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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 2012-09-19

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 a place of mind Vancouver Senate
www.senate.ubc.ca
THE  UNIVER5ITYOF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER SENATE
MINUTES OF 19 SEPTEMBER 2012
Attendance
Present: Mr J. Yang (Vice-Chair), Mr C. Eaton (Acting Secretary), Mr T. Ahmed, Dr R. Anstee,
Dean G. Averill, Dr K. Baimbridge, Dr J. Belanger, Principal H. Brock, Dr L. Burr, Mr B.
Caracheo, Mr B. Caro, Dr G. Chapman, Dr P. Choi, Dr W. Dunford, Dr D. Farrar, Rev. Dr S.
Farris, Mr D. Fernandez, Dean B. Frank, Mr S. Haffey, Rev. Dr M. Hagemoen, Dean pro tem. E.
Hall, Dr P. Harrison, Dean R. Helsley, Mr M. Hunter, Dean M. Isman, Mr T. Jefferson, Dr U.
Kumar, Dr B.S. Lalli, Mr P. Lee, Ms M. Leong, Ms N. Liu, Dr P. Loewen, Ms K. Mahal, Dr W
McKee, Mr W. McNulty, Mr R. Parhar, Dr K. Patterson, Dean S. Peacock, Dean pro tem. S.
Porter, Dr R. Reid, Dr A. Riseman, Mr C Roach, Ms T. Rosseel, Dr L. Rucker, Mr A. Sihota, Mr
D. Simunic, Dr S. Singh, DrR. Sparks, Dr B. Stelck, Ms S. Sterling, Ms K. Tyson, Dr M.
Vessey, Dr L. Walker, Dr R. Windsor-Liscombe, Dr D. Witt, Mr E. Woo, Ms L. Zhu.
Regrets: Ms E. Biddlecombe, Dean M.A. Bobinski, Prof. B. Craig, Mr B. Craig, Ms C. Dickson,
Ms L. Eccott, Mr P. Edgcumbe, Prof. B. Goold, Dr S. Grayston, Dr W. Hall, Dean J. Innes, Dr
A. Ivanov, Dr S. Knight, Dr D. Lehman, Dr P. Leung, Prof. B. MacDougall, Dr P. Marshall, Ms
S. Morgan-Silvester (Chancellor), Principal L. Nasmith, Dr D. O'Donoghue, Dr I. Parent, DrN.
Perry, Principal J. Plessis, Mr J. Ridge (Secretary), Dean C. Shuler, Dean R. Sindelar, Dean G.
Stuart, Mr M. Thorn, Dr S. Thorne, Prof. S.J. Toope (President) Mr D. Verma, Dr R. Wilson, Dr
R. Winter.
Guests: Mr M. Duguay, Dr D. Green, Ms L. Kearns, Dr A. Kindler, Mr P. Lucasik, Ms N.
Madhani, Ms M. McDermott, Mr J. Mills, Dr H. Pechar, Dr A. Redish, Ms J. Shaw, Mr M.
Weiss, Ms M. Wona.
Call to Order
The Vice-Chair called the first regular meeting of the Senate for the 2012/2013 Academic Year
to order.
Senate & Committee Membership
The Acting Secretary welcomed Dean Robert Helsley of the Faculty of Commerce & Business
Administration to Senate.
Tributes Committee
BASIL FREDERICK STUART-STUBBS
CHARLES BOURNE
JOHN E. PHILLIPS
Vol. 2011/12 11/12-1
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-2
Minutes of 19 September 2012
RALPH RAYMOND LOFFMARK
Dean Murray Isman presented on behalf of the Committee Chair, Dr Sally Thome.
Bruce MacDougall }        That Senate approve the Memorial Minutes for Mr
Lance Rucker Basil Frederick Stuart-Stubbs, Dr Charles Bourne,
Dr John E. Phillips, and Prof. Ralph Raymond
Loffmark, that they be entered into the Minutes of
Senate, and that a copy be sent to the families of
the deceased.
Mr. Basil Frederick Stuart-Stubbs
Mr. Basil Frederick Stuart-Stubbs was bom in Moncton, New Brunswick, and moved to
Vancouver with his parents at the age of 16. He received his B.A. (Honours in Philosophy) from
UBC in 1952, and his Bachelor of Library Science from McGill University in 1954. Between
1954 and 1956, Basil worked as a reference librarian at McGill. He returned to UBC in 1956 to
join the Library staff, specializing in collections and rare books. In 1964, Basil was appointed
University Librarian. During his time as University Librarian, he dedicated many years of
service to the UBC Senate.
Basil moved to a faculty position in 1981, when he was appointed Professor and Director of the
School of Library, Archival and Information Studies. While at the School, Basil implemented the
first post-graduate degree program in North America in the field of archival studies. For a dozen
years, he taught the only course available on publishing in British Columbia.
Basil received many awards and honours, including the Gray Campbell Distinguished Service
Award for his outstanding contributions to the book industry in British Columbia in 2004, the
Order of Canada in 2005, and the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.
Privately, Basil spent decades researching his family's genealogy, and enjoyed many travels
abroad. As an amateur pianist and avid concert-attendee, he had a lifelong passion for collecting
sheet music, recordings, and books by and about pianists. Professor emeritus and University
Librarian emeritus at UBC, Basil will be remembered as a bibliophile, scholar, and librarian.
Dr. Charles Bourne
Bom in Barbados, Dr. Charles Bourne moved to Canada to pursue a career in law. He completed
a B.A. from the University of Toronto in 1945, and went on to earn an L.L.M. from Cambridge
in 1947, and an S.J.D. from Harvard in 1970. Following several years at the University of
Saskatchewan's College of Law, Dr. Bourne took a position at UBC's Faculty of Law in 1950.
During his academic career, Dr. Bourne became a world renowned scholar in the areas of water
resources law and the law of the sea. His leadership roles included President of the Canadian
British International Law Association, Academic-in-Residence for External Affairs, President of
the Canadian Council of International Law, member of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-3
Minutes of 19 September 2012
The Hague, advisor to the International Joint Commission in Ottawa, and Chairman of the
International Law Association Committee on International Water Resources Law. He also wrote
numerous articles, and served as Editor-in-Chief for The Canadian Yearbook of International
Law.
Dr. Bourne received many honours, including Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1979,
the John E. Read Medal from the Canadian Council of International Law in 1986, and the UBC
Alumni Award for Research in 2011.
Between 1954 and 1981, Dr. Bourne served on the UBC Senate, as representative of the Faculty
of Law and of Joint Faculties. He also acted as special advisor to the President from 1975 to
1986, when he retired Professor emeritus. In recognition of his long-standing service to UBC, the
University bestowed upon Dr. Bourne an honorary doctor of laws degree in 1993.
Dr. John E. Phillips
Dr. John E. Phillips was born in Montreal in 1934, and spent his high school and university years
in Nova Scotia. After earning his B.Sc. with first class honours in Biology and the University
Medal for Science at Dalhousie University, Dr. Phillips obtained his M.Sc. in 1957. The National
Research Council of Canada awarded him a Special Overseas Scholarship to complete his Ph.D.
in Cellular and Comparative Physiology at Cambridge University, England.
On his return to Canada, Dr. Phillips became an Assistant Professor at Dalhousie, and in 1964,
he joined UBC's Zoology Department. From 1991 to 1996, he served as Department Head, and
in 2000, became Professor emeritus. Under his leadership, Dr. Phillips' group of graduate
students, post-doctoral fellows from abroad, and prominent faculty visitors pioneered the field of
epithelial transport mechanisms and their neuro-hormonal control, including renal function,
which enables various arthropods to inhabit diverse extreme environments. He was also coauthor of some 150 research papers, and sat on the editorial boards of 4 international scientific
journals.
In recognition of his group's life-long research contributions, Dr. Phillips received numerous
honours, including election to the Royal Society of Canada, a Killam Senior Fellowship for
sabbatical leave in Cambridge, a UBC Killam Research Prize, the Fry Medal from the Canadian
Society of Zoologists for which he served as Secretary, Vice-President and President, and the
James Chair at St. Francis Xavier University.
In addition to his many other contributions to UBC, Dr. Phillips represented the Faculty of
Graduate Studies on the Senate from 1987 to 1990, and chaired many University-wide
committees.
Professor Ralph Raymond Loffmark
Professor Ralph Raymond Loffmark was bom in Vancouver in 1920. A man who appreciated the
value of an education, Professor Loffmark pursued studies at the University of Toronto, the
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-4
Minutes of 19 September 2012
University of Pennsylvania, and UBC. He earned his B.A. and M.B.A., before going on to
achieve Law and Chartered Accountancy degrees.
In 1962, Professor Loffmark entered provincial politics, serving first as B.C.'s Minister of Trade,
and then as Minister of Health. After an illustrious political career, he returned to UBC as a
Commerce professor in 1972, and specialized in teaching law to Commerce students. Professor
Loffmark received a Master Teacher Award in 1975, became Professor emeritus in 1985, and
continued at UBC until his retirement in 1990. From 1962 to 1966, he served on the Senate, as
representative of the Faculty of Commerce.
Professor Loffmark was instrumental, along with Dean Peter Lusztig and co-founders Murray
Leith Sr., Michael Ryan and Milton Wong, in setting up the UBC Portfolio Management
Foundation. The UBC PMF has been a significant success at the business school, and is still
recognized as a major achievement that would not have come to pass without Professor
Loffmark's vital input and expertise.
Approved.
Minutes of the Previous Meeting
Aaron Sihota }        That the Minutes of the Meeting of 16 May 2012
Joseph Belanger be adopted as circulated.
Approved.
Business Arising from the Minutes
The Acting Secretary drew Senate's attention to the memorandum distributed from the Registrar
with regard to the allocation of fees from residents.
From the Board of Governors
The Vice-Chair confirmed that the following items approved by the Vancouver Senate were
subsequently approved by the Board of Governors as required under the University Act:
Senate Meeting of April 17, 2012
Curriculum proposals from the Faculties of Education, Forestry, Graduate Studies (Arts,
College for Interdisciplinary Studies, and Land & Food Systems), Law, and Science
New Awards
Senate Meeting of May 16, 2012
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-5
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Transfer of the Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) from the College for
Interdisciplinary Studies to the School of Population and Public Health in the Faculty of
Medicine, and in approving the transfer of the W. Maurice Young Centre for Applied
Ethics from the College for Interdisciplinary Studies to the School of Population and
Public Health in the Faculty of Medicine
Curriculum proposals from the Faculties of Applied Science, Arts, Commerce &
Business Administration, Education, Graduate Studies (Applied Science, College for
Interdisciplinary Studies, Commerce & Business Administration, Dentistry, Education,
and Medicine), Law, and Pharmaceutical Sciences
New Awards
Joint Report from the Academic Policy, Admissions, and Curriculum Committees
See Appendices A: Vancouver School of Economics, andB: Bachelor of International Economics
Paul Harrison }        That Senate approve and recommend to the Board
Kenneth Baimbridge of Governors that the status of the Department of
Economics be changed to the Vancouver School of
Economics within the Faculty of Arts, effective 1
November 2012.
Dr Harrison presented on behalf of the Academic Policy Committee.
He explained for Senate that a change of the nature proposed - from a department to a school -
was not a frequent but was a long-standing practice at UBC. Dr Harrison went on to explain that
In February 1949, Senate set out characteristics for a "school" at UBC and opined that the
Vancouver School of Economics proposal met the spirit of those characteristics due to its
offering of a new, distinctive degree, as well as changes to its teaching, research, and community
outreach mandate.
With reference to the tuition rates included for information in the distributed material, Dr
Harrison advised Senate that the financial information in the proposal was out-of-date and thus
the tuition aspect will not be presented to the Board at its next meeting - consultation would
occur with student groups prior to a tuition proposal being considered by the Board of
Governors.
Senator Loewen noted that one criterion for a school in the 1949 policy is that their coursework
is not normally available outside of the school; he asked for assurances that Economics courses
would still be available to those outside of the School.
Dr Harrison confirmed that they would still be available to students outside of Economics
and that the traditional Economics Major, Honours and Minor programs currently offered
by the Department would still be offered by the new School.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-6
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Ken Baimbridge asked if the "5-year" academic review procedure would be applicable to the
School.
Dr Harrison confirmed that all academic units undergo the usual reviews; as a school, the
Vancouver School of Economics would of course still be an academic unit of the
University.
Approved.
Santokh Singh }        That Senate approve and recommend to the Board
Enzo Woo of Governors the new Bachelor of International
Economics degree program and its associated
courses.
Dr Singh presented the Bachelor of International Economics degree and its associated courses on
behalf of the Senate Curriculum and Admissions Committees. He noted that the proposed
ECON 204 is to be microeconomics and not macroeconomics as listed in the material circulated.
Senator Vessey noted that the new school would raise a lot of money; as chair of the Senate
Library Committee he noted that the proposal did indicate it would increase demands on the
Library. He noted that the Library was dealing with a huge budget situation at present; he asked
if it would make sense to connect the new costs with the library situation.
Dr Singh replied that the Library did note that it would have new expenditures resulting
from the new degree as part of the curriculum consideration process and that this was
discussed at the Curriculum Committee.
With reference to Library funding, the Provost replied that within the central budget there
was not a set link between revenue and specific expenditures. The overall Library budget
is around 35 million dollars, of which 15 million dollars is for acquisitions. He added that
this year, UBC added a 2% inflationary increase to the acquisitions budget, but noted that
the cost of books and online resources are increasing at a greater rate. To this specific
issue, the Provost stated that although specific funding for the Library will not be
provided as part of the Vancouver School of Economics or Bachelor of International
Economics proposals, the issue of a sustainable Library budget was in the forefront of his
mind.
With permission of Senate, Dr David Green of the Department of Economics /
Vancouver School of Economics spoke to the issue of the VSE budget. He indicated that
the revenue from the new degree program would primarily go to funding the VSE but
that a portion would also go towards the central University budget and the Faculty of
Arts.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-7
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Senator Vessey noted that Library sign-offs were required for every new program, and
the Library has always been very cooperative in this regard, but new and continuing
programs were posing increasing challenges for the Library given its limited resources.
Senator Anstee spoke to the notation in the proposal that student visa status will not be a criteria
for selection and that the program balance will be achieved by other means. This is the typical
behavior with UBC Admissions and he asked that the record reflect that it would be the same for
this proposal.
Approved.
Robert Sparks }        That the enrolment target for the Bachelor of
Richard Anstee International Economics program be an equal
balance between domestic and international
students (approximately 50% of each in each
cohort), despite the second part of the resolution
on international student admissions passed at the
May 15, 1996 Senate meeting, wherein the
maximum number of international students
admitted to and registered in an undergraduate
program in any year be established at 15% of the
number of Canadians and permanent residents
registered in that program in the previous year.
Chair of the Senate Admissions Committee, Dr Robert Sparks, spoke to the proposed change in
enrolment policy for this program, drawing Senate's attention to the history and background of
the 1996 Senate resolutions around international enrolment. He suggested that the three
conditions referenced in May 1996 were anachronistic and needed to be reviewed as they were
not supported by current University practices and priorities. He informed Senate that his
Committee was conducting such a review and planned to present a proposal for reform later this
term or early in the new year. In its discussion, the Committee noted that there were several
problems for the 1996 resolution as a number of programs already exceeded the resolution.
Forestry, Commerce & Business Administration, Arts, and several other programs were in
excess of the set percentage. He noted the University's goals to increase international enrolment
and asked that a variance be allowed on the strength of this proposal.
Senator Burr suggested that as the current 15% international limit will likely be raised to 20 or
25%, why did the Bachelor of International Economics proposal specify 50%?
Dr Green replied that an equal balance was viewed as the most beneficial given the
unique focus of the program and desired student learning.
Senator Loewen asked how we would deal with an excess of highly qualified foreign applicants.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-8
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Senator Sparks replied that the Broad-Based Admission criteria used would be the same
for Bachelor of Arts students. The task would be setting a proper threshold to achieve
around 40 domestic and 40 international students based on a baseline set based on
domestic students.
Dr Anstee added that students also came from the same educational jurisdictions despite
having different citizenships (or vice-versa). Some of our domestic students have
international educations and many international students have Canadian educations.
Approved.
Admissions Committee
DISCONTINUATION OF POLICY J-52: ADMISSION FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL APPLICANTS
FOLLOWING THE BC/YUKON CURRICULUM
Robert Sparks } That Policy J-52 be discontinued effective
Philip Loewen immediately.
Senator Sparks spoke to this proposal, noting that senators would recall the March 2012
consideration of this issue and the obligation of the Senate Admissions Committee to report back
at this meeting on the continuation of this policy. The Committee has taken the view that many
aspects of Policy J-52 were temporary measures in light of the British Columbian teacher job
action last spring. The Committee hopes that the province has moved past this impasse but
believes that the broader issue of using Grade 11 marks for consideration of admissibility to
UBC still needs to be considered: our competitors use grade 11 marks to make admission
decisions much earlier than UBC can, and so in the interests of staying at the forefront the
Committee feels it necessary to continue to explore how to use these grades by coming up with a
replacement policy. The Committee Chair further noted that UBC already has a policy in place
for extra-provincial and international applicants for the use of Grade 11 grades and so not having
policy in this area only penalizes BC students.
Dr Sparks went on to say that despite discontinuing J-52, the Committee is recommending that
the calendar language be retained and consultation is being undertaken already on a replacement
policy. The Committee's goal is to have the new policy before the November Senate for
consideration. The language being retained is useful and it lets the public know we are still
considering this matter. The new policy will take a more holistic approach including
conditionality and incentivizing earlier applications.
Senator Haffey expressed his concern at keeping language in the calendar based on a policy that
was repealed; he asked what would happen if the Committee's proposal was not accepted in
November.
Senator Sparks confirmed that if the new policy was not acceptable, he would have to
propose that the current language be removed from the Calendar at that time.
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of 19 September 2012
12/13-9
Approved.
BACHELOR OF EDUCATION - CREDIT REQUIREMENTS
BACHELOR OF MUSIC - AUDITION REQUIREMENT
DOCTOR OF MEDICINE - DEADLINES AND MISCELLANEOUS UPDATES
BACHELOR OF MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE - PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING - ADMISSION AVERAGE
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING - POST-SECONDARY COURSE REQUIREMENTS
See Appendix C: Admissions Summary
Robert Sparks
William McNulty
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Bachelor of
Education program, effective for the 2013 Winter
Session and thereafter;
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Bachelor of
Music program, effective for the 2013 Winter
Session and thereafter;
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Doctor of
Medicine program, effective for the 2013 Winter
Session and thereafter;
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Bachelor of
Medical Laboratory Science program, effective for
the 2012 Winter Session and thereafter;
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Bachelor of
Science in Nursing program, effective for the 2013
Winter Session and thereafter; and
That Senate approve changes in admission
requirements for applicants to the Bachelor of
Science in Nursing program, effective for the 2013
Winter Session and thereafter.
Senator Sparks briefly explained the rationale for each change.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-10
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Senator Baimbridge suggested a correction to the Applications from Current Graduate Student
Sections of Medicine entry to reflect that this section was applicable to graduate students from
other institutions, and not just from UBC.
The Acting Secretary agreed to bring this matter to the attention to the Faculty of
Medicine for review and possible revision.
NB:     Subsequent to the meeting, the Faculty of Medicine replied to the Secretary via Dr
Baimbridge that the current language was to its satisfaction.
Approved.
Curriculum Committee
See Appendix D: Curriculum Summary
On behalf of the Committee Chair, Dr Peter Marshall, Dr Santokh Singh presented.
Dr Singh informed Senate that in accordance with the Senate's Policy on Certificate Programs,
the following certificates have been approved:
- UBC Certificate in Cultural Planning,
- UBC Certificate in Digital Strategy, and
- Graduate Certificate in Educational Administration and Leadership
RATIFICATION OF SUMMERY APPROVALS
Santokh Singh } That Senate ratify the decisions of the Senate
Katharine Patterson Curriculum Committee regarding the attached
proposals.
Senator Singh briefly explained the materials approved by the Committee over the summer
months.
Approved.
SEPTEMBER CURRICULUM PROPOSALS
Santokh Singh } That the new courses, changed courses, new
Darran Fernandez programs, and program changes brought
forward by the Faculties of Education and Land
& Food Systems be approved.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-11
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Senator Singh listed the new proposals for Senate, including the creation of the new Animal
Biology honours program.
Approved.
Nominating Committee
Dr Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe, Committee Chair, presented.
STUDENT AWARDS COMMITTEE
Rhodri Windsor- } That Senate approve the addition ofDr Lawrence
Liscombe Burr to fill the vacant Convocation Senator position
William McNulty on the Student Awards Committee.
Approved.
TITLE CHANGE FOR VICE-PROVOST
Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe     } That Senate approve the adjustment to the
Mark Vessey composition of the Library, Admissions, and
Academic Building Needs Committees to reflect the
change in title from Vice-Provost and Associate
Vice-President, Academic Resources to Vice-Provost
and Associate Vice-President Enrolment and
Academic Facilities.
Senator Vessey noted UBC's inconsistency in the use of a hyphen in its vice-prefaced titles and
it systematic deletion from titles in the Provost's office.
Senator Windsor-Liscombe opined that the hyphens should be reinserted.
NB:      The Acting Secretary agreed to discuss the matter with the Secretary to the Board of
Governors and report back to Senate with the correct spellings.
Approved.
Student Awards Committee
See Appendix E: Awards
Dr Brian Stelck, chair of the Student Awards Committee, presented.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13 -12
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Brian Stelck } That Senate accept the awards as listed and forward
Shannon Sterling them to the Board of Governors for approval; and
That letters of thanks be sent to the donors.
Dr Stelck noted that Senate was considering approximately $156,000 worth of new awards for
consideration.
Senator Haffey asked about the specifying of our current four Korean exchange universities in
the formal award term for the Charles KIM Student Mobility Award in Arts. He suggested that it
may be wise to omit the names in case we gained additional partners there. .
The Acting Secretary advised that should the names be included we would have to
modify the award terms to have new universities be eligible. Normally, the donors in
conjunction with the Development office propose terms.
Senator Stelck suggested that it would not be wise to change the terms on the floor of
Senate given the circumstances; he suggested that he would be happy to bring this matter
up with the Development office next week and propose an amendment if warranted.
With reference to a question on the Bert Welch TLA Scholarship in Forest Operations, it was
confirmed by Dr Stelck that $2500 was the value of the scholarship offered on an annual basis,
not an endowment.
Dr Stelck noted for Senate that at a meeting next week, the Student Awards Committee would be
discussing its procedures and protocols for award consideration.
NB:     Dr Stelck agreed to have the wording for the Charles KIM Student Mobility Award in
Arts reviewed and to bring forward an amendment if warranted to the next meeting of
Senate.
Approved.
Reports from the Provost
VICE-PROVOST AND ASSOCIATE VICE-PRESIDENT, ENROLMENT AND ACADEMIC FACILITIES
The Provost informed Senate of the appointment of Dr Angela Redish as Vice-Provost,
Enrolment and Academic Facilities.
Dr Farrar explained that the shift in this Vice-Provost's title was to show the focus on UBC's
people over UBC's buildings, and expressed his excitement at her joining his office.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-13
Minutes of 19 September 2012
In a related matter, the Provost advised that Dr Anna Kindler's title was now Vice-Provost
Academic (formerly Vice-Provost Academic Affairs) in recognition of her wide-ranging duties
and in parallel with the Provost's appointment as Vice-President Academic.
Further discussion occurred around the inconsistent hyphenation of titles at UBC.
INTERNATIONAL BRIDGE TO UBC
The Provost, Dr Farrar, presented. He noted that when he last presented, this proposal was
known as Pathways College. The name was an issue at Senate and elsewhere, and for now we
are thus calling it A Bridge to UBC: An International Program for the moment, but this may not
be the final name.
In terms of this program being located in a college, the Provost advised that upon consideration
of UBC's naming traditions and academic organizations, the organization being planned seemed
to fit best as a college at UBC.
Dr Farrar reminded Senate that this is a highly complex undertaking and the enrolment of
international students at Canadian universities has its controversies.
The Provost spoke about the impact of international students on universities and Federal and
Provincial priorities in this area. The government approach is largely focused on the socioeconomic benefits surrounding economies; Dr Farrar explained that UBC approaches this from a
different way: increasing the diversity of our student body is something we should be striving for
- increasing our diversity provides a better learning environment by diversifying our
perspectives.
Although there is scholarly literature to support the economic benefits of increasing international
student enrolment, there is no direct research on diverse student bodies; there is however
literature on diverse populations being better at decision making in general. That said, there is a
huge desire amongst our study body to be more diverse. Our surveys indicate that one thing that
attracts students to UBC is diversity, and this is joined by institutional quality and (safety of)
location as being strong drivers for student demand.
With reference to our current international recruitment (ISI) system, Dr Farrar noted:
•
•
•
ISI uses a relationship-based recruitment system from IB/AP or A-level schools that we
wish to maintain. Almost all of these programs are taught in English, and the quality of
ISI students is exceedingly high.
Around 1/3   of our "international" students actually come from Canadian secondary
schools and thus have already experienced a domestic curriculum.
Most of our ISI students come from a privileged background; to get into these schools
students generally have to come from a top-tier economic background.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13 -14
Minutes of 19 September 2012
The Provost suggested that to diversify and grow, we will also have to look at local/indigenous
schools, and these students will also be faced with language and cultural issues. As a result, to
deal with this group of students, we think we have to build a separate entry stream for that class
of students to address their unique backgrounds. This new stream will not replace the current
4000 ISI students but will supplement their numbers. With respect to recruitment of students, Dr
Farrar noted that presently UBC does not use agents nor recruit at "fairs."
Dr Farrar noted for Senate that we presently have around 13% of our undergraduate direct-entry
student body as international students, but suggested that instead of percentages, UBC should be
talking about what kind of student body we want to attract.
In terms of overall goals for this program, the Provost highlighted:
•
Increasing diversity of our student population to give all our students a better
understanding of the world and have greater global opportunities;
• Social Justice - moving beyond just the "elite" schools in foreign countries;
• Enhance financial sustainability and diversifying our revenues; and
• Using this program as a "living lab" for pedagogical innovation
The Provost reminded Senate that inflation was eroding away the fraction of the budget funded
by Government; 5 years ago 50% of our budget was from the government block grant, now it's
46%. Currently tuition is increased by 2% for inflation (and is limited by Government) and we
expect this may be frozen in the future. International students are thus one of our few ways of
dealing with inflationary pressures. Dr Farrar noted that it was important to acknowledge that
UBC is still a public institution, and although government funding has dropped relatively
speaking, we are much better funded than most US institutions where many have had
government funding drop to below 10% of total revenues.
Dr Farrar then spoke of the structure considerations for the program:
• UBC's rejection of the private partner approach taken by Simon Fraser University. UBC
is anxious to retain more control than partners would allow, contain costs, to learn from
this program's offering, and have strong monitoring of program quality.
• Series of Senate Committee would need to be involved in the formal program approval,
consideration of admission standards to UBC degree programs, course acceptability, and
student quality discussions.
• For scale, the Provost suggested that 300 students be the goal for 2014/2015. At steady
state, around 1000 students for 2016/2017 are expected. The program is expected to have
an 80% transition rate to UBC degree programs and we will have to consider the
alternatives for those who do not make the transition.
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• Enrolment numbers will have to be brought to Senate on a regular basis as the program
grows. Based upon the scale considerations referenced earlier, UBC will be close to 16%
at 2016 and if students moved through as expected we would be close to 20% by 2018.
The Provost highlighted the following areas where UBC would need to be vigilante to ensure
success:
• Communications
• Governance Structure
• Infrastructure
• Quality Assessment
• Market Assessment
• Recruiting
Dr Farrar noted for Senate that at a Committee meeting last week there was strong support from
the Board of Governors, and he felt excitement from deans, associate deans, and many faculty
members.
Senator Mahal asked about the recruitment of students to this program from lower socioeconomic backgrounds
Dr Farrar replied that in many countries - with China and India as the primary examples -
there were growing middle classes and many families are interested in sending at least
one child to a school that will offer the kind of education we are offering. He noted that
in Canada's history a similar pattered occurred with emerging middle classes.
He went on to state that we are in discussions with some foundations about recruiting
students from lower income classes in those areas where we want to recruit students from
as well. Some of the revenue from the Bridge program made will be used to pay for
scholarships in the same way 75 ISI students are fully or partially funded at a rate of $35
to 40 thousand a year. It is expensive but we are at much higher level of funding for these
students than our comparators. We are also finalizing discussions with Langara College
for a bridge program for aboriginal students.
Senator Singh asked for more details on the decision to not work with private partners.
The Provost replied that this was part of our infrastructure strategy. The students would
be here on a full-time basis and we could therefore make more efficient use of our
resources and their time. We could for instance schedule them for classes on Saturday, as
these students will be here full-time in residence - we are looking at needing a facility
similar to the Ponderosa Hub development. We are working with faculties on building
out our courses. We have a group in Continuing Studies that looks at English as an
academic language and we are starting to work with them as well.
Senator Mahal asked if there would also be additional resources provided for student services.
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Dr Farrar replied that an increase in students would have to result in more funding for
student services. We need money for libraries, for career services, etc.
Senator Harrison suggested that the Teaching & Learning Committee should be consulted on the
new pedagogy aspects.
The Provost agreed, referencing the Carl Weiman Initiative. He also mentioned the
Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technologies responsibilities, noting that Simon Bates,
its new director, is from Edinburgh - one of few places that has created something similar
to what we are considering building at UBC.
Senator Sterling noted that there were already issues between the Okanagan and Vancouver
campuses with transfers; would there be a relationship with the Okanagan for these students?
Dr Farrar replied that yes we are in discussions with the Okanagan campus. Okanagan
already has a small program for students who are deficient in English. Vancouver did the
same thing for a small cohort of around 80 students already. With respect to the moving
between campuses, he noted that the primary problem was not the switching campuses
but the switching of faculties and degree programs.
Senator Sparks suggested that the Senate Academic Building Needs Committee would also be
interested in terms of space utilization and academic facilities on campus; the Provost agreed.
Senator Mahal asked for comparable institution programs and their successes.
The Provost replied that Simon Fraser University and Navitas had built Fraser
International College. They went from no international students to 20% over six years
and are generally happy with student quality although this growth was a contentious
decision for them. Oregon State University's INTO program is generally viewed as
successful. Dr Farrar noted that both of these schools used international agents as
recruiters and sessional lecturers for teaching, both of which we wish to avoid.
Senator Jefferson noted that there was a citizenship limitation on some professional designations
so this would need to be kept in mind for those programs.
Dr Farrar replied that we are looking at these issues with the faculties; for Engineering's
specific situation with citizenship he would defer to the Dean of the Faculty. For the
Bachelor of Applied Science in particular, Mining Engineering has room for growth and
international students are very interested in this program.
The Dean pro tempore of the Faculty of Applied Science added that there are reciprocal
licensing and registration exemptions for many countries, so he did not expect this be a
major concern. The largest issue he expected for the BASc program would be ensuring
that these students could be made ready for 2n year in the time expected.
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Dr Farrar replied that for some students an extended first year might be needed to
properly prepare them for degree programs. With reference to the cohort
approach, the Provost suggested that separate cohorts may allow us to have a
January start which would help us with recruitment from the southern hemisphere.
Report from the Faculty of Graduate Students
The Dean pro tempore of the Faculty, Dr Susan Porter, presented.
Susan Porter } That the Senate approve the Resolution of the
Christopher Roach Faculty of Graduate Studies of 10 May 2012
regarding delegation of the responsibility for
approving and recommending candidates for
graduation to the Academic Policy Committee of the
Graduate Council.
Senator Baimbridge noted that this would mean that Graduate Studies' candidates for graduation
would be brought to the Senate on a regular basis should this motion be approved.
Approved.
Adjournment
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 8:04 pm.
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Appendix A: Vancouver School of Economics
Faculty of Arts: Proposal for the Creation of the
Vancouver School of Economics at UBC
April 2012
Background
Economic challenges are amongst the most difficult issues confronting society - from
homelessness in Vancouver to fiscal austerity to international financial crises and food security,
the challenges are vast. The goal of the Vancouver School of Economics (VSE) initiative is to
create an institution that would rank among the top ten centres for economic research and
teaching in the world. The VSE (which will replace the Department of Economics) will
contribute to understanding and addressing national and international economic challenges
through intensive undergraduate and graduate programs, through research directed at central
policy issues, and through engagement with policy makers and public policy debates. All
countries face serious economic challenges regardless of size, population, or wealth, and Canada
is no exception. Canada has as many economic problems to solve as other wealthy countries such
as France, the UK or even the US. But Canada has far less capacity to address those problems -
because it has far fewer top level economists.
Creating the VSE will benefit UBC because such Schools provide value beyond the mere sum of
their parts. The best units attract not only top level faculty but also top level visitors, all of whom
are exposed to an environment where Canada's issues are a focus of research and teaching. Since
Canada is not the US, and since it is a small economy, tightly connected to the rest of the world,
such a unit should be oriented both inward to Canada and outward to the rest of the world. The
VSE we envisage would contribute to academic economic debates but also act as an informed
and objective contributor to public policy debates in Canada and the rest of the world.
Creating the VSE will also benefit UBC by providing an education in economics that is second
to none in the world. Both undergraduate and graduate students would be exposed to top level
faculty debating the main economic issues of our time. The students attracted to such an
environment would undoubtedly be committed and interested, and the questioning from such
sharp young minds would further enrich the intellectual discourse of the School and the
university. The student's experience will be enhanced by their immersion in an enriched,
research-intensive learning environment. The new Bachelor of International Economics program
to be created with the School will involve a purposeful mixing of international and domestic
students, enriching the VSE, the Faculty of Arts and the university as a whole by bringing more
bright international students to campus.
The essence of the proposal is that by refocusing the existing department of economics and
raising its visibility the Vancouver School of Economics at UBC will: create a globally
recognized brand that will attract students from across Canada and the world to graduate and
undergraduate programs; enhance existing undergraduate programs and develop exciting new
undergraduate programs; build deeper relationships with alumni; offer a richer research
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experience for faculty as the department grows; strengthen graduate programs; and expand
UBC's contribution to policy debates, locally, nationally and internationally.
Why UBC?
UBC is a top international university that will provide a natural home for a School of Economics,
building on the foundation of research and teaching excellence provided by the current
Department of Economics and the Sauder School of Business.
UBC has an outstanding Department of Economics with strengths in research, teaching and in
contributing to policy debates. Building on those strengths fits with the Place and Promise
commitment to "Focus efforts on areas of excellence".
UBC economics is, by most rankings, the top economics department in Canada in terms of
research and in the top 20 to 25 in the world despite its relatively small size (rankings are
typically based total research output, not on per faculty member research). One concrete
representation of the research strength of the department is given by the Rae prize, which is
given out by the Canadian Economics Association every other year to the top research economist
in Canada. Of the last 5 winners - stretching back a decade - 4 have been from UBC Economics.
UBC's strengths in economics are not found solely in the Economics Department. The Sauder
School of Business is home to a strong contingent of excellent economists. In fact, the
economics group in Sauder on its own would be the fifth ranked economics department in
Canada (if they were an economics department).
The Department of Economics takes great pride in teaching at both the graduate and
undergraduate level. In the past decade - at the university's request - the department has
expanded its number of FTE undergraduate students by 50%, becoming one of the most popular
majors programs. In the same period, the number of majors has approximately tripled to its
current level of 280. Even then, last year the department had to turn away 140 applicants who
wanted Economics as their major because of a lack of available teaching resources. The
department is actively engaged in trying to make the undergraduate experience in Economics
match the goals set out in Place and Promise. For example, it has introduced second year courses
in areas of broad interest in order to help non-majors attain a level of economic literacy that will
contribute to good citizenship. The department also continues to offer a capstone course that has
served as a model for other programs and has implemented a Community Service Learning
course (with more on the way). At the graduate level, the MA provides technical training for
people who go on to work in government and business. The PhD program is rising in quality,
with one of our students getting a job at Princeton this year. These strengths are complemented
by Sauder's strong commitment to teaching: a commitment that is in evidence in the reworking
of Sauder's entire curriculum.
The third main strength of the department is its engagement in public policy debates and policy
advisory capacities. Faculty members take an active part in public debates - for example, in
December, 2011 the Vancouver Sun commissioned a set of 4 op-eds from department members
on inequality in Canada in response to the debates raised by the Occupy Movement. But more
than that, department faculty are actively engaged in advising policymakers and informing them
on our research. The list of ways Economics faculty have engaged in policy advising is too long
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to set out here, but it includes direct and active roles in issues related to BC's Carbon Tax, the
HST, and the setting of the minimum wage; chairing a Royal Commission; and advising
Statistics Canada, HRSDC, the Bank of Canada, and various other central banks.
From all of this, the Department is in a position of strength that it sees as a basis for substantial
further improvement in research, teaching, and policy activity. The VSE is the vehicle for
making that improvement.
What the VSE at UBC Would Deliver
In Place and Promise UBC has articulated a series of values and ambitions that will set the
University's priorities for the next decade. The VSE aims to become a flagship unit of the
Faculty of Arts and the University and helping to realize these ambitions. The department is
looking forward to a transformation that will:
• attract undergraduate and graduate students from around the globe;
• offer undergraduate students a range of programs, including a new Bachelor of
International Economics degree offered in collaboration with the Sauder school, with new
emphasis on enriched educational experiences - including research opportunities, co-op
and internships and international exchanges;
• offer PhD programs that incorporate exchange terms with other top-departments
(potentially joint PhD programs);
• create a platform for significantly expanded engagement with economic policy issues;
• contribute to raising the research profile of the Faculty of Arts and the University by
expanding the scale and scope of an excellent research department;
• provide a mechanism for greater engagement with alumni through components such as
public fora on key economic issues.
Key Elements of the VSE at UBC
• Bachelor of International Economics
• Bachelor of Arts in Economics (majors, combined majors, honours)
• Graduate Programs (MA, PhD)
• Community and Alumni Outreach
• Visiting Scholars Program
• Faculty Hiring
1) Bachelor of International Economics
Objective:
To offer an elite program that would enable students to access the resources in both Economics
and the Sauder School of Business to provide an education that builds a global perspective
through both the curriculum and the composition of the student body.
Structure:
The program would be offered by the VSE and the Sauder School to 80 students per year who
would take a number of dedicated courses as well as taking electives in other parts of the
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university. In the steady state there would be 320 students in the program across the four years.
Students would be admitted into year 1 of the program, with a very few admitted in year 2 to
offset attrition in the first year cohort. The annual cohort intake of 80 students would be balanced
with a target of approximately 50% domestic and 50% international students. This is a
purposeful choice: part of the international character of the program will come from the
perspectives of fellow students from different parts of the world.
The new Bachelor in International Economics (B.I.E) will be supported by one dedicated staff
person and a faculty director, who will be given a course release to take on this task. In addition,
the students will be given access to a Career Centre modeled on (and ran in co-operation with)
the very successful Sauder Career Centre. This will involve working with students on career
objectives starting in their first year and with increased intensity in each subsequent year. There
will be the equivalent of one and half dedicated staff people hired for the Career Centre. The
budgeting assumes the staff person dedicated to the B.I.E. and the main staff person for the
Career Centre are at the Managerial and Professional rank.
Rationale:
The B.I.E. program has a number of features that will contribute to the objectives of the Arts
Strategic Plan and Place and Promise. First, the program builds on strength: International
economics is an area of strength for both the Economics Department and the Sauder School.
Second, the program will permit students interested in economics to enter directly into the
program. Currently, students who wish to major in Economics must wait until 3rd year to find
out if they are admitted to the program. Prospective students who want to study Economics are
concerned that they will not be accepted into the program at UBC and so choose to attend other
Universities. With the creation of the B.I.E., our goal is to attract the best of those students. In
addition, the structured nature of prerequisites in the B.I.E. program makes it particularly
challenging for students to take advantage of internships and student exchanges in their 3rd year.
Direct entry allows the students to take required courses in their second year so that they have
greater flexibility to engage in experiential learning opportunities in their third year. Thirdly,
taking the students into an integrated program that starts in first year will mean that they can be
given deeper training than is available in any standard economics program.
2) Bachelor of Arts in Economics (majors, combined majors, honours)
Objective:
To improve the course offerings and learning support for the majors and honours students in the
regular B.A. program.
Structure:
The standard majors and honours programs currently offered in the Economics Department will
continue to be offered by the VSE at UBC. UBC Economics currently has 1000 students in
majors, honours and minors in the combination of 3rd and 4th years. Those numbers will be
maintained under the new school. However, new hiring (discussed in detail below) will allow for
an 8% increase in undergraduate sections offered. The Department is in discussion with current
honours and majors students to find out whether they think it is best to use those resources to cut
class sizes or to offer a wider variety of courses. In addition, anticipated space enhancement
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plans include a social space for the majors and honours (as well as a separate one for the
Bachelor of Economics students) as well as access to new student study rooms.
The VSE will expand and enhance the provision of enriched educational experiences to students,
as mandated in Place and Promise. One faculty member would be given reduced a teaching load
in return for involvement in developing international exchanges, internships and co-op
placements, as well as working on career placement.
Rationale:
The current majors, minors and honours programs provide a strong education in economics but
there is clearly room for improvement. Over the past decade the number of FTE students in
economics has increased by 50% while the number of Economics faculty has not changed. The
result has been a combination of larger class sizes, more classes taught by sessional faculty, and
a focus on the core curriculum rather than experiential learning opportunities. The goal under the
VSE is to enrich the student experience both by the relatively direct methods of increasing the
share of courses taught by full-time faculty and reducing class size, and, more importantly, by
enriching the co-curricular side of the program. The combination of enriched educational
experiences, more choice of specific streams and bringing more international students to campus
will enable the VSE at UBC to make a significant contribution to developing better citizens for
Canada and the world.
3) Graduate Programs
Objective:
To significantly enhance the quality of the Economics graduate programs by restructuring the
existing graduate programs to separate PhD and MA training - the goals include attracting even
stronger incoming classes of students and to position our students so that they are offered
outstanding academic (PhD students) and non-academic (PhD and MA) career options.
Structure:
A set of new graduate courses will be introduced with some being PhD-only and other MA-only
courses. As part of this, the number of PhD students admitted each year would be increased from
the current rate of 15 to 20 a year to approximately 20 to 25 per year. In addition, the VSE will
expand its fundraising activities to attract money for graduate fellowships, both to improve
current funding packages which are uncompetitive relative to PhD programs, at peer institutions,
and to attract the very best new students.
Rationale:
Currently, Economics PhD students take 2 years of coursework (which is standard in Econ PhD
programs). The first year is required theory courses; the second year is field courses, and many
of the latter are taken jointly with MA students who are significantly less well trained. As a
result, the MA students suffer because the courses are sometimes taught at a higher level than
appropriate for them and the PhD students do not receive the specialized training they need.
Creating a new set of classes will allow each set of students to receive training at the appropriate
level.
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4) Community and Alumni Outreach
Objective:
To provide opportunities for enhanced public discussions of economic issues and to further
integrate economics alumni into the life of the university.
Structure:
The VSE at UBC will hold regular public lectures on key, current economic issues to facilitate
deliberative public dialogue on issues of public concern. If this were being done today, the
lectures would cover topics such as: inequality and the Occupy Movement; financial crises in
Europe; budget restraint versus expansion in an era of uncertain recovery; what we can learn
from experimental economics; and new methods for effective redistribution in India. This is only
an indicative list but it includes topics areas in which UBC Economics already has considerable
expertise. Alumni would be given special invitations to these lectures and also invited to
roundtable discussions with the presenter afterwards. In addition, there will be lunches and
roundtables targeted specifically at alumni. Those events would also include current students,
allowing for a cross-generational flow of ideas.
In addition to enhanced connections with the community, the VSE at UBC will build on the
already strong connections of unit members to the policy making community. Currently, UBC
faculty travel to talk with governments and central banks in Canada and around the world. Under
the VSE, there would be an outreach program in which policy makers are brought to UBC in the
summer for "policy weeks" bringing together academics and policy makers in one week, focused
workshops. The goal will be to make sure that policy makers understand the latest research and
that researchers understand the most important policy questions.
Rationale:
Creation of the VSE at UBC will provide visibility, helping to make the community aware of the
economic talent that exists at UBC. In addition, it will constitute an event and an ongoing market
for jumpstarting a relationship with alumni that, in the case of UBC Economics, has been underdeveloped. The policy weeks will further the goal of contributing to solid, evidence-based
policymaking in Canada and elsewhere. Ultimately, it will help meet UBC's strategic goal to
"Dedicate University resources to public understanding of societal issues and stimulate action for
positive change."
5) Visiting Scholars Program
Objective:
To bring the best economics scholars in the world to UBC for extended periods of time.
Structure:
The VSE at UBC space will include dedicated offices set aside of short and long term visitors as
well as post-docs. UBC Economics currently has an annual Woodward speaker, who is one of
the leading economists in the world and who visits the department for about half a week, giving
several lectures and interacting with faculty and students. The list of past Woodward speakers
includes several Nobel laureates, so it is clear that UBC Economics is capable of attracting the
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very best economists to visit. The VSE at UBC will fundraise to have funds to bring in more
visitors over the course of a year on a more informal basis (leaving the Woodward as the
marquee lecture each year). Places like the LSE, the Toulouse School of Economics, and the
Economics Department at University College London have successfully set up environments
where top level researchers often visit for several days at a time. That pattern is self-reinforcing,
with more people anxious to visit because they are sure to overlap with other good visitors.
Those places also take advantage of the attractiveness of their respective cities as part of the
allure. Vancouver can certainly play that role for the VSE at UBC.
Rationale:
UBC Economics is currently forced to turn down requests to visit from very good researchers
because of a lack of office space. The proposed VSE at UBC would reserve offices to make sure
this no longer happens. Moreover, it is not clear that it is widely known how many good
economists there are on UBC campus and how much they work together. This is because outside
scholars are unsure of the location of Sauder. Creating the VSE at UBC with Sauder economics
faculty having adjunct titles will help make clear to the rest of the economics community the
exceptional set of people all within close proximity.
6) Faculty Hiring
Objective:
To increase the number of the Economics research and instructional faculty in a way that
enhances the intellectual and teaching environment at UBC.
Structure:
Under the proposed plan for the VSE at UBC, 9 new research faculty and 2 new instructional
faculty will be hired into the School. In addition, the economics units in Sauder will hire 3 new
research faculty and 1 new instructional faculty as part of their role in teaching in the new
Bachelor of Economics. It is important to recognize that hiring and keeping faculty at this level
is expensive in Economics. UBC Economics has undergone almost continuous raids from other
departments offering considerably more money than UBC salaries. Thus, achieving this
objective will require meeting a complementary objective of fundraising to secure fellowships
and professorships that will make it possible to attract and keep high level faculty. This is an
approach already used successfully by Sauder.
Rationale:
First, it is the hiring of these faculty that will make possible the creation of the new Bachelor of
Economics and the enhancements to the undergraduate and graduate programs. In addition, size
does matter in research units. A larger faculty will allow for more depth in areas of current
strength and greater coverage of areas where UBC is not currently as strong. The result will be
an enriched intellectual environment. The goal will be to hire research and instructional faculty
at a level commensurate with being at top 10 Economics department. One disadvantage of being
a department ranked in around 25th in the world is that departments higher up the rankings know
of UBC's excellent faculty and constantly raid some of the best people. UBC in recent years has
lost people to Harvard and Oxford, for example. The resulting high level of turnover has meant
that UBC Economics has had to reinvent itself almost continually. The fact that this has been
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accomplished while actually increasing its place in the rankings provides some evidence that the
new VSE at UBC could credibly claim to be able to hire at a level to meet its hiring objective.
Funding
The funding for the faculty and staff hiring the forms the core of the new initiative will be
generated from the new Bachelor of Economics. A plan has been developed working with the
Strategic and Decision Support unit in the Provosf s office under which domestic and ISI
students in the new program will pay tuition that is approximately 7% above Sauder's tuition.
The result is net new tuition revenue of $5.4 million per year once the program is in steady state
(i.e., once students from all four years are present on campus). The number is net in the sense
that it does not include tuition from domestic students who, given that the number of domestic
students on campus is capped, will not contribute net new dollars to UBC.
Under an agreement with the President and Provost, the revenue will be divided with
approximately $1.4 million going to the university itself, $0.5 million going to the Faculty of
Arts, $1 million going to Sauder to fund its part of the teaching of the new Bachelor of
Economics, $2.1 million going to the VSE to fund the objectives listed above, and $0.4 million
going to student financial aid. The latter will be used to ensure accessibility of the new BE
program to students from diverse backgrounds. A budget document is available on request. The
numbers in the budget plan have been vetted by the SDS group.
Governance
As was the Department of Economics, the VSE at UBC will be a unit within the Faculty of Arts
and its Director will report to the Dean of Arts. The VSE constitutes a transformation of the
Economics Department (i.e., once the VSE is created, the Economics Department as an academic
unit will cease to exist), however, existing governance structures in the Department that support
its current programming will remain in place, with some necessary additions.
The key differences in governance structure are: (a) the addition of an Advisory Board for the
School, (b) the administrative structure for the new B.I.E. program; and, (c) hiring an assistant to
the director of the School. The assistant to the director would be responsible for coordinating
with the Advisory Board, supporting fund-raising and alumni engagement, and strategic
initiatives.
The Director will have an Executive Council drawn from faculty of all ranks within the School.
The Council will meet regularly to provide the Director with advice on key issues, though final
decisions will remain with the Director. There will also be an Advisory Board made up of
interested members of the broader community who will provide further advice to the Director
and will meet twice a year. Reporting to the Director of the School will be a Director of Graduate
Studies, a Director of Undergraduate Studies (Bachelor of Arts), and a Director of
Undergraduate Studies (Bachelor of International Economics). The Bachelor of Economics will
be given with the supporting partnership of the Sauder School of Business but it will be a degree
within the Faculty of Arts and decisions on its structure and content will ultimately rest with the
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Faculty of Arts. The Director of Undergraduate Studies (B.I.E.) will have an advisory committee
that will consist of 3 faculty from the VSE at UBC and 3 faculty members from Sauder.
What Success Will Look Like
Success, on the grand scale, will look like an exciting, intellectual beehive with faculty, students,
alumni and visitors interacting in a high level discourse on the economic issues of the day.
Success will ultimately be measured by whether that beehive is created and by the excitement
level of the students, faculty and alumni who move through it.
The key concrete markers of success will be in the people associated with the VSE at UBC.
Within 5 to 10 years, the VSE will have expanded by approximately 9 research faculty and 2
instructional faculty. While fully acknowledging the shortcomings of ranking systems, one way
to measure the success of those hires will be in the research rankings of the unit. UBC
Economics currently ranks around number 20 to 25 among Economics Departments/Schools in
the world. The 5 to 10 year goal is to move 10 positions higher in those rankings. From there, the
goal will be to become an acknowledged top 10 unit in the world. For those rankings to be
meaningful, they must be accompanied by a positive shift in the intellectual environment in the
unit. Thus, another measure will be the number of high level research visitors and post-docs to
the unit.
For students, success will involve generating a stimulating intellectual environment providing
training that opens doors to further opportunities. Success will be measured by the number of
enriched educational experiences in which the students are engaged and by the number of student
led initiatives such as lunch time colloquia. For undergraduate students, success will further be
measured by the placements of the students in either jobs or graduate education opportunities.
For graduate students, success will be measured by job placements.
For the community/alumni success will involve the creation of a unit with active engagement in
public debates and education. This will be measured by public lectures and opportunities for
special interactions with alumni. Ultimately, success will involve contributing to a higher level
of economic discourse in BC and Canada more generally.
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Minutes of 19 September 2012
12/13-27
Appendix B: Bachelor of International Economics
New Program:
Bachelor of International Economics in the Vancouver School of Economics (Faculty of Arts)
New Courses:
ECON 204 (3)
ECON 205 (3)
ECON 227 (3)
ECON 228 (3)
ECON 493 (3)
ECON 494 (3)
Intermediate Open Economy Microeconomics
Intermediate Open Economy Macroeconomics
Introduction to Empirical Methods
Methods of Empirical Research
Advanced Empirical Methods for International Economics
Seminar in Applied International Economics
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Appendix C: Admissions Summary
Changes to admission requirements:
Bachelor of Education - Credit Requirements
Teacher certification is no longer tied to an acceptable degree policy through the Teacher
Regulation Branch. Therefore, there is no need for the 75 credit requirement, as all certification
requirements are met by specific course work criteria.
Bachelor of Music - Audition Requirements
Cancellation of early auditions at the School of Music. Auditions will be held one time only per
year (normally in March).
Doctor of Medicine - Deadlines and Miscellaneous Changes
Changes include streamlining admissions deadlines, incorporating a link in the Calendar to the
latest fees, conducting interviews in February to better prepare for final applicant selection, and
changing the title of Aboriginal Programs Coordinator to Aboriginal Programs Manager.
Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science - Pre-requisite Courses
This change is to align the Calendar entry regarding completion of certain UBC courses prior to
entry into the program with Senate-approved curriculum changes.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing - Admission Average
Change in the minimum admission average from C (or grade point average of 2.0 calculated on a
four-point scale) to 70% (or grade point average of 2.8 calculated on a four-point scale).
Bachelor of Science in Nursing - Post-Secondary Course Requirements
Removal of BIOL 155 as a course that satisfied the human anatomy and physiology admission
requirements.
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Minutes of 19 September 2012
12/13-29
Appendix D: Curriculum Summary
New Certificates:
Certificate in Cultural Planning in the Division of Continuing Studies
Certificate in Digital Strategy in the Division of Continuing Studies
Graduate Certificate in Educational Administration and Leadership in the Faculty of
Education
Faculty of Education
New Courses:
EDCP 329 (3)
EDCP 498 (3)
EDUC 170 (3)
EDUC 172 (3)
EDUC 173 (2)
EDUC 174 (2)
EDUC 175 (2)
EDUC 176 (2)
EDUC 177 (2)
EDUC 179 (3)
EDUC 270 (2)
EDUC 272 (2)
EDUC 273 (2)
EDUC 274 (2)
EDUC 275 (3)
EDUC 276 (2)
EDUC 277 (3)
EDUC 278 (2)
EDUC 279 (3)
EPSE 171 (3)
EPSE 271 (3)
Agriculture in the Curriculum
Curriculum Inquiry in Home Economics Education
Reviewing the Principles of Teaching
Language and the Curriculum
Teaching History and Government I
Teaching Geography I
Teaching Secondary English
Teaching Mathematics I
Teaching General Sciences
Practicum I
Communication Skills in Teaching
Teaching Chemistry
Teaching History and Government II
Teaching Geography II
Global Education
Teaching Mathematics II
Teaching Physics
Teaching Biology
Practicum II
Education in the Adolescent Years
Teaching Adolescents with Special Learning Needs
Faculty of Graduate Studies
New Courses:
CICS511(1.5)
CICS514(1.5)
CICS516(3)
ECED 530 (3)
ECED531 (3)
Computational Structures
Computer Networks and Cloud Computing
Web Technologies
Early Childhood Development, Intervention, and Inclusion in Early
Childhood Programs
Supporting Young Children's Social Emotional Learning in Early
Childhood Programs
 Vancouver Senate
Minutes of 19 September 2012
12/13-30
Education and Complexity Theory
Multilingual Literacy and International Development
Cardiovascular Pathophysiology
Public Health, Transportation and the Built Environment
Public Health, Transportation and the Built Environment
Evidence for Practice
Measurement for Assessment, Planning and Evaluation
Physical Activity in Health and Chronic Conditions
Major Project, Part I
Major Project, Part II
EDCP 515 (3)
LLED 512 (3)
PATH 570 (3)
PLAN 579 (3)
SPPH 571 (3)
Changed Courses:
RHSC 501 (3)
RHSC 505 (3)
RHSC 515 (3)
RHSC 587 (3)
RHSC 589 (6)
Changed Programs:
Master of Rehabilitation Science -> Change to Program Requirements
Graduate Certificate in Rehabilitation -> Change to Program Requirements
Discontinued Program:
Master of Arts / Master of Education in Teacher Librarianship
Faculty of Land & Food Systems
New Program:
Applied Animal Biology - Honours Program
New Courses:
APBI414(3)
APBI415(3)
FRE 402 (3)
Animals and Global Issues
Applied Animal Behaviour
Market Research and Analysis in Agri-Food Industries
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
New Course:
PHAR 403 (1)
Clinical Skills - Administration of Injections
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-31
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Appendix E: Awards
New Awards:
ALLNORTH Consultants Limited Award in Engineering - Two $1000 awards are offered by
Allnorth Consultants Limited to third or fourth year undergraduate students studying Civil,
Electrical, or Mechanical Engineering who exemplify both academic excellence and leadership
qualities. Class participation and involvement in university and community organizations will be
taken into consideration. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Departments of
Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering in alternating years. (First Award Available in the
2012/2013 Winter Session)
Margaret E. Barr BIGELOW Memorial Scholarship - Scholarships totalling $14,190 have
been endowed in memory of Dr. Margaret E. Barr Bigelow for undergraduate or graduate
students. To be considered, undergraduate candidates must be entering their penultimate or final
year of study, and graduate students must be entering the first year of their program. Candidates
enrolled in any year study in the DMD, MD and JD programs are also eligible. Adjudications are
made by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2013/14 Winter Session)
BITES Institute Prize in Dentistry - A $2,500 prize and a one year membership to the BITES
Study Club are offered by the BITES Institute to a graduating DMD student who demonstrates a
special interest and excellence in the field of implantology. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Dentistry. (First Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter
Session)
Hon Justice Grant BURNYEAT Award in Law - An award in the amount of at least $10,500,
the gift of Hon Justice Grant Bumyeat, is available to provide the yearly tuition fee of a student
enrolled in any year of the J.D. program who has demonstrated academic merit, who has shown
significant leadership skills, and who faces financial challenges that would prevent pursuit or
completion of legal education. This award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Law. (First Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
CASIRO Family Island Medical Program Award - Awards totalling $1,000 have been
endowed by the Casiro family to support students in financial need in the Island Medical
Program who are the first in their immediate family to pursue a career in medicine. The awards
are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine in consultation with the Office of
Student Affairs of the Island Medical Program. (First Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter
Session)
N. G. CHAKRABARTI and Aparna Chakrabarti Memorial Scholarship in Engineering -
Scholarships totaling $1,000 have been endowed for Materials Engineering students who are
specializing in Minerals and Metal Extraction by Mr. Swaraj K. and Mrs. Gayatri Chattopadhyay
in memory of Mrs. Chattopadhyay's parents, N. G. and Apama Chakrabarti. N. G. Chakrabarti
(1912-1984) devoted many years of his life as an "Expert Foundry Engineer" all over the world
on behalf of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNLDO).
 Vancouver Senate 12/13 - 32
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Recommendations are made by the Department of Materials Engineering. (First Award
Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
CHRYSALIS Dental Centre Vancouver Prize in Dentistry - A $2,500 prize is offered by
Chrysalis Dental Centre - Vancouver to a third year DMD student who demonstrates a special
interest and excellence in the field of implantology. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Dentistry. (First Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
CLASS of 1961 Forestry Award - A $1,000 award has been endowed by the Class of 1961 for
an undergraduate student in the Faculty of Forestry. Preference is given to students who are in
good academic standing with demonstrated leadership skills and significant involvement in, or
contribution to, university and community activities. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Forestry. (First Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
David J. COFFIN Memorial Bursary in Geology - Bursaries totalling $3,500 have been
endowed by friends and family in memory of David Coffin for undergraduate students pursuing
a major in geology within the Faculty of Science. David was the founder and co-editor of the
Hard Rock Analyst publications but started his career working as a prospector and project
manager. David always believed in the importance of supporting talent and helping young people
get the experience required to help make tomorrow's discoveries. He was always happy to give
advice and encouragement and this bursary is a fitting legacy to David's generosity of spirit.
Adjudications are made by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter
Session)
CONETEC Geotechnical Award in Engineering - Three service awards of $2,500 each are
offered by the Conetec Education Foundation to undergraduate students in second or third year
who have demonstrated leadership, curiosity and independent thinking and who have indicated a
desire and suitability to pursue field work and field research. Applicants from Civil Engineering,
Geotechnical, Geological and Mining Engineering will be selected annually. Recipients may also
be invited to apply for paid summer internship experience for a period of 12 - 16 weeks at one of
ConeTec's North American field operations. The awards are made on the recommendation of
faculty within the departments of Civil, Geotechnical Geological and Mining Engineering in the
Faculty of Applied Science. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Ingrid and Birgit CURREY Award in Nursing - Awards totalling $12,500 are offered by H.
David Currey, BASc (Agricultural Engineering), 1950 for students pursuing an undergraduate
degree in Nursing in the Faculty of Applied Science. In addition to academic merit, consideration
is given to qualities such as leadership skills, involvement in student affairs, extracurricular
activities or community service. Preference will be given to students demonstrating financial
need. These awards are established in memory of Mr. Currey's wife, Birgit, a Swedish nurse, and
in honour of their daughter, Ingrid, who is an active teacher in psychiatric nursing. No individual
award shall exceed $4,000. Awards are made on the recommendation of the School of Nursing.
(First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Daniel J. GRIMBLE Memorial Bursary - A $1,000 bursary has been endowed in memory of
Mr. Daniel J. Grimble. The bursary is awarded to a student in the Sauder School of Business
 Vancouver Senate 12/13 - 33
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Bachelor of Commerce in the Real Estate program. It is adjudicated by Enrolment Services.
Preference will be given to a mature student in financial need. Mr. Grimble graduated with his
Bachelor of Commerce from UBC in 1973 as a mature student. His quest for knowledge was one
of the many driving forces in his life. His continued passion for education kept him in
classrooms into his final years. Dan was a consummate gentleman who practiced ethical, honest
business. He was a loving husband and father and will forever be missed by his family, friends
and business associates. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Lillian HALBERG Southern Medical Program Bursary - Two $5,000 bursaries are offered
by Mrs. Lillian Halberg to support students in the Faculty of Medicine Southern Medical
Program. Students must be Canadian citizens. Adjudications are made by Enrolment Services.
(First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Marlowe HANSON Memorial Men's Basketball Award - Awards totalling $1,900 are offered
by family and friends of Marlowe Hanson to UBC Men's Basketball players with a high level of
basketball proficiency who exemplify the strong qualities of leadership, commitment and loyalty.
Marlowe Hanson was a passionate fan and avid supporter of UBC Men's Basketball, and father
of Head Coach, Kevin Hanson (2000 to present). A well-respected businessman with the Royal
Bank, Marlowe was always seen at UBC home games, sitting up behind the team bench in his
regular reserved seats cheering on the Thunderbirds. In everything he did, he tried to make a
positive difference. Recommendations are made by the Department of Athletics and Recreation.
(First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Dave HUSBY TLA Scholarship in Forest Operations - Through a gift of $2,500 from The
Truck Loggers Association, a scholarship, in memory of Dave Husby, is available to a third-year
student majoring in Forest Operations in the Faculty of Forestry, on the basis of academic
standing in the program. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry.
(First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
KAO SHAO CHING Graduate Travel Award in Art History - A $10,000 award is offered to
a student in the Art History graduate program in the Department of Art History, Visual Art and
Theory (AHVA) whose work focuses on the Asian Art stream of the program. The award
supports a graduate student conducting research at other academic institutions, archives,
museums and galleries to which they must travel overseas. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory (AHVA) in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter
Session)
Charles KIM Student Mobility Award in Arts - Two $7,500 awards are offered to
undergraduate students in the Faculty of Arts who seek opportunities to study abroad in Korea.
The awards will support undergraduate students who will study at one of UBC's partner
universities in South Korea (one of: Ewha Womans University, Korea University, Seoul National
University, and Yonsei University) through Go Global for either one term or one year. The
awards are made on the recommendation of the Go Global Student Mobility Program Office in
consultation with the Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
 Vancouver Senate 12/13 - 34
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Willard KITCHEN Memorial Bursary - Bursaries, totalling $1,000, have been endowed by
the Estate of Judith Jardine in memory of Willard Kitchen (1860-1937). Mr. Kitchen, the
grandfather of Ms. Jardine, played an active role in the early development of Canada's railway
system both in the Maritimes and in Western Canada. The awards are available to students in the
Faculty of Medicine. Adjudications are made by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in
the 2012/13 Winter Session)
KNIGHT Family Centenary Scholarship for Aboriginal Students - Scholarships totalling
$700 have been endowed by Dr. Ursula H. Abbott (nee Knight) for British Columbian
Aboriginal students who have achieved good academic standing and are in need of financial
assistance. Adjudication is made by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the
2012/2013 Winter Session)
LAW Foundation of British Columbia Entrance Award - Awards totalling $3,720 have been
endowed by the Law Foundation of British Columbia to students entering the JD program. The
awards are intended to reduce financial barriers and to assist a diverse body of students in
obtaining their legal education. Recommendations are made by the Faculty of Law. (First Award
Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
LIFEMARK Health Award in Leadership, Clinical Excellence & Innovation in
Occupational Therapy - A $3,000 award is offered by LifeMark Health (a division of Centric
Health) to recognize a graduating student in the Master of Occupational Therapy program who
demonstrates exceptional leadership talent, a commitment to clinical excellence and best
practice, and innovation in health care delivery. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Department of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, in consultation with the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
LIFEMARK Health Award in Leadership, Clinical Excellence & Innovation in Physical
Therapy - A $3,000 award is offered by LifeMark Health (a division of Centric Health) to
recognize a graduating student in the Master of Physical Therapy program who demonstrates
exceptional leadership talent, a commitment to clinical excellence and best practice, and
innovation in health care delivery. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department
of Physical Therapy, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First Award
Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Brian MCILROY Scholarship in Film Studies - A scholarship in the amount of $1,000 has
been funded by Dr. Brian McUroy and alumni, friends, and colleagues to either an undergraduate
major or honours student entering 4th year of the BA in Film Studies or a graduate student. The
award will be given on the recommendation of the faculty of the Film Studies Program in the
Department of Theatre and Film and in the case of a graduate student, in consultation with the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First Award Available in the 2013/14 Winter Session)
MONT ALB ANO Scholars Fellowship - Fellowships of $10,000 each are offered by John and
Dana Montalbano to support PhD students in International Relations or International Law who
are recipients of one or more of the following: Four Year Doctoral Fellowship; Killam Doctoral
Fellowship; Canadian Institutes of Health Research Doctoral Research Award or Canada
 Vancouver Senate 12/13 - 35
Minutes of 19 September 2012
Graduate Scholarship; Natural Science and Engineering Council Postgraduate Scholarship or
Canada Graduate Scholarship; or Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Doctoral
Fellowship or Canada Graduate Scholarship. Preference will be given to students entering their
first year of the PhD program at the University of British Columbia. John Montalbano is an
alumnus of UBC, a Leslie Wong Fellow at UBC's Portfolio Management Foundation and a
Chartered Financial Analyst. He is CEO of RBC Global Asset Management and Phillips, Hager
& North Investment Management, and is responsible for RBC Global Asset Management
worldwide. Mr. Montalbano is a trustee of the Killam Trusts, co-chairs the Downtown Eastside
Community Arts Fund and he serves on the board of the Take a Hike Youth at Risk Foundation,
the board of the Phillips, Hager & North Centre for Financial Research and the Bureau of Asset
Management at the University, and is also an advisor to Power To Be Adventure Therapy
Society. Provided that a successful candidate continues to meet the eligibility criteria, the
fellowship may be renewed for an additional two years. The recommendation is made by the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First Award Available in the 2013/2014 Winter Session)
Eric Walter MOUNTJOY Memorial Scholarship - Scholarships totaling $4,375 have been
endowed by the Estate of Eric Walter Mountjoy to undergraduate geological science students
who are originally from Quebec. Recommendations are made by the Department of Geological
Sciences. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Daniel F. MUZYKA Award in Entrepreneurship - A $3,500 award has been endowed in
honour of Daniel F. Muzyka as a tribute to his inspiring vision, tireless commitment and
distinguished service to the Sauder School of Business as Dean and Professor from 1999-2012.
The endowment has been created through lead gifts from Robert T. Stewart and Gregory J. Peet,
proceeds from Le Grand Voyage Celebratory Gala and contributions from friends of the Sauder
School community. The Award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty to a third or
fourth year student in the Bachelor of Commerce Program at the Sauder School of Business who
has demonstrated an interest in entrepreneurship and displayed outstanding leadership in student
or community affairs. (First Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
Rev. Dr. Bernard J. O'CONNOR Scholarship - One $3,000 scholarship is offered to a
graduate student in the second or subsequent year(s) of study who is in the process of researching
and writing his or her thesis on a subject related to numismatics, which is the art, science, and
history of coins, medals, tokens, paper money and related financial instruments. Research and
writing may be in areas such as the numismatics of Canada, fine art and money, banking history,
the history of collecting, metallurgy and money, and economic history. The scholarship is in
honour of Bemie O'Connor, who was a lifelong collector who specialized in the specie of pre-
Confederation Canada. The recommendation is made by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First
Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
ORW Opportunities through Rehabilitation and Work Society Graduate Award - A $1750
award has been endowed by ORW Opportunities through Rehabilitation andWork Society for a
graduate student in any Faculty whose work or research addresses how policy change can reduce
or remove barriers to employment and enhance workplace inclusiveness for persons with
disabilities. Preference will be given to a student who, in their academic, professional or
volunteer work, is helping to effect policy change and advocating workplace inclusiveness.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-36
Minutes of 19 September 2012
ORW is a non-profit organization that seeks out new and innovative approaches to facilitate
change so that there are no barriers designed into employment legislation, policies, regulations
and programs for persons with disabilities. Persons with disabilities will have the same
flexibilities, opportunities and productive work options as others in the work world. Research or
studies that address any disability, including mental health and developmental disability, are
eligible. Students from all Faculties are eligible, but preference will be given to students in the
Faculty of Arts and the Sauder School of Business. The award is made on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (First Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
Noel Roddick Service Award - Awards totalling $1,000 have been funded by Terralink
Horticulture Inc. and by family and friends in honour of Noel Roddick (B.Sc.Ag.1962), whose
outstanding service has helped to sustain the agricultural community in the face of numerous
challenges. The awards are intended for undergraduate or graduate students in good academic
standing who engage in community service, including research projects, on topics relevant to the
reduction of risks to the Delta, BC farm community due to agronomic, economic or social
factors. Preference is given to students conducting projects in collaboration with the Delta
Farmers' Institute, Delta Farmland and Wildlife Trust or members of the local agricultural
business community. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Land and
Food Systems. (First Award Available in the 2012/2013 Winter Session)
Sopow Shellard SOPOVA Education Bursary - Bursaries totalling $2,000 have been
generously donated by Marya Sopova, formerly Mary (Sopow) Shellard, to provide financial aid
to a single mother who is pursuing an undergraduate degree in education. Adjudications are
made by Enrolment Services. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Twenty-8 Group Academic Achievement Award - The Twenty-8 Group Award for Academic
Achievement will provide one award (minimum value $1,000) for a member of each women's
Thunderbird team. This annually-funded award is being established in recognition of returning
student athletes that have demonstrated academic leadership while competing in varsity sport.
Preference will be given to student-athletes who have achieved 80% average or greater in a full-
time course of study, as determined by the respective intercollegiate governing body.
Recommendations are made by the Department of Athletics. (First Award Available in the
2012/13 Winter Session)
Twenty-8 Group Leadership Award - The Twenty-8 Group Leadership Award will provide
one award (minimum value $1,000) for each women's Thunderbird team in recognition of
outstanding student athletes who have demonstrated leadership attributes. This annual award is
being established in recognition of the additional time and effort required to participate in varsity
athletics. Recommendations are made by the Department of Athletics. (First Award Available in
the 2012/13 Winter Session)
UNDERGRADUATE Arts Co-op Student of the Year Award - One award of $1,000 is
offered to an outstanding co-op student in the Arts Co-operative Education Program annually in
recognition of outstanding achievement in all aspects of their performance, including academic
standing, workplace performance, and professional/community involvement. The award is made
 Vancouver Senate 12/13-37
Minutes of 19 September 2012
on the recommendation of the Director of the Arts Co-op Program in consultation with the Arts
Co-op Program Advisory Committee. (First Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
VANCOUVER and District Dental Society President's Award - A $1,000 award, established
by the Vancouver and District Dental Society is offered to a community minded dental student
who demonstrates volunteerism and service in the dental outreach program. The
recommendation is made by the Faculty of Dentistry. (First Available in the 2012/13 Winter
Session)
Don WEST Memorial Bursary - A bursary of $1,300 has been endowed in memory of Donald
T. West by friends, colleagues and three corporations with whom Don had long-standing
relationships: Connaught Oil & Gas Ltd., Enerplus Corporation and Pulse Seismic Inc. The
bursary will be awarded to an undergraduate student entering the fourth year of study in the
Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at UBC, majoring in Geophysics. Don
was born in Vancouver, raised on the west coast and was a graduate of UBC, earning a B.Sc. in
Geology and Physics. He pursued a successful career in oil and gas exploration, ultimately
becoming a prominent and influential leader in the industry. Don was a life-long learner and
believed in giving back to the community. The award is made on the adjudication of the
Enrolment Services. (First Available in the 2013/14 Winter Session)
Don WEST Memorial Prize - A prize of $1,300 has been endowed in memory of Donald T.
West by friends, colleagues and three corporations with whom Don had long-standing
relationships: Connaught Oil & Gas Ltd., Enerplus Corporation and Pulse Seismic Inc. The prize
is awarded to undergraduate students entering their fourth year of studies in the Department of
Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at UBC, majoring in Geophysics. Don was born in
Vancouver, raised on the west coast and was a graduate of UBC, earning a B.Sc. in Geology and
Physics. He pursued a successful career in oil and gas exploration, ultimately becoming a
prominent and influential leader in the industry. Don was a life-long learner and believed in
giving back to the community. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department.
(First Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Greg YEN Scholarship for Excellence in Finance - A $1,500 scholarship is offered by Greg
Yen, BCom'87 and past president of the Commerce Undergraduate Society, to support a third
year student specializing in finance at the Sauder School of Business. The recipient will be
selected based on top academic standing and extracurricular involvement. Recommendation is
made by the Sauder School of Business. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter Session)
Previously-Approved Awards with Changes in Terms or Funding Source:
#5861 ASSOCIATION of Women in Finance Scholarship in Law - A $1,500 scholarship is
offered by the Association of Women in Finance (AWF), an organization that encourages and
supports women in financial professions, to an outstanding female student enrolled in the
Business Law Concentration in the J.D. Program. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Law. Preference will be given to a student who demonstrates a history of
community service.
 Vancouver Senate 12/13 - 38
Minutes of 19 September 2012
How amended: narrowed the focus to women and included the preference that the
scholarship be given to a student who demonstrates community service. (Revision to
commence in 2012W)
Dr. A. DODEK Outstanding Clinical and Ethical Performance in Cardiology Award - A
$900 award will be granted to a first or second year resident physician in core internal medicine
who intends to pursue a residence in cardiology and who demonstrates excellence in clinical
care, bedside manner/communication, and ethics. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Director of the Postgraduate Education Program for General Internal Medicine, in
consultation with the Division of Cardiology. (First Award Available in the 2012/13 Winter
Session)
How Amended: Inclusion of "Dr. A. Dodek" as per the donor's request
#5116 Charlotte Froese FISCHER Student Mobility Award in Science - A $1,500 award has
been endowed by Dr. Charlotte Froese Fischer (B.A. 1952, M.A. 1954) for an undergraduate
student in the Faculty of Science who is participating in a recognized UBC exchange with a
partner institution outside of Canada. The award will support incoming and outgoing exchange
participants in alternating years, with preference given to students who intend to complete two
semesters abroad. The award is made on the recommendation of the Go Global Student Mobility
Program Office in consultation with the Enrolment Services.
How amended: the donor would like preference to be given to students going on
exchange for two semesters, and would like to ensure that it alternates between incoming
and outgoing exchange students in alternating years.
#0952 HUGHES Condon Marler: Architects Scholarship - A $875 scholarship has been
endowed by Hughes Condon Marler: Architects for a student in the Master of Architecture
Program with preference for a students entering their final year who has demonstrated a strong
understanding of architecture as it relates to its regional context at an urban design level. The
award is made on the recommendation of the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture
and in case of a graduate student, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
How amended: this annual award is now endowed and the donor has completed his five
year pledge of $25,000. This endowment is grandfathered under the endowment minimum
thresholds of 2007.
#5659 Yamuna KALYANPUR Prize in Obstetrics and Gynecology - A $1,000 prize is
offered in honour of Dr. Yamuna Kalyanpur, Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in
the Faculty of Medicine. The award is to be given out to an Obstetrics and Gynaecology resident
who is in the top 10% academically and embodies the other personal qualities that Dr Kalyanpur
processes such as kindness and compassion. The award can be given out to a resident in either
the PGY-4 or PGY-5 year of training and it may or may not be given out every year.
How amended: top 10% requirement added to the criteria as well as soft skills of
kindness and compassion and the specific years of study the residents must be enrolled in
 Vancouver Senate 12/13 - 39
Minutes of 19 September 2012
the residency program for consideration. In addition a note has been included that the
prize may not be given out every year if there is not a suitable candidate. (Revision to
commence in the 2011/12 Winter Session)
#2343 Bert Welch TLA Scholarship in Forest Operations - Through a gift of $2,500 from
The Truck Loggers Association, a scholarship, in memory of Bert Welch, is available to a
second-year student majoring in Forest Operations in the Faculty of Forestry, on the basis of
academic standing in the program. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Forestry.
How amended: lowered the value from $5,000 to $2,500, limited the award to a second
year student and named the award in honour of Bert Welch.

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