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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2000-05-17

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 Lhe University  of  British  Columbia
Vancouver Senate Secretariat
Senate and Curriculum Services
Enrolment Services
2016-1874 East Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
www.senate.ubc.ca
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF MAY 17, 2000
Attendance
Present: President M. C. Piper (Chair), Dean F. S. Abbott, Dr. P. Adebar, Dr. J. D. Berger, Dean J.
Blom, Mr. P. T. Brady, Mr. T. C. Y. Chan, Ms. J. Dennie, Ms. K. Gammon, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert,
Dr. R. Goldman-Segall, Dr. D. Granot, Dean F. Granot, Mr. E. Greathed, Dr. S. W. Hamilton,
Ms. M. Hassen, Dr. P. E. Harding, Ms. J. Hutton, Dean M. Isaacson, Dr. C. Jillings, Dr. D. D.
Kitts, Dean M. M. Klawe, Dr. B. S. Lalli, Dr. V. LeMay, Mr. T. P. T. Lo, Mr. R. W. Lowe, Ms. Y.
C. Lu, Dr. D. M. Lyster, Dr. M. MacEntee, Dr. P. L. Marshall, A/Dean J. A. McLean, Dr. W. R.
McMaster, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dean D. Muzyka, Dr. P. N. Nemetz, Ms. E. Nerome, Dr. G. N.
Patey, Dr. T. F. Pedersen, Dr. J. Perry, Mr. G. Podersky-Cannon, Mr. H. Poon, Dean M. Quayle,
Dr. V. Raoul, Ms. K. Riecken, Dr. H. J. Rosengarten, Prof. A. F. Sheppard, Dr. D. Sjerve, Dr. C.
E. Slonecker, Ms. L. M. Sparrow, Dr. B. Stelck, Dr. R. C. Tees, Dr. J. R. Thompson, Dean R. J.
Tierney, Dean A. Tully, Mr. D. R. Verma, Mr. B. Warren, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Dr. R. A.
Yaworsky.
By invitation: Dr. N. Guppy, Dr. F. B. Holl, Mr. W. Sudmant
Regrets: Dr. W. L. Sauder (Chancellor), Vice-President B. C. McBride, Mr. R. Affleck, Dr. R. W.
Blake, Mr. P. T. Burns, Dr. H. M. Burt, Dean J. A. Cairns, Ms. E. J. Caskey, Dr. D. Fisher, Mr.
H. D. Gray, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Rev. T. J. Hanrahan, Dr. J. Helliwell, Dr. S. B. Knight, Mr. J.
Kondopulos, Ms. P. Liu, Ms. V. G. Mirehouse, Dr. W. J. Phillips, Ms. C. Quinlan, Dr. K.
Schonert-Reichl, Dr. C. Shields, Mr. D. Tompkins, Mr. D. Visser, Ms. K. Wilker, Dr. W. C.
Wright, Jr., Dean E. H. K. Yen.
Senate Membership
DECLARATION OF VACANCIES
One student representative from each of the Faculties of Applied Science, Dentistry and
Education.
Vol. 1999/2000 12414
 Vancouver Senate 12415
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Dr. Gilbert l        That the minutes of the meeting of April 19,
Dr. MacEntee J       2000 be adopted as circulated.
Carried.
Business Arising from the Minutes
SENATE NOMINATING COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Vacancies had been declared at the April 19, 2000 meeting for two student
representatives to serve on the Nominating Committee. Nominations were received for
Ms. Keri Gammon, Ms. Erina Nerome and Ms. Katie Riecken. An election by written
ballot was conducted, and Ms. Gammon and Ms. Nerome were declared elected.
Chair's Remarks and Related Questions
CONGREGATION MAY 2000
The President reminded members of Senate that 21 congregation ceremonies were to be
held over six days in late May, and invited everyone to attend several of the ceremonies. A
variety of distinguished honorary degree recipients would attend to receive their respective
degrees. President Piper described, with pride, the great deal of meaning that these
ceremonies hold for graduates and their families.
ASSOCIATION OF PACIFIC RIM UNIVERSITIES MEETING
The President reported that the Association of Pacific Rim Universities was to meet at
UBC from June 23rd to 25th. The presidents from approximately 32 major research
universities throughout the Pacific Rim were to attend to discuss global science and
technology in the 21st century. The President was honored that UBC was to host this
prestigious meeting, which she described as an opportunity to showcase both the
University and Canada. The members of the Association are:
•    Australia: Australian National University, University of Sydney;
 Vancouver Senate 12416
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
• Canada: University of British Columbia;
• Chile: University of Chile;
• China: Fudan University, Peking University, Tsinghua University, University of
Science and Technology of China, Hong Kong University of Science and
Technology;
Chinese Taiwan: National Taiwan University;
Indonesia: University of Indonesia;
Japan: Kyoto University, Osaka University, University of Tokyo, Waseda
University;
Korea: Seoul National University;
Malaysia: University of Malaya;
Mexico: National Autonomous University of Mexico;
New Zealand: University of Auckland;
Philippines: University of the Philippines;
Russia: Far Eastern State University;
Singapore: National University of Singapore;
Thailand: Chulalongkorn University;
United States of America: California Institute of Technology, Stanford University,
University of California, Berkeley, University of California, Davis, University of
California, Irvine, University of California, Los Angeles, University of California,
San Diego, University of California, Santa Barbara, University of Southern
California, University of Oregon, and University of Washington.
Reports from the Vice-President, Academic and Provost
UNDERGRADUATE ENROLMENT TARGETS 2000-2001
Please see 'Appendix A: Undergraduate Enrolment Targets 2000-2001'.
Dr. Lyster presented the report in the absence of Vice-President McBride.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the undergraduate
Dr. Tees i        enrolment targets for the 2000-2001 academic
year.
Dr. Lyster reported that the targets were presented at that particular time because the
University's budget and enrolment projections had only recently been confirmed.
Extensive consultation had involved the Committee of Deans, the Senate Admissions
Committee, and the Enrolment Management Committee. He described the goal of this
process as achieving enrolment levels as close as possible to funded levels. Where errors
occur, it would be preferable to
 Vancouver Senate 12417
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Candidates for Degrees
accept more students than are funded, rather than fewer. Dr. Lyster introduced Mr.
Walter Sudmant, Director, Planning and Institutional Research and Dr. Neil Guppy,
Associate Vice-President, Academic Programs. Dean Isaacson pointed out that the
proposed 20 additional spaces in the School of Nursing had not yet been confirmed, as
discussions were ongoing between the Faculty of Applied Science and the President's
Office.
In response to a query from Mr. Podersky-Cannon, Mr. Sudmant stated that the
methodology for forecasting enrolment had not recently become more precise. Variables
include the rate of returning students, where the prediction has been accurate within one
percent, and the number of credits for which individual students choose to register.
1
The motion was
put and carried.
Candidates for Degrees
Dean Isaacson
Dean Granot
That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
are recommended, effective May 2000, and
that the Registrar, in consultation with the
Deans and the Chair of Senate, be empowered
to make any necessary adjustments.
Carried.
Academic Building Needs Committee
Dr. McMaster presented the following report, as chair of the Committee.
 Vancouver Senate 12418
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Academic Building Needs Committee
ACADEMIC BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE:
The major responsibilities of this committee would be to:
1. monitor the implementation of the Campus Plan;
2. annually review all building project priorities;
3. recommend priorities on new academic buildings with consideration for the needs
of academic and nonacademic buildings, balance of types of teaching spaces and
relationship to physical plant and planning; and
4. review the impact of every development, whether building or landscape, on the
total teaching and academic resource. (Minutes of Senate, September 14, 1994)
Responsibilities under the University Act:
The University Act (1999) states:
Powers of the Board 27 (l)(d) "in consultation with the senate, to maintain and keep in
proper order and condition the real property of the university, to erect and maintain the
buildings and structures on it that in the opinion of the board are necessary and advisable,
and to make rules respecting the management, government and control of the real
property, buildings and structures" Powers of the Board 27 (l)(e) "in consultation with
the senate, to provide for conservation of the heritage sites of the university, including and
heritage buildings, structures and land of the university"
Discussion:
Over the past several years the requirements for considering space and building priorities
have become complex and now encompass: the Main Campus Plan, Faculty Master Plans,
Planning Principles (A Legacy and a Promise) and ensure that they accurately reflect the
Mission Statement of the University as developed in Trek 2000, and the Academic Plan,
the Official Community Plan (OCP), the Comprehensive Community Plan (CCP) and
Neighbourhood Plans. The SABN Committee has worked in parallel with the President's
Property and Planning Advisory Committee (PPPAC). The SABN members are voting
members of PPPAC. The PPPAC is being revised to be more proactive in advising on space
and building priorities and planning. The revised terms of reference of PPPAC explicitly
include membership of the SABN committee. By the inclusionary membership of SABN in
PPPAC and the inclusion of one member of SABN in the PPPAC Heritage Sub-committee,
consultation with Senate will be consistent with the University Act.
Dr. McMaster l        That, where the University Act requires
Dean Granot J        consultation with the Senate on building issues,
this consultation shall occur through the
Senate Academic Building Needs Committee.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12419
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Admissions Committee
Dr. Lyster presented the reports, as chair of the Committee.
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES: CHANGES TO/NEW ADMISSIONS STATEMENTS FOR NEW
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Item 1. Bachelor of Science in Agroecology
Present Calendar Entry (page 89, 1999/2000 Calendar)
Admission
Students should refer to Part II, "Undergraduate Admission." Students may gain
admission directly from secondary school or on transfer from a recognized university or
college, or on the basis of maturity and experience. Students seeking transfer from other
universities or colleges will be granted advance credit for parallel courses in the first two
years of the degree program where standings obtained are above the minimum passing
grade at the other institutions.
For admission to the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture program, students from Grade 12
British Columbia schools must meet the general University admission requirements and
must have completed English 11 and 12; Social Studies 11; French 11 or another approved
language 11; Mathematics 11 and 12; at least two of Biology 11, Chemistry 11 and
Physics 11; a science course numbered "12" chosen from Chemistry 12, Physics 12,
Biology 12, Geology 12; a course numbered "12" chosen from among those listed in the
prescribed Senior Secondary School Curriculum in the Arts or Science category. Admission
to the International Resource Systems (IRS) program is restricted. See International
Resource Systems on page 93 for details.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Admission
Students should refer to Part II, "Undergraduate Admission." Students may gain
admission directly from secondary school or on transfer from a recognized university or
college with a minimum of 24 credits, or as mature students (see page xx). For admission
to the Bachelor of Science in Agroecology program, students from Grade 12 British
Columbia schools must meet the general University admission requirements and must
have completed English 11 and 12; Social Studies 11; an approved language 11 (see page
xx); Principles of Mathematics 11 and 12; at least two of Biology 11, Chemistry 11 and
Physics 11; one of Chemistry 12, Physics 12, Biology 12, Geology 12; a course chosen
from among the approved examinable Grade 12 courses (see page xx).
Rationale:
The present Calendar entry details the admission requirements for the B.Sc.(Agr.)
program. The program is being deleted and replaced by several new degree programs, the
first of which is the B.Sc. (Agroecology). The admission criteria for this new degree are the
same as for the old program. Since the International Resource Systems major within
 Vancouver Senate 12420
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
the B.Sc. (Agr.) is being replaced by a new degree, the reference to this major in this
statement should be removed.
Effective Date: September 2000.
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions statement for the Bachelor
Dean Quayle J        of Science in Agroecology be approved.
Carried.
Item 2. Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health
Present Calendar Entry (page 89, 1999/2000 Calendar)
Admission
Students should refer to Part II, "Undergraduate Admission." Students may gain
admission directly from secondary school or on transfer from a recognized university or
college, or on the basis of maturity and experience. Students seeking transfer from other
universities or colleges will be granted advance credit for parallel courses in the first two
years of the degree program where standings obtained are above the minimum passing
grade at the other institutions.
For admission to the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture program, students from Grade 12
British Columbia schools must meet the general University admission requirements and
must have completed English 11 and 12; Social Studies 11; French 11 or another approved
language 11; Mathematics 11 and 12; at least two of Biology 11, Chemistry 11 and
Physics 11; a science course numbered "12" chosen from Chemistry 12, Physics 12,
Biology 12, Geology 12; a course numbered "12" chosen from among those listed in the
prescribed Senior Secondary School Curriculum in the Arts or Science category. Admission
to the International Resource Systems (IRS) program is restricted. See Inter-national
Resource Systems on page 93 for details.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Admission
Students should refer to Part II, "Undergraduate Admission." Students may gain
admission directly from secondary school or on transfer from a recognized university or
college with a minimum of 24 credits, or as mature students (see page xx). For admission
to the Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health program, students from Grade
12 British Columbia schools must meet the general University admission requirements and
must have completed English 11 and 12; Social Studies 11; an approved language 11 (see
page xx); Principles of Mathematics 11 and 12; at least two of Biology 11, Chemistry 11
and Physics 11; one of Chemistry 12, Physics 12, Biology 12, Geology 12; a course chosen
from among the approved examinable Grade 12 courses (see page xx).
Rationale:
The present Calendar entry details the admission requirements for the B.Sc.(Agr.)
program. The program is being deleted and replaced by several new degree programs, the
 Vancouver Senate 12421
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
second of which is the B.Sc. (Food, Nutrition and Health). The basic admission criteria for
this new degree are the same as for the former B.Sc. (Agr.) program. For the Nutritional
Science major, originally in the Faculty of Science, the admission requirements are relaxed
slightly.
Effective Date: September 2000.
Item 2a. Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health, Major in Dietetics
Present Calendar Entry (page 97, column a, 1999/2000 Calendar)
Admission
Please see Undergraduate Admission. Effective 1998, admission to the Bachelor of Science
in Dietetics is limited to students who have already completed the first-year university
courses as specified below. Before enrolling in a first year program at UBC, prospective
Dietetics students should consult with an adviser in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences.
Students seeking admission to the Dietetics program should apply to the University for
admission to the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences. Students applying to UBC for the first
time should follow the standard application procedure. Students currently registered in
another program of study at UBC must apply by submitting a "Change of Faculty" form
to the Registrar's Office. The deadline for receipt of all applications is April 30. Admission
is based on completion of prerequisites and the applicant's grade point average calculated
according to procedures developed by the University's Undergraduate Admissions Office.
Because of enrolment limitations, the academic standing required for admission may be
higher than the published minimum.
Admission is to the second year of the program. Requirements are as follows:
1.   A minimum of 30 credits of university or college coursework, which normally
must include the following (or their equivalents). These credits may be completed
at UBC, at another university, or at a community college. Successful completion of
UBC's Science One Program fulfills all of the science and mathematics
requirements for first year, with a social science elective and English. In addition to
completing the specified prerequisite courses, students are required to fulfill all
requirements of the faculty in which they are enrolled; accordingly the elective
credits listed above will often consist of courses required by a given faculty.
a. BIOL 120 (3) and one of BIOL 110 (3), BIOL 115 (3) or 80% or better in
Biology 12;
b. CHEM 111 (3) and 112 (3), or CHEM 121 (3) and 122 (3);
c. First-year English (6), ENGL 112 recommended;
d. Psychology, sociology, or anthropology (3-6) at the 100 or 200 level;
 Vancouver Senate 12422
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
e.   Electives (6 to 12) as required to fulfill 30 credit minimum. (ECON 100 is a
recommended elective)
2. The secondary school prerequisite is Mathematics 12 or the equivalent.
3. Minimum academic standing: 70% (GPA 2.8), calculated for the 30 credits of prerequisite university or college courses.
Applicants who cannot meet the requirements exactly as specified should submit a special
appeal to the Registrar's Office with their application forms. The Director will consider all
appeals.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Admission to the Dietetics major is limited to students who have completed 30 credits of
university or college coursework, which must include English (3 credits), Biology 121, and
Chemistry 111/112 or 121/122, or their equivalents. Six credits in Social Science (PSYC
100 or SOCI 100 or equivalent) are recommended. Admission is based on an academic
standing of at least 70% calculated on 30 credits of university or college courses including
pre-requisite courses. Due to enrolment limitations, the academic standard required for
admission may be higher than the published minimum.
Rationale:
The proposed entry is in addition to the general admission requirements for the B.Sc.
(Food, Nutrition and Health) requirements (as indicated in item 2 of this report). This
reflects the current practice, but in the context of including the Dietetics major in the
B.Sc.(Food, Nutrition and Health) program.
Effective Date: September 2000
Item 2b. Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health, Major in Food Market Analysis
Present Calendar Entry:
(N/A)
Proposed Calendar Entry:
The first two years of the Food Market Analysis major are comprised of the core of the
FNH program. Admission to the Food Market Analysis major requires an academic
standing of at least 70%, calculated on the best 21 credits of post-secondary courses
required in this program. Students can apply for this major after completing at least 21
credits of the listed first year courses (or their equivalent).
Rationale:
The proposed entry is in addition to the general admission requirements for the B.Sc.
(Food, Nutrition and Health) requirements (as indicated in item 2 of this report). The
additional requirement of a standing of 70% is a reflection of the rigours of this program,
almost like a double major.
Effective Date: September 2000.
Item 2c. Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health, Double Major in Food Science and
 Vancouver Senate 12423
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Nutritional Sciences
Present Calendar Entry:
(N/A)
Proposed Calendar Entry:
The first two years of the Food and Nutritional Sciences double major are comprised of
the standard core of the FNH program. Admission to this double major requires an
academic standing of at least 70%, calculated on the best 21 credits of post-secondary
courses required in this program. Students can apply for this major after completing at
least 21 credits of the listed first year courses (or their equivalent).
Rationale:
The proposed entry is in addition to the general admission requirements for the B.Sc.
(Food, Nutrition and Health) requirements (as indicated in item 2 of this report). The
additional requirement of a standing of 70% is a reflection of the rigours of this program,
a double major.
Effective Date: September 2000
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions statements for the
Dr.Kitts i        Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and
Health (items 2, 2a, 2b, and 2c above) be
approved.
Carried.
Item 3. Bachelor of Global Resource Systems
[Note: Later in the meeting, the name of this program was changed to "Bachelor of
Science in Global Resource Systems." Please see under "Curriculum Committee." The
proposed Calendar entry below has been amended to reflect this change.]
Present Calendar Entry (page 89, 1999/2000 Calendar) Admission]
Students should refer to Part II, "Undergraduate Admission." Students may gain
admission directly from secondary school or on transfer from a recognized university or
college, or on the basis of maturity and experience. Students seeking transfer from other
universities or colleges will be granted advance credit for parallel courses in the first two
years of the degree program where standings obtained are above the minimum passing
grade at the other institutions.
For admission to the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture program, students from Grade 12
British Columbia schools must meet the general University admission requirements and
must have completed English 11 and 12; Social Studies 11; French 11 or another approved
language 11; Mathematics 11 and 12; at least two of Biology 11, Chemistry 11 and
Physics 11; a science course numbered "12" chosen from Chemistry 12, Physics 12,
Biology 12, Geology 12; a course numbered "12" chosen from among those listed in the
prescribed Senior Secondary School Curriculum in the Arts or Science category.
 Vancouver Senate 12424
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Admission to the International Resource Systems (IRS) program is restricted. See
International Resource Systems on page 93 for details.
Proposed Calendar Entry: (Change in Bold)
Admission
Students should refer to Part II, "Undergraduate Admission." Students may gain
admission directly from secondary school or on transfer from a recognized university or
college with a minimum of 24 credits, or as mature students (see page xx). For admission
to the Bachelor of Science in Global Resource Systems program, students from Grade 12
British Columbia schools must meet the general University admission requirements and
must have completed English 11 and 12; Social Studies 11; an approved language 11 (see
page xx); Principles of Mathematics 11 and 12; at least two of Biology 11, Chemistry 11
and Physics 11; one of Chemistry 12, Physics 12, Biology 12, Geology 12; a course chosen
from among the approved examinable Grade 12 courses (see page xx).
To be considered for admission to the Global Resource Systems (GRS) program, students
are required to have an academic standing of at least 70% on the best 21 credits of
courses required by the GRS program. Due to enrolment limitations, the academic
standard required may be higher than the published minimum. Students can apply to the
program after completing 21 credits from the first year courses (or their equivalent) listed
below.
Rationale:
The present Calendar entry details the admission requirements for the B.Sc.(Agr.)
program. The program is being deleted and replaced by several new degree programs, the
third of which is the Bachelor of Science in Global Resource Systems. The admission
criteria for this new degree are the same as for the former International Resource Systems
major in the B.Sc. (Agr.) program.
Effective Date: September 2000.
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions statement for the Bachelor
Dean Tully i        of Science in Global Resource Systems be
approved.
Carried.
FORESTRY: CALENDAR ENTRY CHANGE - BROADER BASED ADMISSION
Present Calendar Entry (page 184, column 1):
Approximately ten applicants from secondary school who meet minimum academic
requirements, but who do not meet the required competitive average for admission, will
be selected for admission by the admissions committee of the Faculty of Forestry on the
basis of additional information provided on a supplementary application form. Such
applicants may also be interviewed. All applicants who do not meet the admission-aver-
 Vancouver Senate 12425
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
age cutoff for early admission will be sent a copy of this form, with an invitation to
submit it for possible consideration by the Admission Committee. Submission is optional.
The Admission Committee will consider all applicants who submit a supplementary
application form and who have a final grade minimum average equal to or above the
minimum average for admission to the University (67%).
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Replace the current paragraph with a subheading Broader Based Admission and the
following: Up to ten applicants from secondary school who meet minimum academic
requirements, but who do not meet the required competitive average for admission, will
be selected for admission by the admissions committee of the Faculty of Forestry on the
basis of additional information provided on a supplementary application form. Such
applicants may also be interviewed. All applicants who do not meet the admission-average
cutoff for early admission will be sent a copy of this form, with an invitation to submit it
for possible consideration by the Admission Committee. Submission is optional. The
Admission Committee will consider all applicants who submit a supplementary
application form and who have a final grade minimum average equal to or above the
minimum average for admission to the University (67%). The Admissions committee will
consider the following information when making their decision:
forestry-related work, community or volunteer experience
field experience
completion of high school forestry courses (if offered)
recent awards, honours or recognition
participation in school clubs and organizations
two reference letters from people who can give further information about your
academic performance, extra-curricular activities, or work/volunteer experience
your reasons for choosing forestry (as outlined in a brief essay)
extenuating circumstances that may have affected your GPA
Also, insert the phrase See also "Broader Based Admission" on page xx at the end of the
Admission section under each degree heading to make it clear that the Broader Based
Admission policy now applies to all degrees (p. 188, col.l after "See also "Program
Approval" and Advising"..."; p.189, col.2 after "See also "Program Approval and
Advising"..."; p.190, col.2 after "See also "Program Approval and Advising"...").
Rationale:
Senate Admissions Committee has requested all Faculties to institute Broader Based
Admission policies. This calendar entry change will make it clear that the Forestry policy
now applies to all degrees in the Faculty.
 Vancouver Senate 12426
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Effective Date: September 2001.
Dr. Lyster l        That Senate approve the broader based
A/Dean McLean J       admission policies for the Faculty of Forestry.
Carried.
FORESTRY: UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION STATEMENT PERTAINING TO FIRST
AND SECOND CHOICE APPLICANTS
Present Calendar Entry (page 184, column a)
Admission
Achievement of the minimum academic requirements outlined in this chapter and in Part
II, "Undergraduate Admission" does not guarantee admission to these programs. Due to
limited enrolment, the admission of applicants will be determined competitively on the
basis of admission average.
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Admission
Achievement of the minimum academic requirements outlined in this chapter and in Part
II, "Undergraduate Admission" does not guarantee admission to these programs. Due to
limited enrolment, the admission of applicants will be determined competitively on the
basis of admission average; however, preference may be given to those applicants who
have indicated the Faculty of Forestry as their Faculty of first choice.
Rationale:
The Faculty of Forestry has traditionally had a lower entrance G.P.A. for all programs
and all years compared to the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science. As such, Four-
story programs attract those students who are not admitted into Arts or Science as their
first choice. Students with a high G.P.A. and Faculty of Forestry as a second choice bump
those students who have Faculty of Forestry as a first choice but a lower G.P.A. Each
year, approximately 20% of first-year applicants and 15% of second-year applicants are
found to be following a program outside the Faculty of Forestry. Such students either
transfer Faculties at the end of the academic year or are asked to withdraw. These spaces
could have been filled with students who requested Faculty of Forestry as their first choice
and who will potentially be with the Faculty for four years. This problem has been
exacerbated for the 2000W session due to budget restraints and enrolment quota cutbacks
in all Faculties. As of April 19, 2000, (two weeks before the Admission Application
deadline) the Faculty of Forestry is facing a substantial increase in the number of second
choice applicants compared to April 30, 1999. Changing the admission policy to include a
preference for first choice applicants will help alleviate the problem of turning away
students who truly want to be in the Faculty of Forestry without running the risk of
enrolling over the quota.
 Vancouver Senate 12427
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Effective Date: September 1, 2001.
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions statement pertaining to
A/Dean McLean J       first an^ second choice applicants to the
Faculty of Forestry be approved.
Carried.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE: MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE: CLARIFICATION OF
INTENT OF ADVANCED STANDING
Present Calendar (1999/2000) Entry page 116, Column 1, 4th paragraph)
Students holding a pre-professional architecture degree (e.g., Bachelor of Environmental
Design, Bachelor of Environmental Science, or Bachelor of Arts with a Major in
Architecture) may be given advanced standing and therefore be able to complete the
degree in two years. The School's admissions committee will determine advanced standing
on the basis of the applicant's undergraduate transcript.
Proposed Calendar Entry (change in bold)
Students holding a pre-professional architecture degree (e.g., Bachelor of Environmental
Design, Bachelor of Environmental Science, or Bachelor of Arts with a Major in
Architecture) may be given advanced standing and may in some cases be able to complete
the degree in two and one-half years. The School's admissions committee will determine
advanced standing on the basis of the applicant's undergraduate transcript and portfolio.
Rationale:
Clarifies intent. As the determination of eligibility for advanced standing is dependent on
the applicant's academic background and portfolio, the number of credits will vary. As the
Master of Architecture degree is three and one-half years and as advanced standing will be
granted to a maximum of one year to those with a pre-professional degree, the degree may
in some cases be completed in two and one-half years. The review of the applicant's
portfolio is integral to determining advanced standing.
Effective date: May 1, 2000.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE: MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE: CHANGE OF PROGRAM
DURATION FROM THREE YEARS TO THREE AND ONE HALF YEARS
Present Calendar Entry (1999/2000 Calendar page 115, 4th paragraph)
The Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) program is three years' duration for students in full-
time attendance during Winter Session; students studying on a part-time basis will need
more than this time to fulfill degree requirements.
Proposed Calendar Entry (delete and replace with the following new text - changes in
bold)
The Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) program is three and one-half years' duration;
students studying on a part-time basis will need more than this time to fulfill degree
requirements.
 Vancouver Senate 12428
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Rationale:
Under the 110 credit Bachelor of Architecture program, the program was defined as a
three year program. With the 119 credit Master of Architecture program, students
generally take an additional half year to complete the requirements.
Effective date: May 1, 2000.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE: MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE: CLARIFICATION OF
SELECTION PROCESS
Present Calendar (1999/2000) Entry page 116, Column 2, 2nd paragraph)
Interest in the program far exceeds the School's resources and facilities, so the places are
awarded on a comparative basis.
Proposed Calendar Entry (change in bold)
Interest in the program far exceeds the School's resources and facilities, so the places are
awarded on a competitive basis.
Rationale:
The proposed Calendar entry clarifies the basis by which selection is made.
Effective date: May 1, 2000
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE: MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE: REVISED CALENDAR
ENTRY
Present Calendar Entry (1999/2000) page 205, Column 3 - page 206, column 1,2.
Master of Architecture
Architecture is one of several professions concerned with the human environment: the
architect is educated to understand and participate in the design of the built environment.
As an academic discipline, architecture encompasses the fields of humanities, sciences,
technology and creative arts. A candidate for admission to the program must have a
strong academic record and demonstrate qualifications necessary for creative problem
solving. It is essential therefore that all students entering the School of Architecture be
academically mature and that they possess an imaginative outlook. Thus the school selects
students from a variety of disciplines on which to build architectural understanding and
competence. The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) is a professional degree designed to
fulfill the requirements necessary for licensing as an architect. Students entering the
program with an undergraduate degree normally take a minimum of three years to
complete the requirements. However, students holding a pre-professional architecture
degree (e.g., Bachelor of Environmental Design, Bachelor of Environmental Science, or
Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Architecture) may be given advanced standing and
therefore be able to complete the degree in two years. The School's admissions committee
will determine advanced standing on the basis of the applicant's undergraduate transcript.
Students entering the program should demonstrate interest and potential in the broad field
of the creative arts and architecture. Prior instruction and experience in the arts, crafts, or
other design-oriented activities, with emphasis on visual communication in various media,
is extremely valuable. Similarly, the selection of university courses cov-
 Vancouver Senate 12429
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
ering a broad range of studies in the arts, humanities and social sciences on the one hand,
and the physical and applied sciences on the other, offers a desirable breadth and mix of
academic experience. Irrespective of specific degree requirements within various faculties
or universities, the School of Architecture considers it desirable that entering students have
completed university-level course work in mathematics, physics, English literature and
composition.
For students seeking general information and guidance in preparation for entry to the
School of Architecture, a brochure, Information for Prospective Applicants, is available
from the school on request. Candidates for admission to the school are generally required
to hold a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) from a recognized college or university. In the
final two years of the undergraduate degree program, candidates should have obtained a
minimum overall average in the "B" grade range (76% or 3.3 on a 4.0 scale). Applicants
must demonstrate aptitude for the study of architecture and creative potential. Applicants
who do not meet the academic requirements but demonstrate advanced architectural
achievement may be considered for admission. Interest in the program far exceeds the
school's resources and facilities; therefore, places are awarded on a comparative basis. The
school reserves the right not to accept applicants for admission even though they may
nominally meet the entrance requirements. All admissions must be approved by the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. The sub-mission deadline for application to the school is
January 8.
All applicants to the school should note that a workshop course is mandatory for entering
students. This course is an integral part of design program in first year. It is normally one
week in duration and takes place in late August. Dates and other particulars concerning
the workshop course are normally provided with the letter of acceptance. Students who
are unable to attend the complete workshop course, or who fail to remit the course fee by
the prescribed time, will have their admission cancelled. A workshop fee of $300 is
payable within two weeks of the date of an applicant's offer of admission. One hundred
fifty dollars ($150) is refundable until July 1. After this time, no refund is possible.
Students accepted for admission to the school who subsequently find that they are unable
to attend must re-apply for admission at a later date.
Proposed Calendar Entry (delete and add the following new text)
Master of Architecture
The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) program is a first-professional graduate program
designed for those with an undergraduate degree who have an interest in becoming
licensed professional architects. While an undergraduate degree in a field related to
architecture may be advantageous, it is not a necessary prerequisite as the demonstration
of interest and aptitude in the field occurs as part of the application process to the
program. The Master of Architecture is a very intensive course that fulfills the education
requirements for architectural registration. The course requires three and one-half years of
full time study.
For detailed information, please refer to the listing under The School of Architecture in the
Faculty of Applied Science.
 Vancouver Senate 12430
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Rationale:
A brief statement on the Master of Architecture program clearly identifies the essential
elements of the program but directs the reader to the full write-up in the section in the
School of Architecture under the Faculty of Applied Science.
Effective date: May 1, 2000.
Dr. Lyster l        That the proposals pertaining to the Master of
Dean Isaacson J        Architecture be approved.
Carried.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE: MASTER OF ADVANCED STUDIES IN ARCHITECTURE:
RECONFIGURATION OF THE MASA CURRICULUM
Present Calendar (1999/2000) Entry page 206, Column 1 & 2)
Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture
The School of Architecture offers a post-professional graduate program leading to the
degree of Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture (M.A.S.A.). This degree is primarily
designed for those who have a professional degree in architecture and have some
experience in architectural practice. However, under certain circumstances, consideration
will be given to individuals holding a degree and experience relevant to architecture. All
candidates are advised that particular aptitudes and experience will be required for this
program, and admission will be based on faculty judgment of qualifications over and
above the general admission requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The
program is post-professional and therefore does not fulfill the requirements for
certification necessary for licensing as an architect.
This program will allow the student to investigate an area of knowledge within the broad
field of architecture in collaboration with one or more members of the faculty interested in
that area and engage in ongoing developmental research, or consulting activity in that
area. The research project is expected to draw together and synthesize existing knowledge
in architecture and related fields to clarification or new understanding in the field resulting
in a written thesis.
Entering students will be required to work out a course of study with an adviser for
approval by the M.A.S.A. program committee. The program must prepare them for work
in the chosen thesis area and fill in gaps in areas of knowledge relevant to the thesis topic.
In some cases makeup courses will be required beyond the total number of credits of
course work prescribed for the degree.
In order to fulfill the requirements for the degree of Master of Advanced Studies in
Architecture, the student must complete a total of 30 credits. Full-time students are
required to spend two terms of full-time attendance in the program. Part-time study, as
defined this chapter, is allowed and encouraged, but only with the approval of the
M.A.S.A. program committee of the School of Architecture.
 Vancouver Senate 12431
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Full-time students normally complete this program within two academic years. No longer
than five years may elapse between first registration and satisfactory completion of the
entire program, including the thesis.
First Year
First-year students are normally required to take:
• ARCH 580 (0) Graduate Seminar; and
• 18 credits of courses selected in consultation with the student's adviser, including a
minimum of 12 credits from courses at the 500 level offered by the School of
Architecture and other departments, some of which must be related to the student's
research interests; three credits of courses should be in research methods if the
student's background is deficient in this area; and
Second Year
• Architecture 598 (12 credits) Thesis for the M.A.S.A.
Areas of Study
Research activities and thesis development will be focused within the following areas of
study: design for a sustainable future, design for selected populations, architectural history
and theory, housing and urban design, electronic design, building technology.
Action:
Replace material concerning M.A.S.A. from the Faculty of Graduate Studies listing with
proposed material and move to the listing under The School of Architecture in the Faculty
of Applied Science after the Master of Architecture section and before the Professional
Association section [i.e. page 118, column 1 in the current calendar].
Replace the material currently in the Faculty of Graduate Studies listing with the first
paragraph of the proposed material with a reference to the School of Architecture listing
under the Faculty of Applied Science.
"'Note: Material for review by the Faculty of Graduate Studies curriculum committee is
bracketed (<«>») and is included for context only.
Proposed Calendar Entries:
This material should be placed under the School of Architecture in the Faculty of Applied
Science after the Master of Architecture section and before the Professional Association
section, i.e. p 118, column a in the current calendar.
MASTER OF ADVANCED STUDIES IN ARCHITECTURE
The Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture (M.A.S.A.) is a post-professional
graduate program primarily designed for those who have a professional degree in
architecture or related fields and have some experience in the field. It is an intensive course
culminating in a thesis for those who wish to expand their knowledge in a particular area.
The degree can be completed in four academic terms. («<Two terms of full-time
residency are required. This is a research degree and as such does not fulfill the education
requirements for architectural registration.»>)
Admission
 Vancouver Senate 12432
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
The M.A.S.A. program allows a student to investigate an area within the broad field of
architecture in collaboration with one or more members of the faculty. The ability to carry
out independent research is critical. A well-defined Statement of Research Intent is the
primary indicator of the student's potential in the selected area. Areas of study are History
and Theory, Building Technology, Advanced Design Research and Digital Media9, Impact
of Buildings on Energy and Resource Use, and Housing and Urban Design. Information
on research interests of the faculty is available on the School of Architecture's Web Site.
A brochure, Information for Prospective M.A.S.A. Applicants, is available from the School
and on the School's Web Site. Students are selected on a competitive basis dependent on
the research interests of the faculty. Prior to formal submission applicants are encouraged
to send a brief outline of a potential research topic to the Program Chair for an initial
assessment of suitability.
Applicants must submit the following by February 15th.10 (Note: Only applications
received prior to January 15th will be considered for University Graduate Fellowships.)
• Application Form and Fee.
• Transcripts. Two official transcripts of all post-secondary study should be for-warded
directly from the originating institution. The admission requirements of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies must be fulfilled prior to being considered by the School of Architecture.
• Letters of Reference. Three letters of reference from persons who can best assess the
applicants' ability in an independent research program. Letters must be sent directly to the
School of Architecture by the referee.
• Test of English as a Second Language (TOEFL). Applicants whose first language is not
English must pass the TOEFL exam with a minimum score of 600 (250 on the computer
based exam).
• Biographical Statement: A chronological listing in resume form including education, work
experience, travel and other relevant experience. Prose form can be used to elaborate on
key areas of the resume.
• Portfolio of professional or academic work.
• Statement of Research Intent. A minimum 500 word statement discussing back-ground
education and work experience in the selected area of study and giving a clear outline of
the area of research to be pursued.
«< Academic Regulations
The student should consult the Faculty of Graduate Studies for University policies.
Degree Requirements
Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits including the following:
COURSE WORK:
• ARCH 568 (3 credits) Research Methods In Architecture is to be taken Fall Term during
the first year. Students will develop a preliminary proposal for their thesis by the end of
the course.
 Vancouver Senate 12433
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
•     15 credits of course work or directed study selected in consultation with advisor. A
minimum of 9 credits must be at the graduate (500) level. In some cases makeup courses
will be required beyond the total number of credits of course work. It is intended that the
course work will be completed by the end of the second term. At this time the student
orally presents the thesis proposal for critical discussion by faculty and students.
THESIS:
ARCH 598 (12 credits) Thesis. Depending on the area of study, the form of the thesis may
be written, digital media, or a design investigation. An oral defense of the thesis is
required for all M.A.S.A. students.
Time Limit for Completion of Degree Requirements
University regulations establish a five-year time limit for the completion of a Master's
program.>»
*The following material should be placed in the Faculty of Graduate Studies section under
the School of Architecture.
Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture n
The Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture (M.A.S.A.) is a post-professional
graduate program primarily designed for those who have a professional degree in
architecture or related field and have some experience in the field. It is an intensive course
culminating in a thesis for those who wish to expand their knowledge in a particular area.
The degree can be completed in four academic terms. Two terms of full-time residency are
required. This is a research degree and as such does not fulfill the education requirements
for architectural registration.
For detailed information, please refer to the listing under The School of Architecture in the
Faculty of Applied Science.
Rationale:
Various adjustments to procedures and requirements as noted are the result of Faculty
defined reconfiguration of the MAS A curriculum.
9 The topics for study within the MASA program have expanded owing to new faculty
within the School.
10Moving back the deadline from March 31 to February 15 brings the program in line
with similar research degree programs in architecture and thus is more competitive.
nIt is felt for clarity that it is best to minimize the information under the Faculty of
Graduate Studies listing and refer the reader to the section under The School of
Architecture in the Faculty of Applied Science.
 Vancouver Senate 12434
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
Effective Date: May 1,2000.
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions proposals pertaining to
Dean Muzyka J        the Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture
be approved.
Carried.
GRADUATE STUDIES: MBA FOR ACCOUNTING PROFESSIONALS
Proposed Calendar Entry:
Master of Business Administration for Accounting Professionals: Joint Program with
Simon Fraser University
The Master of Business Administration for Accounting Professionals (MBA) is a course of
study in Business Administration offered on a part time basis, primarily in a down-town
Vancouver location (initially SFU Harbour Centre) in conjunction with the Faculty of
Business Administration at Simon Fraser University.
The curriculum is designed to capitalize on a candidate's professional accounting
designation and related work experience, and builds on this knowledge by covering
related business areas such as marketing, finance, organizational behaviour, managerial
economics, information systems and operations. This degree acknowledges that
accounting professionals already have extensive background in accounting but will
enhance their career by broadening their knowledge and skill set through additional
expertise in finance, information technology, human resource management and strategic
decision making. The curriculum does not contain any financial accounting instruction.
The degree is designed to enlarge and diversify the accounting professional's
understanding of the financial and organizational management challenges facing
corporations businesses and future potential business leaders.
Courses will be offered on a module basis (1.5 credits) on evenings or weekends. The
program will consist of 30 credits of study (20 modular courses). Entry to the program
will require a bachelors degree in any area, being a member in good standing with a
Canadian accounting professional association and having a CA, CGA or CMA
designation.
Rationale:
The MBA for accounting professionals program is a joint initiative between the faculties
of business from Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia. It is a
twenty two month twenty course, part-time, evening program specifically and exclusively
designed for Canadian accounting professionals. Candidates will have completed a four
year bachelors degree program and be a member in good standing of a Canadian
accounting professional group (CA, CMA or CGA). The graduate schools of both
universities require a four year bachelors degree, a grade point average of 76% (B+) and a
competitive GMAT score (550+) for admission.
Both universities bring strengths to this degree. SFU has over twenty years of experience in
executive MBA education and was ranked first in comprehensive university edu-
 Vancouver Senate 12435
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Admissions Committee
cation in Canada four years in a row. UBC ranked second in Canada for research and the
business faculty is the top Ph.D. granting institution in the country. Both universities
recognize the opportunity to provide this MBA but also appreciate that working
cooperatively is a way of capitalizing on their respective strengths thereby providing an
out-standing program
The program is tailored to address the learning needs and career expectations and
opportunities of accounting professionals. It is shorter than most other similar degrees.
This efficiency is possible because the introductory business and general management
curriculum course work is not required as the candidate will have this knowledge from
course work required to earn an accounting professional designation. Accounting
professionals have many of the tools and skills for success in today's employment market
place. However, many employers like MBA graduates. This degree seeks to broaden the
knowledge platform of accounting professionals and thereby equip graduates with a
competitive advantage over typical MBA's.
The primary instruction method is business cases. Program design and course selection
keep in mind the academic and working experience backgrounds of candidates in financial
matters. The curriculum capitalizes on this relatively homogeneous set of experiences by
immediately addressing intermediate and advanced financial management issues from an
accounting professional's point-of-view. Background experiences are capitalized upon in
developing specific course content and instruction methodology. Courses are taught in six
week, modular format. Candidates enroll in two courses each session. With the exception
of the first module, all modules or semesters are eight weeks in duration, consisting of six
weeks of instruction, a week off, followed by a one week evaluation period. No classes are
scheduled during the summer.
Sixteen courses in the program are required. The remaining four are electives chosen from
a list of seven courses. Elective courses, particularly in finance and/or information
technology, afford candidates flexibility to design a program of studies suitable to their
interests. Candidates enroll in two courses each semester. Missing a course or semester
delays graduation one full year.
When classes run, candidates spend two evenings a week in the downtown campus of
SFU. Additionally, during these weeks, about six to ten hours of out-of-class reading and
preparation is expected. During the two weeks after classes finish for any semester but
before the next semester, twenty plus hours of preparation for presentations, projects or
examinations, is expected.
The curriculum design evolved through a process which included the input from
representatives of the accounting professionals groups, surveys of potential candidates for
this masters degree, faculty from UBC and SFU and extensive committee deliberations.
Fees are $16,000 per year for a total of $32,000 for the degree. Fees include textbooks,
meals and accommodation for the off-site foundation week.
 Vancouver Senate 12436
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Budget Committee
Effective Date: September, 2000.
Dr. Lyster l        That the admissions statement for the Master
Dr. Hamilton i        of Business Administration for Accounting
Professionals be approved.
In response to a query from Mr. Podersky-Cannon, Dean Muzyka stated that the Library
would incur no additional costs, as the program was intended to be self-liquidating.
Dr. MacEntee asked why the proposal for the new program had not been sent to the
Budget Committee.
Upon invitation by President Piper, Dr. Guppy responded that budgetary information
would have been sent to the Budget Committee, along with the letter of intent for the new
program, approximately two years earlier. It was Dr. Guppy's understanding that the
Budget Committee had approved the proposal. Dr. Hamilton added that tuition for the
two year program would be in the order of $32 K. All resource materials would be
packaged for students under the cohort model. A contribution back to each of the two
universities, in lieu of a specific budgetary allocation, had been included in the program's
financial planning. Dr. MacEntee stated that there appeared to be remaining confusion
about the process used by Senate to monitor the budgetary implications of new programs.
President Piper reminded members of Senate that the motion was for approval of the
admission requirements only, and that the program itself would be approved separately.
Dr. MacEntee expressed concern about the possibility that students could therefore be
admitted to a program that had not yet received Senate approval. The Registrar assured
members of Senate that, even where admission requirements are approved in advance,
students are not admitted to new programs until those programs have also been
approved.
The motion was
put and carried.
Budget Committee
Please see report under "Other Business."
 Vancouver Senate 12437
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Curriculum Committee
Curriculum Committee
Please see "Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary."
Dr. Berger presented the reports, as chair of the Committee.
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Dean Quayle gave background information on the Faculty's proposed restructuring of its
under-graduate programs. In September 1997, the Faculty began its major transformation
by collapsing its five departments into one administrative unit. The Faculty had since
reduced its number of undergraduate programs to four: three of which were presented for
approval at the meeting, with the fourth to come forward in the future. Under the
proposed Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health, there were formerly a
Bachelor of Science in Dietetics, a Bachelor of Science in Nutritional Sciences (located in
Faculty of Science), and a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. The Bachelor of Science in
Agroecology was to replace the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. The Bachelor of
Global Resource Systems was formerly known as the International Resource Systems
program under the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. The Bachelor of Home Economics
was described as "in transition," and the Faculty also hoped to put forward a Bachelor of
Environmental Design.
Dean Quayle reported that the Faculty's new approach to curriculum was based on the
view of a broad undergraduate education. The new suite of programs would provide a
more focused approach that was deliberately connected to the background and goals of
the Faculty's students.
Dr. Berger provided an overview of the course proposals.
Dr. Berger l        That the proposed new courses and course
Dean Muzyka J        changes in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
be approved.
Carried.
Bachelor of Science in Agroecology
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000
Curriculum Committee
12438
Dr. Berger
Dean Quayle
That the Bachelor of Science in Agroecology be
approved.
Carried.
Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health
Dr. Berger l        That the Bachelor of Science in Food,
Dr. Thompson J        Nutrition and Health be approved.
Carried.
Bachelor of Global Resource Systems
Dr. Berger l        That the Bachelor of Global Resource Systems
Dean Muzyka i       be approved.
A discussion ensued about the proposed name for the new degree, as it did not comply
with the Policy on Degree Names and Parchments. Dr. Tees, as chair of the Academic
Policy Committee, pointed out that new degree names should not be approved unless it
would be confusing or inconsistent with North American practice to use one of the
standard degree names. The recommendation of the Academic Policy Committee was that
the new degree be named the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and that the program
name, "Global Resource Systems" be shown on the second line of the parchment. The
Committee also offered a second, less preferable option of creating a new credential
entitled the "Bachelor of Science in Global Resource Systems."
Dean Quayle responded that the Faculty had carefully considered how to position itself,
especially considering that the Faculty receives funding from both SHHRC and NSERC.
The Dean stated it had been difficult in the past to recruit students under the
"Agriculture" label, and the Faculty proposed the new degree name as one way to send a
message to prospective students that the program would provide a good balance between
arts and science. Dean Quayle understood
 Vancouver Senate 12439
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Curriculum Committee
the desire for consistency in degree names, and pointed out the Faculty had reduced its
number of credentials.
After further discussion, Dean Quayle agreed to accept the Committee's second
recommendation, namely the "Bachelor of Science in Global Resource Systems."
In amendment.
Dr. Berger l        That the Bachelor of Science in Global
Dean Muzyka i        Resource Systems be approved.
Dr. MacEntee spoke in support of the interdisciplinary nature of this program, and agreed
with Dean Quayle that labelling a program as either arts or science would act as an
undesirable limiting focus. He suggested that Senate approve the program with one of the
names, suggested by the Academic Policy Committee, and that the Faculty could present
another name at a later date.
The amended
motion was put
and carried.
FACULTY OF ARTS
Dr. Berger l        That the proposed undergraduate new courses,
Dean Tully i        course changes, and program changes from the
Faculty of Arts be approved.
Dr. Rosengarten, referring to the proposed deletion of specific course titles in favour of
general studies courses in the Department of English, asked whether the lack of specificity
on a student's transcript would be problematic for students applying to other institutions.
Dean Tully agreed that transcript evaluation was sometimes difficult, but that it had not
yet posed an insuperable
 Vancouver Senate 12440
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Curriculum Committee
problem. Dr. Berger added that, given the number of credits within a major, students
probably would not have more than two transcript entries under the same course titles.
The motion was
put and carried.
First Nations Studies
Dr. Berger l        That the proposed new First Nations Studies
Dean Muzyka i       program in the Faculty of Arts be approved.
In response to a query from Mr. Greathed, Dean Tully stated that the new program had
been developed in response to both academic and political considerations, and that those
considerations were inextricably linked. He viewed the program as a statement of a very
reputable evolving tradition, and as meeting an important need.
The motion was
put and carried.
1
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Dr. Berger l        That the curriculum proposals from the
Dean Granot i       Faculty of Graduate Studies (with the
exception of the proposed MBA for
Accounting Professionals) be approved.
Dr. MacEntee reported that the costs of the transition to problem based learning (PBL) in
the Faculties of Dentistry and Medicine had been considerable, and that those costs had
not been addressed at the time of approval. He asked how Agricultural Sciences planned
to address similar concerns. Dean Quayle responded that the Faculty had consciously
chosen to move some programs directly to PBL, while choosing a hybrid type of delivery
for other programs. A small group of faculty members had traveled to Albuquerque, New
Mexico for training in problem based learning delivery, and had since become trainers. As
of May 2000, 80 people, including all but five of 50 faculty members, had been trained
through a three day workshop. Case writing
 Vancouver Senate 12441
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Curriculum Committee
workshops were also held. By the Faculty's calculations, there were sufficient human
resources to deliver the problem based learning curricula. Dean Quayle stated that the
Faculty had proposed approximately 111 course deletions, but only 71 changes or
additions, resulting in a net decrease of approximately 40 courses. The members of the
Faculty were excited about engaging graduate students in PBL tutoring, and about the
fact that they will be able to tutor across a wider range of subjects. Dr. Holl added that
the Faculty had recently received a Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund grant for
continuing development of the PBL training process over the following six to twelve
months, in cooperation with the Teaching Advisory Group. Although the Faculty had
been conscious about the financial and human resource implications of this transition, Dr.
Holl acknowledged that there may be unexpected demands.
In response to a question from Dr. Lyster, Dean Quayle stated that the Faculty had
addressed Library needs, in part, by creating a learning centre that includes the
MacMillan Library, and the Librarian had been consistently involved in the curriculum
revision process. Because learning outcomes would not drastically change, library needs
would not be significantly different. The Faculty had also considered whether sufficient
space was available. Part of this solution was to use the huts behind the MacMillan
Building, which had been vacated by the Faculty of Forestry.
In response to a query from Dr. LeMay, Dean Quayle stated that the training of PBL
tutors in the new course AGSC 500 would not result in them assuming bargaining unit
work. Graduate students under this arrangement would tutor one or two cases, but not a
whole course. As these students gain experience, it was expected that they would
eventually work as paid tutors.
 Vancouver Senate 12442
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Curriculum Committee
Dr. MacEntee commended the Faculty's enthusiasm and consideration of the issues, but
added that the experience of other Faculties with PBL warranted careful attention to
financial matters. He suggested that the Budget Committee may wish to look into this
general issue.
The motion was
put and carried.
Master of Business Administration for Accounting Professionals
Dr. Berger l        That the course proposals pertaining to the
Dean Muzyka i       Master of Business Administration for
Accounting Professionals be approved.
Carried.
Dr. Berger explained that specially tailored courses for this new MBA program were
suitable because students would enter the program with substantially more knowledge
and experience compared to students entering other MBA programs. These courses could
therefore begin at a higher level.
Dr. Berger l        That the new Master of Business
Dr. Hamilton i        Administration for Accounting Professionals
be approved.
Dr. Tees reported that the Academic Policy Committee had considered this new degree
proposal with a view to answering some of the relevant questions about joint degree
programs, as presented to Senate at the April 19, 2000 meeting (Minutes of Senate, pp.
12381-3). The Committee was confident that the questions had been addressed in the
proposal and expressed support for the program in a general sense. For example,
although students would not be eligible for scholarships or fellowships at either UBC or
Simon Fraser University, the two universities would be working to establish financial
support within the program itself.
In response to a query from Dr. Tees, Dr. Hamilton clarified that students would be
governed by the policies and procedures of the university and the faculty of the dean who
is chair of the Ven-
 Vancouver Senate 12443
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Nominating Committee
ture Board for that year, and will continue under those same policies and procedures until
graduation. Dr. Tees stated that this resolved the Committee's concerns about changing
rules for a student, especially where a problem does not fit neatly into one academic year.
In response to a question from Mr. Verma about perceived or established demand for the
program, Dr. Hamilton stated that market analysis had been done in 1998/99 prior to
submission of the letter of intent. The Faculty was optimistic that a cohort of 30 to 35
students would be filled each year. When letter of intent was circulated around province,
there was also interest in delivery of this type of program by distance education in order
to serve other areas of the Province.
The motion was
put and carried.
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Dr. Berger
Dr. Slonecker
That the new courses FMED 427:
Reproduction and FMED 428: Growth and
Development be approved.
Carried.
Nominating Committee
Dr. Williams presented the reports, as chair of the Committee.
COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS FOR STUDENT SENATORS
The Nominating Committee recommended that Senate approve the following
appointments of student representatives to the Committees of Senate for the term from
May 17, 2000 to March 31, 2001 and thereafter until a replacement is appointed:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. Howard Poon, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Mr. Ben Warren, Faculty of Law
 Vancouver Senate 12444
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Nominating Committee
Academic Policy
Ms. Yvette C. Lu, At-large representative, Faculty of Science
Vacancy
Admissions
Ms. Keri Gammon, At-large representative, Faculty of Science
Ms. Pamela Liu, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Agenda
Mr. Dennis Visser, At-large representative, Faculty of Science
Vacancy
Appeals on Academic Standing
Mr. Timothy Chan, Faculty of Science
Ms. Katie Riecken, At-large representative, Faculty of Arts
Mr. David Tompkins, Faculty of Graduate Studies
Budget
Mr. David Tompkins, Faculty of Graduate Studies
Mr. Dennis Visser, At-large representative, Faculty of Science
Continuing Studies
Ms. Pamela Liu, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Ms. Erina Nerome, Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
Curriculum
Ms. Keri Gammon, At-large representative, Faculty of Science
Mr. Dennis Visser, At-large representative, Faculty of Science
Mr. Ben Warren, Faculty of Law
Elections
Mr. James Kondopulos, At-large representative, Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Ms. Katie Riecken, At-large representative, Faculty of Arts
Library
Ms. Yvette C. Lu, At-large representative, Faculty of Science
Mr. Ben Warren, Faculty of Law
Vacancy
 Vancouver Senate 12445
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Nominating Committee
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
Ms. Michelle Hassen, Faculty of Arts
Mr. Howard Poon, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Mr. James Kondopulos, At-large representative, Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration
Student Awards
Ms. Michelle Hassen, Faculty of Arts
Mr. James Kondopulos, At-large representative, Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration
Tributes
Mr. Timothy Chan, Faculty of Science
Ms. Yvette C. Lu, At-large representative, Faculty of Science
Dr. Williams l        That Senate approve the recommendations of
Dr. Gilbert i        the Nominating Committee with respect to
committee assignments for student senators.
Carried.
SENATE COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
The Nominating Committee recommended the following appointment and change of
appointment:
1. Academic Policy Committee: Dean Robert J. Tierney to replace former Dean
Nancy Sheehan.
2. Continuing Studies Committee, ex officio membership (term ongoing): "Senior
Associate Dean, Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration" to replace
"Associate Dean of Professional Programs, Commerce."
Dr. Williams l        That Senate approve the recommendations of
Dean Muzyka i        the Nominating Committee with respect to
Senate Committee membership.
Carried.
 Vancouver Senate 12446
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Student Awards Committee
Student Awards Committee
As chair of the Committee, Dr. Thompson circulated for information a list of the heads of
graduating classes and major award winners for May 2000 congregation.
NEW AWARDS
Please see "Appendix C: New Awards"
Dr. Thompson i        That the new awards be accepted and
Mr. Greathed J       recommended for approval by the Board of
Governors, and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried.
Tributes Committee
Dr. Slonecker presented the following memorial minutes on behalf of the Committee:
MEMORIAL TRIBUTES
Helen W. Sonthoff
September 11, 1916 - January 3, 2000
Helen Sonthoff was born in Rochester, NY, on September 11, 1916. She was educated at
Smith college (AB 1937), and Radcliffe College. She taught for some years in
Massachusetts and Washington DC before coming to UBC in 1957 as a Teaching
Assistant. The high quality of her teaching gained her a tenured appointment as an
Assistant Professor of English in 1968.
Ms. Sonthoff was an enthusiastic teacher and scholar of Canadian literature, back in the
days when Canadian literature was still struggling to establish itself as a field worthy of
study. Her own writing was on the fiction and poetry of such contemporary figures as
Phyllis Webb, Milton Acorn, Eli Mandel, and Leonard Cohen, and from time to time she
promoted their work on the CBC as a reader and critic.
She served on numerous departmental and faculty committees, and in 1972 she was
elected to a three-year term on the University Senate as a representative of the Faculty of
Arts. As a member of the fledgling Women's Action Group she contributed to the first
Report on the Status of Women at UBC in 1973.
Ms. Sonthoff was an early supporter of aboriginal education at the post-secondary level,
and worked with colleagues in Arts and Education to give special help to aboriginal
students. Herself a good teacher, she worked tirelessly to persuade others of the
importance of good teaching at the undergraduate level.
 Vancouver Senate 12447
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Tributes Committee
The long-time companion of writer Jane Rule, Helen Sonthoff was a gracious, warm and
witty person, much liked by her students and colleagues, and much respected for her
unflinching adherence to principle. She retired from the English Department in 1976, and
died in Victoria, BC on January 3, 2000.
George Michael Volkoff
B.A. (UBC), M.A. (UBC), Ph.D. (Univ. of Cal., Berkeley), D.Sc. Honoris Causa (UBC)
Dean Emeritus
February 23, 1914 - April 24, 2000
George Michael Volkoff was born in Moscow, Russia on February 23, 1914 and died in
the Purdy pavilion at UBC on April 24, 2000, after a lengthy illness. He had a strong
association with the University of British Columbia for 70 years and served on the UBC
Senate 1950-54, 1961-63, and 1969-79. George arrived in Canada with his family in 1924
as an eleven-year-old. He completed elementary school in Vancouver and then followed
his family to Harbin, Manchuria where he completed his secondary school. He entered
UBC in 1930 as a sixteen year old and graduated in 1934, winning the Governor
General's medal as head of the graduating class.
After obtaining his master's degree at UBC in 1936, George went to Berkeley to work
with Robert Oppenheimer. His Ph.D. work, published in 1939, became very famous and
was instrumental in Volkoff becoming and Officer of the Order of Canada 55 years later.
This work concerned the predictions of the properties of collapsed stars, resulting from
supernova explosions: it showed that such massive objects were essentially made entirely
of neutrons and had densities of a million billion times that of water. This paper at first
lay neglected until, in the middle 1960's, pulsars were discovered and identified as neutron
stars of just the kind that Oppenheimer and Volkoff had predicted. Volkoff was appointed
as Assistant Professor in the UBC Physics Department in 1940. During 1943-46 he was on
leave to the nascent Canadian atomic energy project. He was responsible for the lattice
calculations for the first large reactor in Canada, the NRX reactor at Chalk River,
Ontario, completed in 1946. For this wartime work Volkoff was awarded a D.Sc.
(Honoris Causa) by UBC in 1945 (at age 31, perhaps the youngest recipient of such a
degree from UBC) and the M.B.E. in 1946.
On returning to UBC in 1946 Volkoff embarked on research in the new field of Nuclear
Magnetic Resonance and supervised the very first student, Tom Collins, to receive a UBC
Ph.D. He continued an excellent teaching career at UBC and rendered great service to the
University as Physics Department Head (1961-71) and Dean of Science (1971-79) and
gave his outstanding judgement to countless other UBC bodies. He also served on many
national and international committees in the service of science. George Volkoff was
known around the world for his early scientific brilliance, his intelligence, his fairness and
his interest in people and intellectual affairs. He gave lifelong service to UBC and brought
the University great distinction.
 Vancouver Senate 12448
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Other Business
Written by Dr. Erich Vogt.
Dr. Slonecker l        That the memorial minutes for Helen Sonthoff
Dr. Pedersen i        an^ George Michael Volkoff be entered into
the Minutes of Senate.
Carried.
Other Business
BUDGET COMMITTEE
Please see "Appendix D: Budget Committee Report 1999-2000."
Dr. MacEntee, as chair of the Committee, apologized for his inability to circulate the
report in advance of the meeting. He explained that the University budget had not been
finalized until just prior to the meeting, but that the Committee had felt it important to
deliver its report prior to the end of the academic year.
The Budget Committee has a somewhat unusual role: it assists the President in preparing
the University budget and makes recommendations, it reports to Senate on budget
developments, priorities and issues, e.g. the budgetary implications of new programs.
Although the Committee had been considering new programs under its second term of
reference, Dr. MacEntee expressed the need to make this function explicit. He
recommended the following notice of motion:
Dr. MacEntee l        That the following charge to the SBC be
J        adopted as its third term of reference:
1.   to consider, in response to requests from the
Vice President Academic and Provost, and in
cooperation with the appropriate Deans or
Directors, the budgetary implications of all
"Statements of Intent" from Faculties or
Schools planning new degree programs, and to
report unresolved concerns directly to the
President and to Senate.
 Vancouver Senate 12449
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Other Business
Dr. MacEntee gave an overview of the Committee's report, highlighting that the
Committee had not received budgetary information for all new programs, but had been
reassured that this information would be reported to Senate in future. The Committee
would be working over the next year to establish a mechanism to ensure that this
information is reported to Senate. He also explained that the Committee's
recommendation that the President examine the ancillary status of IT Services and Green
College had been made in light of the academic contributions that these two units make
and the significant roles that they play in the implementation of Trek 2000.
Dr. MacEntee stated that the Committee was impressed with the transparency of the
budgetary process, which had established not just a budget for that year, but a set of
priorities for future funding based on very wide consultation. He congratulated the
President and thanked her for her effort on the University's behalf.
There was discussion about the policy that all additions or adjustments to Committee
terms of reference are examined by the Nominating Committee. In lieu of accepting Dr.
MacEntee's notice of motion, the President referred the issue to the Nominating
Committee for their consideration and report to Senate.
Dean Isaacson voiced concern about the urgency with which reports are brought to
Senate, especially when these reports are not screened by the Agenda Committee and
circulated in advance of the meeting. He stated that it would be more helpful if reports
followed the prescribed process, so that fewer procedural issues required resolution from
the floor of Senate.
Addressing the content of the Budget Committee report, Dean Isaacson expressed concern
about the evolving role of the Budget Committee and the growing trend to examine the
details of individual situations. He drew attention to references in the report to the Budget
Committee approv-
 Vancouver Senate 12450
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Tributes Committee - in camera
ing new programs, which Dean Isaacson did not understand to be part of that
Committee's mandate. He added that a letter of intent, as required by the Province, does
not require budgetary information. This information, for internal UBC consideration, is
presumably included in a secondary document. As the University's handling of letters of
intent evolves, Dean Isaacson expressed the hope that these issues could be clarified
before Dr. MacEntee's motion was brought forward.
Dr. MacEntee responded that the Committee did not intend to "micromanage" the
University's budgetary affairs, but would like to raise awareness of the budgetary
implications of new programs. He agreed that there was ambiguity about the Committee's
role. He clarified that the proposed notice of motion did not refer to "approval," but
"consideration in response to requests," and "reporting of unresolved concerns,"
functions which he felt fit clearly within the Committee's mandate.
In response to a query from Dr. Pedersen about whether Plant Operations had offered a
schedule for improvements, Dr. MacEntee stated that Mr. David Barnes had only recently
been appointed Director of Plant Operations and was therefore unable to know either the
extent of the problem or the nature of the solution.
Tributes Committee - in camera
EMERITUS STATUS
The Tributes Committee recommended that the following people be granted emeritus
status.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000
12451
Tributes Committee - in camera
Name
Proposed Rank (effective August 31, 1999)
Arcus, Margaret E.
Professor Emerita of Social Work and Family Studies
Name
Proposed Rank (effective December 31, 1999)
Baldwin, Virginia A.
Associate Professor Emerita of Pathology
Birch, Daniel R.
Vice President Emeritus, Academic and Provost
Cragg, Dr. Olga
Associate Professor Emerita of French, Hispanic and Italian Studies
Grymaloski, Martha
Clinical Professor Emerita of Radiology
Knickerbocker, W. James
Clinical Associate Professor Emeritus of Radiology
Proctor, Eileen
Clinical Associate Professor Emerita of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Seelig, Michael Y.
Professor Emeritus of Community and Regional Planning
Wollaston, Elsie (de
Bruijn)
Administrative Librarian Emerita
Name
Proposed Rank (effective June 30, 2000)
Adams, Robert A.
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Autor, Anne P.
Professor Emerita of Pathology
Bohm, Bruce A.
Professor Emeritus of Botany
Brumelle, Shelby L.
Professor Emeritus of Commerce and Business Administration
Bury, Karl Victor
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Cochran, Larry R.
Professor Emeritus of Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special
Education
Doidge, Florence
General Librarian Emerita
Dykstra, Stephanie
General Librarian Emerita
Fankhauser, James L.
Professor Emeritus of Music
Gartshore, Ian S.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Gomel, Victor
Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Greenwood, Priscilla
Professor Emerita of Mathematics
Hirshen, Sanford
Professor Emeritus of Architecture
Holl, F. Brian
Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Sciences
Holm, David G.
Professor Emeritus of Zoology
Holsti, Kalevi J.
Professor Emeritus of Political Science
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000
12452
Tributes Committee - in camera
Name
Proposed Rank (effective June 30, 2000)
Housego, Billie E. J.
Associate Professor Emerita of Educational and Counselling Psychology and
Special Education
Hughes, Anna Marie
Assistant Professor Emerita of Nursing
Hundert, Edward J.
Professor Emeritus of History
Laquian, Aprodicio
Professor Emeritus of Community and Regional Planning
Lentle, Brian C.
Professor Emeritus of Radiology
Matthews, Peter W.
Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics and Astronomy
More, Arthur J.
Associate Professor Emeritus of Educational and Counselling Psychology and
Special Education
McGraw, Robert W.
Professor Emeritus of Orthopaedics
Newman, Jerry
Associate Professor Emeritus of Lheatre, Film and Creative Writing
North, Margaret
Senior Instructor Emerita of Geography
Parfitt, Hugh
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry
Parker, William E.
General Librarian Emeritus
Pearson, Richard J.
Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Sociology
Roberts, Fred
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Roy, Chunilal
Clinical Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry
Silverman, Martin
Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Sociology
Stanbury, William L.
Professor Emeritus of Commerce and Business Administration
Stewart, Jack F.
Professor Emeritus of English
Lurner, Christopher J.
Professor Emeritus of Germanic Studies
Uhler, Russell
Professor Emeritus of Economics
Vaughan, Henry
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Whittaker-Bleuler,
Sharon A.
Assistant Professor Emerita of Human Kinetics
Wood, Stephen
Professor Emeritus of Medical Genetics
1 Name
Proposed Rank (effective July 31, 2000)
Luke, Diana Moira
Associate Professor Emerita of Human Kinetics
Schutz, Robert W.
Professor Emeritus of Human Kinetics
Name
Proposed Rank (effective August 31, 2000)
Wild, Reginald D.
Assistant Professor Emeritus of Curriculum Studies
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000
12453
Adjournment
Dr. Slonecker
Dr. Rosengarten
That Senate approve the recommendations of
the Tributes Committee with respect to
emeritus status.
Carried.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the last regular meeting of the Senate for the 1999/2000
session was adjourned.
Next meeting
The first regular meeting of the Senate for the 2000/01 session will be held on
Wednesday, September 13, 2000 at 8:00 p.m.
 Vancouver Senate 12454
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix A: Undergraduate Enrolment Targets 2000-2001
Appendix A: Undergraduate Enrolment Targets 2000-2001
REPORT FROM THE VICE-PRESIDENT, ACADEMIC AND PROVOST
For the 2000-2001 academic year we plan to bring our total undergraduate enrolment closer
to our funded level. This year our forecast enrolment is 25,458 Full Time Equivalent (FTE)
students (slightly above our funded level of 25,446). This will translate into approximately
28,000 students (the difference is from an adjustment for students taking fewer than 30
credits). As you will recall, our enrolments have been further above our government-funded
targets in previous years.
We want our actual FTE enrolment to be as close as possible to the enrolment for which the
government funds us. Meeting this funded target exactly is extremely difficult. In most
undergraduate programs we have to offer admission to about twice as many students as we
wish to enrol. Once offers are made, however, we cannot control either the number of
students who enrol, or the number of courses in which they register. In addition, our funded
FTEs include both new and returning students. We cannot predict exactly how many students
return, or in how many courses each returning student will register.
To be under our FTE target would be to abdicate our responsibility in educating British
Colombians. To be over by too much, however, means that we stretch our limited financial
resources unduly, thereby eroding the quality of learning. We therefore try to ensure that if
there is a difference between our actual and target enrolments, we are over rather than under
the funded targets. Over the past three years our enrolments have grown, but again this year
we will work to maintain quality by keeping enrolment growth in check.
We are also planning that again in the coming academic year the distribution of full-time
equivalent students (FTEs) among the Faculties will remain relatively constant. In the past
some Faculties have changed in size at rates greater or smaller than the overall growth of
UBC. For this coming year we plan on holding constant the number of FTEs in each Faculty.
There are some minor exceptions to this in that we forecast that FTEs in Arts, Commerce,
Education and Science will decline slightly, while there will be an increase in Nursing FTEs.
One other important trend is that FTEs in both information technology and high technology
courses and programs have been rising in recent years. This growth continues to anticipate
government efforts to expand these places.
The university has in place two committees to oversee undergraduate enrolments. First, the
Senate Admissions Committee is responsible for reviewing University and Faculty enrolments
of new and continuing students. I met with this committee on January 26, reviewing the
enrolment plan for the upcoming year and discussing the strategies we will use to maintain
previous enrolment levels. Second, the Enrolment Management Committee (chaired by the
Registrar, Richard Spencer) oversees the enrolment process, advising Faculties and the
Undergraduate Admissions Office as necessary. This committee meets regularly through the
enrolment cycle.
The Committee of Deans also reviews our enrolment plans and helps in the process of setting
enrolment targets for the university and for specific Faculties. In particular the Deans of
admitting Faculties are responsible for determining at which year levels and at what numbers
we are to admit new students. The individual Faculty in-take numbers for 2000-2001 I am
providing
 Vancouver Senate 12455
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix A: Undergraduate Enrolment Targets 2000-2001
you with at this time have been recommended by the Deans. The attached tables are for
information."''
"'tables not included in the Minutes. Please contact Manager, Secretariat Services to obtain
copies.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
All changes are to be effective September 2000, unless otherwise indicated.
12456
CATEGORY 1 UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSALS (FOR APPROVAL)
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Program changes and new programs
Dean's Office
Bachelor of Science in Agroecology: Program Description, Advising Office: Student
Services, Admission, Academic Regulations, Degree Requirements, English Requirement,
Pre-Veterinary Program;
Bachelor of Science in Food, Nutrition and Health: Program Description, Advising Office:
Student Services, Admission, Academic Regulations, Degree Requirements, Food Science
Concentration and Major, Nutritional Science Major, Dietetics Major, Food and
Nutritional Sciences Double Major, Food Market Analysis Major;
Bachelor of Science in Global Resource Systems: Program Description, Advising Office:
Student Services, Admission, Academic Regulations, Degree Requirements.
New courses
Course changes
AGRO 322, AGRO 360, AGRO 361, AGRO 411, AGRO 422,
AGRO 423, AGRO 444, AGRO 460, AGRO 461, AGRO 490,
AGRO 497, AGRO 498, AGRO 499, AGSC 350, AGSC 450,
AGSC 490, FNH 302, FNH 313, FNH 325, FNH 340, FNH 341,
FNH 425, FNH 451, FNH 473, FNH 490, FNH 497, FNH 498,
FNH 499, FRE 302, FRE 306, FRE 420, FRE 475.
AGSC 260, FOOD 300: pre-requisite, subject code, vector;
AGSC 300: credits, description, subject code;
ANSC 319, PLNT 338, HUNU 303: description, number, subject
code, vector;
ANSC 320, ANSC 350, SOIL 304, SOIL 321: number, prerequisite, subject code, vector;
PLNT 331, PLNT 336, : number, subject code;
SOIL 313, SOIL 403, SOIL 416, HUNU 250, FRE 295: number,
subject code, vector;
ANSC 313, PLNT 433: description, number, pre-requisite, subject
code, vector;
ANSC 460, PLNT 418, FOOD 258, HUNU 305: description,
number, subject code, title, vector;
AGSC 100: credits, description, title, vector;
HUNU 407, HUNU 419: credits, description, number, subject code,
vector (eff. Sept. 2001);
HUNU 207: number, subject code;
FOOD 301, FOOD 309: subject code, vector.
HUNU 307, FOOD 303, FOOD 410: description, number, prerequisite, subject code, title, vector.
HUNU 421: number, subject code, title, vector.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
12457
Delete courses
HUNU 309: description, pre-requisite, subject code, title, vector.
ANSC 422: number, pre-requisite, subject code, vector.
ANSC 421: description, number, pre-requisite, subject code, vector.
ANSC 481: number, pre-requisite, subject code.
HUNU 411: number, pre-requisite, subject code, vector.
AGEC 340: description, subject code, vector.
AGEC 374: subject code.
AGEC 430, ANSC 430, PLNT 430, SOIL 430, AGEC 498, ANSC
498, PLNT 498, SOIL 498, AGEC 499, ANSC 499, PLNT 499,
SOIL 499, FOOD 430, HUNU 477, FOOD 499, HUNU 449,
AGEC 201, AGEC 258, AGEC 260, AGEC 295, AGEC 302,
AGEC 306, AGEC 340, AGEC 401, AGEC 403, AGEC 407,
AGEC 411, AGEC 415, AGEC 416, AGEC 420, AGEC 421,
AGEC 423, AGEC 430, AGEC 498, AGEC 499, AGSC 200, AGSC
210, AGSC 213, AGSC 220, AGSC 260, AGSC 310, AGSC 320,
AGSC 323,AGSC 421, ANSC 313, ANSC 319, ANSC 320, ANSC
321, ANSC 322, ANSC 323, ANSC 350, ANSC 406, ANSC 413,
ANSC 414, ANSC 417, ANSC 421, ANSC 422, ANSC 423, ANSC
430, ANDC 439, ANSC 450, ANSC 460, ANSC 482, ANSC 498,
ANSC 499, FOOD 258, FOOD 259, FOOD 300, FOOD 301,
FOOD 302, FOOD 303, FOOD 308, FOOD 309, FOOD 401,
FOOD 405, FOOD 410, FOOD 414, FOOD 418, FOOD 430,
FOOD 499, HUNU 203, HUNU 207, HUNU 303, HUNU 305,
HUNU 307, HUNU 309, HUNU 321, HUNU 351, HUNU 403,
HUNU 409, HUNU 411, HUNU 421, HUNU 449, HUNU 467,
HUNU 477, PLNT 258, PLNT 259, PLNT 304, PLNT 315, PLNT
320, PLNT 321, PLNT 322, PLNT 401, PLNT 404, PLNT 408,
PLNT 409, PLNT 410, PLNT 411, PLNT 413, PLNT 417, PLNT
423, PLNT 424, PLNT 435, SOIL 308, SOIL 314, SOIL 400, SOIL
401, SOIL 417, SOIL 422, SOIL 430, SOIL 433, SOIL 435, SOIL
442, SOIL 443, SOIL 498, SOIL 499.
Faculty of Arts
Asian Studies
New course JAPN 410.
Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies
New courses CLST 339, RELG 385, RELG 386.
English
New courses (effective Sept. 2001) ENGL 358, ENGL 359, ENGL 362, ENGL 369,
ENGL 419, ENGL 462, ENGL 466, ENGL 470, ENGL 472,
ENGL 474, ENGL 490.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000
12458
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
Course changes
Program changes
Delete courses
First Nations Studies
New program
New courses
Geography
New courses
History
New course
Latin American Studies
New courses
ENGL 341, ENGL 351, ENGL 389, ENGL 396, ENGL 415:
description, number, title;
ENGL 355, ENGL 366, ENGL 370, ENGL 375, ENGL 331,
ENGL 311, ENGL 310: credits,
description, number, title;
ENGL 368: number and title;
ENGL 312, ENGL 313, ENGL 314, ENGL 450: description,
number;
ENGL 336, ENGL 427, ENGL 446: description, number, title;
ENGL 318: credits, description, number.
Major in English
ENGL 350, ENGL 353, ENGL 360, ENGL 361, ENGL 363,
ENGL 365, ENGL 371, ENGL 372, ENGL 380, ENGL 381,
ENGL 382, ENGL 383, ENGL 384, ENGL 390, ENGL 391,
ENGL 392, ENGL 394, ENGL 395, ENGL 430, ENGL 431,
ENGL 434, ENGL 315, ENGL 316, ENGL 317, ENGL 319,
ENGL 330, ENGL 335, ENGL 337, ENGL 400, ENGL 410,
ENGL 416, ENGL 401, ENGL 403, ENGL 404, ENGL 411,
ENGL 413, ENGL 414, ENGL 333, ENGL 420, ENGL 421,
ENGL 422, ENGL 423, ENGL 424, ENGL 425, ENGL 426,
ENGL 429, ENGL 433, ENGL 435, ENGL 436, ENGL 437,
ENGL 439, ENGL 460, ENGL 461, ENGL 451, ENGL 440.
First Nations Studies.
FNSP 200, FNSP 310, FNSP 320, FNSP 400, FNSP 433.
GEOG 446, GEOG 447.
HIST 447.
LAST 201, LAST 205, LAST 301, LAST 303.
 Vancouver Senate 12459
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
School of Social Work and Family Studies
New course SOWK 200.
Program change BSW pre-admission studies.
Lheatre, Film and Creative Writing
New courses THTR 356, THTR 456.
Women's Studies
New courses WMST 205, WMST 210, WMST 230, WMST 235, WMST 301,
WMST 480.
CATEGORY 1 GRADUATE PROPOSALS (FOR APPROVAL)
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
New courses AGSC 500, ANSC 524.
Faculty of Applied Science
Chemical and Biological Engineering
New courses PPEN 501, PPEN 502, PPEN 503, PPEN 504, PPEN 505, PPEN
506, PPEN 507.
Civil Engineering
New courses CIVL 542, CIVL 543.
Metals and Materials Engineering
New course MMAT 579
School of Architecture
New courses ARCH 543, ARCH 555, ARCH 556.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000
12460
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
Course changes
Program change
Faculty of Arts
Asian Studies
New course
ARCH 515: credits, description, title.
ARCH 568: description, grading.
Add Co-operative Education component.
ASIA 580.
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
New program (Joint with SFU) Master of Business Administration for Accounting
Professionals.
New courses
MBAA 500, MBAA 501, MBAA 502, MBAA 503, MBAA 504,
MBAA 505, MBAA 506, MBAA 507, MBAA 508, MBAA 509,
MBAA 510, MBAA 511, MBAA 512, MBAA 513, MBAA 514,
MBAA 515, MBAA 516, MBAA 550, MBAA 551, MBAA 552,
MBAA 553, MBAA 554, MBAA 555, MBAA 556.
Faculty of Forestry
New courses FRST 568, FRST 569.
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSALS, CONTINUED
Faculty of Medicine
New course
Course change
FMED 428.
FMED 427: credits, grading, title.
 Vancouver Senate 12461
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
CATEGORY 2 PROPOSALS (FOR INFORMATION)
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Editorial changes to Spring 2000 Curriculum Report
Faculty of Applied Science
Chemical and Biological Engineering
Course changes CHBE 353, CHBE 442: reopen until Sept. 2001.
Delete course: CHBE 341.
Faculty of Arts
Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies
Course changes CLST 311, CLST 312: description and title;
RELG 380: number.
Fine Arts
Program changes Honours in Fine Arts, Third and Fourth Years.
Course changes FINA 300, FINA 469: title.
History
Course changes HIST 310: splits to HIST 310 and HIST 311;
HIST 406: splits to HIST 406 and HIST 409;
HIST 419: splits to HIST 416 and HIST 417;
HIST 460: splits to HIST 418 and HIST 419.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000
12462
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
Music
Course change
Program changes
MUSC 427: number.
General Studies, Secondary Education Stream, Third Year;
Honours in Music, Third and Fourth Years;
Organ, Third Year.
Lheatre, Film and Creative Writing
Course changes
Delete course
Program changes
Faculty of Education
Curriculum Studies
Course changes
THTR 150, THTR 345: description and pre-requisite;
THTR 160, THTR 260, THTR 362, THTR 370, THTR 462,
THTR 470: description;
THTR 305, THTR 350, THTR 351, THTR 352, THTR 353,
THTR 354, THTR 450, THTR 451, THTR 452, THTR 453:
pre-requisite;
THTR 320: splits to THTR 320 and THTR 321;
THTR 340: credits;
THTR 420: description, title.
THTR 199.
Major in Theatre: First and Second Years, Third and Fourth
Years, Honours in Theatre, Minor;
BFA: Acting, Second Year, Design/Technical Theatre, Certificate
in Theatre (Advanced Technology), Certificate in Theatre
(Design).
ARTE 314, BUED 314, CSED 314, CUST 314, HMED 314,
MAED 314, MUED 314, PETE 314, SSED 314, STED 314,
SCED 316: credits;
EDUC 306: subject code.
 Vancouver Senate 12463
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
Language and Literacy Education
Course changes LLED 312, LLED 313, LLED 314, LLED 318: credits.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Landscape Architecture Program
Program changes Master of Landscape Architecture: program description,
admission.
Faculty of Applied Science
Course change APSC 512: description.
Chemical and Biological Engineering
Delete courses CHML 580, CHML 581, CHML 582, CHML 583, CHML 584,
CHML 585, CHML 586, CHML 587, APSC 597.
Program changes Pulp and Paper Engineering, Master of Engineering.
Civil Engineering
Course change CIVL 541, CIVL 597: credits;
CIVL 555: credits, pre-requisite.
Delete course CIVL 554, CIVL 556.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Course change EECE 596: description.
School of Architecture
Course change ARCH 407, ARCH 410, ARCH 502, ARCH 503: description,
title;
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of May 17,2000
12464
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
ARCH 511, ARCH 530: description;
ARCH 512,ARCH 531: description, pre-requisite;
ARCH 541, ARCH 571: pre-requisite;
ARCH 573: credits, description, pre-requisite, title.
Delete course       ARCH 408, ARCH 411, ARCH 430, ARCH 450, ARCH 451,
ARCH 509, ARCH 527, ARCH 528, ARCH 534, ARCH 535,
ARCH 542, ARCH 543, ARCH 546, ARCH 547, ARCH 565,
ARCH 583, ARCH 584, ARCH 585, ARCH 586,ARCH 587,
ARCH 588.
Program changes:
Master of Architecture    Study Abroad Program;
Academic Regulations: Standing and Promotion, Advanced
Standing, Degree Requirements, Students holding a pre-
professional architecture degree, Course exemptions, ARCH 548
report, Final Review, Graduation Project, General requirements
for architectural registration;
Change in duration to three and one half years.
Master of Advanced Studies in Architecture      Program description, Academic
Regulations, Degree Requirements, Time Limit for Completion.
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
Course changes
Faculty of Science
Biology
Course change
Physics and Astronomy
Program change
Faculty of Law
Course change
BAIT 501, BAIT 502, BAIT 503, BAIT 504, BAIT 505, BAIT
506, BAIT 510, BAIT 513: title.
ZOOL 525: subject code.
Doctor of Philosophy.
LAW 307: title.
 Vancouver Senate 12465
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix B: Curriculum Change Summary
Faculty of Medicine
School of Rehabilitation Sciences
Course change RHSC 201: credits, vector.
 Vancouver Senate 12466
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix C: New Awards
Appendix C: New Awards
Agnes Ferguson ABERDEEN Bursary in Medicine — Bursaries totalling $14,500 have been
endowed through a bequest by Agnes Ferguson Aberdeen and are offered to students in
Medicine. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Pauline CAPELLE Memorial Prize in Nursing — A $300 prize has been endowed by family,
friends and colleagues of Pauline Capelle, Professor Emerita, UBC School of Nursing. The
award is offered to the top graduating student in the Master's program in Nursing (MSN) and
is awarded on the recommendation of the School of Nursing in consultation with the Faculty
of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
CHEMETICS Scholarship in Engineering — A $750 scholarship has been endowed by
Chemetics for a student in third year of the Chemical Engineering program (Process Option)
or Mechanical Engineering program. The award is made on the recommendation of the Dean,
Faculty of Applied Science. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
David Roy COELL Memorial Scholarship in Commerce — A $1,500 scholarship is offered by
D.R. Coell & Associates Inc. in memory of David Roy Coell, AACI, RIBC (1926-2000). The
scholarship is awarded to an undergraduate student with an interest in Urban Land
Economics in the B.Comm program and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Sonia CRADDOCK Memorial Prize — A $600 prize has been endowed in memory of Sonia
Craddock, elementary teacher, reading researcher, teacher educator and author of children's
literature. The prize is offered to an undergraduate student in the Faculty of Education who
achieves distinction in a children's literature course. Preference is given to a student who uses
children's literature effectively in a teaching practicum. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Education. (Available 1999/2000 Winter Session)
FIRST Nations House of Learning Bursary — Bursaries totalling $750 have been endowed
for First Nations students in any program and year of study. (Available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
CD. HOWE Graduate Fellowship — A $16,000 fellowship has been endowed by The CD.
Howe Memorial Foundation and The University of British Columbia. The award is offered to
a graduate student in a master's or doctoral program and is made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
CD. HOWE Graduate Fellowship in Public Policy — A $16,000 fellowship has been
endowed by The CD. Howe Memorial Foundation and The University of British Columbia.
The award is offered to a graduate student in public policy and is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Arthur S. HAWKES Scholarship in Chemistry — Scholarships totalling $2,200 have been
endowed through a bequest by Dr. Arthur S. Hawkes. The awards are offered graduate
students in Chemistry involved in biochemical research and are made on the recommendation
of the Department of Chemistry in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
(Available 2000/ 2001 Winter Session)
 Vancouver Senate 12467
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix C: New Awards
Linda Smith HAWKES Scholarship in Social Work — Scholarships totalling $6,600 have been
endowed through a bequest by Dr. Arthur S. Hawkes in honour of his late wife, Linda Smith
Hawkes. The awards are offered to students in Social Work involved in mental health studies
and are made on the recommendation of the School of Social Work and, in the case of
graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001
Winter Session)
Elizabeth KENDALL Scholarship in Education — Scholarships totalling $2,400 have been
endowed by Marie Kendall in honour of her sister. The awards are offered to students
excelling in English education or language arts and are made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Education and, in the case of graduate students, in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
Jack and Isabel KIRKPATRICK Scholarship in Social Work — Scholarships totaling $5,000
have been endowed by Margaret R. Crickard in honour of her cousins Jack and Isabel
Kirkpatrick. The awards are offered to students in the School of Social Work and Family
Studies and are made on the recommendation of the School and, in the case of graduate
students, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter
Session)
Malcolm MACINTYRE Memorial Entrance Scholarship in Law — A $1,500 entrance
scholarship has been endowed by his family in memory of Dr. Malcolm Maclntyre, who
taught at Dalhousie, was professor and Dean of Law at the University of Alberta, and
Professor in UBC's Faculty of Law from 1948 until his death in 1964. His special interests
were in the field of Torts and Trusts, and he was a master of the Socratic method of teaching.
The award is offered to students entering first year of Law and is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
McFARLANE-KARP Scholarship in Arts — Scholarships totaling $52,200 have been
endowed through a bequest by Kathleen Karp. The McFarlane-Karp scholarships, valued at
$2,500 each, are offered to first year undergraduate students entering the Faculty of Arts, and
are made on recommendation of the Undergraduate Admissions Office. ($48,900 available
1999/ 2000 Winter Session)
Harriet Evelyn MALLORY Memorial Scholarship — A $1,000 scholarship has been endowed
by family, friends and colleagues of Harriet Evelyn Mallory, Director, UBC School of Nursing
(1943-1967). The award is offered to a graduate student in nursing after completion of first
year and is made on the recommendation of the School of Nursing in consultation with the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
06328Tim and Ann O'RIORDAN Fellowship — A $18,000 fellowship has been endowed by
Tim and Ann O'Riordan and The University of British Columbia for a member of Green
College involved in sustainability research. The award is offered to a doctoral student
involved in the study of sustainable development and is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies and the Green College admission committee. (Available
2000/2001 Winter Session)
Oscar SZIKLAI Memorial Bursary in Forestry — A $300 bursary has been endowed in
memory of Dr. Oscar Sziklai by family, friend, and colleagues. The award is offered to a
student in
 Vancouver Senate 12468
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix C: New Awards
fourth year Forest Sciences with preference given to those studying Genetics/Silviculture.
(Available 2000/2001 Winter Session)
 Vancouver Senate 12469
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix D: Senate Budget Committee Report 1999-2000
Appendix D: Senate Budget Committee Report 1999-2000
PROCEDURAL ISSUES
Because of the unusual advisory position of the committee to the President and to the Senate,
the Committee spent some time reviewing its terms of reference, which are:
1. to meet with the President and assist in the preparation of the University budget. In
advising the President on the University budget, the Senate Budget Committee may request
information on any of the fund accounts of the University.
(Minutes of Senate, September 14, 1994)
2. to make recommendations to the President and to report to Senate concerning academic
planning and priorities as they relate to the preparation of the University budget.
(Minutes of Senate, p. 6239 and pp. 7721-2)
In addition, on Oct. 16 th , 1996, the SBC was instructed by Senate to consider, in
response to requests from the Vice President Academic and Provost, and in cooperation
with the Committee of Deans, all "Statements of Intent for New Programs" from Schools
or Faculties planning new degree programs (p.11530 Senate Minutes). Unfortunately, the
process in place for making these considerations was unclear, probably because it was
impractical to meet easily with the Committee of Deans. Therefore, the SBC has adopted a
new process for reporting on the budgetary implications from each Statement of Intent.
This involves one or more of the following steps: 1) an immediate statement of approval
to the Provost; 2) contact between the Chair of the SBC and the appropriate Dean to seek
resolution of concerns raised by the SBC; 3) a meeting of the Chair, the Dean and the
Provost if resolution is not obtained by the Chair and the Dean alone; and 4) a report to
the President immediately and to the Senate in the annual report from the SBC indicating
the unresolved budgetary concerns.
Consequently, we propose, that the following charge to the SBC be adopted as its third
term of reference:
3.   to consider, in response to requests from the Vice President Academic and
Provost, and in cooperation with the appropriate Deans or Directors, the
budgetary implications of all "Statements of Intent" from Faculties or Schools
planning new degree programs, and to report unresolved concerns directly to
the President and to Senate.
STATEMENTS OF INTENT FOR NEW PROGRAMS
Finally, on this matter, the Committee considered and approved the budgetary implications
for new program proposals relating to degrees in: Institute of Asian Research; Asia Pacific
Policy Studies; First Nations Studies (Major and Minor); Integrated Engineering; Women's
Studies and Gender Relations; and European Studies.
Some concerns were raised in the course of our assessments of each proposal, but the Provost
assured us that the full financial implications of each program would be addressed later and
reported to Senate.
 Vancouver Senate 12470
Minutes of May 17,2000	
Appendix D: Senate Budget Committee Report 1999-2000
BUDGETARY INSPECTIONS
We inspected with approval the new Policy (#72) on Tuition-fees requested by the Board of
Governors. We heard from the VP Academic's office that Access Funds have been allocated to
the GPOF budgets of faculties based on enrollment changes and activities relating to Trek
2000, but, we are pleased to see, not proportionally to the size of the faculty.
Budgetary proposals were heard with approval for ancillary services involving the Bookstore,
Parking & Security, Food Services, Plant Operations, Utilities, UBC Athletics & Recreation,
and from UBC Housing & Conferences, Applied Research and Evaluation Services (ARES),
Biomedical Communications, Green College and IT Services.
Serious concerns were raised about the business practices of Plant Operations in the past,
however, the report from David Barnes, the new Director of Plant Operations, offered hope
for improvements in the future.
Concerns were raised also about the contribution of some ancillary services - notably IT
Services and Green College - to the academic life of the university without some GPOF
support. The SBC has recommended that the President review the status of Green College and
IT Services solely as ancillary services in light of the academic contributions they provide and
of the significant role they play in the implementation of TREK 2000.
BUDGET DEVELOPMENT AND PRIORITIES
President Piper involved the SBC throughout the year in the development of a general strategy
with the other three major universities in the province to attract more financial support from
Government. Essentially, the strategy focused on the gap of $54.4M between the annual
support from operating grants and tuition fees in BC compared to other provinces, and to
seek support for faculty renewal and research infrastructure.
Subsequently, the Federal Budget confirmed our expectations with $900M for the Canada
Foundation for Innovation, $300M over five years for 21st Century Chairs for Research
Excellence, and $200M over five years for TRIUMF, and $10M for the SSHRCC. We feel
that all of these initiatives should contribute very favourably to the academic life of UBC, and
it commends President Piper for the central role she played in helping to create them.
We discussed thoroughly with President Piper our priorities for spending a possible increase
of $6M from the provincial government. However, when the provincial budget was
announced, we had to limit our plans. Nonetheless, we are pleased with the 5% increase and
the $14.2 million in new revenue to our base-operating budget this year. Moreover, we
believe that our involvement in establishing financial priorities will serve us well in meeting
our academic objectives over the next few years.
In short, we strongly endorse the budget presented by the President.
Respectfully submitted,
Michael MacEntee (Chair)
May, 2000

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