/67 split
Support staff working-days need to stay within the maximum allowed under respective
collective agreements; this is particularly important to keep in mind for lab scheduling and
daycares
Early (i.e. 8 am) and late (i.e. 5 pm) class/lab start-time slots should take into
consideration possible daycare needs for faculty, staff, and students (mainly graduate).
In order to meet publication deadlines and for the scheduling software to assign space, the
majority of course scheduling for the 2001/2002 Winter Session must be completed by
timetable representatives between November 1 and January 26, 2001.
As timetable representatives have limited time and access to complete scheduling, it is
recommended that approval of this change be considered no later than November 2000. A
report is being prepared for consideration of the Board of Governors in November.
Budget
Only one hard cost has been identified - daycare, at an $80,000 worst case.
Funding would come from annual daycare fee increases, and/or U-TREK Card program
revenues. This would be the subject of annual budget review process.
Next Steps
• Approval by Board of Governors - November 2000
• Implementation - September 2001
Proposed implementation of changes in class start times
Appendix to Lecture Start-Time Change Proposal, submitted by Dr. R. A. Spencer, Registrar
These notes outline how Student Services is proposing to implement a change in class start
times, if this change is approved.
1. Most classes will have start times from 8 AM to 5 PM (most current start times are from
8:30 AM to 4:30 PM).
2. Most classes will start on the hour, instead of the half hour. Some 1.5 hour classes will
start on the half-hour. However, there will continue to be some classes that start at nonstandard times.
3. The majority of classes with current start times from 8:30 to 4:30 will initially be rescheduled to start 30 minutes later. However, in some faculties and departments, classes
will be re-scheduled to start earlier. The decision on whether to initially re-schedule
specific classes to start earlier or later will be made in consultation with faculty and
department representatives.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
12501
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Courses currently starting at 5 PM or later will not be rescheduled, except where timetable
representatives reschedule individual courses.
Following the initial conversion of the existing schedule to the new times, faculty and
departmental timetable representatives will be able to move existing courses to new times,
and to schedule new courses at the times that work best, as they do now.
The standard sequences for 3 credit courses will be:
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
1 hour classes starting on the hour, with start times from 8 AM to 5 PM
Tuesdays and Thursdays
Three 1.5 hour classes in the morning, starting at 8, 9:30 and 11 AM
Two 1.5 hour classes in the afternoon, starting at 2 and 3:30 PM
The use of standard start times and sequences will be strongly encouraged to allow
effective use of rooms and permit maximum freedom of choice when students are selecting
courses.
Subject to approval by Senate, the two hour break from 12:30 to 2:30 on Thursdays,
during which classes should not normally be scheduled, would be either moved to 12:00 to
2:00, or shortened to 90 minutes and moved to 12:30 to 2:00. Some courses are currently
scheduled in this period, and this may continue to be the case. If the break is not reduced
to 90 minutes, the third 1.5 hour class on Thursdays would run into the 2-hour period by
20 minutes.
Many courses do not use the standard 3 credit course sequences. Recommended start
times for most of these courses are shown in Appendix 1.
Where non-standard start times are necessary in specific programs, these would continue to be
used.
Recommended Standard Start Times
The most common class durations are: 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4-hours. Most 1-hour classes start at
well defined standard times. Standard starting times for the other class durations are not as
well defined, with some classes starting on every half-hour and hour boundary. The most
common start times for each duration are shown below, together with new recommended
standard start times.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of November 15,2000
12502
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Class
Current standard start times for
Proposed standard start times for
Thursday break 12:00-
duration
common class durations1
common class durations
2:00or12:30-2:003
(start times below
should not be used)
1 he
On the half-hour
8:30,9:30,10:30
On the hour
8:00,9:00, ...,5:00
12:00
1:00
1.5 hours
30, 10:00, 11:30,
30, 4:00
00,9
00,3
30, 11:002
30
2 hours 8:30, 10:30,
2:30,4:30
1:30 and 3:30 are also popul
starting times
8:00, 10:00 12:00,
2:00, 4:00
1:00 and 3:00 could also be
alternatives for any day except
Thursday
12:00
1:00
3 he
9:30
1:30 or 2:30
9:00
1:00 or 2:00
1:00
4 he
30
30 or 2:30
00
00 or 2:00
1:00
1With the exception of the 4-hour meetings, classes are currently starting on every half-hour and hour
time boundary.
2 1.5 hour courses scheduled at 11:00 on Tuesdays and Thursdays will extend into the 2 hour Thursday
break time by 20 minutes. If the break is reduced to 90 minutes this will not conflict.
3 If the break remains at 2 hours, it will be scheduled from 12:00 to 2:00. If Senate approves shortening
it to 90 minutes, it would be scheduled from 12:30 to 2:00. Most students would have a 2-hour break,
as the only conflicting standard sequence would be 1.5-hour classes beginning at 11:00. Having the
ability to schedule 1.5-hour classes at 11:00 is critical for many faculties and departments.
Vice President McBride
Dean Granot
That the Lecture Start-Time Change Proposal
be approved.
Mr. Greathed remarked that 8:00 a.m. was not the optimal time for students to attend
classes, as demonstrated by clinical studies. He added, however, that since the students
had endorsed the plan, that the Senate should approve it as well. In response to a query
from Mr. Greathed, Mr. Lovegrove confirmed that Food Services would extend its hours
to accommodate the new schedule, but that the Student Services offices in Brock Hall
would not change their hours of operation.
 Vancouver Senate 12503
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Dr. Tees asked whether the proposers had examined the issue of additional costs to
Faculties and Departments for audio-visual services. Mr. Lovegrove responded that, for
the most part, the change could be accommodated by splitting the shifts worked by audiovisual technicians. He added that Departments incurring direct costs related to additional
shifts might be eligible to receive funding from the U-TREK program.
Dr. Yaworsky pointed out that there was some precedent for Senate's consideration of
class scheduling issues, and referred to the 1997 approval of a 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
break between classes on Thursdays. The report that led to the approval of the 2-hour
break had been presented by the Academic Policy Committee. He added that the start-
time change proposal would have wide-reaching implications.
Dr. Yaworsky l        That the Lecture Start-Time Change Proposal
Mr. Podersky-Cannon      i        ^e f^ferred to the Academic Policy Committee
for review.
Dr. Spencer stated that, if Senate approval of the proposal were delayed until December
2000, it would not be possible to implement the scheduling changes for September 2001.
Vice President McBride, speaking against the motion to refer, stated that extensive
discussion had already taken place on campus, and that consultation had been conducted
with staff, faculty and students. Furthermore, future negotiations with the transit
authority depended upon the approval of the start-time shift.
Dr. Tees also spoke against the motion to refer, but added that he would be interested to
hear what issues the Academic Policy Committee might explore. Dr. Yaworsky stated that
he was distressed that Senate had been presented with a proposal on the last possible day
that it could be approved, and offered the opinion that the proposal should have been
brought forward at an ear-
 Vancouver Senate 12504
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
lier date. He stated that the Academic Policy Committee should be granted the
opportunity to conduct a cursory review of the implementation guidelines.
Ms. Simmons offered information about the process followed in developing the proposal,
which had included meetings with timetable representatives, information sessions on
likely impacts on scheduling, and meetings with identified representatives from each
Faculty. Testing of the scheduling system had been conducted, and Ms. Simmons reported
that Classroom Services felt well prepared to effect the necessary changes.
The motion to
refer was put and
defeated.
The motion to
approve was put
and carried
(2 opposed)
ACADEMIC COMMITTEE ON THE CREATIVE USE OF LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES
(ACCULT) DISCUSSION PAPER
[Note: the text of this report does not appear in the Minutes. Copies are available from
the Manager, Secretariat Services.]
Dr. McBride presented a discussion paper entitled "The Creative Use of Learning
Technologies," which had been prepared by the Academic Committee on the Creative Use
of Learning Technologies (ACCULT). He invited Dr. Neil Guppy, Associate Vice
President, Academic Programs, and Mr. Tony Bates, Director, Distance Education and
Technology, to address Senate. Two additional members of the ACCULT were present:
Mr. Ted Dodds, Associate Vice President, Information Technology, and Prof. Kathy
Pichora-Fuller from the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences.
Dr. Guppy stated ACCULT hoped to assess whether they had correctly captured the
Senate's sense of where learning ought to be moving at UBC, and what role learning
technology ought to
 Vancouver Senate 12505
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
play. ACCULT was also seeking feedback about whether the discussion paper identified
some of the necessary steps toward our vision of learning. Dr. Guppy acknowledged that
ACCULT cannot know exactly how technology would effect learning, but focused instead
on a process that the University might adopt to place itself strategically for upcoming
changes. Dr. Guppy emphasized that the newer forms of learning technology, such as
computer-enabled or video-enabled learning, could enhance learning at UBC, but that
they would not completely replace traditional teaching and learning methods.
With information gathered from various workshops, meetings and focus groups,
ACCULT had developed a number of scenarios depicting learning with technology. One
such scenario was illustrated by a video entitled, "UBC 2005: Learning with
Technology," and the video was shown to Senate.
Mr. Bates pointed out that the video represented just one of many different scenarios. The
video deliberately focussed on the student's perspective, and did not cover the faculty's
perspective, nor the necessary technical support. Mr. Bates explained that ACCULT
wished to confirm that they were heading in the right direction before developing
proposals to address funding and technical support. As technology would allow almost
any kind of teaching, Mr. Bates urged members of Senate to consider what kind of
teaching would be most desirable.
Dr. Guppy asked for general comments from members of Senate, and stated that
ACCULT intended to bring a fuller set of recommendations back to Senate in the spring
of 2001.
Dr. Blake expressed the opinion that ACCULT was heading in the right direction. He
added that an evaluation of the likelihood of particular pitfalls and how they might be
avoided would be helpful.
 Vancouver Senate 12506
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Dr. Berger stated that the human infrastructure required to implement the technologies
outlined in the report was a fundamental issue for Departments, especially given the
current climate of fiscal restraint. Since many departments fall short financially just in
terms of supporting their basic missions, a substantial redirection of funding would be
necessary.
Dr. Tees described his involvement with a network of graduate department heads in
Psychology, and stated that many members of this group could offer expertise about
implementing learning technologies. He agreed with Dr. Berger that either an infusion of
new funds or a major redeployment of existing funds would be necessary, and added that
evaluation would be crucial during implementation to ensure that our efforts are
improving learning.
Dean Tierney expressed appreciation for the statement about weaving the cost of
technology into budgets on an annual rate, rather than on a one time basis. He stated the
that video appeared to place students in a receptive rather than constructive mode with
technology. He suggested the development of a strategic plan about how the University
would move ahead with regard to professional support, given the wide range of faculty
experience and expertise related to technology. Dr. Goldman-Segall expressed the opinion
that the deployment of new media was remarkably slow and problematic on many levels,
and that implementation could only be accomplished in incremental steps. She stressed
the need for a clear vision for teaching and learning in the context of new media, and
added that she would like Senate to see some of the work being done at UBC and
elsewhere and to examine other models.
Dr. Lyster stated that it was important to deal with issues such as obsolescence, and gave
an example of data stored in 1997 that had since become inaccessible.
 Vancouver Senate 12507
Minutes of November 15,2000
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
Mr. Podersky-Cannon commended ACCULT for an excellent video production, which
would help the University community become excited about the possibilities associated
with learning technologies. He suggested that a thorough downside risk analysis be
conducted. He asked whether implementation could happen incrementally, or whether it
would be necessary to install computer cables over entire Faculties or the entire campus.
He also remarked on the high cost of some of the hardware shown in the video.
Dr. Burt explained that the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences was faced with the task of
building a new curriculum, likely using case-based or problem-based learning. She
described one of the challenges as how to teach students to efficiently access, retrieve,
evaluate and disseminate information.
Some members of Senate felt that the video implied the devaluation of traditional learning
methods. The title, "UBC 2005: Learning with Technology," for example, implied that no
other technologies had been used in the past.
Ms. Quinlan stated that interesting work was being done on campus in the area of
technology, and that the University could look to build upon that work. She added that
many of these efforts had been funded on a one-time basis using soft funds, and that a
these funds should be moved into a more confirmed, ongoing area of the University
budget.
Vice President McBride thanked the Committee for its work, and stated that the feedback
from members of Senate would be taken under consideration. He stated that, given the
progressive technological environment, the University would incur a large risk if it were
not prepared to invest. He added that he looked forward to discussions about where this
issue fits among the priorities for the University.
 Vancouver Senate 12508
Minutes of November 15,2000
Enrolment 2000/01
CHANGE OF NAME FOR CENTRE FOR INTEGRATED COMPUTER SYSTEMS
RESEARCH (CICSR)
Vice President McBride had circulated a proposal to change the name of CICSR to the
Institute of Computing, Information and Cognitive Systems (IOCS). The proposal had
been developed in relation to a successful Canada Foundation for Innovation application,
which will integrate and expand the work going on at CICSR. The governance structure
of the unit was to remain unaltered.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve of changing the name of
Dean Isaacson i        the Centre for Integrated Computer Systems
Research (CICSR) to the Institute of
Computing, Information and Cognitive
Systems (ICICS).
Carried.
BOTANICAL GARDEN AND CENTRE FOR HORTICULTURE
Vice President McBride had circulated a proposal from the Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences to establish the Botanical Garden and Centre for Horticulture.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Quayle i        Botanical Garden and Centre for Horticulture.
Carried.
Enrolment 2000/01
[Note: the text of this report is not included in the Minutes. Copies are available from the
Manager, Secretariat Services.]
The Registrar circulated statistics on student enrolment to date for the 2000/01 academic
year, which indicated a shortfall of approximately 269 full time equivalent (FTE) students
fewer than the target. Dr. Spencer outlined the enrolment management process, stated
that 2000/01 marked the first year in many year that enrolment had been under the
target.
 Vancouver Senate 12509
Minutes of November 15,2000
Golden Key International Honour Society: An Update
Although the University had admitted 323 new students more than its target, the numbers
of returning students were lower than predicted. Students had also registered in courses at
a slightly lower rate than projected. Dr. Spencer stated that a survey was underway to
assess whether any particular factors were responsible for the lower-than-projected
registration.
Golden Key International Honour Society: An Update
BACKGROUND
Dr. Rosengarten gave an oral report on the activities of the Golden Key International
Honour Society, which followed a report he had given to Senate two years earlier on the
same topic.
When the Golden Key Honour Society (as it was then called), inaugurated its chapter at
UBC on November 16th, 1998, it was immediately criticized by the Ubyssey student
newspaper as "secretive, and lavish in its spending of students' money." The Alma Mater
Society voted against supporting a chapter of what it regarded as an "elitist American"
society. Dr. Rosengarten had been asked to review the operation of the Society, and had
reported his findings to Senate on February 24, 1999. He reported that UBC staff had
given due diligence to checking the Society's credentials, that the Society's financial affairs
had been audited and found to be in order, and that the membership fee of $80 was not
excessive, since it was a one-time fee and brought life-time membership. The UBC chapter
was approved by the Campus Advisory Board on Student Development. Membership
offered students a number of benefits, including scholarships and the promise of career
contacts with major companies. Dr. Rosengarten's report had concluded that Golden Key
appeared to be a praise-worthy organization. He had also agreed to ask the Vice
President, Students to report back to Senate on the Society's activities in November 2000.
With the support of Vice President Brian Sullivan, Dr. Rosengarten had prepared this
report for the information of Senate.
 Vancouver Senate 12510
Minutes of November 15,2000
Golden Key International Honour Society: An Update
GROWTH OF THE SOCIETY
In January 2001, the Society was to change its name to become the "Golden Key
International Honor Society," in recognition of its rapid growth around the world. There
were 260 chapters in the United States, and approximately 40 branches in Canada,
Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia and South Africa. The number of life-time members
had passed the million mark. Eleven chapters had been established in Canada, including
at the University of Toronto, the University of Alberta, and at all four British Columbia
universities. Concordia University was to join in the spring of 2001. These 11 Canadian
chapters housed over 13,000 Golden Key lifetime members in Canada. The UBC chapter
had approximately 1400 members, and was expected to pass the 2000 mark in the near
future.
RECENT ACTIVITIES
Three members of faculty and staff acted as advisors to the UBC chapter: Dr. Paul
Harrison, Associate Dean, Faculty of Science; Andrew Arida, Student Recruiter-Advisor;
and Julie Walchli, Director, Arts Co-op Program.
Since the UBC chapter's inception, UBC student members had won approximately
$35,000 USD in scholarships and prizes, including two Golden Key Scholar Awards,
which were $10,000 scholarships awarded by Golden Key to 10 people selected each year
from its entire membership. The Society also promoted excellence in the arts: at the
Golden Key International Convention in Los Angeles earlier in 2000, a UBC student had
won a $1,000 award for excellence in the performing arts.
The UBC chapter had become quite active in Golden Key affairs, sending representatives
to conferences in Orlando, Los Angeles and Seattle. In March 2000, the UBC chapter
hosted the first Golden Key conference in Canada, which attracted 80 delegates from
across the country.
 Vancouver Senate 12511
Minutes of November 15,2000
Golden Key International Honour Society: An Update
Dr. Rosengarten noted that the Society's Manager for Canadian Operations and the
Canadian Regional Director were both UBC alumni, and that the current President of the
UBC chapter (Mr. Timothy Chan) was a member of Senate. Other Golden Key activities
included participation in the Terry Fox Run, book drives in support of Queen Alexandra
Elementary School, and volunteer work on the Downtown East Side. Members had also
hosted a trip to UBC by children and staff members from Queen Alexandra Elementary
School.
MEMBERSHIP INCENTIVES
One of the membership incentives was the promise of contact with the corporate world.
Members were offered career advice through an on-line career centre, which assisted them
in preparing and posting their resumes. The Society's Corporate Council now includes
Ford Motor Company, Motorola, Dow Chemical and General Mills. Dr. Rosengarten
stated that it was difficult to determine whether Canadian members had benefited from
this aspect of Golden Key. The Manager of Canadian Operations had agreed that it was
difficult to say with any confidence that a student got a job because s/he was a member of
Golden Key. She did offer several anecdotes, however, which suggested that employers
had been favorably inclined to applicants with such membership.
SUMMARY
The Golden Key International Honour Society had demonstrated itself to be a responsible
and well run organization, and that it acted in the best interests of its student members.
Its UBC chapter had distinguished itself by academic success and commendable service
activity.
Mr. Chan added that both of the UBC winners of the Golden Key Scholar awards had
also been named Lett Scholars.
 Vancouver Senate 12512
Minutes of November 15,2000
Other Business
Other Business
ACTING DEAN JOHN A. MCLEAN
The President announced that Acting Dean John McLean was attending his last meeting
of Senate as Acting Dean of the Faculty of Forestry. The President thanked him for
serving so ably as Acting Dean, and stressed her sincere appreciation for his work on
behalf of the Faculty and the University at a very important time. Members of Senate
offered a round of applause.
Tributes Committee: in camera
CANDIDATES FOR HONORARY DEGREES
Dr. Helliwell presented the list of candidates for honorary degrees. He stated that the
candidates reflected positively on their communities, on the University, on Canada, and
on the world. He noted that the group represented a considerable range of disciplines,
backgrounds and contributions. The candidates were:
Note: This section of the Minutes is not circulated.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of November 15,2000
12513
Adjournment
Dr. Helliwell
Dr. Nemetz
That Senate approve the recommendations of
the Tributes Committee with respect to
honorary degrees.
Carried.
In response to a query from Dr. Knight, Dr. Slonecker stated that the new deadline for
receipt of nominations for honorary degrees would be June 30, 2001 for consideration for
2002.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned.
Next meeting
The next regular meeting of the Senate will be held on Wednesday, December 13th, 2000,
at 8:00 p.m.
 Vancouver Senate 12514
Minutes of November 15,2000
Appendix A: New Awards
Appendix A: New Awards
ALLARD and Company Prize in Corporations-A $1000 prize is offered by Allard and Company
to a student with high standing in Corporations I (Law 459). The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
ALLARD and Company Scholarship in Law-A $1000 scholarship is offered by Allard and
Company to an outstanding student in second year Law. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Bob BAKER Memorial Bursary in Law-A $300 bursary has been endowed by family and friends
in memory of Bob Baker (LL.B., '81). The award is offered to a student in Law. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
Janet Louise BERRYMAN Scholarship in Medicine-Scholarships totalling $17,500 have been
endowed through a bequest by Janet Louise Berryman. The awards are offered to students in the
Faculty of Medicine, including those in the School of Rehabilitation Sciences. The awards are
made on the recommendation of the Faculty. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Anne and John BROWN Fellowship in Diabetes and Obesity Related Research-A $18,000
fellowship has been endowed by Ann and John Brown. The award is offered to a graduate student
involved in diabetes and obesity related research and is made on the nomination of the Killam
Fellowship Committee in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
CANADIAN Association on Water Quality Scholarship-A scholarship of $1,750 has been
endowed by the Canadian Association on Water Quality (CAWQ), for a student in Environmental
Engineering in the M.A.Sc. or Ph.D. program. The scholarship is offered to a student involved in
research related to water quality and waste management and is awarded on the recommendation
of the Department of Civil Engineering in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
(Partial funding available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
CANADIAN Council of Financial Analysts Prize-A $500 prize has been endowed by the
Canadian Council of Financial Analysts. The award is offered to a third or fourth year
undergraduate student in the Finance option and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Commerce and Business Administration. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Kay and Lloyd CHAPMAN Bursary-Bursaries totalling $1,750 have been endowed by Kay and
Lloyd Chapman for students in any program or year of study. (Partial funding available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
Millie and Ralph DRABINSKY Graduate Scholarship in Medicine-A $600 scholarship has been
endowed by family and friends in honour of Ralph and Millie Drabinsky's fiftieth wedding
anniversary. The award is offered to a master's or doctoral student in the Faculty of Medicine
undertaking research into the etiology or treatment of Alzheimer's or related neurodegenerative
diseases of the central nervous system. No individual will receive support from this fund for more
than two consecutive years. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Medicine in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
 Vancouver Senate 12515
Minutes of November 15,2000
Appendix A: New Awards
Gail HELLER Memorial Bursary in Occupational Therapy-A $300 bursary has been endowed in
memory of Gail (nee Feldman) Heller by family, friends, and colleagues, and is offered to a
student in the Bachelor of Science Occupational Therapy program. (Partial funding available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
Edward and Rachel ISAACSON Memorial Prize in Mining-A $300 prize has been endowed in
memory of Edward and Rachel Isaacson, parents of Dr. Michael Isaacson, Dean of Applied
Science, for a student in the fourth year of the Mining and Mineral Process Engineering Program
(Mining Option). The prize is awarded on the recommendation of the Department of Mining and
Mineral Process Engineering, with preference given to a student who has had experience in the
mining industry during the program. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Hanna E. KASSIS Prize in Religious Studies-A $300 prize has been endowed by friends and
colleagues in honour of Professor Emeritus Hanna E. Kassis. The award is offered to a student in
Religious Studies, with preference given to a student with a demonstrated interest in Islamic
Studies. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of Classical, Near Eastern,
and Religious Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Daniel G. Y. LING Memorial Prize-A $500 prize is offered by the family of Daniel G. Y. Ling to
an outstanding Medical Resident with a demonstrated interest in the treatment of cancer of the
ear, nose, and throat. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine.
(Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Grace S.M. LING Memorial Prize-A $500 prize is offered by the family of Grace S. M. Ling to an
outstanding Medical Resident with a demonstrated interest in the treatment of ovarian cancer.
The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. (Available 2000/2001
Winter Session)
Isaac LIPOVSKY Award in Nutrition-A $600 award has been endowed through a bequest by
Shirley Lipovsky in honour of her brother. The award is offered to a student whose academic
focus is the study of nutrition. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Rafe MAIR Prize in Journalism-A $1,000 prize is offered by CKNW Radio in honour of Rafe
Mair. It is awarded to a student in the graduating class in the Master of Journalism program who
has produced the best published work of public service journalism during the degree program.
The award is made on the recommendation of the School of Journalism in consultation with the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
MILLER THOMSON Entrance Scholarship in Law-A $2,500 scholarship is offered by Miller
Thomson, LLP, to a student entering Law. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Kaspar NAEGELE Memorial Prize in Sociology-A $700 prize has been endowed by Robert
(B.A.'60) and Judith Doll (M.A.'94) and former students, friends, and colleagues in memory of
Dr. Kaspar Naegele, a caring and inspirational teacher and renowned scholar who served as
Professor of Sociology from 1954 to 1965 and the Dean of Arts (1964-1965). The award is
offered to an undergraduate student in the honours or majors program in Sociology and is made
on the
 Vancouver Senate 12516
Minutes of November 15,2000
Appendix A: New Awards
recommendation of the Department of Anthropology & Sociology. (Available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
Matti NUT Memorial Prize in Electrical Engineering-A prize of $300 has been endowed in
memory of Matti Niit. The award is offered to an outstanding student in Electrical Engineering,
with preference given to a fourth year student. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Department of Electrical Engineering. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Joan le NOBEL Prize in Environmental Sciences-A $600 prize has been endowed by Joan le Nobel
for an outstanding student in environmental sciences. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Science. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Steve and Therese PETO Memorial Scholarship-A $500 scholarship has been endowed by Peter
Peto in honour of his parents Steve and Therese Peto. The award is offered to an undergraduate
student in the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences and is made on the recommendation of
the Department. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Joseph M. PRODOR Prize in Law-A $500 prize is offered by Joseph M. Prodor to a first year
student who shows outstanding achievement in Torts (Law 207). The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
ST. LEONARD'S Youth and Family Services Scholarship-A $1,100 scholarship has been endowed
by St. Leonard's Youth and Family Services. The award is offered to an undergraduate student
entering the final year of study in Social Work. The award is made on the recommendation of the
School of Social Work. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
SHOPPERS Drug Mart Terry Morrison Scholarship-Two scholarships of $1,000 have been
donated by Shoppers Drug Mart in honour of Terry Morrison. The awards are open to students
in second or third year of the undergraduate program in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Preference is
given to students who demonstrate a contribution to pharmacy. The awards are made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Takao TAN ABE Prize in Painting-A $750 prize is offered by Takao Tanabe through the
Vancouver Foundation for a student in Intermediate Painting (FINA 382) with preference given to
a student in fourth year. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of Fine
Arts. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
UNIVERSITY Women's Club of Vancouver Scholarship in Mathematics Education-A $975
scholarship has been endowed by the University Women's Club of Vancouver Trust Fund for
Education students specializing in Mathematics. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Education and in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Kenneth George VANS ACKER Memorial Scholarship-Scholarships totalling $3,100 have been
endowed by Al VanSacker in memory of his son, Kenneth. The awards are offered to students in
Electrical Engineering and are made on the recommendation of the Department of Electrical and
Computer Engineering, and in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
 Vancouver Senate 12517
Minutes of November 15,2000
Appendix A: New Awards
May WATSON Bursary-Bursaries totaling $940 have been endowed through the estate of May
Watson for undergraduate students. (Partial funding available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
ATHLETIC AWARDS
INNOVATIVE Fitness Football Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum
value of $300 each are endowed in honour of Innovative Fitness. Awards are offered to students,
in any year of study, who are outstanding members of the Thunderbird Football team. Awards are
made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
SIDOO Family Thunderbird Athletic Award-One or more awards, which may range from a
minimum value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations,
are offered to outstanding members of a Thunderbird Varsity Team in any year of study. Awards
are made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Alpine Skiing Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum
value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered
to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Alpine Ski Team in any year of study. Awards are
made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Baseball Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum value
of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered to
outstanding members of the Thunderbird Baseball Team in any year of study. Awards are made
on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available 2000/2001
Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Field Hockey Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum
value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered
to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Field Hockey Team in any year of study. Awards are
made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Men's Soccer Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum
value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered
to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Men's Soccer Team in any year of study. Awards are
made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Men's Volleyball Award-One or more awards, which may range from a
minimum value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations,
are offered to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Men's Volleyball Team in any year of
study. Awards are made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee.
(Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Rowing Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum value
of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered to out-
 Vancouver Senate 12518
Minutes of November 15,2000
Appendix A: New Awards
standing members of the Thunderbird Rowing Team in any year of study. Awards are made on
the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
THUNDERBIRD Rugby Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum value of
$500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered to
outstanding members of the Thunderbird Rugby Team in any year of study. Awards are made on
the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
THUNDERBIRD Swimming Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum
value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered
to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Swimming Team in any year of study. Awards are
made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Track & Field Award-One or more awards, which may range from a minimum
value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations, are offered
to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Track & Field Team in any year of study. Awards are
made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Women in Sport Award-One or more awards, which may range from a
minimum value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations,
are offered to outstanding female members of the Thunderbird Teams in any year of study.
Awards are made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee.
(Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Women's Basketball Award-One or more awards, which may range from a
minimum value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations,
are offered to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Women's Basketball Team in any year of
study. Awards are made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee.
(Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
THUNDERBIRD Women's Ice Hockey Award-One or more awards, which may range from a
minimum value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association regulations,
are offered to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Women's Ice Hockey Team in any year of
study. Awards are made on the recommendation of the President's Athletic Awards Committee.
(Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Approved by Senate Committee on Student Awards
September 26, 2000
 Vancouver Senate 12519
Minutes of November 15,2000
Appendix B: Memorial Minute for Loring (Jack) Goodwin Mitten
Appendix B: Memorial Minute for Loring (Jack) Goodwin Mitten
Professor Loring (Jack) Goodwin Mitten, Professor Emeritus, died on June 19, 2000 at the
age of 79.
Jack was a leader within the Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration during his
tenure (1969 through 1985) at UBC. Jack joined UBC from Northwestern University where
he had already established a reputation for high quality research, a strong commitment to
teaching and leadership in his chosen discipline. Upon joining UBC, Jack served as Chair of
the Division of Management Science from 1969 to 1979. He was the guiding force in the
development of both the undergraduate and graduate programs in Management Science and
the quantitative methods courses in the Commerce curriculum. Jack played a major role in
designing the strategy for the emerging Management Science Division and played a major role
in recruiting top quality colleagues in quantitative methods, statistics and logistics. In 1982
Jack was awarded the prestigious UBC Commerce Talking Stick for his outstanding
leadership in developing the Management Science programs and quantitative courses in
Commerce.
Jack was also a strong supporter of the graduate program in Management Science at UBC. He
personally recruited a number of outstanding Ph.D. candidates, and then ensured that their
learning experience at UBC was second to none. He is fondly remembered by his many former
graduate students.
In addition to his many contributions to the development of our Management Science
teaching programs, Jack provided valuable leadership in the administration of the Faculty of
Commerce & Business Administration. He persuaded the Faculty (subsequently the
University) to allow students to attend regular Faculty meetings, a hotly debated issue in
Senate at that time. Jack encouraged the Faculty to institute mandatory and regular course
and teacher evaluations long before they became part of UBC policy. Jack promoted the
creation of the Faculty Executive Committee, a committee comprising both senior and junior
colleagues to assist the Dean in the management of the Faculty. Jack was also instrumental in
redrafting the Appointment, Promotions and Tenure policies for the Faculty, including the
requirement for student input in the Appointment, tenure and promotion process. As former
Dean Lusztig once noted, "Jack had a role in every important committee in Commerce".
Jack's scholarship and his strong commitment to students are remembered each year when the
Faculty presents the Jack Mitten Award to the Commerce undergraduate student with the
highest average in second year Commerce. As one former student noted on the occasion of
Jack's retirement in 1985, "Jack's class was a refreshing break in the middle of a hectic day. I
always felt refreshed when I woke up. ... For me, the genius of Jack Mitten is Commerce 110.
It's amazing how Jack could receive 400 identical exams and return them in a perfect Bell
curve".
While Jack retired almost 15 years ago, UBC Commerce continues to enjoy the benefits from
many of his initiatives and projects. His wit, insightful observations, leadership and sincere
concern for students will always be remembered.
Jack was predeceased by his wife Jean, and is survived by his daughter Suzanne Cloud Mitten-
Lewis and his son Richard Charles Mitten.
 Vancouver Senate 12520
Minutes of November 15,2000
Appendix B: Memorial Minute for Loring (Jack) Goodwin Mitten
Stanley W. Hamilton, Senior Associate Dean
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration

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