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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2015-10-21

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 UBC
w
aplaceoftTlind Vancouver Senate
www.senate.ubc.ca
THE  UNIVERSITYOF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF 21 OCTOBER 2015
Attendance
Present: Dr M. Piper (Chair), Mr J. Abaki, Dr P. Adebar, Mr T. Ahmed, Dr R. Anstee, Dean G. Averill, Dr S.
Avramidis, Dr K. Baimbridge, Mr A. Bailey, Ms E. Biddlecombe, Dr L. Burr, Dr A. Collier, Dean C. Dauvergne,
Mr N. Dawson, Mr K. D'Souza, Dr A. Dulay, Dr S. Forwell, Dean B. Frank, Dr C. Godwin, Prof B. Goold, Mr S.
Gurm Mr S. Haffey, Dr P. Harrison, Ms M. Hatai, Dean R. Helsley, Dr A. Ivanov, Mrs C. Jaeger, Dr P. Keown, Dr
B. Lalli, Mr H. Leong, Dr P. Loewen, Ms J. Loveday, Mr K. Madill, Dr B. MacDougall, Dr C. Marshall, Dr W.
McKee, Mr W. McNulty, Ms K. Melton, Mr D. Munro, Ms J. Omassi, Dr N. Perry, Dr G. Peterson, Dr J. Plessis,
Dean S. Porter, Dr A. Redish, Mr A. Rezaiean-Asel, Dr A. Riseman, Dr L. Rucker, Dr C. Ruitenberg, Mr G.
Sangha, Dr B. Sawatzky, Dr T. Schneider, Ms S. Simon, Dr S. Singh, Dr R. Sparks, Ms S. Sterling, Mr T. Tanaka,
Mr J. Tang, Dr R. Tees, Dr S. Thorne, Dr L. Walker, Ms S. Vohra,Dr D. Witt, Dean R. Yada, Mr E. Zhao.
Regrets: Dr P. Choi, Dean M. Coughtrie, Dr W. Dunford, Dr J. Gilbert, Dr D. Gillen, Chancellor L. Gordon, Dr F.
Granot, Dean J. Innes, Dean D. Kelleher, Dr S. Knight, Dr P. Marshall. Dr P. Meehan, Dr C. Naus, Dr C. Nislow,
Dr I. Parent, Dean M. Parlange, Dean S. Peacock, Dean C. Shuler, Dr R. Topping, Dr R. Wilson,
Recording Secretary: Mr C. Eaton.
Call to Order
The Chair of Senate, Dr Martha Cook Piper, called the second regular meeting of the Vancouver
Senate for the 2015/2016 academic year to order at 6:05 pm.
Senate Membership
The President welcomed Professor Bruce MacDougall to Senate as a representative of the
Faculty of Law, replacing Professor Isabel Grant.
Amendment to Agenda
By general consent the agenda was amended to move the discussion item on
Student Mental Health and Wellbeing to after the President's remarks.
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Richard Tees }        That the Minutes of the Meeting of 16 September
Lawrence Burr 2015 be adopted as corrected:
Correction: Spelling of Musqueam on page 11.
Approved
Vol. 2013/14 15/16-02-1
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-2
Minutes of 21 October 2015
Business Arising from the Minutes
As Dr Parent could not be present, the Associate Registrar, Mr Eaton, read out a statement on her
behalf.
In response to the questions raised by senators at the previous meeting, I have
reviewed the status of data within cIRcle and the AMS examination
database.   There seems to be some level of confusion regarding this issue, and in
particular, there was an assumption made that some data in cIRcle was lost or
missing. I can advise you that this is not the case: rather, the old AMS
examination database was never transferred to cIRcle. The AMS data (roughly
1400 records) was retained by the AMS. The Library's own collection of
examinations (from 1915 through 2003) was never digitized, and is still available
in either microfilm or print format.   The AMS and the Library did experiment
with loading 183 licenced examinations (171 from Mathematics and 12 from
Physics); however, the requirements for access control and regular record deletion
required a different database than cIRcle which is based on an Open Access
model. The AMS and the Library mutually agreed to withdraw the records from
public access in 2013 to avoid confusion with departmental databases and because
so few permissions could be obtained from faculty members. Although removed,
these files and their associated metadata were backed up and can be restored if
needed.
The Library continues to provide advice on copyright and usability for the newly
developed AMS exam database and looks forward to continuing to work with the
students on this and other endeavours. Regretfully I cannot attend the October
meeting of Senate due to travel on University business; however, I would be
happy to address any further questions or concerns senators may have at the next
opportunity
Remarks from the Chair
The President advised that few hours prior, she had the privilege to welcome Mohamed Fahmy
to UBC's School of lournalism. The President drew a parallel between journalist freedom of
expression and academic freedom; she noted that at least 66 journalists had been killed last year
during the course of their work, and opined that this showed how dear freedom of expression
could be. President Piper stated that neither freedom of expression nor academic freedom can
ever be taken for granted and we must be constantly vigilant to ensure that both are protected.
Dr Piper reminded Senate that on October 15, UBC received the full report from the Hon. Lynn
Smith QC regarding allegations that Dr lennifer Berdahl's rights under the collective agreement,
and UBC policies, or her academic freedom, were infringed or interfered with in response to a
blog posting. The administration has accepted Ms Smith's findings and she would suggest that
all senators read the summary of the report.   The President reminded the Senate of the terms of
reference agreed to by UBC and the Faculty Association for this report:
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-3
Minutes of 21 October 2015
Whether John S. Montalbano, Chair of the Board of Governors, and/or
individuals in the Sauder School of Business identified by the Faculty Association,
conducted themselves in the events following Professor Jennifer Berdahl's
publication of her blog on August 8, 2015 in a manner that violated any provision
of the Collective Agreement, the UBC Statement on Respectful Environment, or
any applicable university policies including whether her academic freedom is or
was interfered with in any way.
The President went on to advise that Ms Smith's conclusions were as follows:
• UBC failed in its obligation to protect and support Dr Berdahl's academic freedom. The
Collective Agreement Preamble creates a positive obligation to support and protect
academic freedom. Through the combined acts and omissions of Mr. Montalbano, the
named individuals in the Sauder School, and others, UBC as an institution failed to meet
that obligation with respect to Dr Berdahl's academic freedom.
• Montalbano, on his own, did not infringe any provision of the Collective Agreement, the
UBC Statement on Respectful Environment, or any of the applicable university policies.
• No individuals in the Sauder School of Business identified by the Faculty Association, on
his or her own, infringed any provision of the Collective Agreement, the UBC Statement
on Respectful Environment, or any of the applicable university policies.
The President opined that no individual infringed on Dr Berdahl's academic freedom but the
University failed in its obligation to protect and support her academic freedom. She stated that
the Collective Agreement, to paraphrase, includes an obligation to protect and support the
academic freedom of others, that is to say, all members of the University had a positive
obligation to be constantly vigilant and supportive, and we as an institution failed to stand up and
advise Dr Berdahl that she had the right to say what she was saying. The President advised that
no one told her she did not have the right, but collectively we did not say that she did.
Dr Piper noted that this was only the second issue of academic freedom in her time; we did not
defend the collective agreement after 9-11, and we did not defend it now.
The President then went on to state that her administration would take the following steps in
response to the Smith Report:
• Hire a specialist who will proactively work with faculty, staff, and governors to ensure
that academic freedom is safeguarded and preserved at UBC. This person will provide
advice, education, and counsel regarding all issues involving academic freedom,
including the obligation of all members of the university to protect and support this
central freedom.
• Create an education program that would be aimed at all new faculty members, heads,
directors, administrators and deans, regarding how to fulfill their obligation to protect
academic freedom.
• Develop an online tool to allow people to access information on what academic freedom
is, how to manage academic freedom issues, and answers to frequently asked questions.
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-4
Minutes of 21 October 2015
•    Develop a more formalized module on academic freedom as part of the orientation/on-
boarding process for all new governors and senators.
Senator Singh said that this was a less than perfect summer for UBC. Academic freedom,
transparency all took a hit. Individually no one failed, but collectively our omission was a
failure. We need to target where this problem originated.
The President advised that she herself should have called Professor Berdahl. Some did
call her but that wasn't enough. UBC as an institution should have been more public in its
support.
Senator Singh asked what we would do for six months while we implemented these
recommendations.
The President replied that she would do everything she could to put this into place prior
to the end of her interim term.
Senator Loewen said that the failure was a team effort, and we had a fairly good idea who that
team was.
The President replied that no individual failed; she suggested that we did not understand
our positive obligation.
Senator Rucker suggested that the discussions and tools should also provide guidelines for
faculty and students as to what constitutes academic freedom and how not to abuse academic
freedom.
The President advised that we have one definition of it in our collective agreement, and
one in our calendar. We need help here, especially in the Canadian context as it is
different vs in the US or Europe.
Senator Thorne advised that in the respectful environment statement there was a grey area and no
capacity to predict individual interpretations. She hoped that we did not have a legalistic
definition and accepted that spirit of ambiguity and potentially unanswerable questions.
The President replied that we did not want to be legalistic, we wanted wise counsel who
understood the messiness of universities and the boundaries of academic freedom.
Senator Baimbridge asked if we should distinguish between academic freedom and freedom of
speech. We need to know if an opinion is from academic expertise or a personal one. With the
new technology of blogs, etc, versus traditional media such as journals, we need to keep up with
technology.
The President replied that this was an important question. You can say whatever you
want so long as it isn't illegal; if a professor falsifies research, even if that could be
covered by freedom of speech it would still be wrong in the academic environment. She
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-5
Minutes of 21 October 2015
noted the case of a physics professor at the University of Alberta who had a paper
published in a physics journal that had nothing to do with physics but rather with the
position that the children of women who work were more likely to cheat at school.
Senator Baimbridge clarified that he wanted to know when the university should take positive
action. It would be easy if it was a matter where someone was expert at talking academically.
The President replied that as a citizen you can write whatever you want; the difference
exists if you sign it as a professor of UBC.
Dean Averill replied that in grappling this issue it gives us an opportunity to face a
problem that many universities have had difficulty with or had chosen to ignore because
of its complexity.
The President further replied that this was similar to where we were with equity 25 years
ago; we all thought it was important to address but didn't know how to move forward.
Senator Munro noticed that students were asking how the proposed increase in international
tuition would affect academic matters.
The President replied that the financial decision was at the Board table and the Board has
passed a resolution to move us to our peers for international tuition. Consultation is
taking place. The impact will come through the Senate Budget Committee.
Senator Abaki stated that he respected the need under the University Act to maintain our
separation of powers but there was a clear impact on academic affairs. One of the key goals in
our strategic plan was to increase diversity and these increases would challenge that.
After consultation with the Secretary, the President advised that academic matters
relating to the proposed increases should be considered by the Senate Academic Policy
and Admissions Committees in addition to the Budget Committee
From the Secretary
Dr Ross confirmed that the items circulated via email on 21 September 2015 were approved:
• The Dr. Chew Wei MBBS [HK] FRCOG [Eng] Memorial Chair in Gynecologic
Oncology
• The Peter P. Dhillon Centre for Business Ethics
Discussion Item
STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING
With consent of Senate, Dr Louise Nasmith and Dr Richard Keeling presented.
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-6
Minutes of 21 October 2015
Dr Louise Nasmith introduced the topic, noting that last year, Senate struck a committee and
then approved a framework on student mental health and wellbeing. The Board of Governors
also approved additional funding, some of which was used to hire new staff, and a portion was
set aside to investigate the situation further.
Dr Richard Keeling spoke, outlining how mental health issues were related to learning. He stated
that there have been many conversations with students, faculty administrators and others to try to
understand some of the factors affecting students and causing the observed problems. From
those discussions, there have been two important sets of finding: access to services were not
adequate and services themselves and had not been explored. Related to the second set of
findings was the context of services: firstly, that UBC was a competitive, intense place where
students found challenges as they went through a thicket of demands, and secondly that members
of faculty and staff live and work in that same context.
Dr Keeling suggested that from the above findings comes an opportunity to think differently and
decide what a concerned community does to promote a greater level of support for health and
wellbeing. We all have a role here both as participants and as part of this process. We have a role
in how we teach, set policies, and in the signals we send to students for what matters and what
doesn't. The challenge is simple and difficult. Two competing ideas are rigor and empathy;
excellence and caring.
Senator Singh said that he hadn't considered the issue except in recent years when his students
started to bring up these issues and he felt it important as a faculty member to get involved. A
few years ago, early alert was introduced and he was wondering what worked and what didn't
work for things we have already tried.
Dr Nasmith replied that data was starting to come forward.
The incoming Education student senator, lolene Loveday, asked what UBC was doing around
stigma around mental health issues.
Dr Nasmith agreed that this was a huge issue and a big barrier.
Senator Omassi said that an important point was academic policies. Students have identified
specific policies that while not designed to compromise wellbeing, have done so over time.
Changes were needed so that the purpose of policies were upheld but that wellbeing issues were
addressed.
Senator Thorne said that the ad hoc committee spent a lot of hours listening to all of UBC and
she was profoundly moved by how much talent and enthusiasm there was on this campus to
address these issues.
Senator Ruitenberg said that as a graduate advisor we have remarkable faculty and staff who will
go out of their way to make things possible. Our culture however is a problem, as is our
privatizing of mental health issues. lust as we have a collective responsibility for academic
freedom we have the same for mental health issues.
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-7
Minutes of 21 October 2015
Senator Harrison said that academic policy is trying to grapple with some of these issues, but the
practice was more important that the policy. We all have a responsibility to put policies into
practice supportively and responsibly. We're inconsistent there.   Secondly, there are many
wonderful initiatives going on under the radar or even in parallel. We need a general overview of
what is going on and of coordinated efforts. This was an academic responsibility and he asked
how the Provost could support it.
Senator Abaki asked about the issue of balance between rigour and empathy. He asked where the
point was between the two. Secondly the need to maintain confidentiality while being able to talk
openly about mental health was an ongoing issue. Finally, he asked if UBC would hire
counsellors who could be tailored towards the needs of specific groups of students.
To the last point, Dr Nasmith replied that hiring was done with that in mind.
The President thanked Dr Nasmith and Dr Keeling for their presentation.
Academic Policy Committee
Dr Paul G Harrison, Chair of the Senate Academic Policy Committee, presented.
REVISED ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY FOR MASTER'S STUDENTS - FACULTY OF
GRADUATE AND POSTDOCTORAL STUDIES
Paul Harrison } That the revised Academic Progress policy for
Philip Loewen master's students and the corresponding change to
the Grading Practices section of the Academic
Calendar be approved.
Senator Harrison advised that the changes made were to provide clarity for graduate students.
Approved
Admissions Committee
The Vice-Chair of the Senate Admissions Committee, Mrs Carol jaeger, presented.
CHANGE TO ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR OF PHARMACY FLEXIBLE
PROGRAM
Carol laeger } That Senate approve the changes to the admission
Richard Anstee requirements for the Doctor of Pharmacy Flexible
Program, effective for the 2016 Winter Session and
thereafter.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of 21 October 2015
15/16-
Approved
Awards Committee
The Chair of the Awards Committee, Dr Lawrence Burr, presented.
NEW AWARDS AND CHANGES TO EXISTING AWARDS
See Appendix A: Awards Report
Lawrence Burr
Susan Forwell
} That Senate accept the awards as listed and forward
them to the Board of Governors for approval; and
that letters of thanks be sent to the donors.
By general consent, the Donald MacDougall Award withdrawn was withdrawn
Approved as
amended
Curriculum Committee
The Chair of the Senate Curriculum Committee, Dr Peter Marshall, presented.
See Appendix B: Curriculum Report
OCTOBER CURRICULUM REPORT
Peter Marshall
Nick Dawson
} That the new courses, revised courses, and
discontinued program brought forward by the
faculties of Education, and Graduate and
Postdoctoral Studies (Dentistry, and Medicine) be
approved.
Senator Marshall briefly outline the nature of each proposal.
Approved
Other Business
CONFIDENTIALITY AGREEMENT BETWEEN UBC AND ARVIND GUPTA
Dr Richard Anstee gave notice of the following motion to be placed on the next agenda of
Senate:
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-9
Minutes of 21 October 2015
Richard Anstee } The Senate calls on the President to approach the
S ean Haffey Board of Governors and Professor Gupta and have
them renegotiate the terms of his resignation
agreement so that both the University and Professor
Gupta are able to speak fully to the reasons for his
resignation.
Senator Anstee noted that many research faculty were supportive and hopeful of Professor
Gupta's presidency given his openness and support for research and that transparency regarding
his departure would go a long ways in calming concerns from faculty and the University
community. He suggested that there was much speculation and misinformation in the public
realm, and transparency again would go a long ways to resolving these. Dr Anstee further noted
that UBC was embarking on a search for the next president and any candidate for that job would
want to know what happened; however, the Board of Governors sent a letter to the Faculty
Association on 21 September 2015 stating that the privacy act precluded them from releasing any
employment details. Dr Anstee finally suggested that such a resolution would put more weight
behind the request to Professor Gupta and the Board for transparency regarding the former's
resignation.
Senator Bailey asked whether we were not confident that it was the wishes of the individual
rather than the body.
Senator Thorne spoke against the motion; her view that even the Senate's act of passing this
motion could cause more turmoil and it is very likely that no information will be made available:
This would put UBC, its President and Board in a further difficult situation.
Senator Singh said that the matter was basically one of transparency and openness, suggesting
that the cloud over the University has not lifted, and that we could either hope that it dissipates,
or we can take an active approach.
Senator Marshall spoke against the motion, and advising that while his instinct was not to press
into this matter, his greater concern was that he did not think it was the business of Senate to pry
into the private agreement between Professor Gupta and the Board.
Sean Haffey said that Senate had a role in choosing the President, and there were comments at
the last meeting regarding the failure of the previous search committee; he suggested that if we
don't make an effort to learn if there were mistakes in the past we may repeat them.
Richard Tees spoke against the motion. He expressed his gratitude that President Piper had
agreed to return as Interim President and suggested that adding a negotiation between Professor
Gupta and the Board to release more information would not be an appropriate use of her limited
time given the unlikelihood of success. Secondly, he reminded Senate that Kenneth Hare and
George Peterson had also both left after short periods of time and Senate did not demand to
know their reasons at the time.
 Vancouver Senate                                                                                                                                  15/16-10
Minutes of 21 October 2015	
Senator Burr noted that if he was a candidate for President he would want to know why his
predecessor had resigned. He asked what answer we would give candidates to that question.
The President replied that she would reply as she has already: that it was a personal
decision.
Senator Forwell noted that the confidentiality agreement was a legal document between the
Board and Professor Gupta and suggested that we may need legal advice if the Senate chooses to
move in this direction.
Senator Anstee replied that if both parties agreed he couldn't see why the agreement
couldn't be amended.
Senator MacDougall agreed that there was no legal impediment to the agreement being
changed with the consent of both parties.
Senator Bailey asked what had occurred since that agreement was made that made Senator
Anstee think the Board or Professor Gupta would be open to changing the agreement.
Senator Anstee replied the turmoil since it was signed may be reason to reconsider.
Senator Burr asked why the contract to hire the former president was public but not the
confidentiality agreement for his leaving.
The President replied that the Privacy Act made clear what we could disclose, and this
was balanced by the Freedom of Information aspects.
Senator Loewen spoke in favour of the motion; stating that to have a president leave after 13
months was a failure at some point, and to properly manage UBC we need to understand what
went wrong.
Senator Harrison suggested that a "black cloud" hasn't really been over UBC. He agreed that
some aggrieved people would like to know the reasons so that they can move forward, but he
suggested that the only cloud would be to re-open these discussions in public.
Senator Baimbridge replied that he had serious doubts that this motion would produce any
further information, and hoped that the Board had learned a lesson from this situation - any
future agreements must have the parties agree to a mutual statement of reasons.
Senator Sparks spoke against the motion as not being in UBC's interests.
Motion Failed
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 7:43 pm.
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-11
Minutes of 21 October 2015
Appendix A: Awards Report
New Awards:
James E. AXELSON Outstanding Graduate Scholar - A scholarship of $35,000 per year for two
years is offered by Swamy Yeleswaram for a pharmaceutical sciences PhD student entering the
Outstanding Graduate Scholar Training Program. This award is established in honour of Professor
Emeritus James E. Axelson, who served as Dr. Yeleswaram's mentor while he was a graduate
student at UBC in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Recommendations are made by the
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral
Studies. (First Award Available in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
KIN's Excellence Award in Food Science - A $1,650 award has been made available through an
endowment established by Kin's Farm Market to a graduate student pursuing their M.Sc. or Ph.D. in
Food Science with a focus on food safety, extended shelf life of produce, or produce and human
health, in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The successful recipient will be selected based on
academic excellence, as well as demonstrated excellence in a range of non-academic fields such as
community service, student leadership, and volunteerism. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Land and Food Systems in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate and
Postdoctoral Studies. (First Award Available in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
Anna Ruth LEITH Memorial SLAIS Scholarship - A $1,000 scholarship is offered annually to
the student who achieves the top average grade across the core courses of the MLIS or MAS program
in the preceding year. The award has been made available by the Estate of Anna Ruth Leith. Anna
Ruth Leith had a long and successful career at UBC. She graduated from UBC with a BA in 1945. In
1959 she joined the UBC Library Science Division and became head of the Division in 1961. She
was appointed Head of the UBC Woodward Biomedical Library in 1967 and retired from that
position in 1988. The award is made on the recommendation of the School of Library, Archival and
Information Systems, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. (First
Award Available in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
PAN Tianshou Scholarship - Five graduate scholarships of $2,000 each are offered annually to
Master's and PhD students who are studying or conducting research in Chinese Studies with the
Institute of Asian Research (IAR). Selection is based on academic performance, the quality of the
research project proposal, research productivity or excellence. One scholarship will be offered
annually to a student in a Master's or PhD program in the Department of Art History, Visual Art and
Theory. Two scholarships will be offered annually to students in other Master's or PhD humanities
programs. Two scholarships will be offered annually to students in other disciplines. The
scholarships are funded by the Pan Tianshou Foundation (PTSF) based in China, and the Vancouver
Chinese Culture and Arts Foundation (VCCAF). The awards are made on the recommendation of the
Institute of Asian Research in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.
(First Award Available in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
Amanjit PAYER Memorial Scholarship in Women's Volleyball - One or more scholarships,
which range from a minimum value of $500 each to the maximum allowable under athletic
association regulations, have been made available through an endowment established by the family,
friends, UBC Athletics and teammates of Amanjit Payer in recognition of her passion and enthusiasm
for women in sport, specifically volleyball. While attending UBC, Amanjit was manager of the
Thunderbird Women's Volleyball team, where her natural ability to act as the facilitator of the team
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-12
Minutes of 21 October 2015
enhanced the winning culture of this team. This award will provide scholarships to UBC Thunderbird
Women's Volleyball student-athletes who maintain good academic standing and exemplify courage
and leadership in all that they do. The award is made on the recommendation of the Athletics Awards
Committee. (First Award Available in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
Christopher SPENCER Memorial Entrance Scholarship in Engineering - Scholarships totalling
$4,200 have been made available through an endowment established by Christopher Spencer. The
scholarships are available to students entering the first year of the Engineering program at UBC.
Christopher Spencer (1869-1953) had strong ties to both UBC and the history of Vancouver. He
served on the Board of Governors of UBC from about 1919 to 1935. In 1952, when Christopher
Spencer received his Honorary Doctor of Laws, he was referred to as a "merchant, philanthropist and
'founding father' of this University". The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Applied Sciences. (First Award Available in the 2016/2017 Winter Session)
CENTENNIAL Scholars Entrance Awards - The University of British Columbia offers entrance
awards valued up to $10,000 to outstanding students entering university from secondary schools in
Canada, or transfer students from other colleges and universities, or Canadian citizens living abroad.
Criteria for these entrance awards include demonstrated academic and leadership achievements in the
arts, community, athletics, and school. Recipients are academically qualified students with an interest
in joining and contributing to the UBC Vancouver community but who would not be able to attend
UBC without significant financial assistance. Candidates must be nominated by a member of their
school or community. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Centennial Scholars
Entrance Award Committee. (First Award Available in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
CENTENNIAL Scholars Major Entrance Awards - The University of British Columbia offers
renewable entrance awards valued up to $40,000 over 4 years to outstanding students entering
university from secondary schools in Canada, or transfer students from other colleges and
universities, or Canadian citizens living abroad. Criteria for these entrance awards include
demonstrated academic and leadership achievements in the arts, community, athletics, and school.
Recipients are academically qualified students with an interest in joining and contributing to the
UBC Vancouver community but who would not be able to attend UBC without significant financial
assistance. Subject to continued scholarship standing, the awards will be renewed for a further three
years of study or until the first undergraduate degree is obtained (whichever is the shorter period).
Candidates must be nominated by a member of their school or community. The awards are made on
the recommendation of the Centennial Scholars Entrance Award Committee. (First Award Available
in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
VAN LEEST Family Southern Medical Program Award - Two $2,000 awards are offered
annually by the Van Leest Family to support one second year student and one third year student in
the UBC Faculty of Medicine Southern Medical Program. Preference is given to students with
financial need who have graduated from a high school outside of the Vancouver metropolitan area.
The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. (First Award Available in
the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-13
Minutes of 21 October 2015
recommendation of the Faculty of Applied Sciences. (First Award Available in the 2016/2017 Winter
Session)
CENTENNIAL Scholars Entrance Awards - The University of British Columbia offers entrance
awards valued up to $10,000 to outstanding students entering university from secondary schools in
Canada, or transfer students from other colleges and universities, or Canadian citizens living abroad.
Criteria for these entrance awards include demonstrated academic and leadership achievements in the
arts, community, athletics, and school. Recipients are academically qualified students with an interest
in joining and contributing to the UBC Vancouver community but who would not be able to attend
UBC without significant financial assistance. Candidates must be nominated by a member of their
school or community. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Centennial Scholars
Entrance Award Committee. (First Award Available in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
CENTENNIAL Scholars Major Entrance Awards - The University of British Columbia offers
renewable entrance awards valued up to $40,000 over 4 years to outstanding students entering
university from secondary schools in Canada, or transfer students from other colleges and
universities, or Canadian citizens living abroad. Criteria for these entrance awards include
demonstrated academic and leadership achievements in the arts, community, athletics, and school.
Recipients are academically qualified students with an interest in joining and contributing to the
UBC Vancouver community but who would not be able to attend UBC without significant financial
assistance. Subject to continued scholarship standing, the awards will be renewed for a further three
years of study or until the first undergraduate degree is obtained (whichever is the shorter period).
Candidates must be nominated by a member of their school or community. The awards are made on
the recommendation of the Centennial Scholars Entrance Award Committee. (First Award Available
in the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
VAN LEEST Family Southern Medical Program Award - Two $2,000 awards are offered
annually by the Van Leest Family to support one second year student and one third year student in
the UBC Faculty of Medicine Southern Medical Program. Preference is given to students with
financial need who have graduated from a high school outside of the Vancouver metropolitan area.
The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. (First Award Available in
the 2015/2016 Winter Session)
Revised Awards:
#149 R. E. McDermit Memorial Prize - A $600 prize to recognize the late Robert E. McDermit's
commitment to excellence in health administration and his dedicated years of service in government,
health care organizations and the private sector is offered annually by his family. The award is made
to a graduating student in the M.H.A. program for the best paper examining current issues in the
planning, management or administration of health service programs. The award is made on the
recommendation of the School of Population and Public Health in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.
Rationale for Proposed Changes - Type of Action: upon request from the Faculty of
Medicine Development team, we have changed the calendar description to reflect the name
of the new recommending body.
#3131 G. F. Amyot Prize - A $300 prize has been made available through an endowment
established with donations from the Health Officers of British Columbia in honour of G. F. Amyot,
who contributed greatly to the development of public health services in British Columbia and
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-14
Minutes of 21 October 2015
assisted in the establishment of the Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of
Medicine. The prize is awarded on the recommendation of the School of Population and Public
Health to a student or resident who has demonstrated meritorious scholarship, leadership, and
academic research ability in public health.
Rationale for Proposed Changes - Type of Action: upon request from the Faculty of
Medicine Development team, we have changed the calendar description to reflect the name
of the new recommending body.
#7696 Suzanne H. Mullin Bursary - Bursaries totaling $13,100 have been made available through
an endowment established with a bequest from the late Suzanne H. Mullin for students in the field of
Public Health (School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine). The awards are made
on the recommendation of the School of Population and Public Health.
Rationale for Proposed Changes - Type of Action: upon request from the Faculty of
Medicine Development team, we have changed the calendar description to reflect the name
of the new recommending body.
#8071 Urea Formaldehyde Foam Insulation Action Association Bursary -A $2,250 bursary has
been made available through an endowment established by the Urea Formaldehyde Foam Insulation
Action Association, a group of concerned home-owners who had UFFI installed in their homes. The
award is made on the recommendation of the School of Population and Public Health to a student
investigating toxic chemicals and pollutants, with particular emphasis on their effects on human
health. Students who have recently completed research or studies in this field should apply in writing
by October 1 to the Director of the M.Sc. (Occupational and Environmental Hygiene) in the School
of Population and Public Health. A copy of a recent paper on the relevant topics or a description of
current studies should be included.
Rationale for Proposed Changes - Type of Action: upon request from the Faculty of
Medicine Development team, we have changed the calendar description to reflect the name
of the new recommending body.
#4442 James A. Moore Major Entrance Scholarship - A $10,000 Major Entrance Scholarship is
offered annually by The James A. and Donna-Mae Moore Foundation to a student entering the
Faculty of Science with the highest academic achievement in Mathematics, having graduated from a
High School outside of the Lower Mainland and expressed an interest in pursuing a career in
teaching. Mr. Moore was an alumnus of UBC, Double Honours Baccalaureate Degree in
Mathematics and Chemistry 1932, Master of Arts, 1939. An enthusiastic teacher and pioneer of the
BC Community College System, he dedicated his career to helping students realize their academic
potential. The successful candidate will be selected by the Major Entrance Scholarship Selection
Committee.
Rationale for Proposed Changes - Type of Action: the donor has requested that we remove
the renewable language from the award description; the donor has also requested that the
top academic student in Mathematics receives the award each year, and that the recipients
must have attended a secondary school outside of the Lower Mainland. The latter change is
in particular to recognize that accessibility and cost of attendance to UBC for students
outside of the Lower Mainland are substantial.
 Vancouver Senate 15/16-15
Minutes of 21 October 2015
Appendix B: Curriculum Report
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
New courses
KIN 390 (3) Human Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy; KIN 425 (3) Aging, Health, and the
Body; KIN 456 (3) Field Experiences in Physical Education Settings
FACULTY OF GRADUATE AND POSTDOCTORAL STUDIES
New and revised courses; and discontinued program.
Dentistry
DENT 777 (1) Interdisciplinary Graduate Seminars: Interdisciplinary Treatment Planning I;
DENT 778 (1) Interdisciplinary Graduate Seminars: Interdisciplinary Treatment Planning II;
DENT 779 (2) Interdisciplinary Graduate Seminars: Interdisciplinary Treatment Planning III
Medicine
Medicine>Genetics Graduate Program; Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies>Degree
Programs>Genetics.

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