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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2017-10-18

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THE  UNIVERSITYOF  BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Office of the Senate
Brock Hall | 2016 - 1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
Phone 604 822 5239
Fax 604 822 5945
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF 18 OCTOBER 2017
Attendance
Present: Mr I Gattinger (Vice-Chair), Dr K Ross (Secretary), Dr P. Adebar, Ms I. Booth, Dr R.
Boushel, Ms S. Brar, Dr V. Bungay, Dr L. Burr, Dean C. Dauvergne, Mr K. Doering, Mr B.
Fischer, Dr A. Fisher, Dr S. Forwell, Dean B. Frank, Dr J. Gilbert, Ms A. Glinsbockel, Dr J.
Greenman, Dr V. Griess, Ms M. Grist, Mr S. Haffey, Ms M. Hamid, Dr P. Harrison, Mr M.
Isaacson, Dr A. Ivanov, Dr M. Koehoorn, Dr C. Krebs, Dr M. Kuus, Mr D. Lam, Mr H. Leong,
Dr K. Lo, Dr P. Loewen, Ms A. MacDougall, Dean M. MacDougall, Dr S. Matsui, Dr W.
McKee, Mr W. McNulty, Dr P. Meehan, Ms S. Ngo, Ms S. Park, Ms S. Parker, Dean S. Peacock,
Dean S. Porter, Mr M. Pratt, Dr T. Rogers, Mr Q. Salehmohamed, Mr I. Sapollnik, Dr T.
Schneider, Dr J. Shepherd, Dr S. Singh, Dr L. Stothers, Dr A. Szeri, Dr R. Tees, Dr M. Thachuk,
Dr S. Thorne, Ms L. Wang, Mr W. Wong, Dean R. Yada.
Regrets: Dr S. Ono (Chair), Mr T. Ahmed, Dean G. Averill, Dr H. Brock, Dr A. Collier, Dean
M. Coughtrie, Dr A. Dulay, Dr G. Faulkner, Mr F. Gallegos, Dr C. Godwin, Chancellor L.
Gordon, Dr S. Graystron, Dean J. Innis, Prof. C. laeger, Dean D. Kelleher, Dr P. Keown, Dr A.
Kindler, Dr D. MacDonald, Dr C. Marshall, Dr P. Marshall, Dr A. Murphey, Dr C. Nislow, Dean
Pro Tem. J. Olsen, Prof. A. Sheppard, Mr M. Stewart, Dr R. Topping.
Clerk: Mr C. Eaton
Call to Order
Mr lakob Gattinger, Vice-Chair of Senate, called the meeting to order at 6:05 pm.
Senate Membership
The Registrar welcomed Dr Robert Boushel, faculty representative from the Faculty of
Education, and Ms Alexandra Glinsbockel, student representative from the Faculty of Education,
to Senate for terms ending 31 August 2020 and 1 October 2018 respectively.
Minutes of 20 September 2017
Kevin Dearing
Marium Hamid
}        That the Minutes of the Meeting of 20 September
2017 be adopted as corrected.
Senators A. MacDougall, Ivanov, Stothers,
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McKee, and Haffey were in attendance
Approved
Report from the Provost
SRATEGIC PLANNING
On behalf of President Ono who could not attend due to University business in Africa, Dr
Andrew Szeri, Vice-President Academic & Provost, updated the Senate on developments with
tthe strategic planning process. He advised that over the last month, and in consultation with the
executive, deans and others, we have continued to refine and build convergence around a
framework for the strategic plan. There are many more engagements planned with senate,
student government, faculty, and other groups, as well as town halls and online forums. We have
also established a set of working groups to delineate priorities for key areas.
OMBUDSPERSON ANNUAL REPORT
Ms Nakata presented on her office's work for the past year. She noted that her work was twofold; individual student situations, and engaging with faculty and staff on policy and system
matters. Ms Nakata opined that as they worked with individual students the Ombudsoffice those
situations to find avenues to advance fairness for students more generally.
The Ombudsperson noted that in 2016 numbers went down. In part this was due to their
Okanagan Office closing due to lack of funds. She noted that student union there would like to
re-open the office and we are working to do so.
Ms Nakata advised that graduate students were 35 to 40% of business. Most undergrad students
are in their senior years. International students seemed to be overrepresented compared to the
overall campus demographics. Most students work with the office 3 to 5 times, but some require
more contact.
The Ombudsperson noted the following key reflections:
• Demonstrating fairness: Perception is 9/10 fairness. Recognize diversity and be open to
difference. Fairness is not sameness.
• Inclusive Design: Must be at the onset, improves accessibility and viability.
• Grad student supervision: integrated and coordinated approach needed; a mutual
accountability framework should be understood.
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In closing, Ms Nakata made the following recommendations:
• Embed structures to ensure fairness is demonstrated
• Ensure inclusive policy design starts at the beginning of the process
• Implement structural accountability mechanisms for mutually rewarding student -
supervisor relationships.
Agenda Committee
PUBLICATION OF SENATE COMMITTEE MINUTES
Dr Harrison presented on behalf of the Agenda Committee.
As one of the governing bodies of The University of British Columbia, the Vancouver Senate has
a responsibility to be transparent to its faculty, staff, students and alumni, as well as the broader
University community. A key component of this transparency is the timely communication and
distribution of information relating to Senate's decisions - including at the committee level. It is
important for the UBC community to be able to view and understand the process and discussion
behind motions that Senate considers. Most committees of Senate currently take minutes and
approve them at the subsequent meeting of the committee. However, these minutes are not
shared with the public.
The Senate Agenda Committee is interested in improving Senate's transparency and
accountability by publishing committee minutes whenever possible, with the understanding that
for some committees the nature of their work makes this impossible. The Agenda Committee is
seeking the opinion of Senate in pursuing these changes, and commits to consulting with all
committees of Senate to ensure that necessarily private and in camera information remains as
such. Furthermore, no change will be made to the way minutes are taken in committees,
including whether or not minutes are composed at all.
Dr Harrison noted that many committees dealt with maters that it would not be a problem for
publication; but that some challenges were identified with certain matters and so the Agenda
Committee was bringing this to Senate for discussion.
Dr Tees said that one problem would be the timing. Minutes would potentially be created after
the Senate meeting where a final decision was made.
Dr Harrison agreed.
Senator Doering noted that UBC has made significant efforts over the past year to improve
transparency at the Board and that this was an effort the Senate could easily make. Having these
records public would still be of value.
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Senator Haffey spoke in favour of the idea.
Dr Forwell said that she was in favour and that this was overdue. She noted that some in camera
discussions were minuted but those minutes were not distributed.
Dr Harrison replied that this sort of detail would be one matter that we would need to
consider should this idea be implemented. These sorts of details should be sorted out by
each committee.
Senator Ngo asked if this would increase the amount of business for the Senate website.
The Provost asked if there would be a standard for committee minutes; for instance, would
statements or opinions be attributed to specific individuals such as they are for Senate.
Dr Harrison replied that this would be up to the committees.
Dr Loewen asked if draft proposals would be included in minutes.
Dr Harrison replied that this was something the committees would need to sort out. In
some cases the development and changes to policies may be of interest to people but in
others it could cause confusion; committees would need to see what was appropriate.
Senator Krebs spoke in favour, but said minutes should be vetted to ensure ideas are clear. Right
now, the campus community was a little disconnected. This could be used as a way to engage
with the broader campus community.
Dr Harrison replied that this could work for matters that have long discussions, but for
some proposals the lag would not make this possible.
Senator Brar said that the student senators' focus in this proposal was on the outcomes rather
than the discussions.
Senator Schneider said that another aspect could be improved by this proposal was internal
communication between committees.
Senator B. Fischer asked if committees could still keep some matters private.
Senator Harrison replied that he was certain that the ability to do so would be needed
from time to time, and would be obligatory in situations such as appeals.
Senator Loewen suggested publishing the agendas as well.
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Senator Tees suggested doing this as an experiment and monitoring the hit rate for the use of
these documents. The senate minutes themselves had the relevant action items and he wasn't
convinced committee minutes would provide further utility
Dr Harrison proposed that there are groups on campus that would be interested, such as
potential senators.
Senator Wang noted that several committees didn't present proposals frequently to Senate such
as the Budget or the Teaching & Learning Committee.
Senator Doering did not agree with Senator Tees on the relevance of hit rates. He suggested that
the principles of transparency should rely on quality rather than quantity of engagement.
Senator Burr asked if this was a common practice across Canada.
The Acting Secretary, Mr Eaton, replied that they had looked at the U-15 senates or
equivalent bodies and that this was not a common practice.
Awards Committee
NEW AND REVISED AWARDS
See Appendix A: Awards Report
Lawrence Burr }        That Senate accept the awards as listed and
Lynn Stothers forward them to the Board of Governors for
approval; and that letters of thanks be sent to the
donors.
Dr Harrison commented on the "TREK Excellence Scholarship for Indigenous Students" noting
that only 24 credits were required while all others required 27 in the previous session. He
advised that many students would appreciate the credit load being reduced, and noted that the
Awards Committee was looking at this matter and said he and others would appreciate the matter
being more broadly applied.
Senator Thatchuk asked how the criteria were set for awards.
Dr Burr replied that the University has a policy numbered V-200 on student awards. One
challenge for the committee this triennium is to revise that policy. The Committee would
invite suggestions from Senate. The Criteria for awards are negotiated between the
donor, Enrolment Services, and the Development Office.
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Senator A. MacDougall noted that the word "Society" was struck from award 740. She asked for
the rationale.
Dr Burr noted that this was the wording agreed to between the Land & Food Systems
Undergraduate Society and the Development Office.
Approved
Admissions Committee
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS
Paul Harrison
Susan Forwell
That Senate receive the report entitled "New
Approach to Holistic Undergraduate
Admissions ";
That Senate approve in principle the
recommendations and assessment criteria set in
that report; and
That Senate direct the Admissions Committee to
propose amendments to UBC's admissions
requirements and the academic calendar to
implement these recommendation generally, and
in particular the relationship and relative
weighting of the four criteria listed.
Dr Harrison advised that the key purpose of this proposal was to take greater advantage of
information available to us, and to make better admissions decisions as a result.
The proposal recommends that an admission decision consist of four distinct assessments:
1. Academic: Overall. This overall assessment considers the near-entirety of a student's academic
coursework at the Grade 11 and 12 levels. Calculated as the Overall average. The purpose is to gain
a complete picture of who the student is as a learner. The assessment is constructed in the same
manner for all applicants (regardless of intended program of study at UBC).
• The overall assessment may be adjusted based upon the breadth of course work (i.e, the
number of courses taken), depth of coursework (i.e., enriched courses such International
Baccalaureate [IB] or Advanced Placement [AP]), and the individual context of coursework
(i.e., a student who attends a secondary school in a rural community may not be able to
present as many
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2. Academic: Program-Specific Aptitude. This assessment considers the entirety of a student's
coursework (to most senior level of study) in disciplines relevant to the intended Faculty/Program of
study at UBC. Calculated as the Core average. The purpose is to assess a student's potential and
preparation for a specific degree program. The construction of the assessment varies based upon the
applicant's intended program of study.
• The core assessment may be adjusted based upon the breadth of course work (i.e, the
number of courses taken) depth of coursework (i.e., enriched courses such International
Baccalaureate [IB] or Advanced Placement [AP]), and relevancy of coursework to the
intended program of study.
3. Academic: Key Courses. Minimum grade thresholds are imposed on key courses (e.g., Pre-
Calculus 12 for admission to the Bachelor of Science) as determined by the Faculty.
4. Personal: Personal characteristics. This assessment considers personal characteristics,
accomplishments, and self-reflection as evidenced on the UBC Personal Profile.
With permission of Senate, Mr Andrew Arida, Director of Undergraduate Admission, presented.
Mr Arida advised currently UBC used three data points for undergraduate admission: An
academic average, key course grades, and a personal profile. The BC Curriculum is changing
and our existing data points are will be challenged by that new system as the typically, student
will have 10-16 courses that are not considered at all in an admissions decision. Mr Arida
advised that what the admissions office would propose is to look at everything in grades 11 and
12, and then focus in to relevant courses, and then focus further on key courses that best predict
success.
Mr Arida went over the principles for effective undergraduate admission and this informed key
principles:
•
•
Holistic admission: Academic assessment should be robust. Right now we don't value
breadth, depth, or relevancy.
Promote positive learning outcomes in high school.
lurisdictional Equity: Currently, UBCs acceptable course list comes from the former
provincially-examinable courses. We want to align with other jurisdictions; currently we
accept fewer courses from BC than the rest of Canada and actually consider courses from
out of province that we wouldn't consider in BC. We only pick apart a transcript from
North America; from Asia or Europe we already look at the entirety of the transcript.
40% of our applicants now are coming from outside of Canada.
•    Mitigation of average inflation and creating a greater distribution of grades to increases
our predictive ability slightly.
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•    Ensuring relevant courses being properly emphasized.
Mr Arida then went over several case studies under both the current and proposed systems.
Senator Bungay asked how diversity of courses being offered would be taken into consideration.
Without equity, private school students would have an advantage.
Mr Arida replied that we would have to use discretion to consider situations where
students were coming from environments where breadth wasn't available. Minima would
still exist but we would only apply that near thresholds.
Senator Stothers noted that for some languages there weren't' available at all at the grade 12
level.
Mr Arida replied that this would be less of an issue in the new system as we could
consider grade 11 language courses.
Senator Gallegos asked what the implementation plan would be if approved in principle.
Secondly, he asked what the implementation would be for staffing.
Mr Arida replied that this would have less of an impact for applicants outside of North
America, and that these currently were around 40% of our applicant pool. For the 60%
remaining we will have to build new systems. As Senate knows, we are working towards
the Student Information Systems Initiative (SASI); however, there may be a gap of
around 2 years but we have started planning to work through that period. For
Communicating with schools, we have shared this with the ministry and schools. We
Senate's approval, we aim to implement these changes for September 2019.
Senator Griss expressed a concern that Grade 11 students would have to pre-emptively decide
their academic future through their course selections. She suggested that having a requirement
for more specific courses was contrary to the idea of holistic admission.
Mr Arida agreed that we would be asking for a little more. Right now our admission
system is based on binary rules. We would like the ability to look at other things and this
is what was meant by holistic.
Senator Krebs said she liked the idea of holistic admission. She suggested that high school and
the start of an undergraduate degree were important developmental time for students and this
new system would make students more risk adverse. She asked how we would value
extracurricular activities that have people take a lesser course load.
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Mr Arida replied that we would continue to have the personal profile. One of the things
we want to introduce is for the students to give us information as to why the picked their
course load. The point on experimentation is well taken and as a result, the proposal to
the Senate Admissions Committee would be to always exclude the lowest course grade
that was not relevant to a program at UBC in calculation of overall averages.
Senator Salehmohamed asked if we had data on if we implemented this last year, what
percentage difference would we see in this year's class.
Mr Arida replied that we have modeled how grades and admissions decisions would have
changed based on a sample population, but have not done so for an entirely entry class as
this would essentially mean doubling the work of the admissions office for a year.
Senator Loewen expressed his surprise that the correlation wasn't actually that strong on the new
model.
Mr Arida replied that his wasn't about re-engineering the class but rather equity and
alignment. Final grades were always better predictors and a more holistic process will
give us more final grades.
Senator A. Fischer said he was struck that an overall average was still be used. He asked if we
had considered calculating both the new and the original one and then further investigating if
there was a variance. He asked if we controlled for local characteristics (such as considering
class rank).
Mr Arida replied that right now GPA boosting classes had 25% weight; we would be
reducing their effect.
Dr Ross noted there was value in a broad average as well as a control value.
Senator Isaacson asked what the impact would be on enrolment planning thresholds in the early
years.
Mr Arida replied that he did not expect it would affect overall numbers but careful
planning would have to go in to model decisions for future years.
Senator Ngo asked if this policy would apply to competitive athletics or college transfer.
Mr Arida replied that there were mechanisms to take athletics into consideration. We
would like to apply this new process eventually to transfer students. Right now we
already do look at all college grades so this would be less of a change for transfer
students versus secondary school applicants.
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Senator B. Fischer expressed his concern at rural students being disadvantaged in both depth and
breadth.
Mr Arida noted that the committee was equally concerned about this being an issue for
rural BC. We would need more discretionary admissions and this would mean more
work.
Senator Thatchuk noted that UBC itself published a lot of information; he asked if we were
pressuring the Ministry of Education to give more information on relative student success.
Secondly said UBC had a huge amount of data on relative school success and yet we did not talk
about which schools were better predictors of success.
Mr Arida replied that yes, we have seen patterns, but they're primarily at the district level
rather than the specific secondary school; we think that is about socioeconomic factors
rather than grading. He acknowledged that there were some schools that were commonly
outliers, but overall BC grades do correlate well with success.
Dr Ross advised that we were working diligently to encourage the Ministry of Education
to put more information on transcripts but this is a challenge as they philosophically did
not agree with the inclusion of such information.
Senator Singh expressed a concern that first nation's communities or other communities that
often had socioeconomic challenges will be further disadvantaged by this system.
Mr Arida replied that breadth and depth were not being required, but this would at least
allow us to consider reasons for lack of depth and breadth in coursework.
Senator Singh asked how the four criteria would be weighted.
Mr Arida replied that this would be for the faculties to propose.
Senator Doering asked several questions: what change occurred for the students we did sample,
how would we consider breath, He said that he felt there should be breadth considered, how
would this affect diversity on campus, and how would be control for bias as more human
judgment and interpretation is introduced into the admissions process.
Mr Arida advised that the only way to consider displacement would be to model the
entire class. We cannot figure out the total effect with just a sample and we felt this
would be too much work. Roughly, we expect 80% of students will be admitted based on
numeric cut offs and thus not to be changed by this proposal. Mr Arida agreed that bias
could be an issue and we do our best to control for it but there is no way to remove it. If
we look at students as individuals we would have to apply some sort of discretionary
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judgments. We have to contain discretion but allow for the proper application of
discretion.
Senator Ivanov asked if he have looked at how to measure outcome success in 5 to 10 years.
Mr Arida replied that we default to looking at 1st year success as a metric because later
years are subject to more variance. In the long term, this would be successful if students
in BC felt that UBC valued a wider variety of classes sand focused less on knowing
exactly what to do to get in.
Senator Ivanov asked if there was consideration towards randomization for the remaining 20%
rather than using a complicated evaluation process.
Mr Arida replied that yes, if we selected the last 20% of each class by sortation the
outcomes would likely be the same, but we find it important to show that we consider and
value merit in our decision making. By using sortation our outcomes may be the same but
our message to the community would be very different.
Senator A. Fischer asked why it would be different to account for district-by-district differences.
Mr Arida said that the analysis that was done was controlled by grades but this did not
take into consideration resource availability or other factors in districts.
Senator Boushel asked what the impact UBC's admissions processes had on high school
curriculum.
Mr Arida replied that the impact was large. As an example, a number of years ago we
started to accept Lawl2; it is now the 6th most common class. Conversely, we do not
accept psychology 12 so anyone takes it, despite Psychology being one of the most
popular subjects at UBC.
Senator Forwell asked for follow up so we could measure and capture any unintended
consequences of this change. She asked if there was a consultation with the professional
programs that drew students from UBC's direct entry undergraduate programs. .
Mr Arida replied that yes, the impact would be considered regularly by both the Senate
Admissions Committee and by the Enrolment Management Committee.
Senator Sapollnik asked if consultation had been done with the AMS and GSS
Mr Arida advised that no, we had not done so.
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Senator A. MacDougall asked if we would still continue to modify grades from Alberta and for
IB and AP Students.
Mr Arida said that yes, we would continue to adjust average for Albertan students under
this proposal, and the IB and AP grades would still be translated into higher averages.
Approved
Curriculum Committee
Senator Ian Sapollnik presented on behalf of Dr Peter Marshall, Chair of the Senate Curriculum
Committee.
CURRICULUM PROPOSALS
See Appendix B: Curriculum Report
Ian Sapollnik
Daniel Lam
}
That the new courses, and revised degree
parchments brought forward by the faculty of
Arts, and Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
(Applied Science, Arts, Education, and Medicine)
be approved.
Approved
Nominating Committee
POLICY 18: APPOINTMENT OF DESIGNATED SENIOR ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATORS
Richard Tees }        That Senate approve the attached amendments to
Susan Porter Policy 18 and its procedures with the proviso that
the Board of Governors or the President concur
with amendments to the Procedures to Policy 18
to change all appointments to be made "by " a
Senate to read "by and from " a Senate.
Senator Tees noted that in the course of considering proposed amendments to Policy 18 to
formally change the title of "Vice-President Research and International" to "Vice-President
Research and Innovation" the Committee had discussed its previous concern with senate
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representation no longer being mandated on senior administration search committees and had
taken this opportunity to ask that UBC revert back to its previous language.
Senator Doerning asked that it be noted in the minutes that the University Counsel's submission
still included two colleges that no longer existed.
Approved
NB: Senator Loewen abstained from this motion.
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
Richard Tees
Kevin Doering
That Dr Gage Averill be appointed to the Senate
Tributes Committee until 31 August 2020 and
thereafter until replaced, to replace Dr Catherine
Dauvergne;
That Ms Ainsley MacDougall be appointed to the
Senate Curriculum Committee until 31 March
2018 and thereafter until replaced, to fill a
vacancy; and
That Ms Alexandra Glinsbockel be appointed to
the Senate library and Tributes committees until
31 March 2018 and thereafter until replaced, to
replace Mr Jeffery Solis.
Approved
Other Business
Senator Ngo asked about initiatives towards student mental health and was asked to email the
secretary for further details.
Adjournment
Seeing no other business, the meeting was adjourned at 8:09 pm.
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Appendix A: Awards Report
New Awards - Endowed
Kathleen Cummins (nee Jackson) Bursary
Bursaries totalling $1,200 have been made available through an endowment established by the
family of Kathleen Cummins to undergraduate students entering second year or later who
demonstrate unmet financial need. Preference will be given to students from Trail, British
Columbia or the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Kathleen met her husband George at
UBC when Kathleen was the Assistant Dean of Women. Kathleen continued her career in
academia, finally retiring from teaching Social Work at Memorial University in Newfoundland
in 1988. They had two boys, Brad and Travis, who grew up in Newfoundland. The bursaries are
adjudicated by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Michael and Mary Gerry Graduate Scholarship in Physical Chemistry
A $1,200 scholarship has been made available through an endowment established by the late Dr.
Michael C.L. Gerry and Mrs. Mary Gerry. The award is offered to a graduate student of high
academic standing who has demonstrated excellence in Physical Chemistry. Preference will be
given to a student working in the area of Molecular Spectroscopy. Candidates must be Canadian
citizens to be considered. The award is to be made on the recommendation of the Department of
Chemistry in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Studies. (First
Award Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Cleveland and Rae Hickman Scholarship in Zoology
Scholarships totaling $4,000 have been made available through an endowment established by
Cleveland and Rae Hickman to support outstanding students in the Bachelor of Science program
in Biology with an interest in animal biology and zoology. These scholarships were created to
honor Dr. William S. Hoar, who was Dr. Hickman's mentor during his time at UBC. Dr.
Hickman received his PhD in Zoology in 1958 and became distinguished in the field of zoology,
authoring many research papers; textbooks, including the widely used Integrated Principles of
Zoology and Animal Diversity; and the Galapagos Marine Life Series of field guidebooks.
During their years at the University of Alberta and at Washington and Lee University they both
recognized how strongly they have always felt about supporting students in the pursuit of post-
secondary education. The scholarships are made on the recommendation of the Department of
Zoology under the UBC Biology Program. (First Award Available in the 2018/2019 Winter
Session.)
Grace and Alexander Maclnnes Award in Occupational and Environmental Health
A $2,000 award has been made available through an endowment established by Grace and
Alexander Maclnnes to support a graduate student studying in the area of occupational and
environmental health. Given the many global challenges we face, there is a pressing need to train
researchers who can find solutions to new and existing environmental health issues. Students
must be entering their second year of graduate studies, with preference given to students who
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have returned to academia after an absence of at least one year and who demonstrate leadership
qualities in the course of their studies. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Medicine in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. (First Award
Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
New Awards - Annual
The Advocates' Society Indigenous Student Law Award
Awards totalling $5,100 are offered annually by The Advocates' Society to Indigenous students
and non-Indigenous students entering second or third year of the J.D. program at the Peter A.
Allard School of Law who have demonstrated a commitment to Indigenous law and/or
Indigenous communities. Financial need may be considered. Indigenous students are defined as
First Nations, Inuit, or Metis people of Canada. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Peter A. Allard School of Law in consultation with Enrolment Services. (First Award
Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Business Law Clinic Award
Awards totalling $3,000 are offered annually to second or third year J.D. students enrolled in the
Business Law Clinic at the Peter A. Allard School of Law who have demonstrated excellence in
business law and a commitment to providing business law services to non-profit community
organizations and underserved members of the public. This award is made on the
recommendation of the Directors of the Business Law Clinic and the Executive Director of the
Centre for Business Law at the Peter A. Allard School of Law. (First Award Available in the
2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Dental Hygiene Faculty Award
A $1,000 award is offered annually by members of the Dental Hygiene faculty to a student in the
Dental Hygiene Degree Program who has completed their second or third year of study.
Preference will be given to a student who has demonstrated courage, resolve, integrity, and
collegiality. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Dentistry. (First award
available in the 2018/2019 Winter Session.)
Dental Hygiene Faculty Graduating Award
A $1,000 award is offered annually by members of the Dental Hygiene faculty to a graduating
student in the Dental Hygiene Degree Program. Preference will be given to a student who has
demonstrated an aptitude for teaching and research. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Dentistry. (First award available in the 2018/2019 Winter Session.)
Manjula and Indrajit Desai Award for Indigenous Students
A $1,000 award is offered annually by Mrs. Manjula Desai in memory of Dr. Indrajit Desai,
Professor Emeritus, to a First Nations, Inuit, or Metis undergraduate student of Canada in the
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Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Land and Food Systems. (First Award Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Kyla Lee Indigenous Law Students Bursary
Bursaries totalling $3,300 are offered annually by Kyla Lee (J.D. 2011) to students in any year of
the Indigenous Legal Studies Program at the Peter A. Allard School of Law who demonstrate
financial need. Preference will be given to First Nations, Inuit, or Metis students of Canada who
are sole-supporting and who do not receive Band funding. The bursaries are made on the
recommendation of the Peter A. Allard School of Law in consultation with Enrolment Services.
(First Award Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Eunice Li-Chan Scholarship in Food Science
Awards totalling $2,000 are offered annually in honour of Professor Emeritus Eunice Li-Chan to
students in the Master of Food Science, Master of Science or PhD programs in Food Science.
Preference will be given to outstanding students who demonstrate academic excellence, a
commitment to the profession, and the potential to advance knowledge or practices in the field of
food science. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Land and Food
Systems in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. (First Award
Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Master of Health Administration Bursary
Bursaries are offered annually by the School of Population and Public Health to graduate
students in the Master of Health Administration program who demonstrate unmet financial need.
Funding is determined annually based on enrolment in the program. The bursaries are
adjudicated by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Mechanical Engineering Class of 1976 Indigenous Student Entrance Award in Engineering
A $9,250 entrance award is offered annually by the Mechanical Engineering Class of 1976 to an
outstanding First Nations, Inuit, or Metis student of Canada entering engineering from a
secondary school or transferring from another college or university. Community involvement
and leadership skills may also be considered. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Applied Science. (First Award Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
UBC Dentistry DMD Centennial Bursary
Bursaries totalling $5,000 are offered annually by UBC Dentistry to students in the Doctor of
Dental Medicine program who demonstrate unmet financial need. The bursaries commemorate
the UBC Centennial and celebrate the University's first century of achievement and growth. The
bursaries are adjudicated by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2017/2018
Winter Session.)
UBC Dentistry Dental Hygiene Centennial Bursary
Bursaries totalling $1,000 are offered annually by UBC Dentistry to students in the Bachelor of
Dental Hygiene program who demonstrate unmet financial need. The bursaries commemorate
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THE   UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA Officeof the Senate
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the UBC Centennial and celebrate the University's first century of achievement and growth. The
bursaries are adjudicated by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2017/2018
Winter Session.)
Dr. Michele Williams Outstanding Patient Care Award
A $1,000 award is offered annually to recognize a 4th year Doctor of Dental Medicine student
who is a patient advocate and who demonstrates exceptional patient care. Dr. Michele Williams
had a passion for Oral Medicine, education and research. She was known among her students
and colleagues for her outstanding patient care. This award has been created by a former Oral
Medicine and Oral Pathology resident to honour Dr. Williams and to keep her memory and her
legacy alive. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Dentistry. (First
Award Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Trek Excellence Scholarship for Continuing Indigenous Students of Canada
Scholarships of $1,500 each are offered to the top 10% of undergraduate First Nations, Inuit, or
Metis students of Canada at UBC Vancouver. To be eligible, students must be enrolled in at least
24 credits of course work over the preceding Winter Session. The scholarships are adjudicated
by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2017/2018 Winter Session.)
Simons Award in Nuclear Disarmament and Global Security
Awards of $1,000 (undergraduate) or $1,500 (graduate) each are provided annually by the Liu
Institute for Global Issues to support full-time UBC undergraduate students of at least third year
standing or graduate students who are selected to participate in research on nuclear disarmament
and global security, and who satisfactorily complete a research paper. Selection of participants
will be based on (1) the potential and originality of the proposed research project, (2) applicants
research fit and knowledgeability about nuclear disarmament and/or global security, and (3)
applicants' records of achievement; a balance of disciplines, gender, and experience levels will
also be taken into consideration. The award is funded by an endowment provided by the Simons
Foundation to advance the understanding of disarmament and arms control issues among UBC
students. Awards are made on the recommendation of the School of Public Policy and Global
Affairs, and in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate and
Postdoctoral Studies.
Previously-Approved Awards with Changes in Terms or Funding Source:
7965 - Canadian Federation of University Women - North Vancouver Bursary
Proposed Award Description
A bursary of $1,000 is awarded bursary has been made available through an endowment
established by the Canadian Federation of University Women - North Vancouver to a female
undergraduate student enrolled in any year or faculty, who is either a resident of North
Vancouver or a graduate of a North Vancouver secondary school (School District #44). The
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THE   UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA Officeof the Senate
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award may be shared if two students meet the criteria. The bursary is adjudicated by Enrolment
Services.
Rationale for Proposed Changes
Award description language has been revised to reflect that this award has changed from
an annually funded award to an endowment and to reflect Senate's preferred terminology
for bursaries.
1722 - Canadian Academy of Periodontology Book Prize
Proposed Award Name: Canadian Academy of Periodontology Book Prize Award of
Excellence
Proposed Award Description
A $400 award is offered annually by the Canadian Academy of Periodontology has established a
book prize to be awarded to the fourth year dental student obtaining the highest standing in the
subject of periodontology.
Rationale for Proposed Changes
Award description language has been revised to reflect that this award has changed from
a book prize to a monetary award.
740 - Agriculture Undergraduate Society Service Award
Proposed Award Name: Agriculture LFS Undergraduate Society Student Service
Leadership Award
Proposed Award Description
A $650 award has been endowed of the made available through an endowment established by the
Agriculture LFS Undergraduate Society, formerly the Agricultural Undergraduate Society, and is
intended to recognize students in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems who have made
unselfish contributions to students and faculty life. The prize, books to a value of $650 will be
chosen considering the recipient's area of interest in the field of agriculture. The recipient of the
award will be nominated by the Agriculture LFS Undergraduate Society Council and by the
members of the Faculty. The final selection will be made by the Faculty of Land and Food
Systems Awards Committee. Candidates must have at least a second class standing.
Rationale for Proposed Changes
Upon request from the land and Food Systems Undergraduate Society and in
collaboration with the IFS Development team, we are revising the name and description
of this award to reflect the current name of the land and Food Systems Undergraduate
Society. The word 'service' is being replaced with 'leadership' to better reflect the
original intent of the award. The award description language has been updated to reflect
Senate's preferred terminology for endowed awards.
2017-02-18
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8198 - Hilda Ellen Silver Karst Memorial Bursary
Proposed Award Name: Hilda H. Ellen Silver Karst Memorial Bursary
Proposed Award Description
A $500 bursary has been made available through an endowment established by family and
friends in memory of Hilda H. Ellen Silver Karst and is offered to an undergraduate student in
Education.
Rationale for Proposed Changes
Upon request of the daughter of Hilda Ellen Silver Karst, who is the donor of this award,
and in collaboration with the Education Development team we are revising the award
description and title to reflect Ms Karst's preferred name. The award description
language has been updated to reflect Senate's preferred terminology for endowed
awards.
2011 - NITEP Aurora Award
Proposed Award Description
An award of $3,000 has been established in is offered annually to support of a student entering
the first year of the Native Indian Teacher Education Program (NITEP). The award may be
renewed for up to three two years, subject to the student's satisfactory completion of the previous
year and enrolment in a following year of study in the NITEP. Only one student receives the
award each year. Preference will be given to a mature student in financial need. The award is
made on the recommendation of NITEP.
Rationale for Proposed Changes
In collaboration with NITEP, the Education Development team, Enrolment Services, and
the donor, the award description has been updated to reflect the donor's intent of
supporting three students in an academic session for a period of three year s of study.
Award language has been updated to reflect Senate's preferred terminology for annual
awards.
4837 - Goel Prize in Political Science
Proposed Award Name: Goel Akanksha Stevens Prize in Political Science
Proposed Award Description
A $500 graduating prize is offered by Dr. and Mrs. D.P. the Goel and family in memory of the
victims of the Jewish Holocaust. The award is offered to an outstanding graduating student in
Political Science and is made on the recommendation of the department, and in the case of a
graduate student, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.
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THE   UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA Officeof the Senate
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Rationale for Proposed Changes
In collaboration with the Arts Development team and as requested by the donor, the
name of the award has been updated to recognize the name of one of the donor's
children.
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THE   UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA Officeof the Senate
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Appendix B: Curriculum Report
FACULTY OF ARTS
New course
ASIA 592 (3) The Profession of Asian Studies
FACULTY OF GRADUATE AND POSTDOCTORAL STUDIES
Applied Science
New courses
NAME 581 (3) Ship Design
Arts
New courses
LING 503 (3) Topics in Language Acquisition; LING 511 (3) Topics in Phonology;
LING 513
(3) Topics in Phonetics; LING 521 (3) Topics in Syntax; LING 527 (3) Topics in
Semantics
Revised degree parchments
Master of Arts in Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice; Doctor of Philosophy in
Gender,
Race, Sexuality and Social Justice
Education
New courses
EDCP 544 (3) Mathematics and Science Teaching and Learning with Technologies;
LLED 560
(3) Picturebooks and Literacy Development
Medicine
New course
SURG 516 (3) Program Planning and Evaluation in Surgical Care Low Resource Settings
2017-02-21

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