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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2001-10-17

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 The University  of  British  Columbia
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF OCTOBER 17, 2001
Attendance
The Second Regular Meeting of the Senate of the University of British Columbia for the Session
2001/02 was held on Wednesday, October 17, 2001 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis
Building.
Present: President M. C. Piper (Chair), Vice President B. C. McBride, Dean F. S. Abbott, Dr. P.
Adebar, Mr. R. Affleck, Ms. C. Bekkers, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dean J. Blom, Mr. P. T. Brady, Dean J.
A. Cairns, Ms. E. J. Caskey, Mr. T. C. Y. Chan, Mr. C. Eaton, Dr. D. Fisher, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert,
Dean F. Granot, Ms. M. Hassen, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Dr. P. E. Harding, Dr. J. Helliwell, Mr. R.
R. Hira, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. C. Jillings, Mr. I. Kathrada, Dean M. M. Klawe, Dr. S. B. Knight,
Dr. B. S. Lalli, Dr. V. LeMay, Dr. D. M. Lyster, Mr. B. J. MacLean, Dr. P. L. Marshall, Dr. W. R.
McMaster, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Ms. V. G. Mirehouse, Mr. R. W. Morasiewicz, Dr. P. N.
Nemetz, Dr. G. N. Patey, Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Dr. J. Perry, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon, Dr. V.
Raoul, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten, Dean J. N. Saddler, Mr. A. F. Sheppard, Dr. C. Shields, Mr. B.
Simpson, Dr. D. Sjerve, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Ms. D. Soochan, Mr. C. Ste-Croix, Dr. B. Stelck, Dr.
R. C. Tees, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dean R. Tierney, Mr. D. Tompkins, Ms. G. Y. C. Tsai, Dean A.
Tully, Mr. D. R. Verma, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky, Dean E. H. K. Yen, Mr. W.
Yuen.
By invitation: Mr. J. Brossard, Mr. I. Burgess, Ms. D. Merritt, Vice President D. Pavlich, Vice
President T. Sumner
Regrets: Dr. W. L. Sauder (Chancellor), Dr. R. W. Blake, Mr. P. T. Burns, Dr. H. M. Burt, Mr. A.
Campbell, Dr. R. Goldman-Segall, Dr. D. Granot, Mr. E. Greathed, Dr. S.W. Hamilton, Rev. T. J.
Hanrahan, Ms. J. Hutton, Dr. D. D. Kitts, Mr. G. Lloyd, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Dr.
M. MacEntee, Dr. K. McQueen, Dean D. Muzyka, Dean M.Quayle, Ms. C. Quinlan, Ms. H. E.
Roman, Dr. K. Schonert-Reichl, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Mr. E. Storm, Mr. W. Tong.
Senate Membership
NEW STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Ms. Christina Bekkers representing the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Mr. Christopher Ste-Croix representing the Faculty of Education
Vol. 2001/02 12784
 Vancouver Senate 12785
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Dr. Tees l        That the minutes of the meeting of September
Mr. Verma J        19, 2001 be adopted as circulated.
Carried.
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SUNERA THOBANI
President Martha Piper had circulated the following excerpt from a speech she gave on
October 9th at the Liu Centre for the Study of Global Issues.
Welcome. We are very pleased to welcome you, this evening, to the President's Circle
Reception. This is a special event for the University, providing us with an opportunity to
thank you — members of the President's Circle — for your ongoing support and your
commitment to the University. Thank you for coming.
As most of you know this event was originally scheduled for Wednesday, September 12th,
and was postponed as a gesture of our respect and support for the individuals who
suffered as a result of the September 11th attack in the United States.
In addition to the postponement of this event and others, the campus community, I
believe, has responded sensitively and compassionately to the attack and its consequences.
Within 24 hours we provided information on our Web page and offered counseling,
advice and support to our students, faculty and staff; following the national day of
mourning we held our own campus memorial service; and we established a fund to receive
donations for the support of victims and their families.
Now while the symptoms of the sickness that erupted so tragically in New York and
Washington on September 11th may be addressed in the halls of diplomacy or through
international coalitions, the solutions — and we must find them — will come from here,
and from places like this. That is why I believe it is so fitting that we are holding tonight's
gathering in the Liu Centre for the Study of Global Issues, a new and very special facility
on this campus — a facility that will attract scholars from around the world to address the
most pressing global issues of the day: human security, trade and immigration, health and
environmental policy, and human rights and freedoms. We will hear later this evening
about these matters from the Director of this Institute, Dr. Lloyd Axworthy, but suffice it
to say that this Centre and this University are committed to furthering mutual respect and
tolerance, and to advancing global understanding and peace through our learning and
research.
In this connection, I would like to say a few words about the importance of academic
freedom. As you are probably aware, the University last week was the focus of national
attention because of comments made by a UBC professor at a conference in Ottawa.
 Vancouver Senate 12786
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Remarks from the Chair and Related Questions
Academic freedom simply refers to the protection of professors and their institutions from
political interference. It asserts that in the university, unconventional ideas and
controversial opinions deserve special protection.
At various times in the 20th century, that kind of protection has proved to be essential. As
noted in Saturday's Globe and Mail, whenever there has been a national crisis, academic
freedom and free speech have been threatened. During the "Red Scare" of the 1950s,
which was endorsed by a large segment of the population, pressure was put on universities
to fire faculty for membership in Communist organizations. The principle of academic
freedom legitimated universities that resisted such pressures.
Having said this, I would emphasize that academic freedom must be accompanied by
academic responsibility; that is, the individual must act responsibly, base statements and
opinions on fact and evidence, and use acceptable scholarly methods in the pursuit of
truth. The question then is: who should determine whether an individual's expressions of
opinion meet the test of fact and evidence? Who should decide whether the individual has
been academically responsible?
This determination has always been the responsibility of other respected scholars in the
field, i.e. peers, who scrutinize and evaluate each other's work. Peer review is the best
system we know of to ensure that a scholar's work is evaluated by the dispassionate
judgement and knowledge of experts, rather than by the court of public opinion or
political policy.
In all this it must be emphasized that the University as an institution holds no "views." I
have often been asked what is the "University's" view on a variety of controversial issues -
- abortion, for example, or Aboriginal land claims, or provincial tax policy. What needs to
be understood is that there is no such thing as a "University" view on such issues; rather,
the University is a community of scholars with a wide range of views and opinions.
Accordingly, the view of one scholar cannot and does not represent the view of the
University. The institution's role is to provide a forum for the free exchange of ideas, so
that through critical analysis and discussion we may move closer to an understanding of
our problems, and — we hope — to the discovery of solutions.
Mr. Brady described the recent speech made by Assistant Professor Sunera Thobani as a
"disgraceful rant" and expressed disappointment that the University made no other
statement to disassociate itself but one in support of freedom of speech. Mr. Verma
agreed, adding that he had endured some criticism from his fellow members of the
Vancouver Rotary Club about UBC's position on the matter. Mr. Verma, who had read
the full text of the controversial speech, found Dr. Thobani to be a profoundly angry
woman and stated that he would hesitate to send one of his children or grandchildren to
her classes.
 Vancouver Senate 12787
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Financial Statements
Dr. Raoul, as Director of the Centre for Women's Studies and Gender Research,
responded that her office had received messages reflecting enormous support both for the
content of the speech and for academic freedom. Dr. Raoul stated that some people had
expressed renewed interest in sending their children to UBC or in donating funds to the
University.
President Piper remarked that academic freedom, which she felt was clearly understood
by most members of Senate, was most frequently questioned during times of crisis.
Academic responsibility is an integral part of academic freedom and is judged by peer
review rather than by public opinion or political persuasion.
Mr. Hira commended the President for the last paragraph of the text of her speech, which
stated that the University did not "take a position." He added that, although individuals
may not agree with what others say, he was proud that UBC did not attempt to indirectly
muzzle people through institutional criticism.
Financial Statements
President Piper invited Mr. Terry Sumner, Vice President, Administration and Finance, to
present the University's Financial Statements for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2001.
Mr. Sumner introduced Ms. Dana Merritt, Director of Budgets, Mr. Ian Burgess,
Associate Director of Budgets, and John Brossard, Controller.
Mr. Sumner stated that the Financial Statements had been approved by the Board of
Governors in June 2001 and had been circulated to government offices, libraries, and the
campus community. Vice President Sumner had also presented the Statements at the UBC
Annual General Meeting on September 28, 2001. The Auditor General had granted the
unqualified opinion that the
 Vancouver Senate 12788
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Financial Statements
Financial Statements represent fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
University for the 2000/01 fiscal year.
HIGHLIGHTS
Total revenues for 2000/01 were $873.9 million, somewhat less than the figure of $879
million for 1999/2000. Vice President Sumner reminded members of Senate that a gift
from Dr. S. Blusson in the amount of $50 million had been included in the 1999/2000
total revenues. When this gift was removed from the total, it became evident that the
revenues to the University had increased by approximately $40 million. This increase
included an increase of $19 million to the University's operating grant.
Tuition fees remained approximately constant in 2000/01, the fifth year of the provincial
government's mandated tuition fee freeze. Credit and non-credit tuition fees represent
13% of all revenues to the University, as compared to 20-25% at some other Canadian
universities.
Dr. Knight asked how the over-enrolment of 1100 students for 2001/02 would affect the
University's financial position. Mr. Sumner stated that, although the University would not
receive the $7200 per student provincial grant for these extra students, it would receive
approximately $2.5 million in additional tuition. Approximately $550 K had been
allocated to the Faculties in support of additional course sections. More needs assessment
was to be done in January 2002.
In response to a query from Dr. Fisher, Ms. Merritt stated that total tuition fees had been
reduced in 2000/01 because courses previously offered by Extra-Sessional Studies were
now being offered by the Faculties.
In response to a question from Mr. Simpson, Mr. Sumner stated that he was uncertain
about the impact of the provincial government's three-year freeze on funding for
education. He noted that
 Vancouver Senate 12789
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
the post-secondary sector had not been isolated as a target of the freeze. President Piper
added that it may be possible to reallocate funds within the Ministry of Advanced
Education, but that further discussion was necessary. President Piper pledged to keep
members of Senate informed.
Academic Policy Committee
COLLEGE OF HEALTH DISCIPLINES
Dr. Tees circulated the following report, as Chair of the Committee. A proposal to create
the new College of Health Disciplines had been circulated to Senate prior to its May 2001
meeting. Copies of the full proposal are available from the Manager, Senate &
Curriculum Services.
Report on the proposal to establish a College of Health Disciplines
In proposing the establishment of a College of Health Disciplines, the Council of Health and
Human Service Programs was guided by University Counsel as to whether such an entity
would be allowed under the University Act (1996), particularly Part 10.
The proposal from the Council of Health and Human Service Programs views a College as an
affiliation of faculties that crosses traditional faculty boundaries and is in accord with TREK
2000 and the Academic Plan. For the purposes of this proposal, the health and human service
programs are seen to conform to the characterization of professional faculties, schools, and
departments outlined by the Committee on the Organization of the University (COU) in their
report to Senate, February 16, 1949; that is: their courses are mainly professional or
vocational in character; they offer a specialized curriculum leading to a distinctive degree; their
policies do not generally affect policies in other departments to any great extent, because their
courses are ordinarily restricted to students following the specialized curriculum; they have a
relationship with outside professional bodies, which is not only desirable, but is necessary
because of professional requirements that must be considered when designing the curriculum.
In light of extensive consultations leading to the framing of this proposal, and since College as
described accords with the University Act, the Senate Academic Policy Committee
RECOMMENDS that:
1. faculties offering health and/or human service programs be permitted to affiliate for
the purpose of carrying out joint interprofessional and interdisciplinary learning,
research and community related activities as the College of Health Disciplines;
2. Senate, exercising its discretion under Part 7, 35 (2) (1) of the University Act (1996),
admit as an additional member the official who holds the office of Principal of the
College of Health Disciplines;
3. the functions and governance of the College of Health Disciplines supersede those of
the Office of the Coordinator of Health Sciences, and that the Office of the Coor-
 Vancouver Senate 12790
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
dinator of Health Sciences be disbanded and its operational units moved to governance
by the College.
Dr. Tees stated that, if the new College were to be approved, the Committee would ask
that the Vice President, Academic & Provost make brief annual reports to Senate for the
first several years. Dr. Tees also pointed out that Section 7 (34) of the University Act
stipulated that the Senate could add additional members. The addition of the Principal of
the College of Health Disciplines would not upset the ratio outlined in the Act such as to
trigger the addition of even more members.
Dr. Tees l        That Senate adopt the report of the Academic
Dr. Gilbert i        Policy Committee on the College of Health
Disciplines and the recommendations therein.
Dr. Gilbert made the following presentation in support of the motion.
On behalf of the Council of Health and Human Service Programs, (a body approved by Senate
in 1998) it gives me pleasure to speak in support of the motion to adopt the report of the
Senate Academic Policy Committee.
The report contains three recommendations:
First, to establish a College of Health Disciplines; second, to admit an additional member to
Senate; and third, to disband the Office of the Coordinator of Health Sciences.
I will not discuss many of the points laid out in the document received by Senate in May 2001.
That document represents about the 30th iteration after a long consultation process, and
aligns the rationale for establishing a College of Health Disciplines with Trek 2000 and the
Academic Plan.
In my comments I will focus on three topics that intersect in this proposal. The three topics
are:
• one, support for a College within the University Act;
• two, the role of Senate in approving the academic programme of the College; and
• three, the place of the affiliated Faculties, in the governance of the College.
I should like to acknowledge the inestimable help of Dennis Pavlich in developing our
understanding of this intersection. Madam Chair, if Senators have questions about aspects of
this proposal in relation to the University Act, I would be most grateful if Dennis might be
admitted to Senate's discussions.
 Vancouver Senate 12791
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
Just over two years ago, the Council of Health and Human Service Programs began discussing
the possibility of establishing a College as a successor to the Office of the Coordinator of
Health Sciences. At that time we did not start with the University Act.
We began by considering a number of generic academic matters that were being discussed in
Council. We had been discussing, for example:
• the desirability of a common set of pedagogic approaches to interprofessional courses;
• the rationalization of approaches to clinical externships or fieldwork, and
• the development of common policy approaches to our relations with government.
It was only with hindsight that we realized that any discussion of a new academic unit at UBC
(or any other provincial university) must begin, and end, with the University Act.
Under Dennis Pavlich's tutelage, it became clear that in order to establish a new academic
unit, [using the title of "College" as allowed under the Act] we needed to recognize the clear
direction the Act gives about the role of the Faculties in academic programs.
The University Act. New academic units must be congruent with the provisions of the Act if
they are to enjoy legitimacy. Without this accord such units have no academic authority, and
are therefore not sustainable.
The Act places academic authority clearly with the Faculties. It is the Faculties that hold the
authority to:
• Develop courses of instruction - subject to approval by Senate,
• Appoint faculty - subject to approval by the President and Board of Governors,
• Award degrees - subject to approval by Senate, and
• Enroll students
It should be made clear immediately that the proposed College will usurp none of this
authority. With the seven affiliating Faculties [Agricultural Sciences, Applied Science, Arts,
Dentistry, Education, Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences] the College will work to:
• establish interfaculty courses of instruction that clearly do not belong in any one Faculty
(what we have termed "interprofessional" courses);
• ensure that faculty are appointed to teach those courses; and
• administer those courses for the collective whole.
The College will also continue to work with the affiliating Faculties in a number of other
arenas of collaborative interest.
The proposed College is a motivated attempt to respond to the changing health care system
whilst working within the constraints of the University Act. Whereas federal and provincial
statutes governing health care issues have been added, altered or eliminated, universities have
chosen (with good reason) not to open the University Act to change.
 Vancouver Senate 12792
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
Senate. The University Act authorizes the university to "establish and maintain colleges ..."
(Part 10, 47, (a)) but it does not contain either a description of a College, nor does it set out
the responsibilities of a College. It is the responsibility of Senate to authorize the description
and academic responsibilities of the proposed College under Part 7, 37, (1) (o) of the Act.
A precedent for the use of this responsibility may be seen in the role played by Senate in its
authorization of the characterization of Schools in 1949, a characterization that has been used
since that time.
Senate played a similar role in 1993 when the Academic Policy committee (Chaired by
Richard Tees) set out Guidelines for the Establishment of a Faculty.
These procedures may appear cumbersome, but their attention to the details of the statute
demonstrates why universities have been reluctant to open the University Act for new
considerations. For the purposes of Senate, the proposed College represents an agreement of
seven affiliating Faculties to collaborate in activities, such as academic programming, that
could not be engaged in by any one Faculty alone. Through its approval procedures, only
Senate may authorize the academic aspects (for example, course approval) of this proposed
collaboration.
[The rationale and procedure for collaborative course approval is set out in Appendix 3 of the
long document.]
Governance. To be in accord with the Act, the Council gave considerable attention to the way
in which the proposed College should be governed.
It was recognized that since the College is a collaboration of affiliating Faculties, then it
should be governed by a Council - the Council of the College of Health Disciplines - or in
brief, the College Council.
It was agreed that the College Council should comprise:
• the Deans (or their designate(s)) of the affiliating faculties. Designates on the existing
Council include the Directors and Heads of health and human service programs;
• the VP Academic and Provost (or designate(s)) which might be the Associate Vice-
President Academic Programs;
• the University Librarian (or designate). On the present Council this is the Head of the UBC
Life Sciences Libraries; and
• an elected member of the Health Sciences Student Association.
On the basis of discussions with Student Senators, it is recommended that the Student Senate
Caucus elect two of its number to serve as members of Council, on behalf of the seven
affiliated Faculties. This is because the HSSA members are not elected representatives of the
student body. The total student representation on Council will therefore be three members.
[Student Senators will introduce a motion to this effect].
The College will be reviewed toward the end of the term of the Principal, in accord with usual
academic practice.
It is suggested that the College report annually to Senate through the Vice-President Academic
and Provost.
 Vancouver Senate 12793
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
It is proposed that the College appoint a Community Advisory Committee, comprising
representation from leaders in the professional and disciplinary fields of affiliated faculties.
Such a Committee would acknowledge the enormous role played by UBC's community
partners in educating the next generation of health and human service professionals. The
Community Advisory Committee would also recognize that students in the health and human
service programs spend more the 30% of their time in community agencies.
The College would have responsibility to carry out functions formerly carried out by the
Office of the Coordinator of Health Sciences, and any others as seen fit by the affiliating
faculties.
After much discussion and consultation it was agreed that the head of the College would be
appointed a Principal, and report to the Vice President Academic and Provost.
The Principal of the College would serve as Chair of the College Council.
It is recommended that Senate, at its discretion and in accord with the University Act, section
35, 2 (1) admit the Principal of the College as an additional member. In the past, Senate has
used this section to admit seven additional Convocation Senators. Since the College would not
enroll students and would have no appointed faculty members, there would be no requirement
to add student or faculty Senators.
The faculty of the College would consist of those members of "faculty" status in affiliated
faculties who are engaged in interprofessional education, research, and/or community
activities that cross professional or disciplinary boundaries, and who voluntarily choose to
affiliate with the College.
Any student enrolled in a health and human service program may participate in activities of
the College, for example, interprofessional courses or interprofessional Fieldwork experience.
Finally, any matters pertaining to the College would be referred to the College Council for
discussion and decision. Clearly any matters dealt with by the College Council that have
implications for the affiliated Faculties would be referred to the affiliated Faculties.
This innovative academic program has engaged many people in many, many discussions.
Threaded through those discussions has been a persistent theme, with which I should like to
end these comments.
Health care is a collaboration. As one of its major foci, the College will deliberately address
the needs of health and human service students to acquire the skills, the understanding and the
predispositions that are the requisites of collaboration.
In response to a question from Dr. Pedersen, Dr. Gilbert stated that the operational units
within the Office of the Coordinator of Health Sciences had been reviewed according to
standard procedure. To a further question regarding the legal implications of the term
"principal", Mr. Pavlich responded that the term may be freely defined and used.
 Vancouver Senate 12794
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
In response to queries, Dr. Gilbert confirmed that the College would not seek to develop
research programs that already exist in the Faculties. He added that the College would
focus on entry to practice rather than on graduate education.
There was some discussion about the addition of the Principal as a member of Senate. Dr.
Tees clarified that this was a somewhat unique situation, and that there were no plans to
admit directors of centres and institutes as members of Senate.
Mr. Morasiewicz l        That the membership of the College Council be
Dr. Gilbert i        expanded to include two student senators.
Carried.
The motion was
put and carried.
Dr. Gilbert recognized the contributions of numerous faculty members and students who
had participated in the consultation process that had eventually led to the proposal. He
also thanked members of Senate and his colleagues in the United Kingdom, the United
States and Australia.
STATUS OF INSTITUTES AND CENTRES
The following report had been circulated.
Report of the Senate Academic Policy Committee on the Status of Institutes and Centres
Within the university, Institutes or Centres appear to fall, at present, into one of two
categories: (1) Institutes or Centres that exist within one disciplinary Faculty, and (2) Institutes
or Centres that represent an affiliation of Faculties across traditional Faculty boundaries, most
often under the jurisdiction of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
This report sets out common characteristics of Institutes and Centres in Category 2, and
recommends principles for their implementation, governance, review and closure. In this
report the words Institute and Centre are used interchangeably. This report does not include a
discussion of other frameworks such as "Laboratories" e.g. AMPEL and BIOTECH, or
"Collaborations" e.g. CORD.
 Vancouver Senate 12795
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
Institutes or Centres at a graduate level may have the following characteristics:
they foster ongoing graduate programs of collaborative research and teaching of an inter-
Faculty, interdisciplinary nature, and serve as incubators for nurturing such programs;
they bring together a critical mass of scholars from several disciplines and areas of
specialization;
they may exist for an extended period of time;
they offer an institutional platform from which to apply for grant support or for financial
support outside of UBC;
they provide a means of fostering cooperation between scholars in the same research area
at other universities, institutions, community, private sector, etc.;
they provide a means to sponsor and organize interdisciplinary lectures, conferences,
symposia, colloquia and workshops;
they attract post-doctoral fellows, visiting professors, adjunct professors and other
scholars wishing to undertake interdisciplinary research at UBC.
The Senate Academic Policy Committee, therefore, recommends:
A. Implementation
1. that proposals for inter-Faculty Institutes or Centres be initiated by a group of faculty
and coordinated by the Deans of the proposing Faculties;
2. that an Implementation Committee to develop a new Institute or Centre include those
faculty members expressing interest in an affiliation to develop an inter-Faculty
Institute or Centre (the proposing Faculties), and other appropriate persons
recommended by the Deans of the proposing Faculties;
3. that the Implementation Committee be chaired by a Dean of a proposing Faculty and
determine an appropriate host faculty for the Institute or Centre, in many instances the
Faculty of Graduate Studies;
4. that a proposal for a new inter-Faculty Institute or Centre developed by an
Implementation Committee be reviewed by all Faculties, and the University Librarian,
for overlap with existing initiatives, and consideration of complementary versus
competitive or duplicative efforts in research, teaching and community linkages;
5. that a proposal for a new inter-Faculty Institute or Centre be approved by the
Committee of Deans prior to submission to Senate;
6. that once approved by the Committee of Deans, a proposal for a new Centre or
Institute go forward to Senate for academic approval.
B. Governance
1. that the governance of an inter-Faculty Institute or Centre be provided by a Steering-
Advisory Committee of representatives from proposing Faculties, the Chair to be the
Dean (or designate) of the host faculty (in many cases the Dean of Graduate Studies),
and include the Director and other participants as deemed appropriate;
2. that the Steering-Advisory Committee have the following specific responsibilities: to
recommend the appointment of a Director of the Institute or Centre on the advice
 Vancouver Senate 12796
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
of an appropriately constituted search committee; to provide the Dean of the host
faculty and the Director with advice on the strategic direction and management of the
Institute or Centre; to approve an annual report including a rolling three-year unit-
based academic plan; to approve an annual budget; to consult with, and obtain the
approval of, affiliated faculties on all matters pertaining to proposed teaching and/or
degree programs;
3. that for most inter-faculty Institutes or Centres at the graduate level, the Director
report to the Chair of the Steering Committee, in most cases the Dean of Graduate
Studies;
4. that the regular review of an Institute or Centre conform to common university
practice, and provide for the closure of an Institute or Centre, when appropriate;
5. that these recommendations come into force when a new Institute or Centre is
proposed, and inform the review of an existing Institute or Centre.
The Senate Academic Policy Committee points out that adoption of the above
recommendations would not prevent any Institute or Centre from becoming a Department,
School or Faculty if Senate and the Board of Governors so decide.
Dr. Tees l        That Senate adopt the report of the Academic
Dean Klawe J        Policy Committee on the Status of Institutes
and Centres
Dr. Tees explained that the current Academic Policy Committee had "inherited" this issue
from the previous Committee, which held office from 1996 to 1999. Consultants included
deans, department heads and directors of established centres and institutes. The
Committee also collected a historical record of centres and institutes at UBC and looked
at the conventions of other universities relating to the naming and function of similar
units.
One of the first things that became apparent to the current Committee was that "centre"
can mean a number of things at UBC, including a building (e.g. the Asian Centre) or a
service (e.g. Centre for Faculty Development & Instructional Services). There did not
appear to be any value in introducing a distinction between a centre and an institute.
Although the Faculty of Graduate Studies did make the distinction such that centres are
based on less secure funding than institutes, the Committee considered this criterion of
minimal significance because UBC institutes appeared historically to be less stable than
centres.
 Vancouver Senate 12797
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
The Committee received many submissions that advised that centres and institutes be
developed and overseen by all participating faculties and departments, and that these
units be fully integrated into UBC's research and teaching missions.
Dr. Tees advised that creators of new institutes and centres address the guidelines above
in their proposals to Senate. Approval of the guidelines would create a Senate-approved
general policy for interfaculty centres and institutes.
Dr. Pedersen, as Associate Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, stated that the
Faculty had some concerns about the proposed governance of centres and institutes. He
described the proposal as "a recipe for bureaucratization," because he believed that
adding additional levels of control would be counter-productive. Directors who report to
the Dean of Graduate Studies, as opposed to an advisory committee, retain necessary
flexibility and may act more quickly when necessary. Dr. Pedersen also expressed the
opinion that the advisory committee should not be responsible for allocating the budget
within the unit.
In amendment.
Dr. Pedersen i        That Item 1, Section B be simplified to read,
Dean Granot J        "that the administrative and budgetary
authority of the unit be in the proposed host
Faculty."
Dr. Tees responded that he did not agree with the portrayal of the advisory committee as
an extra layer of bureaucracy, and that the director would not be required to consult with
the committee on a daily basis. The idea was to ensure that all stake-holders are afforded
some degree of participation in the governance of the unit.
 Vancouver Senate 12798
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Academic Policy Committee
Vice President McBride, speaking against the amendment, recalled that he had served on a
number of such advisory committees and that he believed that the unit director would
have ample latitude in which to make decisions. The chair of the advisory committee
would act in a role similar to that of the dean under the proposed amendment. He added
that the Academic Policy Committee's proposal would create more collaborative and
stronger units. Dean Isaacson also spoke against the amendment, suggesting that advisory
committees would need to meet only a few times annually. He stated that, under the
amendment, some of the participating Faculties might be excluded. Dean Klawe agreed,
stating that the Committee had conducted an enormous amount of consultation before
making its recommendations. Dean Cairns spoke against the amendment, stating that the
Biomedical Research Centre had recently been functioning well under a governance
structure similar to that outlined in the proposal. Dr. Pedersen pointed out that the
budgetary authority for the Biomedical Research Centre rested with the Dean of
Medicine.
In response to a query from Mr. Podersky-Cannon, Dr. Tees clarified that units located in
the Faculty of Graduate Studies were considered to be interfaculty and would thus be
covered by the proposed policy.
The amendment
was put and
failed.
"1
Speaking to the original motion, Mr. Tompkins stated that he would have liked to see a
provision for student participation in governance.
There was some discussion about possibly creating two classes of units: those that follow
the guidelines and those that do not. Dr. Tees stated that, although review committees for
existing units should take the guidelines into account and implement them where possible,
there
 Vancouver Senate 12799
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Nominating Committee
remained the possibility that the committee would find the existing structure to better
serve the needs of the unit.
The original
motion was put
and carried.
1
Nominating Committee
AD HOC SENATE CONSULTATIVE WRITING REQUIREMENTS COMMITTEE
As Chair of the Committee, Dr. Williams presented the following report.
The following motion was put and carried at the May 2001 Meeting of Senate:
That Senate endorse the idea of further exploring the principles of ^writing through the
curriculum' as set out in the Write, Write, and Rewrite report. Such exploration would
involve, at a minimum, consultation with Faculties, with faculty, and with students and
would result in a report back to Senate with specific recommendations; and
That an ad hoc Senate Consultative 'Writing Requirements' Committee be struck by the
Senate Nominating Committee.
The Nominating Committee is pleased to nominate the following people as members of the Ad
Hoc Senate Consultative Writing Requirements Committee:
Members of Senate:
Dr. Alan Hannam
Ms. Michelle Hassen
Dr. Tom Pedersen
Dr. Valerie Raoul
Mr. Bernie Simpson
Mr. Christopher Ste-Croix
Dr. Ronald Yaworsky
Non-members of Senate:
• Dr. Bruce Dunwoody (Associate Dean, Faculty of Applied Science)
• Dr. Janet Giltrow (Associate Professor of English)
• Dr. Neil Guppy (Associate Vice President, Academic Programs)
 Vancouver Senate 12800
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Nominating Committee
Dr. Williams l        That Senate approve the membership of the Ad
Dr. Rosengarten J       Hoc Senate Consultative Writing Requirements
Committee.
Carried.
QUORUM FOR THE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT APPEALS ON ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE
The Nominating Committee had circulated the following report.
In September 2001, the Committee on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
requested that the Nominating Committee consider reducing its quorum from six
voting members to five voting members because the Appeals Committee had been
experiencing difficulty reaching full quorum for the hearing of student appeals.
In acknowledgement of the difficulty in scheduling hearings, and noting that the
Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing has five members as its quorum, the
Nominating Committee recommends that the quorum for this Committee be reduced
from six members to five.
Dr. Williams l        That the quorum for the Committee on
Mr. Verma i        Student Appeals on Academic Discipline be
reduced from six members to five.
Dr. Lalli, as a member of the Senate Appeal Committee on Academic Standing, stated that
it was difficult to get even five people to attend hearings of that Committee. He
recommended that membership for both Committees be enlarged rather than the quorum
reduced.
The motion was
put and carried.
SENATE COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
The Nominating Committee recommended the following changes to the membership of
the Committees of Senate. Appointments were effective immediately except where
otherwise indicated.
Academic Building Needs
Mr. I. Kathrada replaces Mr. H. Poon
 Vancouver Senate 12801
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Nominating Committee
Admissions
Dr. V. LeMay replaces Dr. D. Lyster (effective January 1, 2002)
Agenda
Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert replaces Dean J. Blom
Appeals on Academic Standing
Dean D. Muzyka replaces Dr. T. F. Pedersen
Mr. D. Tompkins replaces Mr. W. Tong
Budget
Mr. B. Simpson replaces Mr. H. D. Gray
Continuing Studies
Dean F. Granot to fill a vacancy
Dean J. Saddler replaces A/Dean J. McLean
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Dean J. Saddler replaces A/Dean J. McLean
Library
Ms. C. Bekkers to fill a vacancy
Dean J. Blom replaces Dr. D. Lyster (effective January 1, 2002)
Mr. R. Morasiewicz replaces Ms. S. Iwagami
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
Mr. C. Ste-Croix replaces Mr. H. Poon
Tributes
Ms. H. Roman to fill a vacancy
Dr. Williams l        That the Senate approve the recommendations
Dean Isaacson i        of the Nominating Committee with respect to
Committee Membership.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12802
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Student Awards Committee
Student Awards Committee
Please see 'Appendix A: New Awards.'
Dr. Thompson presented the new awards for approval, as Chair of the Committee. He
drew attention to the particularly generous TD Bank Financial Group Graduate Bursary.
Dr. Thompson i        That the awards be accepted and
Dr. Nemetz J        recommended for approval by the Board of
Governors, and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried.
Tributes Committee
HONORARY DEGREES PROCEDURE
Dr. Helliwell noted that the 2002 names of the candidates for honorary degrees would be
on the November 2001 Senate agenda for approval. The candidate files will be available
for viewing one day prior to the meeting at the Ceremonies Office.
MEMORIAL MINUTE
The Tributes Committee had circulated the following memorial minute.
Charles Alexander McDowell
1918-2001
Charles A. McDowell was born in Northern Ireland and educated at Queen's University
of Belfast. He received his Bachelor's, Master's and Doctoral degrees in Science from
Queen's University.
During the Second World War he served as a Gas and Bomb Identification Officer in the
UK Civil Defence from 1942-45. His academic career began in 1946 at the University of
Liverpool as a member of the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Science.
Dr. McDowell was appointed Professor and Head of the Department of Chemistry at
UBC in 1955 and served in that capacity until 1981. UBC's Department of Chemistry
flourished under his guidance into one of the largest and most respected departments in
North America. His vision, and his greatest achievement, was to create a vital, modern
 Vancouver Senate 12803
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
department characterized by excellence in both teaching and research. He realized in
particular that the greatness of a university is set by its research achievements.
Charles McDowell was internationally recognized for his own achievements in research in
Physical Chemistry. He was also recognized as an academic administrator whose wisdom
was widely respected throughout Canada and abroad. He held many memberships and
received many honours for his academic achievements. These included: Fellowships in The
Royal Institute of Chemistry (UK), The Royal Society of Canada, The American Institute
of Physics and a Research Fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation. He was awarded
the Chemical Institute of Canada Medal in 1969 and served as President of that body in
1978-79.
He was highly regarded as a faculty member at UBC and served on a number of university
committees. He was a long-time member of Senate from 1966-1981 and an elected
member of faculty to the Board of Governors in 1977-78. Dr. McDowell was designated
as "University Professor" in 1981 at UBC in recognition of his contributions as a
distinguished scholar. In 1984, he received an Honorary Degree (DSc.) from UBC and in
1993 he was named an Officer of the Order of Canada.
Charles McDowell was admired and respected for his analytical ability, his critical
judgement, his devotion to high standards and his practical common sense. He overcame
the effects of a serious case of Guillain-Barre Syndrome, which left him confined to a
wheelchair in 1979. Through his unconquerable spirit and the support of his wife,
Christine, his family and colleagues he returned to resume his research career and was
active as a scholar until shortly before his death.
He will be remembered for his leadership, commitment and dedication to this university
and his research discipline. The Charles A. McDowell Award named in his honour
recognizes annually a UBC faculty member that has demonstrated outstanding research
capability before the age of 40. He was always present to award the medal to the recipient
and stress the importance of excellence in research as the basis for establishing and
judging a university's greatness.
Dr. Helliwell l        That the memorial minute for Charles
Dr. Williams i       Alexander McDowell be entered into the
Minutes of Senate.
Carried.
Reports from the Vice President, Academic and Provost
JAMES & ANNABEL MCCREARY CHAIR IN PEDIATRICS
Vice President McBride was pleased to present the new Chair for approval.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Cairns i       James & Annabel McCreary Chair in
Pediatrics.
 Vancouver Senate 12804
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Adjournment
Carried.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA CENTRE FOR PROSTATE RESEARCH
Vice President McBride had circulated a proposal for the new Centre prior to the meeting
Copies are available from the Manager, Senate & Curriculum Services.
Vice President McBride    l        That Senate approve the establishment of the
Dean Cairns i        University of British Columbia Centre for
Prostate Research within the Faculty of
Medicine.
In response to a query from Mr. Podersky-Cannon, Vice President McBride stated that
proposals for new research centres should be referred to the University Library for
consultation.
The motion was
put and carried.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The next regular meeting of
Senate will be held on Wednesday, November 14th at 7:00 p.m.
 Vancouver Senate 12805
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Appendix A: New Awards
Appendix A: New Awards
Clinton ABERCROMBIE Memorial Entrance Bursary - Bursaries totalling $450 have
been endowed in memory of her husband through a bequest by Winnifred A.
Abercrombie for students entering the University from secondary school.
Recommendations from high school principals will be taken into consideration. (First
award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
ACCENTURE Leadership Award - A $1,200 award has been endowed by Accenture Inc.
for a student entering the fourth year of a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science or a
Bachelor of Applied Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering. In addition to
having achieved high academic standing, candidates for the award must have
demonstrated leadership and participated actively in extra-curricular or volunteer
activities such as professional, school, social and community organizations, athletics or
part-time employment. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Departments,
alternating between of Department of Computer Science in odd-numbered years and the
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in even-numbered years. (First award
available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
ASENDA Pharmaceutical Supplies Ltd. Scholarship in Pharmaceutical Sciences -
Scholarships totalling $2,000 are offered by Asenda Pharmaceutical Supplies Ltd. for
undergraduate students entering second or third year in Pharmaceutical Sciences. The
awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. (First
award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
ASSOCIATION of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of B.C. Scholarship in
Geoscience - A $1,500 scholarship is offered by the Association of Professional Engineers
and Geoscientists of B.C. to a student entering the third year of a Bachelor of Science
program in Geology, Geophysics, Geochemistry or Environmental Geoscience
(Geotechnics) and taking courses leading towards registration as a professional
geoscientist. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of Earth and
Ocean Sciences. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
CENTRE for Korean Research Prize - Up to five prizes of $1,000 each are offered by the
Centre for Korean Research at UBC for graduate students doing work in Korean Studies.
Candidates must submit to the Centre a paper of at least fifteen pages, written in the past
year, on a topic in Korean Studies. Graduating students are not eligible for the
competition. The awards are made each spring on the recommendation of the Centre for
Korean Research in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First award
available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Mabel CHAN Memorial Scholarship in Pharmaceutical Sciences - A $900 scholarship has
been endowed by family, friends and colleagues in memory of pharmacist, Mabel Chan,
for
 Vancouver Senate 12806
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Appendix A: New Awards
undergraduate students entering first year in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. First
preference is given to students from the East Kootenay region and then to students from
the rest of British Columbia. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences. (First award available for the 2002/2003 academic year)
COLLEGE of Dental Hygienists of B.C. Gold Medal - A gold medal, a certificate and a
$500 prize are offered by the College of Dental Hygienists of British Columbia to the
member of the graduating class, B.D.Sc. Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program
with the highest academic standing. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Dentistry. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Jack DIAMOND Bursary - Bursaries totalling $900 have been endowed through a
bequest by Jack Diamond for students in any faculty who demonstrate financial need.
(First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Hon. Thomas A. DOHM, Q.C, Bursary in Medicine - Bursaries totalling $600 have been
endowed by Hon. Justice Thomas Dohm and The University of British Columbia for
students in the M.D. program. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Faculty of MEDICINE 50th Anniversary Bursary - Bursaries totalling $9,000 have been
endowed for M.D. students in honour of the Faculty of Medicine's 50th anniversary at
The University of British Columbia. (Partial award available for the 2001/2002 academic
year)
Faculty of MEDICINE 50th Anniversary Scholarship - Scholarships totalling $900 have
been endowed for M.D. students in honour of the Faculty of Medicine's 50th anniversary
at The University of British Columbia. The awards are made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Medicine. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Erzsebet GESSLER Memorial Scholarship - Scholarships totalling $6,000 have been
endowed in memory of her mother, Erzsebet (Bozsi) Gessler, through a bequest by Dr.
Eva Marie Bene for students in the School of Music majoring in piano. The award is
made on the recommendation of the School of Music. (First award available for the
2001/2002 academic year)
GRADUATING Class of 1940 Bursary - Bursaries totalling $1500 have been endowed by
the Graduating Class of 1940 to mark the occasion of their 60th anniversary. The awards
are
 Vancouver Senate 12807
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Appendix A: New Awards
offered to students in any program or year of study. (First award available for the
2001/2002 academic year)
GRADUATING Class of Medicine 1957 Bursary - Bursaries totalling $850 have been
endowed by the Medicine Class of 1957 for students in the Faculty of Medicine. (Partial
award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Dorothy HELMER Scholarship in Medicine - Scholarships totalling $6,500 have been
endowed through a bequest by Dorothy Evelyn Helmer for masters and doctoral students
in Medicine undertaking research concerning infectious diseases. The awards are made on
the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
HISTORY Students' Association Prize - A $300 prize has been endowed by members of
the History Students' Association and faculty in the Department of History for a student
specializing in History who has achieved high academic standing. The award is made on
the recommendation of the Department of History. (First award available for the
2001/2002 academic year)
Y. S. HSIEH Prize - A $2,500 prize has been endowed in honour of Dr. Y. S. Hsieh by the
Hsu and Hsieh Foundation and The University of British Columbia for the graduating
student in the M.D. program who achieves the highest standing in Obstetrics and
Gynecology. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. (First
award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
INDIA Club of Vancouver Bursary in Agricultural Sciences - Bursaries totalling $500 are
offered by Dr. Indrajit Desai and his wife, Manjula Desai, to students in Agricultural
Sciences, with preference given to international students from a developing country. Dr.
Desai is a Professor Emeritus of International Nutrition and one of the founding
presidents of the India Club. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Tom KENNEDY Memorial Scholarship in Commerce - A $1,500 scholarship is offered in
memory of Tom Kennedy to promote the study of management accounting and encourage
pursuit of CMA-Certified Management Accountant professional accounting designation.
The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration to a student entering fourth year who has attained high standing in the
accounting option of the B.Com. program. (First award available for the 2001/2002
academic year)
Margaret LAWRENCE Scholarship in Arts - Scholarships totalling $19,000 have been
endowed through a bequest by Margaret Elizabeth Lawrence for students in the Faculty
of Arts.
 Vancouver Senate 12808
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Appendix A: New Awards
The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Arts. (Partial award
available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Robert Quarrington MAXWELL Scholarship - Scholarships totalling $1,000 have been
endowed through a bequest from Robert Quarrington Maxwell for students entering the
third year of a Bachelor of Applied Science program in engineering. The awards are made
on the recommendation of the Faculty of Applied Science. (First award available for the
2001/2002 academic year)
Allan McEachern Prize in Criminal Law - A $350 prize has been endowed in honour of
Allan McEachern by the Vancouver Criminal Justice Section of the Canadian Bar
Association as a tribute to the contribution he made to the legal community as Chief
Justice of British Columbia. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Law to a student with high standing in first year criminal law. (First award available for
the 2001/2002 academic year)
School of NURSING 80th Anniversary Scholarship - Scholarships totalling $1,400 have
been endowed to commemorate the School of Nursing's 80th Anniversary. The awards
are made on the recommendation of the School of Nursing. (First award available for the
2001/2002 academic year)
James M. ORR Scholarship - Scholarships totalling $600 have been endowed by Dr.
James M. Orr for undergraduate students in Pharmaceutical Sciences who have achieved
excellence in pharmacokinetics. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Pharmaceutical Sciences. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
William R. and Heather P. RIEDL Bursary - Bursaries totalling $3,000 have been
endowed by William R. and Heather P. Riedl for students in the Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration who are in need of financial assistance. (First award
available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
SEVERNIAN Scholarship in Music - A $1,000 scholarship is offered by Paul Moritz for a
student, either graduate or undergraduate, in the School of Music whose main focus of
study is the oboe, French horn or cello. The award is made on the recommendation of the
School of Music and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
William and Wilhelmina STOBIE Bursary - Bursaries totalling $22,950 have been
endowed through a bequest by Wilhelmina Stobie for students in the Faculty of
Education, the School of Music and the School of Nursing. (First award available for the
2001/2002 academic year)
 Vancouver Senate 12809
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Appendix A: New Awards
Delfa SYEKLOCHA Bursary - Bursaries totalling $300 have been endowed by Dr. Delfa
Syeklocha, Professor Emerita at the University of British Columbia, for students in
Biological Sciences.
TD BANK Financial Group Graduate Bursary - Bursaries totalling $200,000 are offered
by TD Bank Financial Group for graduate students in any discipline who are Canadian
Citizens or Permanent Residents. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
THUNDERBIRD Men's Field Hockey Award - One or more awards, which may range
from a minimum value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic association
regulations, are offered to outstanding members of the Thunderbird Men's Field Hockey
Team in any year of study. Awards are made on the nomination of the President's
Athletic Awards Committee. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Edythe WEBSTER Scholarship in Library and Information Studies - Scholarships totalling
$1,200 have been endowed by Edythe Webster for students in the Master of Library and
Information Studies program. The awards are made on the recommendation of the School
of Library, Archival and Information Studies in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. (First award available for the 2001/2002 academic year)
Dan F. WILSON Memorial Bursary in Religious Studies - Bursaries totalling $300 have
been endowed in memory of Dan F. Wilson through a bequest by his brother, Reginald
W. Wilson, for students in Religious Studies. (First award available for the 2001/2002
academic year)
Change in terms for previously approved award: forwarded to Senate for information
only
Chris LIN Memorial Scholarship - A $2,700 scholarship has been endowed in memory of
Chris Lin, who died tragically on August 31, 1966. Chris was the son of Professor Paul
Lin, for many years the Director of the Centre for East Asian Studies at McGill
University, and an alumnus of the University of British Columbia. Chris was born in the
United States and brought up in China. He was a second year student at UBC at the time
of his death. He was a fine, warm-hearted human being and a student of great promise;
had he lived he would undoubtedly have greatly contributed to the furtherance of
understanding between China and Canada. The recipient of this annual scholarship is a
student, undergraduate or graduate, who meets the following criteria: (1) proficiency in
Chinese equivalent of at least one year of intensive language study, a concentration in
Chinese studies, and academic excellence, (2) evidence of social concerns and good
citizenship; commitment to the study and understanding of cultures and values. Preference
will be given to Canadian citizens and permanent residents, but others
 Vancouver Senate 12810
Minutes of October 17,2001	
Appendix A: New Awards
are also invited to apply. Candidates should submit a curriculum vitae which includes a
brief statement concerning their intentions and life goals to the Chris Lin Memorial
Scholarship Committee, c/o Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia.
The award is made on the recommendation of the Department of Asian Studies.
Points 1 and 2 have been amended. They previously read as follows:
... (1) a Canadian student, undergraduate or graduate, who has attained a proficiency
equivalent to one year of Chinese language study and whose area of concentration is
Chinese studies, or (2) a student from the Peoples Republic of China who regardless of
academic discipline, wishes to engage in comparative studies of Canadian and Chinese
institutions and culture.

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