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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2010-01-20

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 THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
Vancouver Senate
MINUTES OF JANUARY 20, 2010
Attendance
Present: Prof. S. J. Toope (Chair), Mr. J. Ridge (Secretary), Dr. R. Anstee, Mr. C. Au, Dr.
K. Baimbridge, Dean M. A. Bobinski, Dr. J. Brander, Principal M. Burgess, Mr. A.
Cheung, Mr. G. Costeloe, Mr. G. Dew, Dr. W. Dunford, Dean B. Evans, Dr. D. Farrar
(Provost & Vice-President, Academic), Rev. Dr. S. Farris, Dr. D. Fielding, Ms. M. Friesen,
Dean N. Gallini, Mr. R. Gardiner, Mr. C. Gorman, Mr. S. Haffey, Dr. W. Hall, Dr. P. G.
Harrison, Ms. K. Ho, Dr. A. Ivanov, Mr. A. Johal, Ms. A. Johl, Mr. D. Leung, Dr. P.
Loewen, Dr. P. L Marshall, Dr. W. McKee, Mr. W. McNulty, Mr. J. Mertens, Mr. C. Meyers, Dr. G. Oberg, Dr. C. Orvig, Ms. I. Parent, Dr. K. Patterson, Dean S. Peacock, Mr. B.
Perrin, Dr. J. Plessis, Ms. S. Purewal, Dr. A. Riseman, Dr. T. Ross, Dr. L. Rucker, Mr. J.
Sealy-Harrington, Dr. S. Singh, Dr. R. Sparks, Dr. B. Stelck, Dr. S. Thorne, Dean R. Tier-
ney, Mr. B. Tomlinson, Dr. M. Upadhyaya, Mr. D. Verma, Mr. A. Wazeer, Dr. R. A.
Yaworsky, Dr. T. Young.
By invitation: Mr. A. Arida, Mr. N. Beyzaei, Mr. R. Bredin, Ms. S. Chung, Mr. A.C.
Embree, Ms. M. Fryer, Mr. A.J. Hajian, Ms. H. Kim, Dr. A. Kindler, Ms. K. McKellin,
Mr. W. Sudmant, Mr. G. Tse.
Regrets: Dean T. Aboulnasr, Dr. Y Altintas, Ms. K. Aminoltejari, Dr. B. Cairns, Mr. B.
Cappellacci, Ms. B. Craig, Dr. J. Dennison, Ms. A. Dulay, Mr. S. Heisler, Dean M. Isman,
Ms. A. Kelly, Dr. S. B. Knight, Dr. B. S. Lalli, Dr. B. Larson, Dr. D. Lehman, Mr. B. Mac-
Dougall, Ms. S. Morgan-Silvester (Chancellor), Dean D. Muzyka, Principal L. Nasmith,
Dean J. Saddler, Mr. M. Sami, Ms. E. Segal, Ms. A. Shaikh, Dean C. Shuler, Dean R. Sin-
delar, Dean G. Stuart, Mr. D. Thakrar, Dr. M. Vessey, Dr. R. Wilson, Dr. R. Windsor-Lis-
combe.
Recording Secretary: Ms. L. M. Collins.
Senate Membership
DECLARATION OF VACANCY
The Secretary declared a vacancy for one faculty representative of the Joint Faculties to
replace resigning Senator Dr. Yusuf Altintas.
Vol. 2009/2010 97
 THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
Vancouver Senate
MINUTES OF JANUARY 20, 2010
Attendance
Present: Prof. S. J. Toope (Chair), Mr. J. Ridge (Secretary), Dr. R. Anstee, Mr. C. Au, Dr.
K. Baimbridge, Dean M. A. Bobinski, Dr. J. Brander, Principal M. Burgess, Mr. A.
Cheung, Mr. G. Costeloe, Mr. G. Dew, Dr. W. Dunford, Dean B. Evans, Dr. D. Farrar
(Provost & Vice-President, Academic), Rev. Dr. S. Farris, Dr. D. Fielding, Ms. M. Friesen,
Dean N. Gallini, Mr. R. Gardiner, Mr. C. Gorman, Mr. S. Haffey, Dr. W. Hall, Dr. P. G.
Harrison, Ms. K. Ho, Dr. A. Ivanov, Mr. A. Johal, Ms. A. Johl, Mr. D. Leung, Dr. P.
Loewen, Dr. P. L Marshall, Dr. W. McKee, Mr. W. McNulty, Mr. J. Mertens, Mr. C. Meyers, Dr. G. Oberg, Dr. C. Orvig, Ms. I. Parent, Dr. K. Patterson, Dean S. Peacock, Mr. B.
Perrin, Dr. J. Plessis, Ms. S. Purewal, Dr. A. Riseman, Dr. T Ross, Dr. L. Rucker, Mr. J.
Sealy-Harrington, Dr. S. Singh, Dr. R. Sparks, Dr. B. Stelck, Dr. S. Thorne, Dean R. Tier-
ney, Mr. B. Tomlinson, Dr. M. Upadhyaya, Mr. D. Verma, Mr. A. Wazeer, Dr. R. A.
Yaworsky, Dr. T Young.
By invitation: Mr. A. Arida, Mr. N. Beyzaei, Mr. R. Bredin, Ms. S. Chung, Mr. A.C.
Embree, Ms. M. Fryer, Mr. A.J. Hajian, Ms. H. Kim, Dr. A. Kindler, Ms. K. McKellin,
Mr. W. Sudmant, Mr. G. Tse.
Regrets: Dean T Aboulnasr, Dr. Y Altintas, Ms. K. Aminoltejari, Dr. B. Cairns, Mr. B.
Cappellacci, Ms. B. Craig, Dr. J. Dennison, Ms. A. Dulay, Mr. S. Heisler, Dean M. Isman,
Ms. A. Kelly, Dr. S. B. Knight, Dr. B. S. Lalli, Dr. B. Larson, Dr. D. Lehman, Mr. B. Mac-
Dougall, Ms. S. Morgan-Silvester (Chancellor), Dean D. Muzyka, Principal L. Nasmith,
Dean J. Saddler, Mr. M. Sami, Ms. E. Segal, Ms. A. Shaikh, Dean C. Shuler, Dean R. Sin-
delar, Dean G. Stuart, Mr. D. Thakrar, Dr. M. Vessey, Dr. R. Wilson, Dr. R. Windsor-Lis-
combe.
Recording Secretary: Ms. L. M. Collins.
Senate Membership
DECLARATION OF VACANCY
The Secretary declared a vacancy for one faculty representative of the Joint Faculties to
replace resigning Senator Dr. Yusuf Altintas.
Vol. 2009/2010 97
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 98
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Senate Membership, continued
SERVICE RECOGNITION
The President noted that Dr. Robert Tierney was attending his last meeting of Senate
before stepping down as Dean of the Faculty of Education. Senators applauded in appreciation of Dean Tierney's dedicated service to the Senate.
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Mr. Mertens l     That the minutes of the meeting of
Dr. Anstee J     December 16, 2009 be adopted as
circulated.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
METRO VANCOUVER AND ACADEMIC LAND USE (P. 09/10 79)
Further to his remarks at the December 2009 meeting, Prof. Toope reported that Mr. Stephen Owen, Vice-President, External, Legal and Community Relations, had scheduled a
meeting with the Senate Academic Building Needs Committee to discuss Metro Vancouver's plan to introduce new regulations governing use of academic land. In response to a
question from Mr. Costeloe, the assembly recognized Ms. Collins, who stated that guests
were welcome at meetings of Senate Committees at the discretion of each Committee, and
that requests should be directed to the Committee Chair through the Secretariat.
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
PROVINCIAL HST REBATE
The President was pleased to report that the provincial government had decided to provide a provincial Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) rebate for universities. He stated that this
action underscored the provincial government's commitment to post-secondary education. Eligible universities would receive a rebate of 75 percent, meaning that they would
pay no more after harmonization than under the Provincial Sales Tax.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 98
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Senate Membership, continued
SERVICE RECOGNITION
The President noted that Dr. Robert Tierney was attending his last meeting of Senate
before stepping down as Dean of the Faculty of Education. Senators applauded in appreciation of Dean Tierney's dedicated service to the Senate.
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Mr. Mertens l     That the minutes of the meeting of
Dr. Anstee J     December 16, 2009 be adopted as
circulated.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
METRO VANCOUVER AND ACADEMIC LAND USE (P. 09/10 79)
Further to his remarks at the December 2009 meeting, Prof. Toope reported that Mr. Stephen Owen, Vice-President, External, Legal and Community Relations, had scheduled a
meeting with the Senate Academic Building Needs Committee to discuss Metro Vancouver's plan to introduce new regulations governing use of academic land. In response to a
question from Mr. Costeloe, the assembly recognized Ms. Collins, who stated that guests
were welcome at meetings of Senate Committees at the discretion of each Committee, and
that requests should be directed to the Committee Chair through the Secretariat.
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
PROVINCIAL HST REBATE
The President was pleased to report that the provincial government had decided to provide a provincial Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) rebate for universities. He stated that this
action underscored the provincial government's commitment to post-secondary education. Eligible universities would receive a rebate of 75 percent, meaning that they would
pay no more after harmonization than under the Provincial Sales Tax.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 99
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions, continued
STRUCTURAL DEFICIT AND ANNUAL CAPITAL ALLOWANCE REDUCTION
The President noted that the provincial government planned to reduce the University's
Annual Capital Allowance (ACA) by $7 million in the following fiscal year, in addition to
a $6-million reduction in 2009/2010. As a result, the University's structural deficit had
grown from $25 million to approximately $32 million. The University executive was
working aggressively to centrally recover as much of this amount as possible, rather than
distributing cuts across academic units. Increases in revenue and centralized cost savings
were therefore expected to make up $22 million, leaving $10 million to be addressed
through budget cuts to Faculties and other units. The President was hopeful that this
action would stabilize the budget, if grant funding remained steady.
VANCOUVER 2010 WINTER OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC GAMES
The President noted that the Olympic Games were soon to begin, and emphasized the
opportunity to generate excitement about UBC. Highlights included the following:
• The Olympic Torch Relay was to cross the Point Grey campus on February 11, and a
community celebration was scheduled for that day.
• The Robson Square campus was prepared to host thousands of journalists at the International Media Centre.
• Five 'Sport and Society' dialogs were scheduled to take place at the Chan Centre for the
Performing Arts.
INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY
At the President's request, Vice-President John Hepburn had convened an international
advisory council to draft an International Engagement Strategy. The Strategy would refine
and expand upon the ideas in Prof. Toope's earlier discussion paper on this topic. A draft
plan was expected by the summer of 2010.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 99
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions, continued
STRUCTURAL DEFICIT AND ANNUAL CAPITAL ALLOWANCE REDUCTION
The President noted that the provincial government planned to reduce the University's
Annual Capital Allowance (ACA) by $7 million in the following fiscal year, in addition to
a $6-million reduction in 2009/2010. As a result, the University's structural deficit had
grown from $25 million to approximately $32 million. The University executive was
working aggressively to centrally recover as much of this amount as possible, rather than
distributing cuts across academic units. Increases in revenue and centralized cost savings
were therefore expected to make up $22 million, leaving $10 million to be addressed
through budget cuts to Faculties and other units. The President was hopeful that this
action would stabilize the budget, if grant funding remained steady.
VANCOUVER 2010 WINTER OLYMPIC AND PARALYMPIC GAMES
The President noted that the Olympic Games were soon to begin, and emphasized the
opportunity to generate excitement about UBC. Highlights included the following:
• The Olympic Torch Relay was to cross the Point Grey campus on February 11, and a
community celebration was scheduled for that day.
• The Robson Square campus was prepared to host thousands of journalists at the International Media Centre.
• Five 'Sport and Society' dialogs were scheduled to take place at the Chan Centre for the
Performing Arts.
INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY
At the President's request, Vice-President John Hepburn had convened an international
advisory council to draft an International Engagement Strategy. The Strategy would refine
and expand upon the ideas in Prof. Toope's earlier discussion paper on this topic. A draft
plan was expected by the summer of 2010.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 100
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions, continued
CANADA EXCELLENCE RESEARCH CHAIRS
The President had recently attended presentations of four excellent UBC proposals for
Phase 2 of the federal Canada Excellence Research Chairs (CERC) competition. Final
determinations were to be made by a peer review committee. The CERC program was to
fund up to 20 chairs across Canada at an annual amount of up to $1.4 million each over
seven years. The President described the work involved in developing these proposals as
tremendous and he was optimistic that UBC would be successful in the competition.
Academic Policy Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Harrison presented the report.
THURSDAY NOON-HOUR BREAK
The Committee had circulated the following report for information:
As the Senate was informed at its meeting of 13 May 2009, the Academic Policy
Committee has undertaken a review of the policy prohibiting the scheduling of
classes from 12:30 to 2:00 pm each Thursday. The Committee has consulted with
and received data from faculties and administrative offices, considered detailed
documents prepared by student representatives, and discussed the matter at its
meetings in November and December of 2009. The importance of a time for non-
scheduled curricular or non-curricular activities and meetings to regularly occur
during the school day has been made clear to the Committee, but so have the difficulties in fully implementing the existing policy.
In its deliberations, the Committee has attempted to balance the aspirations of
UBC - as exemplified by Place and Promise commitments to creating an "outstanding work environment" and providing "enriched educational experiences
and rewarding campus life" - with the realities of limited classroom space and student and instructor demands for reasonably compact schedules. The Committee
is aware of the difficulties faced by faculties in finding suitable and sufficient
spaces and times for instruction, and thus the erosion of this policy in current
practice, but still views this break as an important mechanism to facilitate the
scheduling activities beyond those in classes.
The Committee has determined that there is not a consensus to rescind or amend
the policy, but is acutely aware that its full implementation is challenged by the
reality of our scheduling and space situations. As such, the Committee can make
no recommendation to Senate at this time for any changes to the existing policy,
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 100
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions, continued
CANADA EXCELLENCE RESEARCH CHAIRS
The President had recently attended presentations of four excellent UBC proposals for
Phase 2 of the federal Canada Excellence Research Chairs (CERC) competition. Final
determinations were to be made by a peer review committee. The CERC program was to
fund up to 20 chairs across Canada at an annual amount of up to $1.4 million each over
seven years. The President described the work involved in developing these proposals as
tremendous and he was optimistic that UBC would be successful in the competition.
Academic Policy Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Harrison presented the report.
THURSDAY NOON-HOUR BREAK
The Committee had circulated the following report for information:
As the Senate was informed at its meeting of 13 May 2009, the Academic Policy
Committee has undertaken a review of the policy prohibiting the scheduling of
classes from 12:30 to 2:00 pm each Thursday. The Committee has consulted with
and received data from faculties and administrative offices, considered detailed
documents prepared by student representatives, and discussed the matter at its
meetings in November and December of 2009. The importance of a time for non-
scheduled curricular or non-curricular activities and meetings to regularly occur
during the school day has been made clear to the Committee, but so have the difficulties in fully implementing the existing policy.
In its deliberations, the Committee has attempted to balance the aspirations of
UBC - as exemplified by Place and Promise commitments to creating an "outstanding work environment" and providing "enriched educational experiences
and rewarding campus life" - with the realities of limited classroom space and student and instructor demands for reasonably compact schedules. The Committee
is aware of the difficulties faced by faculties in finding suitable and sufficient
spaces and times for instruction, and thus the erosion of this policy in current
practice, but still views this break as an important mechanism to facilitate the
scheduling activities beyond those in classes.
The Committee has determined that there is not a consensus to rescind or amend
the policy, but is acutely aware that its full implementation is challenged by the
reality of our scheduling and space situations. As such, the Committee can make
no recommendation to Senate at this time for any changes to the existing policy,
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 101
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Academic Policy Committee, continued
but takes this opportunity request that faculties and departments endeavour to
implement the policy as much as is possible.
DISCUSSION
In response to a question from Mr. Costeloe, Dr. Harrison expressed the opinion that
given the intractability of various conflicting factors, it would not be productive to refer
this matter back to Academic Policy Committee at that time.
Mr. Tomlinson raised the issue of an apparent failure to notify Faculties that the Noon-
hour Break had been reinstated for 2009/2010 following the 2008/2009 suspension. Dr.
Harrison indicated that he thought a reminder had been sent to Faculties. Ms. Collins
agreed to follow up.
Admissions Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Fielding presented the reports, which are summarized below.
ITEM 6(A), BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission requirements for
applicants to the Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources Conservation program. Applicants were required to complete Chemistry 11 for admission to the program.
ITEM 6(B),BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission requirements for
applicants to the Bachelor of Science in Forestry program. Applicants who had completed
more that one Grade 12 Science course were to have additional elective options in first
year. The revised calendar entry also included additional information on the program's
broader-based admission application process.
ITEM 6(C), BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN WOOD PRODUCTS PROCESSING/MINOR
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 101
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Academic Policy Committee, continued
but takes this opportunity request that faculties and departments endeavour to
implement the policy as much as is possible.
DISCUSSION
In response to a question from Mr. Costeloe, Dr. Harrison expressed the opinion that
given the intractability of various conflicting factors, it would not be productive to refer
this matter back to Academic Policy Committee at that time.
Mr. Tomlinson raised the issue of an apparent failure to notify Faculties that the Noon-
hour Break had been reinstated for 2009/2010 following the 2008/2009 suspension. Dr.
Harrison indicated that he thought a reminder had been sent to Faculties. Ms. Collins
agreed to follow up.
Admissions Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Fielding presented the reports, which are summarized below.
ITEM 6(A), BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission requirements for
applicants to the Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources Conservation program. Applicants were required to complete Chemistry 11 for admission to the program.
ITEM 6(B),BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission requirements for
applicants to the Bachelor of Science in Forestry program. Applicants who had completed
more that one Grade 12 Science course were to have additional elective options in first
year. The revised calendar entry also included additional information on the program's
broader-based admission application process.
ITEM 6(C), BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN WOOD PRODUCTS PROCESSING/MINOR
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 102
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Admissions Committee, continued
IN COMMERCE
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission requirements for
applicants to the Bachelor of Science in Wood Products Processing/Minor in Commerce
program. The revised calendar entry outlined a modified application deadline and a list of
courses applicants must complete for admission to the program.
ITEM 6(D), BACHELOR OF COMMERCE: COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
STUDENTS
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission requirements for
applicants to the Bachelor of Commerce program. College and university transfer students would be able to satisfy the program's English admission requirement by completion of either ASTU 150 or ENGL 100, in addition to Arts One or a Coordinated Arts
Program satisfying the three-credit Writing component of the Faculty of Arts Writing and
Research requirement.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate accept the recommendations as
Mr. Dew J     listed in the report of the Admissions
Committee with respect to Agenda Items
6(a) through 6(d), with changes to take
effect for entry for the 2010 Winter Session
and thereafter.
Carried.
ITEM 6(E), ENGLISH LANGUAGE ADMISSION STANDARD: LANGUAGE
PROFICIENCY INDEX REQUIREMENT FOR FIRST-YEAR ENGLISH COURSES
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on the LPI requirement for first-
year English courses. The proposed changes reflected the introduction of the Writing and
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 102
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Admissions Committee, continued
IN COMMERCE
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission requirements for
applicants to the Bachelor of Science in Wood Products Processing/Minor in Commerce
program. The revised calendar entry outlined a modified application deadline and a list of
courses applicants must complete for admission to the program.
ITEM 6(D), BACHELOR OF COMMERCE: COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
STUDENTS
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission requirements for
applicants to the Bachelor of Commerce program. College and university transfer students would be able to satisfy the program's English admission requirement by completion of either ASTU 150 or ENGL 100, in addition to Arts One or a Coordinated Arts
Program satisfying the three-credit Writing component of the Faculty of Arts Writing and
Research requirement.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate accept the recommendations as
Mr. Dew J     listed in the report of the Admissions
Committee with respect to Agenda Items
6(a) through 6(d), with changes to take
effect for entry for the 2010 Winter Session
and thereafter.
Carried.
ITEM 6(E), ENGLISH LANGUAGE ADMISSION STANDARD: LANGUAGE
PROFICIENCY INDEX REQUIREMENT FOR FIRST-YEAR ENGLISH COURSES
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on the LPI requirement for first-
year English courses. The proposed changes reflected the introduction of the Writing and
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 103
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Admissions Committee, continued
Research Requirement for applicants to the Faculty of Arts, approved by Senate in May
2009.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate approve the revised calendar
Mr. Johal J     entry on the English Language Admission
Standard.
AMENDMENT
Dr. Fielding circulated an amended version of the proposal, which removed references to
"Applied Research and Evaluation Services (ARES)", a unit that no longer existed.
The motion to
approve the
calendar entry as
amended was put
and carried.
ITEM 6(F) CHANGE OF DEGREE PROGRAM/CAMPUS
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on Change of Degree Program/
Campus. Requests for readmission and change of degree program would be considered
for both the Summer and Winter sessions.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate approve the revised calendar
Dr. Marshall J     entry on Change of Degree Program/
Campus, effective for entry to the 2011
Winter Session and thereafter.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 103
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Admissions Committee, continued
Research Requirement for applicants to the Faculty of Arts, approved by Senate in May
2009.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate approve the revised calendar
Mr. Johal J     entry on the English Language Admission
Standard.
AMENDMENT
Dr. Fielding circulated an amended version of the proposal, which removed references to
"Applied Research and Evaluation Services (ARES)", a unit that no longer existed.
The motion to
approve the
calendar entry as
amended was put
and carried.
ITEM 6(F) CHANGE OF DEGREE PROGRAM/CAMPUS
The Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on Change of Degree Program/
Campus. Requests for readmission and change of degree program would be considered
for both the Summer and Winter sessions.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate approve the revised calendar
Dr. Marshall J     entry on Change of Degree Program/
Campus, effective for entry to the 2011
Winter Session and thereafter.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 104
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Admissions Committee, continued
ITEM 6(G) POLICY ON ADMISSION
The Admissions Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on Policy on Admission to better reflect the use of broad-based admission information in admission deci
sions.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate approve the revised calendar
Mr. Mertens J     entry on Policy on Admission.
DISCUSSION
Mr. Johal questioned the need to delete specific references to denial of admission "on the
basis of overall academic record," noting that the revised text seemed less transparent.
Prof. Toope explained that because most programs used broader-based admission, it was
possible to deny admission based on criteria other than the academic record.
The motion was
put and carried.
ITEM 6(H) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED BIOLOGY
The Admissions Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission to the
Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology program. The proposed changes removed references to the Bachelor of Science Agroecology program, which had been replaced by the
Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology and reflected recent changes in mathematics
admission requirements for applicants following the BC/Yukon Secondary School Curriculum.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate approve the changes in
Ms. Purewal J     admission requirements for applicants to the
Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology
program, effective for entry to the 2010
Winter Session and thereafter.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 104
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Admissions Committee, continued
ITEM 6(G) POLICY ON ADMISSION
The Admissions Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on Policy on Admission to better reflect the use of broad-based admission information in admission deci
sions.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate approve the revised calendar
Mr. Mertens J     entry on Policy on Admission.
DISCUSSION
Mr. Johal questioned the need to delete specific references to denial of admission "on the
basis of overall academic record," noting that the revised text seemed less transparent.
Prof. Toope explained that because most programs used broader-based admission, it was
possible to deny admission based on criteria other than the academic record.
The motion was
put and carried.
ITEM 6(H) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED BIOLOGY
The Admissions Committee recommended a revised calendar entry on admission to the
Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology program. The proposed changes removed references to the Bachelor of Science Agroecology program, which had been replaced by the
Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology and reflected recent changes in mathematics
admission requirements for applicants following the BC/Yukon Secondary School Curriculum.
Dr. Fielding l     That Senate approve the changes in
Ms. Purewal J     admission requirements for applicants to the
Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology
program, effective for entry to the 2010
Winter Session and thereafter.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 105
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Curriculum Committee
See also Appendix A: Curriculum Summary.'
Committee Chair Dr. Marshall presented the report.
Dr. Marshall l     That the new and changed courses and
Dr. Harrison J     programs brought forward by the Faculties
of Arts, Commerce and Business
Administration, and Science be approved.
Carried.
Teaching and Learning Committee
ITEM OF BROAD ACADEMIC INTEREST: COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING AND
COMMUNITY-BASED RESEARCH
Committee Chair Ms. Friesen introduced the topic, which had been identified as an item
of broad academic interest in response to the Agenda Committee's annual call for submissions. At the request of Ms. Friesen, the assembly recognized guest speaker Dr. Margo
Fryer, Director, Learning Exchange and UBC Community Learning Initiative. The Committee had circulated a briefing note written by Dr. Fryer on the advancement of Community Service Learning (CSL) and Community-based Research (CBR) at UBC.
The following is excerpted from Dr. Fryer's briefing note:
The Growth of Community Service Learning at UBC
Community Service Learning (CSL) has three key elements: classroom learning;
volunteer work that responds to community-identified priorities; and structured
reflection activities that challenge students to make connections between what
they are studying and their experiences in the community.
At its inception in 1999, the Learning Exchange began bringing student volunteers into non-profit agencies and public schools in the Downtown Eastside. Students' enthusiastic response to this opportunity resulted in a doubling of the
number of student participants every year until 2004 when enrolment had to be
limited. In 2002, the Learning Exchange began working with faculty members to
integrate students' volunteer work into academic course work. In 2006, the UBC-
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 105
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Curriculum Committee
See also Appendix A: Curriculum Summary.'
Committee Chair Dr. Marshall presented the report.
Dr. Marshall l     That the new and changed courses and
Dr. Harrison J     programs brought forward by the Faculties
of Arts, Commerce and Business
Administration, and Science be approved.
Carried.
Teaching and Learning Committee
ITEM OF BROAD ACADEMIC INTEREST: COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING AND
COMMUNITY-BASED RESEARCH
Committee Chair Ms. Friesen introduced the topic, which had been identified as an item
of broad academic interest in response to the Agenda Committee's annual call for submissions. At the request of Ms. Friesen, the assembly recognized guest speaker Dr. Margo
Fryer, Director, Learning Exchange and UBC Community Learning Initiative. The Committee had circulated a briefing note written by Dr. Fryer on the advancement of Community Service Learning (CSL) and Community-based Research (CBR) at UBC.
The following is excerpted from Dr. Fryer's briefing note:
The Growth of Community Service Learning at UBC
Community Service Learning (CSL) has three key elements: classroom learning;
volunteer work that responds to community-identified priorities; and structured
reflection activities that challenge students to make connections between what
they are studying and their experiences in the community.
At its inception in 1999, the Learning Exchange began bringing student volunteers into non-profit agencies and public schools in the Downtown Eastside. Students' enthusiastic response to this opportunity resulted in a doubling of the
number of student participants every year until 2004 when enrolment had to be
limited. In 2002, the Learning Exchange began working with faculty members to
integrate students' volunteer work into academic course work. In 2006, the UBC-
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 1(
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
Community Learning Initiative (UBC-CLI) was created, with funding from the
J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and UBC, to develop innovative approaches
to course-based (curricular) CSL. With the integration of students' community-
based activity into course work and the focus among many faculties on providing
students with research experience, students also began doing Community-Based
Research (CBR), which is the conduct of research that addresses questions or
issues identified by a community organization.
In 2008-2009, almost 1700 students engaged in CSL and/or CBR through the
Learning Exchange or the UBC-CLI, a 44% increase since the previous year.
About 60% of these students did CSL or CBR as part of their participation in a
course. The 31 courses that incorporated this kind of community-based experiential learning in 2008-2009 covered a variety of disciplines and subjects. In addition to the students who take part in CSL or CBR activities supported by the
Learning Exchange or the UBC-CLI, many students take part in courses where the
CSL or CBR activities are facilitated by an individual faculty member (in 2007-
2008 about 350 students were involved in such courses). For more information
about student participation rates in CSL and CBR activities in 2008-2009, see
Appendix A.1
The Strategic Plan for the Advancement of CSL and CBR
The strategic plan was developed in response to a call from the President and
other leaders within UBC to significantly increase the participation of students
and faculty in community-based experiential learning. This challenge to "scale
up" is especially focused on two approaches to experiential learning that are
growing quickly at UBC, i.e., Community Service Learning (CSL) and Community-Based Research (CBR). The continued advancement of CSL and CBR will
enable UBC to significantly expand and deepen its engagement with external
communities thereby contributing to the achievement of the UBC Place and
Promise vision and associated commitments, especially the commitment to community engagement.
The goals and strategies outlined in this plan are intended to move UBC's use of
CSL and CBR increasingly towards the "thick" end of the spectrum of community-engaged scholarship where decisions about means and ends are made collaboratively by the university and the community, both costs and benefits are shared,
and learning is a reciprocal, iterative process.
This plan is grounded in the recognition that a rethinking of the processes
whereby CSL and CBR programs are initiated, planned, implemented, and evaluated will be required if UBC is to achieve the significant growth that is envisioned
(from approximately 1,000 students per year in the period from 2004 to 2008 to
4,000 students per year by 2014) while at the same time achieving "thick" community engagement. This plan aims to achieve changes in social or cultural fac-
1. Appendix not included in this excerpt for the Minutes of Senate.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 1(
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
Community Learning Initiative (UBC-CLI) was created, with funding from the
J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and UBC, to develop innovative approaches
to course-based (curricular) CSL. With the integration of students' community-
based activity into course work and the focus among many faculties on providing
students with research experience, students also began doing Community-Based
Research (CBR), which is the conduct of research that addresses questions or
issues identified by a community organization.
In 2008-2009, almost 1700 students engaged in CSL and/or CBR through the
Learning Exchange or the UBC-CLI, a 44% increase since the previous year.
About 60% of these students did CSL or CBR as part of their participation in a
course. The 31 courses that incorporated this kind of community-based experiential learning in 2008-2009 covered a variety of disciplines and subjects. In addition to the students who take part in CSL or CBR activities supported by the
Learning Exchange or the UBC-CLI, many students take part in courses where the
CSL or CBR activities are facilitated by an individual faculty member (in 2007-
2008 about 350 students were involved in such courses). For more information
about student participation rates in CSL and CBR activities in 2008-2009, see
Appendix A.1
The Strategic Plan for the Advancement of CSL and CBR
The strategic plan was developed in response to a call from the President and
other leaders within UBC to significantly increase the participation of students
and faculty in community-based experiential learning. This challenge to "scale
up" is especially focused on two approaches to experiential learning that are
growing quickly at UBC, i.e., Community Service Learning (CSL) and Community-Based Research (CBR). The continued advancement of CSL and CBR will
enable UBC to significantly expand and deepen its engagement with external
communities thereby contributing to the achievement of the UBC Place and
Promise vision and associated commitments, especially the commitment to community engagement.
The goals and strategies outlined in this plan are intended to move UBC's use of
CSL and CBR increasingly towards the "thick" end of the spectrum of community-engaged scholarship where decisions about means and ends are made collaboratively by the university and the community, both costs and benefits are shared,
and learning is a reciprocal, iterative process.
This plan is grounded in the recognition that a rethinking of the processes
whereby CSL and CBR programs are initiated, planned, implemented, and evaluated will be required if UBC is to achieve the significant growth that is envisioned
(from approximately 1,000 students per year in the period from 2004 to 2008 to
4,000 students per year by 2014) while at the same time achieving "thick" community engagement. This plan aims to achieve changes in social or cultural fac-
1. Appendix not included in this excerpt for the Minutes of Senate.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 107
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
tors (e.g., conventions around how decisions are made) as well as structural
changes (e.g., formal roles and responsibilities). It is recognized that difficulties
will inevitably arise as these strategies are pursued.
Based on UBC's experiences building its CSL programs over the past ten years,
and especially the recognition that personal relationships are fundamental to the
success of community engagement, we propose that the advancement of CSL and
CBR at UBC be grounded in metaphors arising from the fields of biology, ecology,
and living systems. Metaphors related to complex adaptive systems are highly
applicable to the terrain of Community-University Engagement where change,
complexity, and diversity are the norm and the challenge of adapting to both crises and opportunities in the environment needs to be embraced.
The four specific goals to be achieved through the implementation of this plan are
given below. Examples of specific strategies and indications of which entities will
take the lead in implementing each strategy are also given.2
Goal 1: To Enhance Student Learning: Help to create an exceptional learning
environment that fosters global citizenship for both undergraduate and graduate
students by providing learning experiences in a variety of off-campus community
settings that enable students to apply their talent, knowledge and skills to real-
world issues while learning from the people and issues they encounter. These
learning experiences will challenge students to reflect on the complexity of community issues and the range of ways that they, as citizens, might respond.
Goal 2: To Contribute to Society: Make a demonstrable contribution to the
advancement of a civil and sustainable society by applying the resources of the
university (including people, knowledge, and methods of inquiry) to important
community issues, priorities, or needs. Increase the number of students, faculty,
staff, and community organizations involved in CSL and CBR. Aim to have 10%
of UBC students involved in CSL and CBR programs every year by 2013-2014.
Goal 3: Lo Collaborate with Community: Engage in mutually beneficial relationships with community organizations characterized by the collaborative development, implementation, and evaluation of students' learning, service, and research
experiences.
Goal 4: Lo Embed CSL and CBR in the Academic Fabric of the University:
Advance CSL and CBR by supporting Faculty-driven CSL and CBR initiatives
while providing centralized, integrative support.
DISCUSSION
Dr. Thorne noted that nursing students were already engaged in practica as part of their
curriculum. As the number of overall students participating in CSL and CBR increased,
2. Strategies not included in this excerpt for the Minutes of Senate.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 107
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
tors (e.g., conventions around how decisions are made) as well as structural
changes (e.g., formal roles and responsibilities). It is recognized that difficulties
will inevitably arise as these strategies are pursued.
Based on UBC's experiences building its CSL programs over the past ten years,
and especially the recognition that personal relationships are fundamental to the
success of community engagement, we propose that the advancement of CSL and
CBR at UBC be grounded in metaphors arising from the fields of biology, ecology,
and living systems. Metaphors related to complex adaptive systems are highly
applicable to the terrain of Community-University Engagement where change,
complexity, and diversity are the norm and the challenge of adapting to both crises and opportunities in the environment needs to be embraced.
Lhe four specific goals to be achieved through the implementation of this plan are
given below. Examples of specific strategies and indications of which entities will
take the lead in implementing each strategy are also given.2
Goal 1: Lo Enhance Student Learning: Help to create an exceptional learning
environment that fosters global citizenship for both undergraduate and graduate
students by providing learning experiences in a variety of off-campus community
settings that enable students to apply their talent, knowledge and skills to real-
world issues while learning from the people and issues they encounter. Lhese
learning experiences will challenge students to reflect on the complexity of community issues and the range of ways that they, as citizens, might respond.
Goal 2: Lo Contribute to Society: Make a demonstrable contribution to the
advancement of a civil and sustainable society by applying the resources of the
university (including people, knowledge, and methods of inquiry) to important
community issues, priorities, or needs. Increase the number of students, faculty,
staff, and community organizations involved in CSL and CBR. Aim to have 10%
of UBC students involved in CSL and CBR programs every year by 2013-2014.
Goal 3: Lo Collaborate with Community: Engage in mutually beneficial relationships with community organizations characterized by the collaborative development, implementation, and evaluation of students' learning, service, and research
experiences.
Goal 4: Lo Embed CSL and CBR in the Academic Fabric of the University:
Advance CSL and CBR by supporting Faculty-driven CSL and CBR initiatives
while providing centralized, integrative support.
DISCUSSION
Dr. Thorne noted that nursing students were already engaged in practica as part of their
curriculum. As the number of overall students participating in CSL and CBR increased,
2. Strategies not included in this excerpt for the Minutes of Senate.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 108
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee
she predicted that competition for certain assignments would become intense and that
tensions would increase. Dr. Thorne asked how an appropriate balance might be maintained. Dr. Fryer acknowledged the need for careful planning. She noted that, as relationships between the University and the community became thicker, the focus would move
away from ad hoc arrangements with community organizations and toward collective
strategic decision making. She noted that all past and future growth depended upon
receptivity in the community.
In response to a question from Dr. Dunford, Dr. Fryer stated that the definition of "community" was inclusive and could be construed to include for-profit companies. The idea
was to engage students in a real-life setting away from the campus and possibly beyond
the student's usual "comfort zone."
In response to a question from Mr. Costeloe, Dr. Fryer stated that early communications
with faculty had been most often initiated by her office. As awareness and interest had
grown, many faculty had begun taking the initiative to find out how to integrate CSL into
existing and new courses. Dr. Fryer expressed the opinion that there were benefits for faculty, observing that faculty involved in CSL/CBR often demonstrated stronger research
and teaching records and therefore fared better with respect to promotion and tenure.
Ms. Purewal asked whether a standardized framework was available for the development
of CSL/CBR curricula. Dr. Fryer acknowledged that development to date had happened
on a relatively ad hoc basis, and that the institution would need to become more cohesive
in future. She noted that it would be important to identify the curricular areas where it
made the most pedagogical sense to invest time and energy.
In response to a question from Dr. Marshall, Dr. Fryer noted that the number of student
participants cited in the briefing note did not include students participating in all forms of
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 108
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee
she predicted that competition for certain assignments would become intense and that
tensions would increase. Dr. Thorne asked how an appropriate balance might be maintained. Dr. Fryer acknowledged the need for careful planning. She noted that, as relationships between the University and the community became thicker, the focus would move
away from ad hoc arrangements with community organizations and toward collective
strategic decision making. She noted that all past and future growth depended upon
receptivity in the community.
In response to a question from Dr. Dunford, Dr. Fryer stated that the definition of "community" was inclusive and could be construed to include for-profit companies. The idea
was to engage students in a real-life setting away from the campus and possibly beyond
the student's usual "comfort zone."
In response to a question from Mr. Costeloe, Dr. Fryer stated that early communications
with faculty had been most often initiated by her office. As awareness and interest had
grown, many faculty had begun taking the initiative to find out how to integrate CSL into
existing and new courses. Dr. Fryer expressed the opinion that there were benefits for faculty, observing that faculty involved in CSL/CBR often demonstrated stronger research
and teaching records and therefore fared better with respect to promotion and tenure.
Ms. Purewal asked whether a standardized framework was available for the development
of CSL/CBR curricula. Dr. Fryer acknowledged that development to date had happened
on a relatively ad hoc basis, and that the institution would need to become more cohesive
in future. She noted that it would be important to identify the curricular areas where it
made the most pedagogical sense to invest time and energy.
In response to a question from Dr. Marshall, Dr. Fryer noted that the number of student
participants cited in the briefing note did not include students participating in all forms of
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 109
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
community-based experiential learning, such as cooperative education or practica. Dr.
Marshall suggested that information be gathered from each Faculty to supplement current
tracking mechanisms. Dr. Fryer indicated that she was also working with the Office of
Planning & Institutional Research to refine participation tracking.
Dr. Hall asked about resources available to support increased participation, particularly
during a time of budgetary restraint. Dr. Fryer replied that financial support would come
from a combination of the University budget and outside donors, and that donors viewed
CSL/CBR as an attractive opportunity. Prof. Toope described the Learning Exchange as a
"jewel in the crown of UBC," but explained that it had historically operated on soft funds.
This arrangement had recently been determined to be inappropriate, and the decision was
taken to allocate approximately $1.5 million of base funding in the University budget. He
added that efforts to attract external support had been very successful, and that this type
of cost sharing would be necessary to cover all costs.
Mr. Mertens asked how accessible CSL/CBR opportunities would be for students across
programs as participation increased to the target of 10 percent. Dr. Fryer stated that this
was yet to be determined, and that strategic choices about where to apply resources would
be necessary. Although some curricular areas lent themselves more readily to CSL/CBR
than others, certain activities at the Learning Exchange would always be open to all UBC
students. Mr. Mertens noted that students in Civil Engineering participating in a CSL
project had expressed concern about high credit loads, and that some had been more satisfied with the experience than others. He identified interdisciplinary CSL as an area for
growth.
Principal Burgess congratulated Dr. Fryer on the collaborative and practical work undertaken to date. He noted implications for the relevance of the University in the community
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 109
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
community-based experiential learning, such as cooperative education or practica. Dr.
Marshall suggested that information be gathered from each Faculty to supplement current
tracking mechanisms. Dr. Fryer indicated that she was also working with the Office of
Planning & Institutional Research to refine participation tracking.
Dr. Hall asked about resources available to support increased participation, particularly
during a time of budgetary restraint. Dr. Fryer replied that financial support would come
from a combination of the University budget and outside donors, and that donors viewed
CSL/CBR as an attractive opportunity. Prof. Toope described the Learning Exchange as a
"jewel in the crown of UBC," but explained that it had historically operated on soft funds.
This arrangement had recently been determined to be inappropriate, and the decision was
taken to allocate approximately $1.5 million of base funding in the University budget. He
added that efforts to attract external support had been very successful, and that this type
of cost sharing would be necessary to cover all costs.
Mr. Mertens asked how accessible CSL/CBR opportunities would be for students across
programs as participation increased to the target of 10 percent. Dr. Fryer stated that this
was yet to be determined, and that strategic choices about where to apply resources would
be necessary. Although some curricular areas lent themselves more readily to CSL/CBR
than others, certain activities at the Learning Exchange would always be open to all UBC
students. Mr. Mertens noted that students in Civil Engineering participating in a CSL
project had expressed concern about high credit loads, and that some had been more satisfied with the experience than others. He identified interdisciplinary CSL as an area for
growth.
Principal Burgess congratulated Dr. Fryer on the collaborative and practical work undertaken to date. He noted implications for the relevance of the University in the community
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 110
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
that could positively affect government relations. He spoke strongly in support of the initiative, expressing the opinion that there were few opportunities for development that
were more important. He suggested convening a series of dialogues in areas where the
government seemed particularly interested.
In response to a question about how the 10 percent target had been selected, Dr. Fryer
stated that the target had been set several years earlier as an arbitrary yet aspirational
goal. Dr. Fryer clarified that not all students would be working in inner-city areas, and
agreed that it would be important not to saturate the Downtown East Side.
Dr. Young expressed support for the initiative and asked about ways (other than letter
grades) to evaluate student performance in order to capture the benefit. Dr. Fryer stated
that this question would be important to consider as the curricular integration increased.
Dr. Rucker suggested consultation with Faculties offering curricula with practical components, where much thought had already be given to how best evaluate students in experiential learning situations.
Mr. Dew asked whether faculty participation in CSL/CBR would be considered teaching
or service activity for the purposes of promotion and tenure. Dr. Farrar stated that this
area was evolving. He noted that CSL/CBR activities often involved significant teaching
and research components, and that he did not view them as chiefly service contributions.
In response to a question from Mr. Johal, Dr. Fryer confirmed that additional costs to date
had been borne by the University, with no additional fees assessed to students. She noted
that other universities were considering asking students to share the costs. A decision for
UBC had not yet been taken, and Prof. Toope confirmed that additional discussion was
necessary. He envisioned, as one example, replacing certain types of scholarships with a
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 110
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
that could positively affect government relations. He spoke strongly in support of the initiative, expressing the opinion that there were few opportunities for development that
were more important. He suggested convening a series of dialogues in areas where the
government seemed particularly interested.
In response to a question about how the 10 percent target had been selected, Dr. Fryer
stated that the target had been set several years earlier as an arbitrary yet aspirational
goal. Dr. Fryer clarified that not all students would be working in inner-city areas, and
agreed that it would be important not to saturate the Downtown East Side.
Dr. Young expressed support for the initiative and asked about ways (other than letter
grades) to evaluate student performance in order to capture the benefit. Dr. Fryer stated
that this question would be important to consider as the curricular integration increased.
Dr. Rucker suggested consultation with Faculties offering curricula with practical components, where much thought had already be given to how best evaluate students in experiential learning situations.
Mr. Dew asked whether faculty participation in CSL/CBR would be considered teaching
or service activity for the purposes of promotion and tenure. Dr. Farrar stated that this
area was evolving. He noted that CSL/CBR activities often involved significant teaching
and research components, and that he did not view them as chiefly service contributions.
In response to a question from Mr. Johal, Dr. Fryer confirmed that additional costs to date
had been borne by the University, with no additional fees assessed to students. She noted
that other universities were considering asking students to share the costs. A decision for
UBC had not yet been taken, and Prof. Toope confirmed that additional discussion was
necessary. He envisioned, as one example, replacing certain types of scholarships with a
 Vancouver Senate 09/10-111
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
voucher system that would allow each student to purchase a high-impact learning experience.
In response to a question from Dr. Baimbridge, Dr. Fryer confirmed that the majority of
student participants were undergraduate, although some graduate students were also
involved.
Dr. Fryer stated that a revised version of the strategic plan was to be posted for comment
by early March.
Prof. Toope thanked Dr. Fryer for her presentation, noting that Dr. Fryer was nationally
regarded as a leader in CSL. He described her approach as "quietly passionate, utterly
thoughtful, and absolutely pragmatic."
Tributes Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Thorne presented the report.
MEMORIAL MINUTE FOR DR. PATRICIA MARCHAK
The Committee had circulated the following memorial minute.
Dr. Marchak served as Dean of the Faculty of Arts at UBC from 1990 to 1996.
Prior to becoming Dean, she was the Head of the Department of Anthropology
and Sociology.
Dr. Marchak received a Bachelor of Arts in 1958 and a PhD in 1970, both at
UBC, and joined the Faculty of Arts in 1973. As a student, she was editor-in-chief
of the Ubyssey newspaper and a secretary to President Norman MacKenzie. As a
faculty member, she served as faculty associate with the Institute for Resources
and Environment, and as a Distinguished Scholar at the Peter Wall Institute of
Advanced Studies.
Dr. Marchak served as President of the Canadian Sociology and Anthropology
Association, and on the executive board of numerous Canadian and international
associations in the fields of Sociology, Forestry and Ecology. She also served on
the editorial boards of various journals, including Canadian Review of Sociology
and Anthropology, Canadian Journal of Sociology, BC Studies, and Current Sociology.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10-111
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Teaching & Learning Committee, continued
voucher system that would allow each student to purchase a high-impact learning experience.
In response to a question from Dr. Baimbridge, Dr. Fryer confirmed that the majority of
student participants were undergraduate, although some graduate students were also
involved.
Dr. Fryer stated that a revised version of the strategic plan was to be posted for comment
by early March.
Prof. Toope thanked Dr. Fryer for her presentation, noting that Dr. Fryer was nationally
regarded as a leader in CSL. He described her approach as "quietly passionate, utterly
thoughtful, and absolutely pragmatic."
Tributes Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Thorne presented the report.
MEMORIAL MINUTE FOR DR. PATRICIA MARCHAK
The Committee had circulated the following memorial minute.
Dr. Marchak served as Dean of the Faculty of Arts at UBC from 1990 to 1996.
Prior to becoming Dean, she was the Head of the Department of Anthropology
and Sociology.
Dr. Marchak received a Bachelor of Arts in 1958 and a PhD in 1970, both at
UBC, and joined the Faculty of Arts in 1973. As a student, she was editor-in-chief
of the Ubyssey newspaper and a secretary to President Norman MacKenzie. As a
faculty member, she served as faculty associate with the Institute for Resources
and Environment, and as a Distinguished Scholar at the Peter Wall Institute of
Advanced Studies.
Dr. Marchak served as President of the Canadian Sociology and Anthropology
Association, and on the executive board of numerous Canadian and international
associations in the fields of Sociology, Forestry and Ecology. She also served on
the editorial boards of various journals, including Canadian Review of Sociology
and Anthropology, Canadian Journal of Sociology, BC Studies, and Current Sociology.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 112
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Tributes Committee, continued
At the University, Dr. Marchak was a member of both the Board of Governors
and the Senate. She served on the B.C. Rhodes Scholarship Selection Committee,
on the Board of the Open Learning Institute and on the Board of University Hospital.
In 1987 she was elected to Fellowship in the Royal Society of Canada, and served
for two years as the Vice-President of Academy II for the Humanities and Social
Sciences. She has also served as Chair of the B.C. Buildings Corporation, and on
the Forest Appeals Commission.
Dr. Marchak authored numerous articles on political ideology, economic development, resources industries and the social context of ecological issues. Her
books include Ideological Perspectives on Canada; In Whose Interest; Green
Gold: The Forest Industry in British Columbia; The Integrated Circus: The New
Right and the Restructuring of Global Markets; Logging the Globe; Reigns of
Terror and No Easy Fix: Global Responses to International Wars and Crimes
Against Humanity. She also co-edited Uncommon Property: The Fishing and Fish
Processing Industries in British Columbia.
Dr. Thome l     That the memorial minute for Dr. Patricia
Dr. Orvig J     Marchak be entered into the Minutes of
Senate and that a copy be sent to the family
of the deceased.
r     Carried
unanimously.
Report from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services &
Registrar
Mr. Ridge presented the reports.
ANNUAL REPORT ON ENROLMENT 2009/2010
The Secretary had circulated the "UBC Annual Report on Enrolment 2009," a collaborative effort by Enrolment Services, Planning & Institutional Research, the International
Student Initiative, and several UBC strategic enrolment management groups. At the
request of the Secretary, the assembly recognized guest co-presenter Mr. Walter Sudmant,
Director, Planning & Institutional Research.
The highlights of the presentation were as follows:
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 112
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Tributes Committee, continued
At the University, Dr. Marchak was a member of both the Board of Governors
and the Senate. She served on the B.C. Rhodes Scholarship Selection Committee,
on the Board of the Open Learning Institute and on the Board of University Hospital.
In 1987 she was elected to Fellowship in the Royal Society of Canada, and served
for two years as the Vice-President of Academy II for the Humanities and Social
Sciences. She has also served as Chair of the B.C. Buildings Corporation, and on
the Forest Appeals Commission.
Dr. Marchak authored numerous articles on political ideology, economic development, resources industries and the social context of ecological issues. Her
books include Ideological Perspectives on Canada; In Whose Interest; Green
Gold: The Forest Industry in British Columbia; The Integrated Circus: The New
Right and the Restructuring of Global Markets; Logging the Globe; Reigns of
Terror and No Easy Fix: Global Responses to International Wars and Crimes
Against Humanity. She also co-edited Uncommon Property: The Fishing and Fish
Processing Industries in British Columbia.
Dr. Thome l     That the memorial minute for Dr. Patricia
Dr. Orvig J     Marchak be entered into the Minutes of
Senate and that a copy be sent to the family
of the deceased.
r     Carried
unanimously.
Report from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services &
Registrar
Mr. Ridge presented the reports.
ANNUAL REPORT ON ENROLMENT 2009/2010
The Secretary had circulated the "UBC Annual Report on Enrolment 2009," a collaborative effort by Enrolment Services, Planning & Institutional Research, the International
Student Initiative, and several UBC strategic enrolment management groups. At the
request of the Secretary, the assembly recognized guest co-presenter Mr. Walter Sudmant,
Director, Planning & Institutional Research.
The highlights of the presentation were as follows:
 Vancouver Senate 09/10-113
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Reports from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services & Registrar, continued
• In addition to the data in the report, specific data (including historical data) had been
provided to each Faculty.
• UBC's 2009 target was 41,488 FTE (full-time equivalents), an increase of 1,301 FTE
over 2008.
• Approximately 400 FTE growth in graduate, 900 FTE growth in undergraduate,
mostly UBC Okanagan.
• 2009/10 enrolment forecast at 42,514 FTE, 1,026 FTE (or 1.5%) over funded enrolment.
• Unfunded graduate and undergraduate enrolment at Vancouver continue to compensate for undergraduate shortfall at the Okanagan campus.
• New student undergraduate applications:
• UBC Vancouver: 19,362 (up 6%)
• UBC Okanagan: 3,024 (up 5%)
• Access:
• UBC Vancouver: 69% admitted (1st choice: 59% / 2nd choice: 10%)
• UBC Okanagan: 80% admitted (1st choice: 74% / 2nd choice: 6%)
• Registration:
• UBC Vancouver: 54% (up 4.5%)
• UBC Okanagan: 59% (up 4.2%)
• Very fine line between over and under enrolment. Taking new steps this year to manage
to targets.
• Each faculty is setting targets for both Domestic and ISI.
• EMC will assess the inter-faculty impacts.
• Initial increase of GPAs to limit first round admissions (create a larger
buffer).
• Later admissions will be a function of faculty capacity.
• Very conservative estimates of yield and attrition.
• Assisting Arts with demand analysis.
• Enrolment planning recently integrated with the new budget allocation framework.
• Strategic enrolment objectives should be aligned with Place and Promise.
DISCUSSION
Mr. Sealy-Harrington inquired about gender balance within and across programs. Mr.
Sudmant noted that, while the percentage of male students had declined overall, women
 Vancouver Senate 09/10-113
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Reports from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services & Registrar, continued
• In addition to the data in the report, specific data (including historical data) had been
provided to each Faculty.
• UBC's 2009 target was 41,488 FTE (full-time equivalents), an increase of 1,301 FTE
over 2008.
• Approximately 400 FTE growth in graduate, 900 FTE growth in undergraduate,
mostly UBC Okanagan.
• 2009/10 enrolment forecast at 42,514 FTE, 1,026 FTE (or 1.5%) over funded enrolment.
• Unfunded graduate and undergraduate enrolment at Vancouver continue to compensate for undergraduate shortfall at the Okanagan campus.
• New student undergraduate applications:
• UBC Vancouver: 19,362 (up 6%)
• UBC Okanagan: 3,024 (up 5%)
• Access:
• UBC Vancouver: 69% admitted (1st choice: 59% / 2nd choice: 10%)
• UBC Okanagan: 80% admitted (1st choice: 74% / 2nd choice: 6%)
• Registration:
• UBC Vancouver: 54% (up 4.5%)
• UBC Okanagan: 59% (up 4.2%)
• Very fine line between over and under enrolment. Taking new steps this year to manage
to targets.
• Each faculty is setting targets for both Domestic and ISI.
• EMC will assess the inter-faculty impacts.
• Initial increase of GPAs to limit first round admissions (create a larger
buffer).
• Later admissions will be a function of faculty capacity.
• Very conservative estimates of yield and attrition.
• Assisting Arts with demand analysis.
• Enrolment planning recently integrated with the new budget allocation framework.
• Strategic enrolment objectives should be aligned with Place and Promise.
DISCUSSION
Mr. Sealy-Harrington inquired about gender balance within and across programs. Mr.
Sudmant noted that, while the percentage of male students had declined overall, women
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 114
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Reports from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services & Registrar, continued
remained underrepresented in some programs, such as medicine. Prof. Toope stated that
institutions across the country were reporting disproportionately low numbers of male
undergraduate students, and that this issue bore watching over the following years. Dr.
Farrar stated that there was no overall plan to engineer gender parity, and noted that gender was not considered in UBC admissions processes. While women were strongly represented in the undergraduate population, representation declined somewhat at the
graduate level, and again among post-doctoral fellows, and yet again through the tenure-
track professorial ranks.
Dr. Loewen asked why direct-entry admission averages had risen. Mr. Sudmant replied
that this increase was related to an increase in the number of applications. He was uncertain as to whether grade inflation also played a role. Mr. Sudmant stated that admission
averages above a certain threshold were very unreliable as predictors of success at UBC.
In the absence of a standardized admission test, most programs relied to some extent on
broader-based admission criteria to evaluate applicants.
Noting the closer connection between enrolment and Faculty budgets, Dr. Baimbridge
asked whether the composition of the current Enrolment Management Committee was
sufficient. Dr. Farrar agreed that it would be critical to work closely with Faculties to
manage enrolment. He gave an overview of the Strategic Enrolment Management Steering
Committee, a broadly representative group of approximately 40 people that met six times
each year. In response to a further question, Dr. Farrar stated that decisions about Faculty
enrolments were made in collaboration between the Office of the Provost and Vice-President, Academic and the Committee of Deans.
Mr. Costeloe expressed hope that all programs would implement broader-based admissions processes in the near future. He also hoped that the University could find alternative
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 114
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Reports from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services & Registrar, continued
remained underrepresented in some programs, such as medicine. Prof. Toope stated that
institutions across the country were reporting disproportionately low numbers of male
undergraduate students, and that this issue bore watching over the following years. Dr.
Farrar stated that there was no overall plan to engineer gender parity, and noted that gender was not considered in UBC admissions processes. While women were strongly represented in the undergraduate population, representation declined somewhat at the
graduate level, and again among post-doctoral fellows, and yet again through the tenure-
track professorial ranks.
Dr. Loewen asked why direct-entry admission averages had risen. Mr. Sudmant replied
that this increase was related to an increase in the number of applications. He was uncertain as to whether grade inflation also played a role. Mr. Sudmant stated that admission
averages above a certain threshold were very unreliable as predictors of success at UBC.
In the absence of a standardized admission test, most programs relied to some extent on
broader-based admission criteria to evaluate applicants.
Noting the closer connection between enrolment and Faculty budgets, Dr. Baimbridge
asked whether the composition of the current Enrolment Management Committee was
sufficient. Dr. Farrar agreed that it would be critical to work closely with Faculties to
manage enrolment. He gave an overview of the Strategic Enrolment Management Steering
Committee, a broadly representative group of approximately 40 people that met six times
each year. In response to a further question, Dr. Farrar stated that decisions about Faculty
enrolments were made in collaboration between the Office of the Provost and Vice-President, Academic and the Committee of Deans.
Mr. Costeloe expressed hope that all programs would implement broader-based admissions processes in the near future. He also hoped that the University could find alternative
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 115
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Reports from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services & Registrar, continued
solutions to reliance on international tuition to balance its budget. Dr. Farrar agreed on
both points, but clarified that increasing international enrolment was one piece of the
strategy to build a sustainable University budget. Prof. Toope stated that UBC's scholarship programs for international students were the most extensive among Canadian universities. UBC hoped to attract international students primarily as a way of enriching the
student body, rather than focusing on their tuition as a revenue stream.
In response to a question from Ms. Purewal, Mr. Sudmant stated that the majority of
international students admitted to UBC had followed an International Baccalaureate (IB)
program, and that a much larger range of IB programs were becoming available around
the world. Dr. Farrar expressed the opinion that IB grades were more reliable than other
high school grades as predictors of academic performance.
In response to a question from Dr. Singh about mechanisms to attract international students, Dr. Farrar stated that UBC's international recruitment strategies were based on
relationships with specific schools in targeted areas. The assembly recognized Ms. Karen
McKellin, Director, International Student Initiative, who added that a team of approximately 25 international recruiters worked with prospective students around the world.
Mr. Wazeer asked about lower retention rates for international students, and suggested
that insufficient supportive programming was in place to meet the needs of this group. Dr.
Farrar stated that the University was taking a closer look at areas of demand and would
respond as appropriate.
In response to a question, Dr. Farrar stated that there had been significant growth in the
numbers of domestic students presenting Advanced Placement (AP) grades for admission,
with approximately 40 percent of new UBC students presenting at least one AP grade.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 115
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Reports from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services & Registrar, continued
solutions to reliance on international tuition to balance its budget. Dr. Farrar agreed on
both points, but clarified that increasing international enrolment was one piece of the
strategy to build a sustainable University budget. Prof. Toope stated that UBC's scholarship programs for international students were the most extensive among Canadian universities. UBC hoped to attract international students primarily as a way of enriching the
student body, rather than focusing on their tuition as a revenue stream.
In response to a question from Ms. Purewal, Mr. Sudmant stated that the majority of
international students admitted to UBC had followed an International Baccalaureate (IB)
program, and that a much larger range of IB programs were becoming available around
the world. Dr. Farrar expressed the opinion that IB grades were more reliable than other
high school grades as predictors of academic performance.
In response to a question from Dr. Singh about mechanisms to attract international students, Dr. Farrar stated that UBC's international recruitment strategies were based on
relationships with specific schools in targeted areas. The assembly recognized Ms. Karen
McKellin, Director, International Student Initiative, who added that a team of approximately 25 international recruiters worked with prospective students around the world.
Mr. Wazeer asked about lower retention rates for international students, and suggested
that insufficient supportive programming was in place to meet the needs of this group. Dr.
Farrar stated that the University was taking a closer look at areas of demand and would
respond as appropriate.
In response to a question, Dr. Farrar stated that there had been significant growth in the
numbers of domestic students presenting Advanced Placement (AP) grades for admission,
with approximately 40 percent of new UBC students presenting at least one AP grade.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 116
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Reports from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services & Registrar, continued
In response to a question from Mr. Haffey about enrolment trends, Dr. Farrar stated that
enrolments were up across the country, even in areas where recruitment was usually difficult. This increase in enrolment was associated to some extent to the state of the economy.
UBC remained a destination of choice, and had maintained strong enrolment patterns
over a long period of time. In response to a further question about how many new students were first-generation post-secondary students, Dr. Farrar stated that some data
about students from non-traditional backgrounds could be found in the results of the
recent New to UBC (NUBC) survey.
Dr. Hall noted that while doctoral applications had risen by 22 percent over the previous
year, the number of admissions had not grown by the same proportion. She noted that
programs in nursing had been recently "discovered" by international applicants. While
applications had increased, many applicants' qualifications were found not to meet the
UBC standard for admission.
ACADEMIC YEAR 2010/2011
The Secretary had circulated for information key dates for the 2010/2011 academic year.
The full academic year was available at: www.students.ubc.ca/calendai7academicy-
ear.cfm?page=2010&action=draft. Mr. Ridge invited Senators to direct any comments or
suggested changes to the Senate Secretariat.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The following regular meeting of the Senate was scheduled for March 3, 2010.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10 - 116
Minutes of January 20, 2010
Reports from the Associate Vice-President, Enrolment Services & Registrar, continued
In response to a question from Mr. Haffey about enrolment trends, Dr. Farrar stated that
enrolments were up across the country, even in areas where recruitment was usually difficult. This increase in enrolment was associated to some extent to the state of the economy.
UBC remained a destination of choice, and had maintained strong enrolment patterns
over a long period of time. In response to a further question about how many new students were first-generation post-secondary students, Dr. Farrar stated that some data
about students from non-traditional backgrounds could be found in the results of the
recent New to UBC (NUBC) survey.
Dr. Hall noted that while doctoral applications had risen by 22 percent over the previous
year, the number of admissions had not grown by the same proportion. She noted that
programs in nursing had been recently "discovered" by international applicants. While
applications had increased, many applicants' qualifications were found not to meet the
UBC standard for admission.
ACADEMIC YEAR 2010/2011
The Secretary had circulated for information key dates for the 2010/2011 academic year.
The full academic year was available at: www.students.ubc.ca/calendai7academicy-
ear.cfm?page=2010&action=draft. Mr. Ridge invited Senators to direct any comments or
suggested changes to the Senate Secretariat.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The following regular meeting of the Senate was scheduled for March 3, 2010.
 Vancouver Senate 09/10-117
Minutes of January 20, 2010
APPENDIX A: CURRICULUM SUMMARY
Faculty of Arts
NEW COURSES
ASIA 258 (3)
PSYC402(3)
PSYC404(3)
PSYC408 (3)
PSYC409(3)
CALENDAR CHANGES
POLI492(12)
PSYC414(3)
PSYC466(3)
FIPR434(3/6)d
FIPR435(3/6)d
FIPR436(3/6)d
Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration
NEW COURSES
BAEN550(1.5)
BA511 (1.5)
BA551 (1.5)
Faculty of Science
NEW AND CHANGED COURSES
BIOL 111 (3)
BIOL 203 (4)
BIOL 326 (3)
BIOL 363 (2)
BIOL 428 (3)
ENVR400(3)
ENVR448(3/6)d
ISCI 320 (3)
ISCI 344 (3)
MICB 301 (3)
MICB 425 (3)
PSYC466(3)
 Vancouver Senate 09/10-117
Minutes of January 20, 2010
APPENDIX A: CURRICULUM SUMMARY
Faculty of Arts
NEW COURSES
ASIA 258 (3)
PSYC402(3)
PSYC404(3)
PSYC408 (3)
PSYC409(3)
CALENDAR CHANGES
POLI492(12)
PSYC414(3)
PSYC466(3)
FIPR434(3/6)d
FIPR435(3/6)d
FIPR436(3/6)d
Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration
NEW COURSES
BAEN550(1.5)
BA511 (1.5)
BA551 (1.5)
Faculty of Science
NEW AND CHANGED COURSES
BIOL 111 (3)
BIOL 203 (4)
BIOL 326 (3)
BIOL 363 (2)
BIOL 428 (3)
ENVR400(3)
ENVR448(3/6)d
ISCI 320 (3)
ISCI 344 (3)
MICB 301 (3)
MICB 425 (3)
PSYC466(3)

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