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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2011-05-18

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 THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
UBC
^p
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
Vancouver Senate
MINUTES OF MAY 18, 2011
Attendance
Present: Mr. S. Haffey (Vice-Chair of Senate, Meeting Chair), Dr. E Andrew,
Dr. R. Anstee, Dr. K. Baimbridge, Dr. J. Brander, Mr. R. Bredin, Mr. T Brennan,
Ms. C. Changfoot, Ms. C. Colombe, Ms. A. Dulay, Dr. W Dunford, Dr. D. Farrar
(Provost & Vice-President, Academic), Dr. D. Fielding, Dr. B. Frank, Ms. M. Friesen,
Mr. R.Gardiner, Mr. T Gibson, Mr. C. Gorman, Mr. E Grajales, Mr. I. Habib,
Dr. W Hall, Dr. P. G. Harrison, Mr. S. Heisler, Dr. A. Ivanov, Dr. S. B. Knight,
Dr. B. S. Lalli, Dr. B. Larson, Dr. P. Loewen, Ms. S. Marzara, Dr. W McKee,
Mr. C. Meyers, Principal L. Nasmith, Ms. I. Parent, Dean S. Peacock, Dr. N. Perry,
Dean pro tern. S. Porter, Mr. S. Rasmussen, Dr. L. Rucker, Mr. A. Sihota, Dr. S. Singh,
Ms. R. Sneath, Dr. R. Sparks, Dr. J. Stapleton, Dr. B. Stelck, Dean G. Stuart,
Mr. K. Truong, Dr. M. Upadhyaya, Mr. D. Verma, Dr. M. Vessey,
Dr. R. Windsor-Liscombe, Mr. J. Yang, Dr. R. A. Yaworsky.
Guests: Mr. A. Bell, Prof. A. Richardson, Dr. T Sork.
Regrets: Dean T Aboulnasr, Dr. B. Cairns, Ms. B. Craig, Dr. S. Farris, Dean J. Innes,
Mr. J. Leung, Mr. B. MacDougall, Dr. P. L. Marshall, Dr. C. Orvig, Dr. K. Patterson,
Mr. J. Ridge (Secretary), Ms. N. Seyednejad, Ms. S. Morgan-Silvester (Chancellor),
Dr. S. Thorne, Prof. S. J. Toope (President and Chair), Dr. R. Wilson.
Recording Secretary: Ms. L. M. Collins
Call to Order
In the absence of the President, Vice-Chair Mr. Sean Haffey called to order the ninth reg
ular meeting of the 2010/2011 academic year.
Tributes Committee
Committee member Mr. Gorman presented the report.
Vol. 2010/2011 137
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-138
Minutes of May 18, 2011
MEMORIAL MINUTE FOR DR. BERNARD E. RIEDEL
The Committee had circulated the following memorial minute for a former Senator who
had recently passed away.
Dr. Bernard E. Riedel
Dr. Riedel served with great distinction as the Dean of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences from 1967 until his retirement in December 1984 and Coordinator,
Health Sciences, from 1977 to 1984.
After completing his undergraduate studies in 1943, Dr. Riedel joined the Royal
Canadian Air Force during World War II, serving as Navigator Bombardier with
the Coastal Command. Upon discharge in 1946, he held the rank of Flying Officer.
He began his academic career soon thereafter as Lecturer and Assistant Professor,
Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Alberta, all the while pursuing his Master's degree. After completing doctoral studies at the University of Western
Ontario in 1953, Dr. Riedel returned to the University of Alberta as Assistant Professor and over a period of six years was promoted to Associate Professor, Full
Professor and Executive Assistant to the Vice-President.
In addition to leading the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at UBC, Dr. Riedel
served as a member of the Senate, Chair of the Senior Appointments Committee
(1970-74; 1981-83) and as a member of numerous other committees. During his
tenure, Faculty programs expanded to include doctoral degrees, Continuing Education and Clinical Pharmacy that served to train students for a patient-oriented
practice of pharmacy.
Dr. Riedel also served as Director and President of the Canadian Foundation for
the Advancement of Pharmacy; Trustee, UBC Health Sciences Centre Hospital;
and Trustee and President, Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia. Following retirement, he served as Executive Member, Board Member, Vice-President
and President of the British Columbia Lung Association; Executive Member of
the Canadian Lung Association; Lrustee and Chairman of the British Columbia
Lransplant Society; and Member of the Science Advisory Committee of the British
Columbia Health Research Foundation.
For his immense contributions, Dr. Riedel was recognized with several awards
and distinctions, including the Canadian Forces Decoration (1960); Canadian
Centennial Medal (1967); Doctor of Science, honoris causa, University of Alberta
(1990); and the 75th Anniversary Medal, UBC (1990). In 1996, Dr. Riedel was
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-139
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Tributes Committee, continued
appointed to the Order of Canada in recognition of his contributions to Canada's
pharmaceutical and health sciences.
Mr. Gorman l     That Senate approve the Memorial Minute
Dr. Rucker J     for Dr. Bernard E. Riedel, that it be entered
into the Minutes of Senate and that a copy
be sent to the family of the deceased.
Carried.
Senate Membership
In the absence of the Secretary, Associate Secretary Ms. Lisa Collins made the following
membership announcements.
1. Notice of Elections: Nominating Committee
The Secretary had issued with the meeting agenda a call for nominations for two Student Senators to serve on the Nominating Committee for the term from May 18, 2011
until March 31, 2012 and thereafter until replaced. Two nominations had been
received by the deadline, for Mr. Sean Heisler and Mr. Spencer Rasmussen. Messrs.
Heisler and Rasmussen were declared acclaimed as elected.
2. New Senator: Mr. Brendan Craig, elected student representative of the Faculty of Law.
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Dr. Rucker l     That the minutes of the meeting of April 20,
Dr. Sparks J     2011 be adopted as circulated.
Carried.
Remarks from the Vice-Chair and Related Questions
PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES OF APPRECIATION
The Provost presented certificates as a token of appreciation for the service provided by
all Senators completing their terms on August 31, 2011.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 140
Minutes of May 18, 2011
From the Council of Senates
ORAL ANNUAL REPORT ON COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES FROM THE COUNCIL OF
SENATES BUDGET COMMITTEE
As Chair of the Vancouver Sub-Committee of the Council of Senates Budget Committee,
Dr. Brander delivered an oral report on Committee activities over the preceding year.
The report is summarized as follows:
• The Council of Senates Budget Committee operated primarily as two sub-committees,
one for each of the campuses. The Committee's role was to engage in discussion about
financial decision making with the President, as well as the Provost, the Vice-President,
Finance, Resources, & Operations, and the Comptroller, among others. The Committee had no financial decision making authority.
• UBC had an enormous economic footprint in the Province of British Columbia. The
combined operating budget for the two campuses was approximately $1 billion. This
did not include non-academic and ancillary activities, which brought the consolidated
budget to approximately $2 billion. Major capital amounted to nearly an additional $2
billion.
• Over the previous several years, the administration had invested significant effort
toward making the budget process more transparent, and the budget itself more stable
and easier to understand. Dr. Brander commended the administration for success in this
area, as well as for handling some significant financial challenges. While the University
was not particularly wealthy, it was financially healthy and in a sustainable position,
while continuing to enhance its academic performance. Few other universities had
fared as well through the recent recession.
• The largest area of budgetary uncertainty was the operating grant from the provincial
government, which comprised $500 million of the $900-million operating budget at
the Vancouver campus. Tuition fees, which were controlled by the provincial government, made up an additional $300 million, meaning that most of the University's operating budget was derived either directly from the provincial government or indirectly
from sources under government control.
• The new budget model allocated funds to faculties based on student enrolment. This
replaced allocation based on one-on-one negotiations with deans. While some negotiation remained necessary, the new system was much more transparent.
• Some progress had been made toward addressing the historic under allocation of funds
for maintenance of new buildings. This created shortfalls that diverted money from the
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-141
Minutes of May 18, 2011
From the Council of Senates, continued
academic mission of the University and made it difficult to attend to all building maintenance needs.
• The University was able to accommodate 27 percent of its full-time students in student
residence, but planned to increase capacity to approximately 35 percent. Dr. Brander
was of the opinion that this percentage was still too low, given the positive correlation
between living on campus and a positive student experience and an enriched campus
life. Residences also generated significant amounts of revenue. For the first time, the
University would be able to offer a space to every student wanting to live on campus.
The University's ability to build new residences was limited by government regulations
on maximum debt, which made no exception for revenue-producing projects.
• Fundraising efforts had increased and had been successful. The expense ratio was in the
range of 15 percent, which was normal for universities.
• Following a reduction in the spend rate to three percent, the University's endowments
were recovering. Although some endowments remained under water, the University
was moving toward a sustainable position.
• The Committee had looked at the financial position of ancillary units, as well as the
appropriate role of those units. One point of view was that ancillaries were service
units that should be subsidized as necessary. Others were of the opinion that they
should generate extra revenue to support the academic mission of the University. A
third view was that they should be maintained on a "break-even" basis. The Committee suggested that more discussion of this topic, including which ancillaries should fall
into each category, be facilitated in the following Senate triennium.
• The University was looking at ways to make more efficient use of the Vancouver campus during the summer. Higher occupancy levels in residences, for example, would contribute positively to the University's financial situation, particularly when combined
with increased numbers of international students.
• While individual Committee members had raised concerns and questions about specific
financial decisions, the Committee was generally supportive of the administration's initiatives and processes. There were no high-level concerns.
DISCUSSION
In response to a question from Dr. Knight about revenue from international tuition fees,
Dr. Brander noted that the University planned to increase international enrolment to comprise 15 percent of its student body.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-142
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Candidates for Degrees and Diplomas
The Secretary had submitted for approval a list of 7229 candidates for degrees and diplomas.
Dr. Baimbridge l     That the candidates for degrees and
Dr. Yaworsky J     diplomas, as recommended by the Faculties
and Schools, be granted the degrees and
diplomas for which they are recommended,
effective May 2011, and that a committee
composed of the Registrar, the appropriate
Dean, and the Chair of the Vancouver
Senate be empowered to make any necessary
adjustments.
Carried
unanimously.
I
Academic Building Needs Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Sparks presented the report.
ANNUAL REPORT ON COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES
The Committee had circulated for information a report on its activities over the preceding
academic year. Dr. Sparks thanked his fellow Committee members and the secretariat. An
excerpt from the report follows:
Overview
This document follows the reporting procedures initiated last fall (November 17,
2010) of submitting a written annual summary to Senate of SABNC meetings and
SABNC participation on the Property and Planning Advisory Committee (PPAC)
so that individual consultations and building projects can be identified. In addition, the report points out opportunities for input into academic building policies
currently being developed at UBC (see Comments section below).
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-143
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Academic Building Needs Committee, continued
Committee work plan for 2010-11
The Committee agreed to continue following the priorities set out during the first
year of its triennium (May 13, 2009 Oral Report to Senate), namely to:
1. Participate actively as voting members on the Property and Planning Advisory
Committee (PPAC)
2. Engage in consultations & policy review and assist with policy development
in three targeted areas relating to the Vancouver campus:
a. Accessibility
b. Sustainability
c. Planning processes, Senate consultation, communication
d. Engage additional issues as they arise including land use and hub development
Activities in 2010-11
In addition to hosting 7 Committee meetings, 5 with consultations, SABNC members collectively participated in 6 PPAC meetings and reviewed 11 presentations,
4 that led to recommendations for capital projects, and 7 for information.
DISCUSSION
Mr. Grajales suggested that a presentation on Open Science, Open Research, and Open
Access would be useful in the following triennium.
Dr. Hall wondered whether the University should consider a bicycle loan program, particular given the number of roads on campus being closed to vehicular traffic. There was
some discussion about a program operated by the Alma Mater Society, programs in place
in other cities, pedestrian safety and increased bicycle traffic, as well as the impact of helmet laws.
Dr. Knight suggested that the Committee arrange for a presentation to Senate on learning
space design guidelines, including specific discussion of pedagogical philosophy.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-144
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Admissions Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Fielding presented the reports.
CANADIAN ABORIGINAL APPLICANTS
The Committee recommended for approval changes in admission requirements for Canadian Aboriginal applicants. Applicants would be able to self-identify upon application for
admission. A number of editorial changes were also included.
MASTER OF JOURNALISM
The Committee recommended to Senate for approval changes in admission requirements
for applicants to the Master of Journalism program. Applicants would no longer be
required to present an honours baccalaureate degree for admission. A number of editorial
changes were also included.
MASTER OF FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
The Committee recommended for approval changes in admission requirements for applicants to the Master of Food and Resource Economics program. Applicants would be permitted to present for admission a baccalaureate degree in Economics.
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HUMAN NUTRITION
The Committee recommended for approval changes in admission requirements for applicants to the Master of Science in Human Nutrition program. For admission, applicants
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18, 2011
10/11 - 145
Admissions Committee, continued
would be required to present three credits of biochemistry and physiology and 12 credits
of advanced nutrition.
Dr. Fielding
Dr. Anstee
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for Canadian Aboriginal
applicants, as outlined in the revised
calendar entry on admission, effective for
entry to the 2012 Winter Session and
thereafter; and
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Master of
Journalism program, effective for admission
to the 2011 Winter Session and thereafter;
and
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Master of
Food and Resource Economics program,
effective for admission to the 2011 Winter
Session and thereafter; and
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Master of
Science in Human Nutrition program,
effective for admission to the 2011 Winter
Session and thereafter.
Carried.
REPORT ON STUDENT MOBILITY AGREEMENTS APPROVED UNDER COUNCIL
OF SENATES POLICY C-2
The Committee reported for information as follows:
Under Policy C-2: Affiliations with Other Institutions of Learning, the Council of
Senates has delegated to the Admissions Committee the authority to approve on
its behalf, terms of student mobility agreements for students going to or coming
from UBC Vancouver programs.
Since implementation of Policy C-2 in October 2009, the Admissions Committee
has approved student mobility agreements with the following institutions:
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18, 2011
10/11 - 146
Admissions Committee, continued
Trinity College Dublin/ Dublin City University/ Sant'Anna School of
Advanced Studies of Pisa
BEM Bordeaux Management School
University of Barcelona
Emory University
ESSEC (Ecole superieure des sciences economiques et commerciales)
Business School
IE (Instituto de Empresa) Business School
University of Botswana
University of Cambridge
ETH (Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule) Zurich
University of Geneva
Nanjing Forestry University
University of Oxford
Pierre and Marie Curie University (Paris 6)
University of Tsukuba
Doshisha University
Nanjing University
Tsinghua University
American University of Beirut
East China Normal University
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Johns Hopkins University
Technion-Israel Institute of Technology
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens/ University of Savoy
University of Navarra
University of Eastern Finland
Technical University of Munich
Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science
University of Grenoble
Detailed information for each student mobility agreement listed herein is available at: https://secure.students.ubc.ca/global/where.cfm.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 147
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Admissions Committee, continued
MATTERS OF DELEGATED AUTHORITY
CRITERIA FOR INCLUDING SECONDARY SCHOOL COURSES IN AN ADMISSIONS
AVERAGE
The Committee reported for information as follows:
In December 2009, Senate approved the Criteria for Including Secondary School
Courses in an Admission Average. Senate also delegated to the Committee the
authority to grant final approval of courses to be used in the calculation of an
admission average and published in the Calendar, with the proviso that all courses
so approved meet the criteria specified by Senate.
For applicants following the BC/Yukon secondary school curriculum, an admission average is calculated on English 12 (or English 12 First Peoples) and three
additional approved Grade 12 courses or equivalent. To date, the Committee has
approved three courses for inclusion in the calculation of an admission average.
Effective for admission to the 2012 Winter Session, applicants may present Calculus 12, Economics 12 and Law 12 for inclusion in the calculation of an admission average.
POLICY J-50: SECONDARY SCHOOL GRADE ADJUSTMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE
ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
The Committee reported for information as follows:
In December 2009, Senate approved Policy J-50: Secondary School Grade Adjustments for Undergraduate Admission to the University. For the purposes of undergraduate direct-entry admission to the University, grades reported for secondary
school applicants outside of the BC/Yukon secondary school curricula may be
adjusted to accurately assess those grades in terms of their ability to predict future
performance at the University.
To date, the policy has been applied to applicants following the Alberta secondary
school curriculum. For entry to the 2010 and 2011 Winter Sessions, grades presented for admission were adjusted upwards by two percent.
Undergraduate Admissions is currently in the process of reviewing first-year academic performance of students admitted under the policy and will report its findings to the Committee.
Dr. Fielding thanked his fellow Committee members for their work over the preceding
three years. He also thanked Enrolment Services staff, particularly Ms. Rosalie Vlaar and
Ms. Amandeep Breen, for their support.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-148
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appeals on Academic Standing Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Yaworsky presented the report.
ANNUAL REPORT ON COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES
The following is excerpted from the Committee's report for information.
Senate has delegated to the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing
the authority to hear and dispose of student appeals from decisions of Faculties in
matters of academic standing. The Committee shall allow an appeal where it is
decided that the decision of the Faculty was arrived at through improper or unfair
procedures, and that as a result, a wrong decision on the merits has or may have
been arrived at. However, the Committee has no jurisdiction where the sole question raised in an appeal turns on the exercise of academic judgment by a Faculty.
The decision of the Committee on an appeal is a final disposition of that appeal.
The Vancouver Senate has conferred on the Committee the power of making final
decisions pursuant to section 37(l)(b) of the University Act (reference: UBC Calendar, Academic Regulations, Senate Appeals on Academic Standing, section 2).
Students may also appeal to the Committee the refusal of the Registrar to extend
the time line for accepting an appeal, namely within 10 days of being informed in
writing of the Faculty's final decision.
As per section 39(a) of the Rules and Procedures of the Vancouver Senate, the
Committee is required to make an annual report to Senate, including the number
of appeals heard, their disposition and the general nature of the appeals.
Since last reporting to Senate in May 2010, 14 appeals proceeded to Committee
hearings (as compared with eight in the prior year), of which three were allowed
and 11 were dismissed.
In addition to the 14 appeals concluded, which are summarized below, the Committee has been advised that in the past year an additional 13 appeals were presented to the Registrar, of which two were resolved prior to a Committee hearing;
three were withdrawn by the appellant prior to a Committee hearing; six were
dismissed by the Registrar due to lack of timely prosecution and two are in progress and are expected to be heard by the Committee in the upcoming weeks.
To provide for more hearing scheduling options for appellants and faculties, the
Committee appointed a Co-Chair.
General Observations
The Committee continues to draw to the attention of faculty and departments the
importance of following due process in all matters relating to student assessment,
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 149
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appeals on Academic Standing Committee, continued
promotion and appeal; of maintaining scrupulous records of course requirements,
grade schemes, and student performance; as well as drawing such regulations and
requirements to the attention of students.
The Committee has become aware of the differing processes of the faculties
regarding the flagging of, and notification to students who are encountering academic problems, in order that the student be advised of the problematic, probationary or failing standing - even if the student has shifted e-mail accounts or if
the Faculty e-mail notifications are being filtered by the student computer mail
service as Junk or SPAM.
The Committee notes, for example, that the Faculty of Science has implemented
a protocol to address such challenges so as to ensure that the student is made
aware of issues related to their academic standing - student registration is blocked
when on probation, and can only be unblocked after the student speaks to a Faculty advisor.
We would recommend that in order to avoid some of the challenges encountered
in the rapidly evolving realm of communicating with students, that the appropriate Senate Committee - perhaps the Academic Policy Committee - consider if it is
appropriate that communication protocols and safeguards be implemented by all
UBC Faculties.
Dr.Yaworsky thanked his fellow Committee members for their work, noting that appeal
hearings were often very long and required careful consideration. He commended the student members in particular, and thanked the secretariat for their support.
Curriculum Committee
Committee member Dr. McKee presented the report.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-150
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Curriculum Committee, continued
CURRICULUM PROPOSALS FROM THE FACULTIES
See also Appendix A: Curriculum Summary
Dr. McKee l     That the new and changed courses and
Dr. Loewen J     programs brought forward by the Faculties
of Arts, Applied Science, Commerce &
Business Administration, Education,
Graduate Studies (Applied Science, Arts,
College for Interdisciplinary Studies,
Commerce & Business Administration,
Dentistry, Education, Forestry, Land &
Food Systems, Medicine, Pharmaceutical
Sciences, Science), Land & Food Systems,
Law, and Science be approved.
Carried.
NEW CERTIFICATES
The Committee reported for information that it had approved two new certificates as submitted by Continuing Studies:
1. UBC Certificate in Translation and Interpretation for Business (Chinese/English; English/Chinese)
2. UBC Certificate in Translation and Interpretation for Business (Korean/English; English/Korean)
Joint Report from the Admissions and Curriculum Committees
Curriculum Committee member Dr. McKee presented the reports.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-151
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Admissions and Curriculum Committees, continued
See also Appendix A: Curriculum Summary.'
Dr. McKee l     That Senate approve the changes to the
Dr. Fielding J     Bachelor of Midwifery and its associated
courses; and
That Senate approve the new Master of Arts
in Science and Technology Studies and its
associated courses; and
That Senate approve the new Master of
Museum Education and its associated
courses.
Library Committee
Committee Chair Dr.Vessey presented the report.
ANNUAL REPORT ON COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES
The Committee circulated the following report for information.
In its first full year of activity since it was revived in 2009-10, and in fulfilling its
mandate [1] to "advise and assist" the University Librarian, the Committee held
consultative meetings with several individuals and groups, including the Library's
newly appointed Director, Digital Initiatives (Allan Bell), its Rare Books and Special Collections Archivist (Sarah Romkey), its Scholarly Communications Coordinator, Digital Initiatives (Joy Kirchner), and one of the co-chairs of the working
group on Open Access for the Provost's Scholarly Communications Steering
Committee (Dr. Wyeth Wasserman, who presented a draft Position Statement on
Dissemination of Research: see also below). A further meeting, with the chairs of
the Library Advisory Committees for the faculties (which were earlier canvassed
for their concerns), has been arranged for a date after the last meeting of Senate.
Recognizing that senators have been informed of the Library's main agenda and
current policy directions by the University Librarian (when presenting her Annual
Report to Senate), having at present nothing [2] "to recommend to the Senate
with respect to rules on the management and conduct of the Library," noting that
the chief of the "matters of policy under discussion by the Committee" [3] this
year — namely, the Library's role in supporting and implementing a future policy
on Dissemination of Research (Open Access) — awaits recommendations by the
Open Access working group of the Scholarly Communications Steering Committee reporting to the Provost, the Library Committee confines itself in this report
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 152
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Library Committee, continued
to three sets of observations of a general order which, it trusts, may be of use both
to the Senate as it considers academic issues bearing on the Library and to the
next Senate Library Committee as it reflects upon its mandate [see 1-3 above].
These observations, framed by the questions posed below, correspond to three
areas of particular concern identified by the University Librarian at the Committee's January 2011 meeting, which were: "awareness of the role of the Library on
campus," "the Library budget," and "space requirements."
1. What is the University Library?
The designation and mandate of a Senate "Library" Committee presuppose a
common understanding of the nature and functions of a University Library, but
such a shared understanding is now difficult to pin down. Whereas a decade ago
it seemed possible that the idea of a University Library would be superseded and
replaced — e.g., by that of a "Learning Centre"— what has happened instead, at
UBC as elsewhere, is that the conception of a University Library has evolved,
mainly by expansion in several directions at once, to encompass new realities.
Thus the idea of the "Library" at UBC now comprehends, inter alia: study and
social space on campus for students and others who may or may not be accessing
information resources provided by the Library ("Learning Commons"); online
information resources for UBC personnel who may or may not be on campus; a
wide range of digitization projects, extending rapidly beyond materials already or
previously held in other forms by the UBC Library; UBC's future stake in a BC
Integrated Research Library (IRL) that would contain the "last" retained copy of
journal-issues and other volumes otherwise deaccessioned by the stakeholder
libraries; an institutional repository (cIRcle) for the research production of UBC
students and faculty, whether or not published elsewhere, envisaged as one element of a larger initiative for Open Access; technical, instructional, reference and
research support and infrastructure provided by library personnel to students and
faculty, whether at Library facilities (e.g., "Research Commons") or elsewhere
across campus or at the hospital sites; electronic systems for management of collections and user accounts, accessible through mobile devices; a wide range of
non-bibliographic services provided to non-University communities, locally and
province-wide (e.g., via the IKBLC) ... While most of the functions named here
still have a visible relation to the "traditional" functions of the University Library
of thirty years ago, all represent significant departures and expansions — driven
or made possible by new technology and new visions of the social role of the university — with respect to the former mandate of university libraries. One inevitable result of this internal diversification and external diffusion of "library"
functions is a fracturing of perceptions of what the University Library is and of
what its limits are or ought to be. From this follow two further "academic" questions:
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-153
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Library Committee, continued
2. What should the "budget" for the Library be?
The Library Committee's mandate to advise and assist the Librarian includes
"advising on the allocation of collection funds to the fields of instruction and
research," but since the idea of a Library as comprising essentially its own "collection^)" is now outdated, in practice the budgetary concerns of the Committee
tend quickly to exceed that brief.
Although the Library has a (small) special fund for new initiatives, its operating
budget has not seen any major increase in recent years, despite the multiplication
and expansion of Library functions, and even though few of the anticipated "savings" consequent on the declining (relative) importance of print media have yet
been banked; physical collections in the traditional sense still need to be acquired,
catalogued, managed, shelved and preserved. As "The Library" comes to stand
for something like "cross-faculty, crosssector local manager of universal data
resources," so the question of how funding for its proliferating functions is
assured at the appropriate level becomes more pressing. While this issue is in a
strict sense ultra vires for the Library Committee, it has loomed large in our discussions this year.
3. What are the "space requirements" of the Library?
As books gradually disappear into vaults or remote storage, so book-stacks give
way to alternative uses of the space occupied by library buildings. If the "real"
library had simply morphed into a "virtual" library accessible without any mediation beyond that provided by Microsoft and Google, all that space could be
vacated for "non-library" uses.
Since that has not happened — since, on the contrary, the Library has assumed an
array of new or expanded functions requiring continued heavy investments in
staff, equipment, infrastructure and in facilities where students, staff, faculty and
members of the public can interact both "live" and online — questions about the
provision and allocation of space for library services, and about the increasingly
porous and potentially contested boundaries between library-space, non-library
common space, and non-library kinds of dedicated space are also coming to the
fore. This, in turn, is just one aspect of the challenge now facing the Library Committee in its duty of advising and assisting the Librarian in "developing a general
program of library service for all the interests of the University."
DISCUSSION
Dr. Knight thanked Dr. Vessey for his willingness to serve as Chair of the Library Committee.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 154
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Nominating Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Windsor-Liscombe presented the reports.
APPOINTMENT OF STUDENT SENATORS TO COMMITTEES OF SENATE AND
COMMITTEES OF THE COUNCIL OF SENATES
The Committee had circulated its recommendations on appointment of Student Senators
to the Committees of Senate and Committees of the Council of Senate. The Committee
recommended that if in September 2011, student appointees were not available to attend
regularly scheduled meetings of the committees to which they are assigned due to their
class schedules, adjustments be made as necessary to better ensure student representation.
Dr. Windsor- l     That Senate appoint student senators to the
Liscombe J     Committees of Senate as recommended by
Mr. Heisler the Nominating Committee for the term-
ending March 31, 2012 and thereafter until
replaced.
ELECTION OF STUDENT SENATORS TO THE COUNCIL OF SENATES
The Committee reported as follows:
As per section 38.1 (e) of the University Act, the Vancouver Senate must elect four
(4) representatives to the Council of Senates and Senate has determined that two
(2) such representatives be students. The Nominating Committee recommends to
Senate the nomination of Kevin Truong and Jack Leung for election to the Council of Senates.
Dr. Windsor- l     That Senate elect Mr. Kevin Truong and Mr.
Liscombe J     Jack Leung to the Council of Senates.
Dr. Sparks
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 155
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee
ANNUAL REPORT ON COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES
Committee member Mr. Verma delivered the report, an excerpt from which follows:
The Senate Committee on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline is a standing
committee of the Vancouver Senate established under section 37(l)(v) of the University Act, R.S.B.C. 1996, c.468. The Committee is the "standing committee in
the final appeal for students in matters of academic discipline." Under section
61(1) of the Act, the "president has power to suspend a student and to deal summarily with any matter of student discipline." Under section 61(2), the President
"must promptly report the action of the standing committee established under
section 37(l)(v) with a statement of his or her reasons." Under section 61(3), the
"action of the president is final and subject in all cases to an appeal to the Senate."
Student discipline is governed by the Academic Regulations section of the UBC
Calendar. The rules and procedures of the Senate Committee on Student Appeals
on Academic Discipline can be found at http://www.senate.ubc.ca/vancouver/
rules. cfm?go=discipline.
During the period from 1 May 2010 and 30 April 2011, the Senate Committee
heard six (6) appeals involving students disciplined by the President upon the recommendation of the President's Advisory Committee on Student Discipline. Of
the appeals considered by the Senate Committee, one (1) was allowed and five (5)
were dismissed. The misconduct, the disciplinary actions taken by the President,
the nature of the appeals and the decisions of the Senate Committee are as follows:
1. June 2010
The student was disciplined for non-academic misconduct. The discipline
imposed by the President was suspension from the University for a period of
12 months, no access to the University campus for the duration of the suspension, no contact with University faculty and staff during the period of suspension and a notation of non-academic misconduct entered on the student's
transcript. The student appealed with respect to the severity of the disciplinary action, namely that the period of suspension was excessive.
Appeal dismissed.
2. July 2010
The student was disciplined for altering an answer on a marked midterm
examination and submitting it for re-grading. The discipline imposed by the
President was mark of zero in the course, a letter of reprimand and a notation
of academic misconduct entered on the student's transcript. The student
appealed on the grounds that there was a breach or unfair application of the
University's procedure prior to the President's Committee hearing that was
raised before the President's Committee but was not adequately remedied
through the President's Committee and that the President incorrectly deter-
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-156
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline Committee, continued
mined that the student's conduct, either admitted or as found by the President, constitutes misconduct or the President incorrectly applied a University
policy or procedure.
Appeal allowed.
3. September 2010
The student was disciplined for plagiarizing two term papers for a course. The
discipline imposed by the President was a mark of zero in the course, suspension from the University for a period of 4 months and a notation of academic
misconduct entered on the student's transcript. The student appealed with
respect to the severity of the disciplinary action, namely the mark of zero in
the course.
Appeal dismissed.
4. October 2010
The student was disciplined for falsely reporting that he had not written final
examinations for two courses. The discipline imposed by the President was a
letter of reprimand and a notation of academic misconduct entered on the student's transcript. The student appealed with respect to the severity of the disciplinary action, namely the notation of academic misconduct entered on the
transcript.
Appeal dismissed.
5. November 2010
The student was disciplined for altering two marked midterm examinations
and submitting them for re-grading. The discipline imposed by the President
was a mark of zero in the course, suspension from the University for a period
of 4 months and a notation of academic misconduct entered on the student's
transcript. The student appealed on the grounds that the President erred in his
assessment of the evidence in the report of the President's Committee, including any factual inferences made by the President, or the credibility of the student or other witnesses and that the discipline imposed was excessive.
Appeal dismissed.
6. January 2011
The student was disciplined for plagiarizing a term paper. The discipline
imposed was a mark of zero in the course, suspension from the University for
a period of 4 months and a mark of academic misconduct entered on the student's transcript. The student appealed with respect to the severity of the disciplinary action, namely that the period of suspension was excessive.
Appeal dismissed.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-157
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Student Awards Committee
Committee Chair Dr. Stelck delivered the report.
NEW AWARDS
See also Appendix B: New Awards.'
Dr. Stelck l     That Senate accept the awards as listed and
Mr. Heisler J     forward them to the Board of Governors for
approval; and that letters of thanks be sent
to the donors.
Carried.
Tributes Committee
Committee member Mr. Gorman delivered the report.
CANDIDATES FOR EMERITUS STATUS
See also Appendix C: Emeritus Status.'
Mr. Gorman l     That the attached list of individuals for
Mr. Meyers J     emeritus status be approved and that,
pursuant to section 9(2) of the University
Act, all persons with the ranks of Professor
Emeritus, Associate Professor Emeritus,
Assistant Professor Emeritus, Senior
Instructor Emeritus, Instructor Emeritus,
General Librarian Emeritus and
Administrative Librarian Emeritus be added
to the Roll of Convocation.
Reports from the Faculty of Graduate Studies
Associate Dean Philip Loewen presented the reports.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-158
Minutes of May 18, 2011
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP
The following is an excerpt from the Faculty's report:
Historical Background
The legislative and administrative authority of the Faculty of Graduate Studies
over graduate programs of study is vested in the Graduate Council by the Faculty
of Graduate Studies and Senate. The Council was established in 1986. When it
was founded, the Council had 50 elected faculty members, representing each Faculty involved in graduate education. In 1990, faculty representation on the Graduate Council was expanded from 50 to 75 members, distributed using a formula
which allocated representatives among the Faculties in proportion to the number
of faculty members who are also members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and
the size of the graduate student body. (Student representation on the Council was
also increased in the proportion to the increase in faculty membership, from 6 to
9 members, to be allocated among Faculties according to the size of the graduate
student body of each Faculty. In 2006, student representation to the Council was
increased further to 14 members.) The allocation formula was updated in 2006,
on the understanding that it would be reviewed five years hence.
Selection of Faculty Representatives on Graduate Council
The bylaws of the Graduate Council require that the 75 seats for faculty members
be filled by elections. In a number of Faculties, the number of candidates has consistently been so small that all the nominees are elected by acclamation rather
than by voting. The Graduate Council suggests amending its bylaws to simplify
this process. Elections will still be allowed, but not required.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18, 2011
10/11 - 159
Reports from the Faculty of Graduate Studies, continued
The proposal also advances the deadline for determining Graduate Council membership by two months. Typically the Council meets in late September each year,
and it is ideal to settle the membership before the first meeting.
Dr. Laewen
Dr. Windsor-
Liscombe
That Senate amend the means for selecting
faculty members to serve on the Graduate
Council as set out in detail below, under the
heading, "Selection of Faculty
Representatives on Graduate Council;"
That Senate amend the formula for
allocation of faculty members to the
Graduate Council as set out in Appendix A,
under the heading, "Allocation Formula for
Faculty Representation on Graduate
Council;"
That Senate receive the proposed allocation
of Faculty Members to the Graduate
Council, effective 1 July 2011, as shown in
the table in Appendix A, under the heading,
"Allocation of Faculty Members to the
Graduate Council (Effective 1 July 2011);"
and
That Senate direct the Graduate Council:
l.To review the allocation of faculty
members to the Graduate Council every
five years effective 1 July 2011;
2. To adjust the membership of the Graduate
Council accordingly; and
3.To provide the results of such reviews and
adjustments to Senate for information.
DISCUSSION
Dr. Anstee asked about the distinction between election and selection, noting that Senators were elected rather than being selected in some other way. Dean pro tern. Porter
stated that, in current practice, graduate advisors tended to hold these seats, making selection more sensible than holding an election.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 160
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Reports from the Faculty of Graduate Studies, continued
In response to a question from Dr. Hall, Dr. Loewen indicated that students in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies Program would have representation because it was the
intent of the Faculty of Graduate Studies to select a faculty member working with that
group of students.
CORRECTION OF REPORT BY UNANIMOUS CONSENT
The table in Appendix A was corrected as follows: Column "Change," Row "Commerce:" Change from "+1" to "-1".
The motion was
put and carried.
AFFILIATIONS WITH BEIJING NORMAL UNIVERSITY, ZHUHAI, AND NORTHEAST
NORMAL UNIVERSITY
An excerpt from the circulated report follows:
The Faculty of Graduate Studies is pleased to forward the requests of the Faculty
of Education to allow for the following affiliations for graduate programs:
Beijing Normal University, Zhuhai - UBC Master of Museum Education
Northeast Normal University - UBC Master of Education in Curriculum Studies
Attached are the proposed memoranda of agreement that will form the bases of
these affiliations. The agreements set out a block transfer of 12 credits into the
respective programs from the designated Chinese university and reiterate the necessary UBC curriculum that must be completed for these students to complete
their degrees. The Faculty notes that twelve credits is the maximum amount currently permitted for transfer into a graduate program by UBC academic regulations, and that these agreements abide by the standard Master of Education in
Curriculum Studies and the proposed Master of Museum Education curricula -
these affiliations do not change any program or academic requirements at UBC.
The Master of Museum Education is a new program being considered by Senate
this evening; for details on this program, please refer to the new program report
of the Curriculum and Admissions Committees.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-161
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Reports from the Faculty of Graduate Studies, continued
Both memoranda have been reviewed by the offices of the University Counsel,
Provost, UBC International, and Go Global.
Dean pro tern. l     That the Senate recommend the attached
Porter J     memoranda of understanding with Beijing
Dr. Anstee Normal University, Zhuhai, and Northeast
Normal University to the Council of Senates
for approval.
DISCUSSION
Dr. Hall noted the proposal that students from the affiliated universities would be given
their own section of some courses. She asked why that arrangement was preferable to registering these students in sections with other UBC students. The assembly recognized Dr.
Tom Sork, Senior Associate Dean, Faculty of Education, who responded that this issue
had been discussed with the partner institutions. For economic and class capacity reasons,
it was important to set up a special section. Necessary supports in areas such as writing
development would also be more easily provided.
In response to a question from Dr. Knight, Dr. Sork confirmed that the language of
instruction for the UBC courses would be English, and that the degree granted would be
solely from UBC.
The motion was
put and carried.
Report from the Provost & Vice-President, Academic
ACCESS COPYRIGHT
The assembly recognized guest presenter Mr. Allan Bell, Director, Digital Initiatives, UBC
Library. The following report had been circulated:
Access Copyright (AC), a copyright collective that collects copyright fees for publishers from postsecondary institutions, has proposed dramatic fee increases.
These fees are payable by universities for copying material from scholarly journals, textbooks, and other materials. Until recently, it was economically feasible
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-162
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Access Copyright, continued
for universities to pay a fee to AC and thereby avoid the cost of seeking individual
copyright clearance directly from each publisher.
UBC currently pays AC fees amounting to $650,000/year, of which $150,000 is
subsidized from UBC's general operating funds and $500,000 a year is built into
the cost of course packs purchased by students. AC has applied to the Copyright
Board of Canada for approval of a new tariff that would increase these costs to
$2M annually.
The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), on behalf of
UBC and its other member universities, is opposing the size of the increase. However, a final determination by the Copyright Board of Canada is likely to take two
years or more. Although the full impact cannot be known until this process is
complete, the effect on students, faculty, and the university budget will be considerable.
The Copyright Board granted Access Copyright an interim tariff (essentially status quo) on Dec. 23, 2010 that will apply from Jan. 1, 2011 through Dec. 31,
2013.
To avoid exposure to a tariff retroactive from Jan. 1, 2011, UBC is exploring the
possibility of opting out of the arrangement with Access Copyright. This decision
rests with the University executive and is expected to be made soon.
The University is legally obligated to ensure that faculty and staff understand
copyright compliance and do not act in violation of the Copyright Act. Infringing
activities may result in claims that would have serious financial implications for
the University and/or individuals.
If and when UBC opts out of the arrangement, there will be several copying practices that will not be possible in the absence of a collective license and that do not
qualify under the fair dealing exception in the Copyright Act. Any photocopying
and scanning from copyrighted works by students, faculty, staff and administrators at UBC would need to be limited to what is allowed under the Copyright Act.
Copies made for the purpose of research, private study, criticism or review can
continue to be made under the "fair dealing" exception of the Copyright Act. It is
also permissible to make copies if authorized by the copyright owner (often the
copyright owner is not the author).
Copying done for the purpose of teaching or instruction is generally not considered "fair dealing". Consequently, faculty and staff making copies in paper or
electronic formats (for example, by creating pdf files or cutting and pasting material into word documents or other formats, or by scanning, etc.) for distribution
to students or colleagues is not generally permitted.
Members of faculty or staff can email ubc-copyright@interchange.ubc.ca for
assistance.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-163
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Access Copyright, continued
AUCC has offered assistance to the campus through the provision of Copying
Guidelines as part of the broader Fair Dealing Policy.
UBC Library has negotiated license agreements with publishers of electronic journals, books and databases it has purchased. Each resource is governed by the
terms of a specific license, and UBC Library has created an Electronic Resources
License Information database to help you understand what you can and cannot
do with these electronic materials.
Course packs can continue to be produced through the UBC Bookstore with permission from the copyright owner. Keep in mind that significantly more lead-time
will be needed to clear copyright (eight to ten weeks is the norm), and in some
cases, permission may not be obtained. Faculty will need to be prepared to change
their course readings if permission is not granted. For more information: UBC
Vancouver Campus 822-0874 or customcourse@mail.bookstore.ubc.ca UBC
Okanagan Campus phone 807-9546 or ubco.coursematerials@ubc.ca
UBC Library, the Bookstore, the Office of the Provost and VP Academic, the
Office of the University Counsel and the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) on both campuses are working to provide coordinated communications, including workshops raising awareness about the copyright issue,
identifying opportunities to disseminate and distribute communications, and
working with Public Affairs on issues management.
Links:
Broadcast email from Wes Pue, December 23, 2010 outlining UBC's position:
http://collections.library.ubc.ca/files/2011/03/UBCV-Campus-Notice-Access-
Copyright-2010-12-23.pdf
Proposed Access Copyright Tariff: http://collections.library.ubc.ca/copyright/
accesscopyright/proposed-access-copyright-tariff-faqs
UBC Library Copyright site: http://collections.library.ubc.ca/copyright
UBC Electronic Resources License Information: http://licenses.library.ubc.ca/
Copyright Act: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-42/index.html
AUCC Fair Dealing Policy: http://collections.library.ubc.ca/files/2011/03/
AUCC-Fair-dealingpolicy-March-2011.pdf
FAQ on the Fair Dealing Policy: http://collections.library.ubc.ca/files/2010/11/
AUCC-Fair-dealingpolicy-February-17-2011-rev-FAQ.pdf
Mr. Bell gave an overview of the current issues facing the University related to copyright
and instructional materials.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-164
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Access Copyright, continued
DISCUSSION
In response to questions, Dr. Farrar and Mr. Bell clarified as follows:
• The University had opted into the arrangement with Access Copyright until August 31,
2011. Because the period after January 1, 2011 was covered by an interim tariff, it was
possible that retroactive fees would be assessed. The longer the University remained
with Access Copyright, the greater that liability could become.
• Of approximately 100 universities in Canada, only 10 percent had opted out, with
none of the large institutions having opted out to date.
• Rules pertaining to custom course packages would change if the University were to opt
out.
• A worst-case scenario would entail much higher costs for students for their course
packages, as well as significant time spent by faculty and staff seeking permission to use
materials. Should the University opt out but later be found to be non-compliant with
copyright rules, heavy fines would be levied.
• Dr. Farrar was looking into the experience of other institutions that had opted out.
Most of those institutions were much smaller than UBC.
• US legislation differed in that its "fair use" provisions covered significantly more materials. Exclusions under Australian legislation were different from those in place in Canada.
Dr. Vessey described the current issue as a new front on an existing scholarly communication war. He asked for an assessment of how much of the Senate's time and the administration's time would likely be spent on the matter, and how much of a stand the University
was prepared to take. Dr. Farrar stated that the immediate decision before the University
was whether to opt out, effective September 1, 2011, or accept the interim tariff for
another academic year. In order to make that decision, the University needed to fully
understand its exposure. He expressed the opinion that the law was far too restrictive,
and that copies for instructional purposes should be permitted. Even given this philosophical opposition, however, it was important to consider how much financial risk the University was prepared to take.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-165
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Access Copyright, continued
In response to a question from Dr. Vessey, Dr. Farrar stated that the Office of the University Counsel would be responsible for procuring the necessary licenses, with involvement
from the UBC Library.
Dr. Hall noted that she preferred to provide students with a list of Digital Object Identifiers in lieu of custom course packages. Mr. Bell stated that Access Copyright had proposed
to have links to documents included under their arrangement. Universities had objected.
Mr. Heisler noted that students would be very concerned if costs were to passed on to
them directly. He asked whether it would be feasible to move away from textbooks in
favour of use licences for other kinds of materials, thereby reducing the net cost to students. Dr. Farrar noted that due to provincial government limitations on student fees, the
University might not be permitted to assess per student fees to recover its costs.
In response to a question from Dr. Loewen, Dr. Farrar stated that the collective of publishers behind Access Copyright did have an effective monopoly on certain kinds of material.
Mr. Gibson asked whether Access Copyright's business model could support a majority of
universities opting out. Dr. Farrar noted that the primary and secondary education markets would continue to provide a steady revenue stream for Access Copyright. Access
Copyright was aware, however, that universities were dissatisfied and the Provost was
hopeful that they would therefore enter into discussion on more reasonable terms.
Mr. Rasmussen asked about the possibility of the University publishing its own materials,
noting that it appeared that publishers appeared to be selling academic materials back to
universities at exorbitant prices. Dr. Farrar noted that where faculty published their work
determined, in part, the quality of that work. Many faculty were therefore understandably reluctant to publish in open source journals.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 166
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Access Copyright, continued
Mr. Grajales asked about the potential of establishing a fund to help faculty cover open
access fees. Dr. Farrar stated that a committee had been established to look at publishing
in the digital age, although it had not yet completed its work.
The Provost indicated that more information would be available over the summer
months.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. The following regular meeting was scheduled to take place on September 14, 2011.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 167
Minutes of May 18, 2011
APPENDIX A: CURRICULUM SUMMARY
Faculty of Arts
NEW COURSES
ART HISTORY, VISUAL ART AND THEORY
AFST 380 (3/6) D
AFST 450 (3/6) D
VISA 390 (3)
VISA 401 (3-18) D
ASIAN STUDIES
ASIA 213 (3)
ASIA 254 (3)
ASIA 330 (3)
ASIA 366 (3)
ASIA 390 (3)
ASIA 391 (3)
ASIA 394 (3)
ASIA 414 (3)
ASIA 453 (3)
ASIA 468 (3)
ASIA 478 (3)
PERS 100 (3)
PERS 101 (3)
PERS 104 (3)
PERS 200 (3)
PERS 201 (3)
PERS 300 (3)
PERS 301 (3)
PUNJ457(3)
CENTRAL, EASTERN & NORTHERN EUROPEAN STUDIES
GERM 303 (3)
GERM 304 (3)
GERM 411 (3)
GERM 412 (3)
CLASSICAL, NEAR EASTERN & RELIGIOUS STUDIES
NEST 315 (3)
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - It
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary, continued
NEST 317 (3)
NEST 318 (3)
NEST 400 (3)
NEST 401 (3)
NEST 402 (3)
CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAM
CRWR203 (3)
ECONOMICS
ECON 390 (3)
FRENCH, HISPANIC & ITALIAN STUDIES
FREN 425 (3/6) D
ITAL495(3)
ITST110(3)
ITST495 (3)
RMST495(3)
SPAN 280 (3)
SPAN 495 (3)
FIRST NATIONS STUDIES PROGRAM
FNSP 100 (6)
FNSP210(3)
FNSP 220 (3)
GEOGRAPHY
GEOG211 (3)
MUSIC
MUSC110(4)
MUSC111 (4)
MUSC119(3)
MUSC210(4)
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLI316(3/6)D
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - It
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary, continued
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC301 (3)
PSYC420(3)
CHANGED COURSES
MUSIC
MUSC300(3)
THEATRE & FILM
THTR 301 (3/6) D
NEW PROGRAMS
Central, Eastern & Northern European Studies
Minor in German Studies
Minor in Scandinavian Studies
Faculty of Applied Science
NEW COURSES
CIVL 446 (2)
EECE 284(1)
EECE455 (3)
APSC 202 (2)
APSC203 (1)
IGEN201 (3)
MTRL 340 (3)
MTRL 392 (2)
MTRL 460 (3)
ENDS 221 (3)
ENDS 231 (3)
CHANGED COURSES
CHBE 366 (2)
CIVL 445 (2)
PROGRAM CHANGES
Second Year Electrical Engineering
Second Year Computer Engineering
Third and Fourth Year Geological Engineering
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 18, 2011
10/11 - 170
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary, continued
Second, Third and Fourth Year Integrated Engineering
Third and Fourth Year Materials Engineering
Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration
NEW COURSES
COMM 202(1)
COMM 301 (3-36)
COMM 303 (3-36)
COMM 390 (3)
Faculty of Education
NEW COURSES
EDST401 (2)
EDST 402(1)
EDST403 (1)
EDST 404(1)
EDUC 430(1)
EDUC440(3)
EDUC 450 (2-3) D
EDUC 451 (2-3) D
EDUC 452 (2-3) D
EPSE 307(1)
EPSE 308 (2)
EPSE 310 (2)
EPSE 311 (1)
LLED 326
LLED 350
LLED 351
LLED 352
LLED 353
LLED 360
LLED 361
LLED 363
LLED 366
LLED 367
LLED 368
LLED 371
LLED 372
LLED 381
LLED 382
LLED 386
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 171
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary, continued
LLED 387 (3)
LLED 388 (3)
LLED 422 (3)
LLED 423 (3)
FACULTY OF EDUCATION, SCHOOL OF HUMAN KINETICS
DEGREE NAME CHANGE
From Bachelor of Human Kinetics to Bachelor of Kinesiology
Faculty of Graduate Studies
APPLIED SCIENCE
NEW COURSES:
EECE 543 (3)
CIVL 580 (3)
CIVL 587 (3)
ARTS
NEW PROGRAMS
Master of Museum Education (M.M.Ed.)
Master of Arts in Science and Technology Studies (M.A. in Science and Technology Studies)
NEW COURSES
JRNL515 (3-9) C
JRNL 530 (3-9) C
JRNL534(3)
JRNL 540 (3-9) C
JRNL 555 (3-6) C
NEST 506 (3)
POLI 565 (3/6)D
PSYC508(3)
CHANGED COURSE
JRNL 533 (3)
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-172
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary, continued
COLLEGE FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
NEW COURSE
FISH 520 (6)
COMMERCE & BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
NEW COURSE
BAHC510(1.5)
DENTISTRY
CHANGED COURSES
DENT 774 (2/4) D
DENT 775 (2/4) D
DENT 776 (2/4) D
EDUCATION
CHANGED PROGRAM
Master of Arts in Educational Studies
Calendar pointers to M.A. in Educational Studies
Master of Arts in Educational Studies, concentration in Adult Education
Master of Arts in Educational Studies, concentration in Educational Administration
Master of Arts in Educational Studies, concentration in Higher Education
Master of Arts in Educational Studies, concentration in Society, Culture and Politics in
Education
DEGREE NAME CHANGES
From Master of Science in Human Kinetics to Master of Science in Kinesiology
From Master of Arts in Human Kinetics to Master of Arts in Kinesiology
From Doctor of Philosophy in Human Kinetics to Doctor of Philosophy in Kinesiology
From Master of Human Kinetics (M.H.K.) to Master of Kinesiology (M.Kin.)
NEW COURSES
EDST 571 (6)
EDST 572 (3)
LLED 601 (3)
LLED 602 (3)
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 173
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary, continued
FORESTRY
NEW COURSES
FRST502(3)
FRST527(3)
FRST551 (3)
FRST552(3)
LAND & FOOD SYSTEMS
NEW COURSES
FRE525(3)
FRE528(3)
CHANGED COURSES
FOOD 549 (18)
HUNU549(18)
PLNT 549 (12/18) C
CHANGED PROGRAMS
Master of Science in Food Science
Master of Science in Human Nutrition
Master of Science in Plant Science
MEDICINE
NEW COURSES
AUDI 555(1)
AUDI 522 (3) (changed course)
SPPH 554 (3)
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
PHAR516(2)
PHAR517(2)
PHAR518 (2)
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-174
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary, continued
SCIENCE
NEW COURSES
CPSC547(3)
MATH 543 (3)
CHANGED COURSES
EOSC 534 (3)
EOSC 536 (3)
EOSC 578 (5)
Faculty of Land & Food Systems
PROGRAM CHANGES
Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition, and Health > Food, Nutrition, and Health Major
Changes to Third and Fourth Year requirements
Bachelor of Science in Applied Biology > Food and Environment Major
Changes to Fourth Year requirements
Faculty of Law
NEW COURSES
LAW 306 (4)
LAW 344 (4)
LAW 404 (4)
Faculty of Medicine
CHANGED PROGRAM
Bachelor of Midwifery (B.Mw.)
Faculty of Science
NEW SPECIALIZATION
Bachelor of Science > Earth and Ocean Sciences > Combined Major > Microbiology and
Oceanography
NEW COURSES
CPSC 189(1)
CPSC259(2)
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-175
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix A: Curriculum Summary, continued
EOSC 445 (6)
ENVR410(3)
ISCI 360 (3)
ISCI 361 (3)
MATH 406 (3)
MATH 444 (3)
MATH 448 (3)
MICB 308 (3)
MICB 408 (3)
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-176
Minutes of May 18, 2011
APPENDIX B: NEW AWARDS
ABORIGINAL Graduate Fellowship: Aboriginal Graduate Fellowships are awarded to
outstanding aboriginal graduate students and provide a minimum annual stipend of
$16,000 plus tuition. Fellowships are awarded through an annual competition, with priority given to aboriginal students whose traditional territory falls, at least in part, within
Canada. Fellowships may be offered for one or more years, with continued fellowship
support conditional on satisfactory academic progress. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First award is available for the 2011/
12 Winter Session.)
BC Assessment Valuation Award: A $1,750 award has been endowed by BC Assessment
Authority to the Diploma in Urban Land Economics student demonstrating leadership in
appraisal and valuation by obtaining the highest standing in a combination of BUSI 330
(Foundations of Real Estate Appraisal) and BUSI 344 (Statistical and Computer Applications in Valuation). Recommendation is made by the Sauder School of Business. (First
award is available for the 2011/12 Winter Session.)
Gordon L. DIEWERT Community Service Entrance Award: A $1,000 service entrance
award is offered in memory of Dr. Gordon L. Diewert, who was killed by a drunk driver,
to promote the prevention of drinking and driving. The award is granted annually on the
basis of good academic performance and community service to a high school student
entering the School of Kinesiology. The recipient must demonstrate participation in volunteer activities associated with the prevention of drinking and driving. Preference will
be given to students who took leadership roles in their high school Dry Grad activities.
Students must complete an application form and include a letter of reference from their
teacher/supervisor. The award will be granted by the School of Kinesiology Awards Adjudication Committee. (First award is available for the 2011/12 Winter Session.)
William McKendrick MCCALLUM Entrance Bursary in Medicine: Bursaries totalling
$6,300 have been endowed by an estate gift from William McKendrick McCallum to
provide funding for medical students who are entering their first year of study and are in
need of financial assistance. Students may receive this bursary more than one time should
they continue to demonstrate financial need and exceptional ability in their medical studies. Recommendations are made by the Faculty of Medicine in consultation with the
Office of Student Financial Assistance and Awards. (First award is available for the 2011/
12 Winter Session.)
Neil POLLOCK 'Mensche' Service Award in Medicine: A $1,000 service award has been
donated by Dr. Neil Pollock to recognize students' commitment to altruism and community service. 'Mensche' directly translates to 'human being' in Yiddish, is a person of
integrity, honour and kindness. Following in this spirit, Dr. Pollock aims to ensure students are recognized for their contributions to their class and the community. Adjudication is based on demonstrated leadership skills, involvement in extracurricular activities
and commitment to community service. The award is made on the strength of applicants
and the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. (First award is available for the
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-177
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix B: New Awards, continued
2011/12 Winter Session.)
Gokal SINGH of Halwara Memorial Service Award in Social Work: A $1,000 award is
offered by Ranjit Hall to a student specializing in social work who has a demonstrated
interest in and advocacy for social justice and equality. To be considered, candidates must
demonstrate community involvement and volunteer work both on and off campus with a
specific focus in helping disadvantaged and recent immigrant persons and groups. Recommendation is made by the School of Social Work. (First Award Available for the 2011/
12 Winter Session)
PREVIOUSLY-APPROVED AWARDS WITH CHANGES IN TERMS OR FUNDING
SOURCE:
Edna BAXTER Memorial Prize - A prize of $100, endowed as a memorial to Edna Baxter by her friends and colleagues, serves as a tribute to her devoted work as a teacher.
This prize is awarded to an undergraduate in the Faculty of Education who achieves distinction in the use of Children's Literature during the practicum.
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
Jean BARMAN Prize in Aboriginal Education - Prizes totalling $1,000 are offered to students of Aboriginal ancestry pursuing graduate or teacher education degree based on a
project related to aboriginal people. The award is named in honour of Dr. Jean Barman,
an outstanding professor who taught and works in this area. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Department of Educational Studies in consultation with the
Associate Dean of Indigenous Education and the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First
Award Available for the 2010/11 Winter Session)
Reason for Change: The donor wanted to open up the criteria to offer it to any student
who is working on a project related to aboriginal people and not simply aboriginal history. Biographic information concerning Dr. Barman has also been revised.
Alice V. BORDEN Memorial Scholarship in Early Childhood Education - A scholarship
of $500 is given by her pupils and their parents, students, colleagues, friends and relatives, in memory of Alice V Borden, 1908-1971, Assistant Professor of Education at the
University of British Columbia, who taught and practised pre-school education there
from 1958-1971. The intent of the scholarship is to encourage the dynamic spirit of dedication to excellence and integrity in learning and teaching which they were privileged to
experience in this rare person and skilful teacher. The scholarship is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education to an outstanding student whose teaching
practicum is in Early Childhood (K-3).
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
Alice V. BORDEN Memorial Prize - A prize of $200 is given by her pupils and their parents, students, colleagues, friends and relatives, in memory of Alice V Borden, 1908-
 Vancouver Senate 10/11 - 178
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix B: New Awards, continued
1971, Assistant Professor of Education at the University of British Columbia, who taught
and practised pre-school education there from 1958-1971. The intent of the prize is to
encourage the dynamic spirit of dedication to excellence and integrity in learning and
teaching which they were privileged to experience in this rare person and skilful teacher.
The prize is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education to an outstanding student graduating with the Bachelor of Education (Elementary), whose practicum is
in early childhood education, and who demonstrates excellence in teaching practice.
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
CHEMETICS Award in Engineering - A $1,000 award is offered by Chemetics to a student entering his/her first or second year of study in Chemical Engineering in even numbered years and Mechanical Engineering in odd numbered years. Recommendation is
made by the Faculty of Applied Science.
Reason for Change: Corporate name change from Aker Solutions to Chemetics and
requested revision to the adjudication criteria to have the award rotate between chemical
and mechanical engineering candidates.
C. K. CHOI Scholarship in Secondary Education - One or two scholarships totalling
$5,400 have been endowed by the Choi family for outstanding students entering the
Bachelor of Education (Secondary) program. The scholarship, made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education, is disbursed in three equal instalments, one at the start
of each term.
Reason for Change: The endowment is no longer in a financially viable state to offer
renewable scholarships.
Sonia CRADDOCK Memorial Prize - A $250 prize has been endowed in memory of
Sonia Craddock, elementary teacher, reading researcher, teacher educator and author of
children's literature. The prize is offered to an undergraduate student in the Faculty of
Education who achieves distinction in the use of children's literature. Preference is given
to a student who uses children's literature effectively in a teaching practicum. The award
is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education.
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
Mathilde MACINNES Memorial Scholarship - As a memorial to his wife, Mathilde
Maclnnes, and in recognition of her interest in young people, this scholarship of $1,100
has been established by Mr. W H. Maclnnes in the field of Education. It is awarded to
the student who obtains the excellent standing in the Winter Session of the program leading to the B.Ed, degree (elementary teaching field) and is proceeding to the extended
practicum and final courses of that program.
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-179
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix B: New Awards, continued
Barbara MIKULEC Prize in Education - A $700 prize has been endowed by Barbara
Mikulec, B.Ed. (Elementary), '69, for undergraduate students in the Faculty of Education. The award is offered to students whose teaching practicum demonstrates success in
teaching English as an Additional Language, and is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Education.
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
PHI Delta Kappa Scholarship in Education - One scholarship of $1,000, a gift of UBC
Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa, is awarded to a student who has completed Winter Session
in the Faculty of Education (defined as the initial eight or nine month winter session) and
is continuing in the degree program. The award is made to a student who not only has
good academic records but who also has shown ability in and aptitude for teaching. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty, with scholarship available for both
the Elementary and Secondary programs.
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
Stella SHOPLAND Memorial Prize - A $175 prize, endowed as a memorial to Stella
Shopland by her friends and associates, serves to mark the esteem and affection in which
she was held by her colleagues and students. In tribute to her special interest in children's
literature, this prize is awarded to an undergraduate in the Faculty of Education who
achieves distinction and who uses children's literature in an effective and imaginative
manner during the practicum.
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
Joan TUEY Scholarship in Early Childhood Education - Scholarships totalling $850
have been endowed by Leon and Joan Tuey for students in Early Childhood Education.
The awards are offered to students in the Teacher Education program concentrating in
Early Childhood Education during the practicum and are made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Education.
Reason for Change: The 2-Year Elementary Option of the Bachelor of Education Program is being phased out.
Frederic H. SOWARD Memorial Fellowship - A $2,300 fellowship has been endowed
through contributions from colleagues, family, friends and students to honour the memory of Frederic H. Soward who served as Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and as
Head of the History Department during his 42 years with UBC. A gifted teacher, he was
also a distinguished authority on Canada's role in international affairs. The award to a
full-time graduate student studying international relations, with the recommendation
alternating each year between the Department of History and the Department of Political
Science, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-180
Minutes of May 18, 2011
Appendix B: New Awards, continued
Reason for Change: The nominations for this fellowship are meant to rotate between the
Department of History and Political Science. The revised description clarifies this point
so it is not lost in adjudication.
 Vancouver Senate 10/11-181
Minutes of May 18, 2011
APPENDIX C: EMERITUS STATUS
Brewer, Jesse: Professor Emeritus of Physics and Astronomy
Canam, Connie: Assistant Professor Emeritus of Nursing
Clay, M. Graham: Clinical Associate Professor Emeritus of Surgery
Cliff, Brian L.: Senior Instructor Emeritus of Chemistry
Duff, Sheldon: Professor Emeritus of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Ekeland, Ivan Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Field, Lanora: Professor Emeritus of Medical Genetics
Forbes, John: Clinical Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics
Henderson, Angela: Associate Professor Emeritus of Nursing
Israel, Robert B.: Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Lawrence, Peter D.: Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Mathers, David Alexander: Associate Professor Emeritus of Cellular and Physiological
Sciences
McClung, David M.: Professor Emeritus of Geography
McDonald, Michael: Professor Emeritus of Applied Ethics
Muller, Nestor Luiz: Professor Emeritus of Radiology
Petric, Martin: Professor Emeritus of Pathology
Spiegelman, George B.: Professor Emeritus of Microbiology
The, Hung Sia: Professor Emeritus of Microbiology
van Rijn, Theo: Clinical Associate Professor Emeritus of Medicine
Walker, David C: Associate Professor Emeritus of Pathology
Wray, William D.: Associate Professor Emeritus of History

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