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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1990-03-21

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 9696.
March 21, 1990
The Seventh Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1989-90 was held on Wednesday, March 21, 1990 at
8.00 p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
President D. w. Strangway, Chancellor L. R. Peterson, Dr. J. M. Anderson,
Mr. R. Bush, Mr. A. K. Haji, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. B. M. Morrison, Mrs.
G. E. Plant, Dr. D. F. Robitaille, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr. L. J. Stan, Dr.
D. A. Wehrung, Dr. W. W. Wood.
Senate membership
Replacement
Dr. D. LI. Williams, Faculty of Science representative, replaces Dr. B. C.
McBride
Minutes of previous meeting
Mr. Pearce    )  That the minutes of the Fifth regular
Dr. Elder     ) meeting of Senate for the Session 1989-90,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
Carried 9697.
March 21, 1990
Business arising from the Minutes
Dr. Elder informed Senate that the Academic Building Needs Committee was
unable to report at the March meeting, as Senate had requested, on a
proposal from Campus Planning and Development but confirmed that a report
would be presented at the April 18 meeting.
In response to a query, Dr. Elder stated that the Admissions Committee
would be reporting at the April meeting of Senate on the Committee's
procedures for appeals for admission and readmission.
Chairman's remarks and related questions
President Strangway was unable to attend the meeting but had requested
that the following report be circulated for information:
"1. Green College, UBC
At this moment Dr. Cecil Green is announcing his commitment to provide
funding to build a residential graduate college. This college will
house about 60 graduate student fellows and 20 senior fellows. The
college will be modelled to some extent on Green College, Oxford, and
Massey College, Toronto. With government matching funds and an
endowment, it will be fully self-sustaining.
This college will be built to incorporate the present Graham House and
will provide an important focus for students and faculty from a wide
range of disciplines. Social Work, which is the present occupant of
Graham House, will be re-housed in a more central campus location.
This commitment from Dr. Cecil Green, now in his 90th year, continues
his remarkable generosity to his alma mater.
2. Continuing Education
An administrative response to the review of the Centre for Continuing
Education has now been prepared and has been presented in outline form
today to the Senate Committee on Continuing Education. This response
will be reviewed by the President's Advisory Committee on Continuing
Education in the near future. It will then be revised and submitted to
Senate. Those parts requiring Senate approval will be formally
submitted for consideration.
3. Learning Disabled Students
You may be aware of the case of a dyslexic student who, over a period of
years, sought exemption from the language requirement for his Bachelor 9698.
March 21, 1990
Chairman's remarks and related questions
3. Learning Disabled Students  (continued)
of Arts. After consultation with the Dean and with experts in the
field, Vice President Birch waived the language requirement. The
University is moving to make itself more accessible to those with
handicaps. Dr. Birch is establishing a small committee to identify ways
in which faculties within the University can seek assistance in
responding to the needs of students with specific learning
disabilities. Any resulting policy recommendations will be submitted to
Senate for discussion and eventual decision. The disability of dyslexia
is not uncommon among able, even brilliant, people as we have learned
from the number of members of our own community who have commented on
the decision, and have welcomed the announcement of this review.
4. Safety for Women on Campus
At the January meeting of Senate, I reported that I would consult across
the campus on issues of safety for women. I have had five such
sessions. Each has reinforced the need for the University to take
stronger steps in connection with safety on the one hand and with
"education" of our community on the other. A draft document on proposed
actions has now been prepared. This will be circulated to those
involved in the discussions, to Deans, Heads and Directors for comment,
and to members of Senate and the Board. When these responses have been
received, we will prepare a final plan of action to be implemented in
the coming academic year.
It will interest Senate to know that Jennifer Simons, head of the H. A.
Simons Foundation, has made substantial donations for scholarships as
follows:
$40,000 - for women Ph.D. candidates in Science and Applied Science
$30,000 - for women Ph.D. candidates in Humanities and Social Sciences
$10,000 - for an undergraduate scholarship in honour of the women
massacred in Montreal
These funds will be matched.
5. Engineering Student Newsletter
The current issue of the Engineering Undergraduate Society newsletter is
extremely offensive. It is racist, sexist and homophobic all at the
same time. As recently as November of 1989 the EUS developed an
editorial policy explicitly stating that the editor would be accountable
to the executive and that it would not publish such material. In a
matter of months it has violated its own policies in a most offensive
and vulgar manner.
The Board of Governors adopted a policy that permitted me to suspend the
collection of fees if this should happen. I have therefore instructed
that the collection of fees for EUS shall be stopped immediately and
that publication of all EUS material be halted until there is a
commitment to abide by its own policies. 9699.
March 21, 1990
Chairman's remarks and related questions
5. Engineering Student Newsletter  (continued)
The actions of this small group are offensive to every constituency at
The University of British Columbia and to many beyond. Furthermore,
these actions are in explicit violation of the Professional Engineers
Code of Ethics.
I am therefore directing the Student Discipline Committee to develop
recommendations with regard to the individuals in this group. In doing
so, I am asking them to consider suspension of those students directly
involved.
The University of British Columbia is committed to a harassment-free
environment for students, faculty and staff. We already have a policy
on sexual harassment issues. I will create a task force to develop a
policy on issues of racial harassment so that we have clear mechanisms
to deal with issues as they arise.
6. UBC/Ritsumeikan University Joint Venture
I mentioned to Senate previously the discussions we have had with
representatives of Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto about development of
a joint venture. The Senate Committee on Academic Policy is considering
the academic principles governing Education Abroad Programs. The
regulations developed for approval by Senate will, of course, apply to
the program worked out jointly by Ritsumeikan and UBC. Our expectation
is that a facility will be erected on the UBC campus to accommodate one
hundred Japanese students and one hundred regular UBC students (perhaps
with priority given to those studying Japanese). Both the capital and
operating costs would be met within the venture. The residence will
assist us in achieving our target for increasing student housing on the
UBC campus.
The students from Ritsumeikan University will study English and
undertake two core courses (if and when they have been approved by
Senate) jointly developed and jointly taught by Ritsumeikan and UBC
faculty. In addition, they may be admitted to a limited number of
regular UBC courses. The Ritsumeikan Senate and its senior academic
representatives have proposed a course in Pacific Rim studies which,
though comprehensive, would incorporate both Japanese and Canadian
content and perspectives. It would be offered for credit both at UBC
and at Ritsumeikan. The second course they have requested would deal
with the study of Japanese and Canadian culture and society in a
comparative context. Vice President Birch will request the Faculty of
Arts to participate in developing such courses.
Ritsumeikan University is very interested in providing reciprocal
opportunities for UBC faculty and students to work and study in Japan.
Ritsumeikan is prepared to make space available on their Kyoto Campus
for a research institute (perhaps in Canadian Studies) and/or a training
centre for graduate students who require an enhanced knowledge of Japan
as a part of their UBC programs. They are also prepared to provide a
residence facility." 9700.
March 21, 1990
Chairman's remarks and related questions (continued)
A report on The UBC Campaign, A World of Opportunity, had also been
circulated for information.
In reference to item 5. of the Chairman's report, several members of
Senate expressed concern at the contents of the March 14, 1990 issue of the
Engineering Student Newsletter.
Ms. Joanna Harrington, student senator, informed Senate that the A.M.S.
Council had met prior to the Senate meeting to discuss what action should be
taken concerning the EUS newsletter. The A.M.S. decided that the
Engineering Undergraduate Society would apologize for the contents of the
newsletter in the form of an advertisement to be placed in the Sun, the
Province and the Ubyssey. Ms. Harrington noted that Student Court will also
be convened to look into this matter and to consider whether there should be
any punishment or fine levied against both the undergraduate society and the
individuals responsible for the contents of the publication. The A.M.S.
also voted to hire a student for a summer project to examine ways of
improving race relations.
Dr. Meisen, Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, said that he was
expressing his views and the views of his Faculty when he called the
publication defamatory, racist, unjust, intolerant, insensitive, and
deplorable. It caused pain to those who were addressed by the publication
and to those (such as himself and his colleagues) who had to witness the
publication. In his view, such a publication has no place in a University
such as UBC Even more importantly, the sentiments expressed in the
publication have no place in the hearts of the members of the community. 9701.
March 21, 1990
Chairman's remarks and related questions  (continued)
Dean Meisen went on to say that he could offer no justification for the
publication, but hoped that justice could be offered. He stated that in
light of the gravity of the problem, the matter had been referred to the
President for consideration as a matter of student disclipine. The
procedures concerning student discipline are well established and are known
to be thorough as well as objective. He hoped that the President's Student
Discipline Committee would not only examine the specific details pertaining
to the publication but that it would establish the culpability of individual
students.
In conclusion, Dean Meisen stated that he hoped the Committee would also
examine the environment within which the publication was produced and deal
with the allegation that there exists on the campus and, in particular,
within Engineering an environment which fosters intolerance.
Dr. Cook commended the President's Office for the way in which the
situation had been handled.
Dr. Cook      )  That Senate commend the UBC President, the
Dr. Auld      )  Academic Vice President, and the Dean of
Applied Science on their strong public
statements deploring the publication of
racist, sexist and homophobic material in
the March 14, 1990 edition of the Engineering
Student Newsletter, and for their appropriate and
expeditious actions of censure applied to the
Engineering Undergraduate Society and those
individual students directly involved in, and
responsible for the offensive publication.
Dr. Elder commented that while she was sure Senate would support the
motion unanimously, she could not help but remark that women had been
suffering the same sort of attacks from the same source for a long time 9702.
March 21, 1990
Chairman's remarks and related questions  (continued)
without having the same response. Dr. Elder felt that if this kind of
action had been taken earlier the University would not have to worry about
the safety of women on campus.
The motion was put and carried.
Dr. Sobrino stated that he would move a motion under Other Business
expressing Senate's opinion on this matter.
Dr. Elder drew Senate's attention to item 3. of the report concerning
Learning Disabled Students, and the fact that, after consultation with the
Acting Dean of Arts and with experts in the field, Vice President Birch
waived the language requirement in the case of a dyslexic student. Dr.
Elder stated that since the matter had been raised in the Chairman's report
she would point out that she could not find in the University Act any
justification for the Vice President Academic waiving any of the Faculty
requirements. Dr. Elder stated that it was her understanding that students
have the right to appeal to Senate and wondered if the position of Senate to
control the requirements of the Faculties had been compromised.
Dr. Elder stated that she had written to the President and also to the
Senate Academic Policy Committee indicating that she would raise the matter
in September when the new Senate has been appointed, and when the question
can be divorced from the particular student and his problems. Dr. Elder
also stated that the Chairman's statement was in error since the student had
not sought exemption over a period of years. Also, the Faculty of Arts
Advisor had not been consulted before the decision was made. Dr. Elder
noted that the Faculty of Arts does have a policy on disabled students and
that the policy is to assist students to meet all of the requirements of the
Faculty of Arts passed by the Faculty and the Senate. 9703.
March 21, 1990
Chairman's remarks and related questions (continued)
Vice President Birch responded that the statement says that the Dean was
consulted as well as experts in the field and that the student had applied
for a waiver at the time of his application for readmission in 1986, and had
applied again in 1989 after learning from the Dean's office that his
application had not been considered and had then appealed in 1990. This
certainly appeared to be a period of years.
Dr. Stager pointed out that the Acting Dean of Arts had been asked to
render a decision about this case, and it was after that that the Vice
President Academic waived the requirement.
Correspondence
The Vice-chairman read to Senate a note of appreciation from the
Universite de Montreal expressing hearfelt thanks for Senate's expression of
sympathy following the tragic events of December 6, 1989. The Chairman also
read a note of appreciation from the family of Professor Lipson expressing
appreciation to Senate for the kind tribute paid in his memory.
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations - subject,
where applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented
without formal reference to the President and the formal agreement of the
President; and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new programs be asked
to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
(i) Proposal of the Faculty of Medicine to establish a Centre for
Transplantation Immunobiology.  (p.9634)
(ii) Curriculum proposals from the Faculties of Arts, Education, Graduate
Studies, Medicine, the Schools of Physical Education & Recreation and
Rehabilitation Medicine, and the Faculty of Science,  (pp.9640-54)
(iii)  Enrolment quotas and controls for 1990/91.  (p.9661)
(iv) Proposal of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration to
establish The Hong Kong Bank Chair in Asian Commerce.  (p.9667) 9704.
March 21, 1990
From the Board of Governors  (continued)
(v) Proposal of the Faculty of Graduate Studies that the Coal Research
Centre be discontinued,  (p.9667)
(vi) Curriculum proposals from the Faculties of Agricultural Sciences,
Applied Science, Arts, Commerce and Business Administration,
Forestry, and Graduate Studies,  (pp.9677-94)
Election results
The following results of the election of Chancellor and members of
Convocation to serve on Senate for the three-year term commencing September
1, 1990 had been circulated:
Chancellor
Leslie Raymond Peterson
Convocation representatives on Senate
David A. Anderson
John A. Banfield
Donald G. A. Carter
Sandra C Lindstrom
William B. McNulty
Michael M. Ryan
Alfred J. Scow
L. Joanne Stan
Minoru Sugimoto
Gordon A. Thorn
Nancy E. Woo
Senate Nominating Committee
In accordance with established procedures, the following vacancies on
the Nominating Committee were declared:
Mr. D. Horvat - student representative
Miss W. A. King - student representative
The new students senators, who take office on April 1, 1990, will be
notified in writing of the call for nominations to fill vacancies on the
Nominating Committee.  Nominations will remain open until the April 18, 1990
Senate meeting and, if necessary, an election held at that meeting. 9705.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Dr. Elder, Chairman of the Committee, reported that, through the good
offices of the Associate Registrar, Ms. Jo-Anne Albright, the Committee
had received copies of the "Year 2000: A Curriculum and Assessment
Framework for the Future" document issued by the Ministry of Education.
Acting on the concerns of the Senate Admissions Committee, Ms. Albright
urged the Graduation Program group to meet admissions officials of the
three universities. The meeting was held and the Senate Admissions
Committee made a submission by the deadline of January 23.
Dr. Elder drew Senate's attention to the lack of prerequisites for Grade
11 courses, and noted that the Faculties of Science and Applied Science
had already expressed concerns about this in the case of Mathematics,
Physics, and Chemistry. She noted, however, that there is also a problem
with language 11 in that, except for English and French, there is no
adequate language training in the proposed new curriculum.
Faculty of Medicine - proposed Calendar changes concerning:
reapplications, admission of students by transfer, and the Medical
College Admission Test
The Committee recommended approval of the following changes in
Calendar entries:
Reapplications - add after exiting entry:
Applications which are withdrawn in writing prior to adjudication are
included in this limitation when more than two applications have been
withdrawn.
Admission of Students by Transfer - add after existing entry:
Factors taken into account in the transfer request include the
reasons for the transfer, the academic standing of the student and a
letter from the Dean (or designate) of the original medical school. A
student must be in good standing in an accredited medical school to
request a transfer. 9706.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Faculty of Medicine - proposed Calendar changes concerning:
reapplications, admission of students by transfer, and the Medical
College Admission Test
The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) - delete last sentence of the
paragraph (The design of this test...) and replace with:
"The design of this test will change in the Spring of 1991 and all
candidates for admission to Medicine in 1993 and subsequent entering
classes are required to take the MCAT in the new (post 1991) format."
Dr. Elder     )  That the proposed changes in Calendar
Dean Webber   )  entries, recommended by the Faculty of
Medicine, be approved.
Carried
Budget Committee
In the absence of Dr. Robitaille, Chairman of the Committee, Dr. Weiler
presented the following report for information:
"This report summarizes the work of the Committee during the period from
April 1989 to February 1990. The Committee discussed a wide variety of
issues pertaining to the budget of the University, and the impact of
those issues on the academic operation. Listed below are summaries of
some of the major topics discussed during the last year.
1. UBC/VGH Nursing Amalgamation
The Committee discussed the proposed amalgamation of the two programs
and the fiscal implications of that initiative with the Dean of the
Faculty of Applied Science, and sought assurances that the proposed
amalgamation would not be a drain on the financial resources of the
University.
2. Comparisons among Faculty Units and between Faculty and Non-Faculty
Units
Several ratios were examined to enable comparisons to be made among
Faculty units and between Faculty and non-Faculty units. Significant
variability was observed across units. One of these indicators, the
ratio of operating budget per weighted full-time-equivalent student,
was included in the published budget summary for 1988-89. The
Committee discussed this matter from a variety of perspectives
including whether or not such variation should exist, whether the
University should strive to equalize those ratios across Faculties
with similar expenditure needs, and what steps might be taken to 9707.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
2. Comparisons among Faculty Units and between Faculty and Non-Faculty
Units
achieve such a goal over a period of several years. In addition to
discussing within-UBC comparisons, the Committee considered similar
data from comparable institutions across the country.
3. Salary Levels at UBC
The Committee discussed the University's commitment to make faculty
and staff salaries competitive with their relevant markets. In
recognition of the fact that salary increases would necessitate
compensating decreases in other aspects of the University's
operations, the Committee also discussed the importance of
encouraging administrative units to seek out ways to maximize
efficiencies in their operations.
4. 1989/90 Operating Budget
The proposed operating budget for FY1989-90 was discussed over a
period of several months, culminating in a meeting of the Committee
in mid-July at which the Committee passed a motion endorsing the
President's strategy for addressing budgetary requirements in that
fiscal year. After approval by the Board of Governors, the budget
was printed and widely distributed.
5. 1990/91 Operating Budget Planning Cycle
The March 1989 report of the Senate Budget Committee refers to the
establishment of a budget-planning cycle for the University. The
proposed cycle for preparing the FY1990/91 budget was discussed with
the Committee, and critical dates agreed upon.
6. Other matters
The Committee also considered a number of other matters in the course
of its deliberations. These included the following:
a. Historical data series. Each year, the Office of Budget Planning
and Systems Management produces historical data series on a number of
variables pertaining to research and teaching activities at UBC
These analyses were discussed with the Budget Committee.
b. Access Funding. The implications of the provincial government's
policy to increase access to post-secondary education in British
Columbia was discussed.
c. UBC Press. The Committee was briefed by the President on actions
taken in response to an external review of the operation of the UBC
Press. The Committee requested and received assurance from the
President that the advice of the Committee with respect to plans for
the Press would be sought periodically. 9708.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
d. Centres of Excellence. The Committee was briefed by the Vice
President Research on the funding from the federal government for
Centres of Excellence. Establishment of these centres has important
implications for space on campus as well as for demands on the
administrative infrastructure of the University.
e. Decentralization Initiatives. The Committee discussed the policy
of decentralization of costs for such previously centralized services
as the mainframe computer and the telephone system. The Committee
also discussed recent progress and future plans for computer service
price reductions and other changes in the pricing structure to
improve the availability of services and the capacity of the
computing centre to attract grant-funded users.
f. Shared Services. The Committee met with the Director of
Purchasing who described cost-savings initiatives, some of which had
already been achieved and others which were being planned, from
volume discounts and sharing of information around the campus on
travel, courier services, and a variety of other goods and services
for which decisions and payments are made on a decentralized basis.
The Committee intends to review other administrative and academic
service units on an on-going basis.
g. Support for Graduate Students. As an outgrowth of the discussion
of provincial access funds, the Committee spent some time discussing
the need for additional funds to support graduate students."
Tables on following pages 9709.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
Salary Expenditures and Budgetted FTE Positions for Academic and Support
Staff 1984/85 and 1988/89
Notes:
1.
2.
The units included are those listed in the Financial Statements for 1988/89.  Expenditures and positions lor 1984/85
have been adjusted to reflect the 1988/89 grouping. Includes Reserve and Funds for Excellence.
Comprises Extra-Sessional Studies, Guided Independent Study. Non-Credit Course Programs, and
Centre for Continuing Education.
3. Includes Library Photocopying (moved from Student Services).
4. Net of costs recovered from departments; excludes parking staff in 84/85 (est.).
5. Includes Staff ETA.
'Faculties' Includes early termination expenses.
Moved to ancilliary services: Media Services, Athletics, Youth Sports Camp, Tennis Centre, Copy and Duplicating.
($000)
Positions
$as%
$as%
#as%
#as%
1984/85
of Total
1988/89
Of Total
1984/85
of Total
1988/89
of Total
ACADEMIC SALARIES AND POSITIONS
Faculties (1)
91,545
59
102.317
58
1,841
45
1.793
43
Other Acad. Units (2)
2,837
2
4.221
2
0
0
0
0
Academic Services (1)
Total Academic
0
94.382
0
60
10
106.548
0
60
0
1.841
0
45
0
1.793
0
43
STAFF SALARIES AND POSITIONS
Faculties (1)
24,738
16
26.802
15
925
23
945
23
Other Acad. Units (2)
1,784
1
3,965
2
90
2
85
2
Academic Svs. (1)
Sub-Total
3,281
29,803
2
19
3,862
34.629
2
20
108
1.123
3
27
124
1.154
3
28
Library (3)
10.000
6
10,464
6
368
9
361
9
Plant (4)
12,841
8
13,685
8
465
11
460
11
Student Svs. (1)
Continuing
2.086
1
2.236
1
48
1
52
1
New Units
0
0
170
0
0
0
7
0
Administration (5)
Continuing
7,089
5
8,940
5
246
6
279
7
New Units
0
0
490
0
0
14
0
General
Sub-total
185
32.201
0
21
237
36,222
0
20
3
1,130
0
28
6
1.179
0
29
Sub Total for staff -
84/85 units
62,004
40
70,851
40
2,253
55
2.333
57
Total Academic and
Staff Salaries
156.386
100
177.399
100
4,094
100
4.126
100
Percentages may not sum due to rounding. 9710.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
SALARY EXPENDITURES AND BUDGETTED PTE POSITIONS FOR
ACADEMIC AND SUPPORT STAFF 1988/89
NEW UNITS
($000)
1988/89
Positions
1988/89
NEW UNITS
Student Svs. (1)
Disabled Student Svs.
School & College Liaison
7
163
1
6
^             Sub-total
170
7
Administration (2)
External Affairs
Development Office
Industry Liaison
Employment Equity
Sexual Harassment
51
151
219
47
22
2
5
4
2
1
Sub-total
490
14
TOTAL NEW UNITS
660
21 c
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Graph A
Total Academic Salaries* as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1984/85 to 1988/89
1984/85
1985/86
1986/87
UBC
UWO
Alta
Tor
Sask
1987/88
 Man
1988/89
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers.
♦Academic Salaries comprises Academic ranks and other instructional staff
and student service appointments.
Excludes early termination agreements.
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Graph B
Non-Academic Salaries as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1984/85 to 1988/89
1984/85
1985/86
1986/87
UBC
UWO
Alto
Tor
Sask
1987/88
 Man
1988/89
Source:    Canadian Association of University Business Officers.
Excludes early termination agreements.
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O
. UBC ENROLMENT
FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE) AND WEIGHTED FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (WFTE)
1983/84 -1989/90 (estimates)
(EST)
1983/84
1984/85
1985/86
1986/87
1987/88
1988/89
1989/90
UNDERGRADUATE
21,857
21,078
20.826
20,344
20,561
20.943
21,274
GRADUATE
3,109
3,075
3,105
3,164
3,228
3,320
3,514
TOTAL FTE
24,966
24,153
23.931
23,508
23,789
24,263
24,788
TOTAL WFTE
50,796
49.308
49,240
48.986
49,559
50,636
52.213
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. 9714.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
Referring to item 1. of the report, Dean Meisen stated that the UBC/VGH
Nursing programs had not been amalgamated but the two units had agreed to
offer a joint program.
Dr. Weiler spoke briefly to the report. He reminded Senate that last
year the Committee had reviewed changes in the percent of the budget in
the academic and non-academic salaries and in positions at UBC, and in
particular in the administrative units, during the five-year period
1983/84 to 1987/88. Last April the Committee had reported its findings to
Senate on those issues. This showed that academic positions had declined
by almost 10% while administration positions had increased by about 20%.
Dean Lusztig had asked the Senate Budget Committee to follow these trends
and report back to Senate if they were changing.
Dr. Weiler informed Senate that the data at the end of the report had
been compiled to show what had happened in the five year period between
1984/85 and 1988/89. He stated that this data shows the problem in only
looking at the end points of the window. He stated that the Committee had
taken steps to get the data to fill in that blank. Referring to the
position data, he noted that in 1984/85 there were 1,841 academic
positions in the Faculties and in 1988/89 1,793, which shows a decline of
3% over that five-year period compared to 10% last year. He stated that
there were 60 new positions through Funds for Excellence. Referring to
administrative positions, Dr. Weiler noted that there were 2 46 positions
in 1984/85, and 293 in the same group in 1988/89. Thus there has been a
decline in the gap between the increases for the two groups. Some of the
increase in the administrative positions is a result of new regulations 9715.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
affecting the University or new functions. He stated that although there
were increases in the past year in External Affairs, the Development
Office, and Industry Liaison it is expected that they will generate
revenue for the University as they expand their function. In conclusion,
Dr. Weiler stated that employment equity and sexual harassment reflect the
University's responsibility to the disadvantaged on campus.
Dean Lusztig stated that when the Budget Committee previously reported
Senate was assured that things were levelling out. He stated that Senate
would have appreciated a report on the same data, comparing 1987/88 to
1988/89. He said that the data presented was not comparable and that it
was hard to get that assurance. Dean Lusztig said he found it disquieting
that after comparing the two financial statements 1987/88 to 1988/89,
where data was comparable, that there was around an 8/9% increase in
salaries on the administrative side and only 1% on the faculty side. He
said that it was very clear that Faculty FTE's had continued to decline
and that there had probably been an increase on the administrative side.
He stated that this was of concern because Faculty budgets had just been
reduced by a further 1%, and that what had been observed between 198 4/88
seemed to be continuing. He stated that the Senate Budget Committee
should be concerned about this data. He felt that Senate would be more
comfortable if it could receive FTE information comparable to that
presented at the March 1989 meeting of Senate so that it could be assured
that things are levelling out. Also FTE data across the units was needed
so that Senate could compare with the previous 4-year period. In
conclusion Dean Lusztig stated that he hoped that Senate could get an
assurance that this information will be provided with a little more speed
than the last time around. 9716.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budqet Committee (continued)
Dr. Weiler responded that the Committee was trying to get this data and
had hoped to have available the comparison of FTE's for last year and this
year but that it had not made it through the system. He stated that this
would be reviewed at the next Senate Budget Committee meeting, and hoped
that the Committee would be able to obtain a clear and consistent record
of position changes as well as reconciling budgets versus expenditures.
Extracurricular Activities
Dr. Dennison, Chairman of the Committee, referred to the Senate policy
that no classes be held on Thursdays between 12.30 p.m. and 2.30 p.m. and
informed Senate that he had received information showing that 161 classes
were being held in that time period. He stated that he wanted to draw
Senate's attention to this in the hope that the Registrar and the Chairman
of Senate would take whatever action could be taken.
The Registrar agreed to circulate a reminder of this policy to Deans and
Department Heads together with a list of all classes currently scheduled
to be given between 12.30 and 2.30 p.m. on Thursdays in the 1990/91 Winter
Session, with a request that they adhere to the Senate policy.
Committee on Student Awards
Dr. Cook, Chairman of the Committee, presented the report. Referring to
the Samuel Rothstein Scholarship, Dr. Cook indicated that the description
had been modified from that circulated and that the first sentence should
read: "A $350 scholarship honouring Dr. Samuel Rothstein, founding
Director of the School of Librarianship, was endowed in 1989."
Dr. Cook      ) That the new awards (listed in the Appendix)
Dean Burns    )  be accepted subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors. 9717.
March 21, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Student Awards (continued)
It was agreed that approval of the C. K. Choi Prize in Buddhist Studies
be withheld pending clarification as to whether the Faculty of Graduate
Studies would be involved in the decision concerning this award.
The Rogers Communications Inc. Scholarship was also withheld pending
clarification of the category of students to whom this scholarship would
be awarded.
The motion was put and carried.
Faculties of Arts and Graduate Studies
Proposal that the Master of Library Science program and the Master of
Archival Studies proqram be reclassified as graduate programs
It  was  stated  in  the  material  circulated  that  the  School  of
Librarianship was established by Senate in 1960, and commenced its first
classes in September 1961.  Its one-year fifteen-unit program led to a
postgraduate Bachelor of Library Science degree,  which was then the
standard in Canada.  In 1971 it joined other Canadian institutions in
replacing the B.L.S. degree with a 30 unit Master of Library Science
degree.  In 1981, in conjunction with the Department of History, the
School added a 30 unit Master of Archival Studies program.  To reflect
this development the name of the School was changed in 1984.
From their inception, the School's programs and curricula have been
subject to the academic policies and procedures of the Faculty of Arts,
and the School has been an administrative unit of that Faculty. It is an
anomaly within the University's academic structure, being the only unit
outside the Faculty of Graduate Studies which offers graduate degree
programs. Its students, though enrolled in graduate courses, are
classified as undergraduates.  The School is also an exception in Canada: 9718.
March 21, 1990
Faculties of Arts and Graduate Studies
Proposal that the Master of Library Science program and the Master of
Archival Studies proqram be reclassified as graduate programs  (continued)
the programs of other Canadian schools are governed by faculties of
graduate studies, or the schools are faculties in their own right.
By agreement of the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the Dean of
the Faculty of Arts and the Director of the School, the two graduate
degree programs provided by the School will be incorporated into the
academic structure of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, effective September
1, 1990. For administrative purposes, the School will remain as a unit
within the Faculty of Arts.
While the academic policies and procedures of the School are mainly in
conformity with those of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, some changes to
existing regulations and practices will be necessary.
Admission Procedures
While the School would continue to receive and process its own admissions,
as does the School of Community and Regional Planning, its students would
be registered in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, and the admissions
officers in both units will need to establish working routines.
Academic Qualifications for Admission - Revised and additional Calendar
statement
The School's Calendar statements concerning academic standing, to be
consistent with the statement of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, should
be reworded as follows:
(b) must have achieved first class standing in at least six units of the
course work and at least second class standing in the remaining
course work taken in the last two years of undergraduate study, or
their equivalent in the case of students completing their
undergraduate programs on a part-time basis. 9719.
March 21, 1990
Faculties of Arts and Graduate Studies
Proposal that the Master of Library Science proqram and the Master of
Archival Studies proqram be reclassified as graduate proqrams
Academic Qualifications for Admission - Revised and additional Calendar
statement  (continued)
The following statement, modelled on the Faculty of Graduate Studies'
statement, should be added to the School's Admission statements:
Applicants who have a Bachelor's degree, or its academic equivalent, who
do not meet the requirements of (b) above, but who have had sufficient
formal training or relevant professional experience to offset such
deficiencies, may be granted admission on the recommendation of the
Director of the School and the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies.
Comprehensive Examination
This non-thesis degree requirement of the Faculty has been met by a
revision to the School's policy. Examinations conducted following
completion of the School's core courses will constitute a comprehensive
examination.
Major Essay
This non-thesis degree requirement will be met in accordance with the
Faculty's Regulations Covering the Master's Degree 'In Course' i.e.
Without Thesis, dated October 30, 1972. Since the student is taking
academic work additional to the basic requirements of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies, one or more in-course essays will be designated as the
major essay, with the approval of the student's advisors and the Director
of the School.
Fees
Students who entered the School in 1989/90 will continue to pay program
fees in 1990/91 at the appropriate levels for those programs, as
determined by the Board. Students entering the School in 1990/91 will pay
the Master's degree tuition fees.
Awards and Financial Aid
Heretofore students in the School have been eligible for merit- and
need-based undergraduate awards. After September 1, 1990 they would be
eligible for awards available to graduate students.
Transitional Matters
Students admitted to either program in 1989/90 and who successfully
complete their first year of studies would be admitted to the Faculty of
Graduate Studies automatically, though there may be rare exceptions where
students do not meet Faculty admission standards.  Such students could be
admitted in accordance with paragraph 5, p.134 of the 1990/91 Calendar. 9720.
March 21, 1990
Faculties of Arts and Graduate Studies
Proposal that the Master of Library Science proqram and the Master of
Archival Studies proqram be reclassified as graduate proqrams
Transitional Matters  (continued)
Information about both programs has already been mailed to hundreds of
prospective applicants, many of whom are already preparing applications
based on existing School policies, fees, etc. The School does not keep a
record of all the persons to whom it has supplied information, and has no
way of contacting them to notify them of changes. Therefore existing
admission standards will be used for students commencing programs in
September 1990. Every effort will be made to restrict admission to those
who meet the standards of the Faculty of Graduate Studies."
Dean Suedfeld  )  That the Master of Library Science Program
Dean Elkins   ) and the Master of Archival Studies
program be reclassified as graduate
programs, effective September 1, 1990.
Carried
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal to establish the Hong Kong Bank of Canada Chair of Asian Research
It was stated in the material circulated that with funds available by
the Province of British Columbia to match a joint donation from the Hong
Kong Bank of Canada and the Hong Kong Shanghai Bank, an endowment is to be
established to fund a Chair in the area of Asian Research. The objective
of the gift is to provide salary support and to support increased teaching
and research activities and administrative leadership in the Institute of
Asian Research and disciplines related to its activities. The appointment
will be made in the Faculty of Graduate Studies; the holder of the Chair
will serve as the Director of the Institute of Asian Research and may hold
a cross-appointment and participate in teaching in a discipline
appropriate to his or her field of expertise.
Dean Suedfeld ) That the proposal of the Faculty of
Dean Burns    )  Graduate Studies to establish the Hong
Kong Bank of Canada Chair in Asian Research
be approved.
Carried 9721.
March 21, 1990
Faculty of Graduate Studies (continued)
Membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies
The following proposal on membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies
had been circulated:
"The function of the Faculty of Graduate Studies is to ensure that
graduate students are provided with training in research and other
scholarly activity of the highest standard. The Faculty of Graduate
Studies will consist of the President, Vice-President Academic,
Vie-President Research, the Dean and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies,
deans of other faculties and appropriately qualified members of the
University faculty.
"Each Faculty to Establish Criteria for Membership of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies
The Committee considered establishinq qeneral University criteria for
determining which University faculty would be members of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. The Committee concluded that the graduate programs
offered were so diverse that only the Faculty, Department or Unit entitled
to offer the advanced degree could define the qualifications required for
supervising graduate students. Whether these criteria should be
established at the Faculty or Departmental level would depend on the size
and organization of the Faculty. Each Faculty should determine the
appropriate level for that Faculty.
Recommendation 1
That each Faculty, department or unit be required to establish formal
criteria for determining which members of that Faculty, Department or Unit
will be members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and provide those
criteria to the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
General Criteria for Membership
Although the Committee considered that the primary responsibility for
defining the criteria for membership of the Faculty of Graduate Studies
should rest with the individual Faculty, Department or Unit concerned, the
Committee believed that there were some general considerations on which
policy should be established. Faculties, Departments and Units would be
expected to establish criteria consistent with these general criteria.
(a)  Full members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies
Full members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies will be entitled to
teach, to supervise graduate students and to vote in the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. Individuals eligible for full membership must be
faculty members holding the title of professor, associate professor
or assistant professor or professors emeriti in an academic Unit
authorized to offer graduate degree programs. 9722.
March 21, 1990
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies  (continued)
"(b) Associate Members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies
Associate members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies will be entitled
to teach or to supervise graduate students but will have no voting or
other privileges in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Individuals
eligible for associate membership of the Faculty of Graduate Studies
will include:
(1) Senior Instructors
(2) Adjunct and Clinical Faculty
(3) Honorary Faculty
(4) Visiting Professors
(5) Research Associates
(6) Post Doctoral Fellows
(7) Staff of Research Institutes affiliated with the University.
The Committee recognized the important contribution that the individuals
listed above have made, and continue to make to this University's graduate
programs. It should be made clear that a faculty, department or unit may
appoint an associate member of the Faculty of Graduate Studies to teach
and to supervise graduate students. Unless an associate member of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies is available to a graduate student on a
full-time basis he should be a co-supervisor with another member of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies who is available on a full-time basis. In
making such an appointment the faculty, department or unit should consider
the individual's scholarly activity in determining whether it is
appropriate to appoint that individual to associate membership in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies.
However, it is the Committee's view that the governance of the Faculty
of Graduate Studies should rest with full-time faculty members of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. The number of individuals eligible for
associate membership of the Faculty of Graduate Studies is sufficiently
large to significantly, and inappropriately, affect the policies of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies if they were entitled to vote in the Faculty
of Graduate Studies.
Recommendation 2
That  the  Faculty  of  Graduate  Studies  establish  two  categories  of
membership:  (a) full, and (b) associate, as defined in this report.
Administrative Procedure
1. Each Faculty, Department or Unit will establish formal criteria for
membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies and provide them to the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. This will enable the Faculty of
Graduate Studies to review them and determine whether any further
action is required. 9723.
March 21, 1990
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies  (continued)
"2. Each Faculty, Department or Unit will submit lists of those members
who meet the criteria for appointment and who are approved for (a)
full, or (b) associate membership of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
3. Individuals approved for membership of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies will be members for a term of five years (or such lesser term
as is specified in the appointment). Membership is renewable.
4. Each Faculty, Department or Unit will be asked to review the list of
members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies annually to determine:
a) whether any new members should be added
b) whether any members should be deleted (because of death,
resignation, etc.).
5. The Faculty of Graduate Studies may review the lists of members
submitted by the Faculties, Departments or Units to determine whether
the membership lists are consistent with the formal criteria
established by the relevant unit. Upon request the relevant unit
will supply the Faculty of Graduate Studies with evidence that a
particular appointment is consistent with the criteria.
6. Where there is a complaint that a member of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies is providing unsatisfactory supervision of a student or is
performing his or her teaching and administrative duties in an
unsatisfactory way, the Dean of Graduate Studies may initiate an
inquiry and may recommend to the President that the individual's
membership of the Faculty of Graduate Studies be suspended or
cancelled.
7. An individual who is aggrieved by any decision concerning his or her
membership of the Faculty of Graduate Studies may request the
Graduate Council to establish an ad hoc Membership Committee to hear
the complaint and to advise the Dean of Graduate Studies.
Recommendation 3
That the Faculty of Graduate Studies approve the administrative procedures
set out for determining membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Review
As a result of the procedures recommended in this report the Faculty of
Graduate Studies will obtain additional information about the practices
and policies in the University for determining membership of the Faculty
of Graduate Studies. It is also possible that unanticipated difficulties
will arise. 9724.
March 21, 1990
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Membership in the Faculty of Graduate Studies  (continued)
"Recommendation 4
That the Graduate Council establish an Ad Hoc Committee on Membership five
years after the adoption of these recommendations to review how they have
worked in practice and whether any changes are required."
Dean Suedfeld ) That the proposal on membership
Dean Webber   )  in the Faculty of Graduate Studies
be approved.
Carried
Proposal to establish an Institute of Health Promotion Research
The following summary of the proposal had been circulated:
"Purpose  To provide a focus at UBC for health promotion research,
education, intersectoral collaboration, and service.
This broadly-based multidisciplinary multi-sectoral Institute of Health
Promotion Research will provide the focus for interdisciplinary research,
education and service at UBC, aimed directly at meeting the challenges of
improving health and quality of life. It will also help to bring the
University's educational programs more closely in line with current views
on health.
Chronic illness is now the dominant form of illness in our society, and
factors relating to lifestyle and the environment play very significant
roles in the health of the population. Environment in this context is
broadly defined to include its social, political, economic and cultural
aspects, as well as the physical environment. Although the Lalonde Report
of 1974 pointed out that the principal causes of illness and premature
death are strongly influenced by behavioural and environmental factors,
support for research and for the delivery of health care services has
remained focussed primarily upon the biology of scute disease. Recently,
initiatives at federal, provincial and state levels throughout North
America to promote "Health for All by the Year 2000" indicate a new
climate of change; also a growing segment of society enthusiastically
accepts that prevention is better than cure, and that timely health
promotion can significantly reduce disability and prolong personal
independence.
Universities, like governments and research funding agencies, have been
slow to accept this broader concept of health, and with a few notable
exceptions they continue to emphasize acute intervention. However, this
situation is changing rapidly in Canada and the USA. Several universities
have established centres and institutes of health promotion, with strong
linkages to the behavioural, biomedical, educational, environmental and
social disciplines where health is recognized as a basic resource, and
health promotion as a process that encourages personal empowerment and
public responsibility. 9725.
March 21, 1990
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal  to  establish  an  Institute  of  Health  Promotion  Research
(continued)
Goals
In its search for excellence in health care, UBC must accept the
challenge of this movement, and become a leader. To this end, the
Institute's functional goals will be:
- to extend research and teaching at UBC into health promotion, and into
health program and policy evaluation;
- to develop and diffuse effective methods of promoting health;
- to establish a graduate program in health promotion;
- to integrate health promotion into the clinical education of health
professionals;
- to advise outside agencies;
- to offer continuing education programs;
- to foster ties to both the public and private sectors concerned with
health promotion at home and abroad;
- to be a resource for developing countries interested in promoting health
and evaluating health care policies.
Functions These goals operate in three broad functional areas:
- Research and Development
- Graduate Studies
- Service, Consultation and Government Linkages
Organizational Structure The institute will require a core of faculty
and support staff, management committees to manage and advise, and core
budget and space, in order to function.
Academic Program Implementation of this program will relate closely to
the teaching and faculty available at UBC. Financial support for the
Institute has been obtained from the Province, with 5-year funding for a
Professorship suitable for the Director. Additional support will be
needed for two Full Time Equivalent academic staff members. At this time,
17 Academic Staff have been identified to serve as Faculty Associates,
with interests that complement the goals of the Institute. Approximately
$1.3 million are obtained annually by this group in grants related to
health promotion. This vigorous activity will serve as the foundation of
an academic group of M.Sc. and Ph.D. studies. However, this graduate
studies program will not be submitted for approval until after the
Institute is established.
Development Plan This describes the objectives, a schedule for
achieving them, and a protocol for their review and evaluation. A Core
Funding and Resource Plan is also presented. The funds already obtained
for the Institute, and the academic and administrative resources available
at UBC, can assure a rapid and successful development."
Dean Suedfeld ) That the proposal of the Faculty of
Dean Burns    ) Graduate Studies to establish an
Institute of Health Promotion Research
be approved.
Carried 9726.
March 21, 1990
Faculty of Graduate Studies  (continued)
Proposal to establish a Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre (MAGIC)
A proposal to establish a Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre
(MAGIC) had been circulated.  It was stated in the material that MAGIC
will be an interdisciplinary research centre with four basic goals:
1. To do outstanding research in developing, understanding, and using
computer-based media graphics technology.
2. To develop software tools to aid users from a wide class of
disciplines to use this technology in their discipline.
3. To foster transfer of this new technology throughout the university
and the community through interdisciplinary research projects
focusing on computer-based media and graphics applications, and a
variety of workshops and courses.
4. To strengthen interaction with industry through collaborative
research projects. These interactions will include collaborations
with computer manufacturers to develop the technology, and
collaborations with industrial users to transfer the technology.
Some other points mentioned in the proposal are as follows:
"Educational Activities
While the main focus of the proposed centre is interdisciplinary
research, the centre would also host a substantial number of educational
activities in addition to the most obvious one of training graduate
students engaged in the centre's research projects. In particular, over
time the centre would establish and publicize a collection of graduate
courses related to its research activities. Many of these courses may
already exist within departments at UBC, (for example the graduate
graphics course in the Department of Computer Science) but are not
well-known to other departments. Other courses, especially the most
interdisciplinary, would be new courses reflecting the new technology and
research directions brought to UBC by the creation of MAGIC. The centre
would also organize workshops and seminar series on a regular basis.
There is no plan at this time to introduce new academic programs
associated with the centre.
The role of MAGIC in graduate education
The main contribution that MGIC will make to graduate education at UBC
is by providing interdisciplinary research opportunities and advanced
training in a key area of rapidly progressing technology. Such research
opportunities at UBC are very scarce today due to lack of resources and
expertise. MAGIC will bring substantial additional resources and
expertise to UBC, focusing, integrating and leveraging today's activities. 9727.
March 21, 1990
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal to establish a Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre (MAGIC)
(continued)
Courses and Workshops
The proposed courses range from brief introductory seminars aimed at
making professionals from diverse fields aware of the current technology
available in computer graphics and animation, to graduate level courses in
computer graphics and media, aimed at training graduate students in a
broad range of disciplines to actually exploit this technology in their
own field. In addition, we plan highly focused workshops on specific
application areas. We will give a brief description of one example of
each type below. These examples all happen to involve computer animation,
but similar programs will undoubtedly be offered in other areas. Although
it might be possible to offer each of these courses independently by
faculty in various departments, it is highly unlikely they would have the
same interdisciplinary flavour and reach the same widespread audiences.
Moreover, by offering these courses through MAGIC, it is possible to share
equipment and staff resources in a way that would be extremely difficult
if they were distributed through different departments. Finally, the
existence of the interdisciplinary research taking place in MAGIC will
generate material for courses that simply does not exist today, and would
be unlikely to be created at UBC without the presence of MAGIC.
Introductory seminar on applications of computer graphics and animation
technology
This seminar would run for approximately half a day, and would include a
broad survey of applications of computer graphics and animation, a number
of more detailed demonstrations of ongoing research projects, and a brief
guide to the type of equipment and training needed to get started.
Graduate level course on computer graphics animation
This course is aimed at graduate students in non-computer science
disciplines who want to use computer graphics animation and modelling in
their own research field. Students would be expected to be familiar with
computer systems, at least one programming language, and basic geometry
and calculus. The course would cover the basic concepts from computer
graphics and animation, and would include a major project in which the
students develop an application within their own field. A list of the
major topics in this course follows:
The components  of  computer  graphics  - modelling,  geometry  and
display. Review of geometry.
Classifications of animations - rigid models, camera animation, light
animation,  flexible  models,  physical  models,  goal-oriented
animation, scientific visualization.
Scripting - key frames, dope sheets, actors, constraints
Kinematic - interpolating from key frames, curves, continuity and
control, inverse kinematics.
Surfaces and Volumes - surface deformations, volume rendering, volume
deformation.
Non-spatial animation - colour animation, texture mapping, surface
characteristics, participating media.
Dynamics - basic dynamics, articulated body, solving the equations,
non-rigid non-articulated bodies, fluid motion.
Interface to media  - video,   film,  real-time animation. 9728.
March 21, 1990
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal to establish a Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre
(MAGIC)  (continued)
"Workshop on application of computer animation and graphics to medicine
This 2-3 day workshop would bring together international leaders in
computer animation and graphics with their counterparts in computer
modelling based medical research to present and discuss the current key
issues..
Organization
Because of the interdisciplinary nature of its research activities and
its importance to graduate education at UBC, we believe that the most
appropriate administrative location for MAGIC is in the Faculty of
Graduate Studies, with the Director of MAGIC reporting directly to the
Dean of Graduate Studies. We propose that most researchers and students
associated with MAGIC occupy regular positions in existing departments
and/or schools, though a certain number of additional
administrative/support positions are necessary to coordinate the
activities of the centre. In addition, it may be appropriate that some
researchers and visitors be affiliated directly with the centre rather
than a specific regular department. Since it is strongly desirable that
the director of the centre be (and continue to be) a leading researcher,
we have chosen to add an executive director who would handle most of the
day to say operations of the centre as well as participating in long term
strategic planning."
Dean Suedfeld ) That the proposal of the Faculty of
Dr. Tees      ) Graduate Studies to establish a Media
and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre
(MAGIC) be approved.
Carried
Faculty of Medicine
Proposal to chanqe the name of the Department of Anatomy to the Department
of Anatomy and Cellular Biology
Dean Webber informed Senate the the proposal to change the name of the
Department of Anatomy to the Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology
had been withdrawn pending consultation with other departments on campus.
First Nations House of Learning
Material had been circulated for information outlininq the nature of the
First Nations House of Learning and its activities. The following covering
letter from Dr. Birch had been circulated with the material: 9729.
March 21, 1990
First Nations House of Learning  (continued)
"For more than 15 years The University of British Columbia has been
involved in programs designed specifically to recruit First Nations
students into the professions. The oldest and largest such program is
the Native Indian Teacher Education Program which operates with four or
five regional centres throughout the province at any given time. NITEP
was followed by the Native law Program and more recently the Ts'*kel
emphasis in graduate programs of the Faculty of Education.
Although the University engages in extensive community liaison and
active recruiting, students are enrolled only if they are considered to
have a reasonably probability of success. No compromises are made in
program requirements. Indeed, programs often require more, given the
inclusion of cultural enrichment, than parallel programs for majority
students.
Absolutely central to the success of students in each of these programs
is the cultural enrichment, counselling, and tutorial provision that is
made. In an attempt to generalize these services to the university
level, we have established the First Nations House of Learning. The
materials outline for members of Senate the nature of the First Nations
House of Learning and its activities. FNHL is under the capable
leadership of Professor Verna Kirkness, Director, and Ms. Ethel Gardner,
Assistant Director. It has been the object of a million dollar campaign
gift and we are planning to include in the enlarged campaign a longhouse
designed to provide a focal point for First Nations students on campus."
Other business
Eligibility to serve on Senate
Dr. Tennant referred to the Senate policy that requires that a vacancy
be declared when a member of Senate goes on leave for a period of more
than six months, and stated that he wished to give notice of the following
motion:
"That faculty members who inform the Secretary of Senate of
their intent to remain on campus and to be active in Senate
business during their leave shall be exempt from the rule
prohibiting membership during faculty leave."
Enqineering Undergraduate Society Newsletter
Dr. Sobrino moved the following motion: Other business
Enqineerinq Undergraduate Society Newsletter  (continued)
9730.
March 21, 1990
Dr. Sobrino
Dr. Cook
) The Senate of The University of
) British Columbia strongly comdemns
the racist, sexist and hompphobic
remarks in the March 14, 1990 issue
of the Engineering Undergraduate
Society Newsletter, and confirms its
determination to do everything within
its power to create in this University
a climate that will strongly discourage
the emergence of any manifestations of
hatred and discrimination against any group.
Carried
Student senators
On behalf of Senate, the Vice-chairman expressed thanks and appreciation
for the contributions made by those students who were attending their last
Senate meeting. Students were requested to continue to serve on
committees until replacements are named.
The meeting adjourned at 10.00 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, April 18,
1990.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 9731.
March 21, 1990
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate
Patricia A. Baird Prize - A $250 prize is endowed by friends and colleagues
to honour Dr. Patricia A. Baird who served as Head of the Department of
Medical Genetics from 1978 to 1989. The award, which includes a
certificate, is made on the recommendation of the Department of Medical
Genetics to a second year medical student who has demonstrated excellence in
medical genetics courses (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
Blake Cassels Graydon Prize in Native Law - Blake Cassels Graydon,
Barristers and Solicitors, gives a $500 prize for the law student who
achieves the highest standing in the course Law 367 (Native Peoples and the
Law). It is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law.
(Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
Canadian Physiotherapy Association Book Prize - A book prize is offered by
the Vancouver Unit of the CPA Neurosciences Division for a graduating
physiotherapy student demonstrating interest and outstanding performance in
clinical placement and high standing in course work related to neurology.
It is awarded on the recommendation of the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine.  (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
CERUM Orthodontics Prize - A $500 prize is provided by Cerum Ortho
Organizers for a dental student completing second year who has demonstrated
excellence in orthodontics courses. It is given on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Dentistry.  (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
C.K. Choi Fellowship in Business Administration - An $11,500 fellowship has
been endowed by the Choi family in honour of their father Mr. Cheung-kok
Choi. It is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, to a student enrolled in the M.B.A., M.Sc (Business Administration)
or Ph.D. program specializing in international business with an Asian
focus. Students with a strong background in Asian business or on the M.B.A.
exchange program with Asia will be considered as candidates. The fellowship
will be renewed for a second year or the second award may be made to another
student.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
C.K. Choi Scholarship - A $5,000 scholarship has been endowed by the Choi
family. The award is open to students in the Faculties of Medicine,
Dentistry, the first year of Graduate Studies, or entering the third or
higher year of a baccalaureate program. The winner will be selected by a
special committee from among those candidates nominated by faculties and
designated student organizations for the Sherwood Lett Memorial Scholarship.
Candidates are expected to have a good academic standing, and have
demonstrated achievement in sports and participation in student and
community activities. The award may be renewed for a second year provided
the winner maintains scholarship standing. Nominations must be received by
July lst.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.) 9732.
March 21, 1990
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate  (continued)
C.K. Choi Scholarship in Enqineering - A $2,500 scholarship has been endowed
by the Choi family for an outstanding student entering engineering from senior
secondary school. Holders of this scholarship who maintain a first-class
average in a full program of courses, or who stand in the top 10% of their
class will be eligible to have the award renewed for a further three years of
study or until the first undergraduate degree is obtained (whichever is the
shorter period). Candidate must submit the Application for University of B.C.
Entrance Scholarships. Completed applications and supporting documents must
be postmarked no later than April 15th.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
C.K. Choi Scholarship in Secondary Education - A $5,000 scholarship has been
endowed by the Choi family for an outstanding student entering the Bachelor of
Education (Secondary) program. The scholarship covers one full year of study
and is disbursed in three equal instalments, one at the start of each term.
It is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Ralph M. and Elizabeth E. Cochran Scholarship - A $1,000 scholarship was
endowed in 1989 by Ralph and Elizabeth Cochran for a graduate forestry
student. It is given on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1991/92 Winter
Session.)
Aunna Currie Memorial Prize - A $400 prize has been endowed by the family of
Aunna Margaret Currie in her memory. It is awarded on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Education to an outstanding student entering the final year of
the B.Ed. (Secondary) program who intends to teach social studies. (Available
1989/90 Winter Session.)
Doris Curtis Memorial Scholarship - The income from a fund donated by family
and friends in memory of Doris Curtis will provide scholarships for women
students in the Faculty of Law. The scholarships will be awarded on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law. Financial circumstances may be
considered. Doris Curtis took a particular interest from the beginning of the
law school in 1945 in the welfare of women law students. Applicants must
apply to the Office of the Dean of Law.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Dairy Bureau of Canada Award - A $550 award is offered by the Dairy Bureau of
Canada for a student in the School of Family and Nutritional Science who has
good communication skills and demonstrates abilities in nutrition education.
It is given on the recommendation of the School. (Available 1990/91 Winter
Session.)
Ecowaste Industries Scholarship - A $500 scholarship, endowed by Ecowaste
Industries, is awarded on the recommendation of the Department of Bio-Resource
Engineering to a student with an interest in waste management. (Available
1990/91 Winter Session.)
Ecumenical Research Scholarship - A $100 scholarship is awarded to a graduate
student with a concentration on ecumenical research in Muslim-Christian
relations. It is made on the recommendation of the Department of Religious
Studies in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.) 9733.
March 21, 1990
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate  (continued)
Governor-General's Gold Medal - A gold medal, presented by the
Governor-General of Canada, is awarded to the graduate student whose record,
in the opinion of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, is the best in the
graduating class for the Doctorate degree. A second gold medal is awarded to
the graduate student whose record, in the opinion of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, is the best in the graduating class for the Master's degree with
thesis. (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.) (Revised description of current
award.)
Governor-General's Silver Medal in Arts - A silver medal, presented by the
Governor-Gernera1 of Canada, is awarded to the student whose record, in the
opinion of the Faculty of Arts, is the best in the graduating class for the
B.A. degree. (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.) (Revised description of
current award.)
Governor-General's Silver Medal in Science - A silver medal, presented by the
Governor-General of Canada, is awarded to the student whose record, in the
opinion of the Faculty of Science, is the best in the graduating class for the
B.Sc. degree. (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.) (Revised description of
current award.)
David J. Greer Scholarship - A $350 scholarship, endowed by David J. Greer, is
awarded on the recommendation of the Department of Computer Science for an
undergraduate student in that department. (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Jean Jure Scholarship - A $2,500 scholarship, endowed by Roy Jure in honour of
Jean Jure (Tait), is awarded on the recommendation of the School of Social
Work to a student in that school.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Kamloops Bar Association Scholarship - A $750 scholarship is offered by
members of the Kamloops Bar Association to a student who achieves high
standing in first or second year law. It is awarded on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Law. (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Joseph Katz Memorial Prize - A $300 prize has been endowed by family, friends
and colleagues in memory of Joseph Katz, a long-term member of the Faculty of
Education. It is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education to
an outstanding student in Multi-cultural and Minority Education. (Available
1989/90 Winter Session.)
Liana Lam Scholarship - A $500 scholarship has been endowed by the parents of
Liana Lam in appreciation of the encouragement and support given their
daughter by School of Music faculty members Robert Silverman and Pawel
Checinski. It is awarded on the recommendation of the School to a student of
piano who combines talent with a commitment to performance or teaching.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Jaswant Kaur Manhas Memorial Scholarship in Business Administration - A $1,500
scholarship, endowed by Kashmir Singh Manhas in memory of his wife, Jaswant
Kaur Manhas, is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies,
to a student entering the M.B.A. or M.Sc. (Bus.Admin.) program.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.) 9734.
March 21, 1990
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Jaswant Kaur Manhas Memorial Scholarship in Medicine - A $1,000 scholarship,
endowed by Kashmir Singh Manhas in memory of his wife, Jaswant Kaur Manhas, is
awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine to an outstanding
medical student entering final year.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Kashmir Singh Manhas Scholarship in Applied Science - A $1,500 scholarship,
endowed by Kashmir Singh Manhas, is awarded on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Applied Science, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, to a graduate engineering student. (Available 1990/91 Winter
Session.)
Kashmir Singh Manhas Scholarship in Law - A $1,000 scholarship, endowed by
Kashmir Singh Manhas, is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law to
an outstanding law student entering final year. (Available 1990/91 Winter
Session.)
Monica McLean Memorial Bursary - A $300 bursary is made available by family
and friends in memory of Monica Doreen McLean, who died at the age of
thirty-eight years on Easter Sunday 1988. Her life was dedicated to
counselling families, children and women in crisis. It is available to a
graduate student in Counselling Psychology. (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
A. Stewart McMorran Scholarship - A $300 scholarship has been endowed by
members of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity to recognize contributions made to the
fraternity and the community by the Honourable A. Stewart McMorran. The award
is made to a fraternity member who has demonstrated to the selection committee
outstanding achievement in the fraternity, on campus and in the community.
Members wishing to be considered should contact the President of the active
chapter in the fall.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
George Pensom Bursary - Bursaries totalling $1,800 have been established by a
bequest of George F. Pensom. The fund is administered in conjunction with the
Vancouver Foundation. Preference is given to students entering UBC from
School District 47 (Powell River).  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Amanda Reid and Rick Hansen Award - This award, in the form of a decorative
plaque is offered by the Physiotherapy Association of British Columbia and the
British Columbia Association of Physiotherapists in Private Practice in honour
of the 25th anniversary of the School of Rehabilitation Medicine. The award
is given on the recommendation of the School to a third or fourth year
physical therapy student for outstandinq contribution to the promotion of the
profession.  (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
Samuel Rothstein Scholarship - A $350 scholarship honouring Dr. Samuel
Rothstein, founding Director of the School of Librarianship, was endowed in
1989. The scholarship is awarded on the recommendation of the School of
Library, Archival and Information Studies, in consultation with the Faculty of
Graduate Studies, to a student selected on the basis of academic achievement
and promise of success in librarianship. Financial circumstances of the
candidate may be considered.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.) 9735.
March 21, 1990
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Harold A. Steane Memorial Award - A $2,500 award has been established in
memory of Harold A. Steane. It is made on the recommendation of the
Department of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering to a student entering
final year of mineral processing undergraduate program or any year in the
Masters program. Preference is given to a student with demonstrated
dedication to the mineral industry and ability in working with others.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
D. and C. Stedman Bursaries - Bursaries totalling $2,000 are offered by D.
and C. Stedman to women who are working towards professional careers through
undergraduate studies in the Faculties of Arts, Science, Medicine, Law or
Education (excluding the School of Physical Education). No single award
will exceed $1,000.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
University of B.C. Medal (in Family and Nutritional Sciences) - This medal
is awarded to the student standing at the head of the graduating class in
the School of Family and Nutritional Sciences. (Available 1990/91 Winter
Session.) (This is replacing the Special University Prize for the Head of
the Graduating Class in Family and Nutritional Sciences.)
University of B.C. Medal (in Fine Arts) - This medal is awarded to the
student standing at the head of the graduating class for the Bachelor of
Fine Arts degree. (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.) (This is replacing
the Special University Prize for the Head of the Graduating Class in Fine
Arts.)
University of B.C. Medal (in Music) - This medal is awarded to the student
standing at the head of the graduating class for the Bachelor of Music
degree. (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.) (This is replacing the
Special University Prize for the Head of the Graduating Class in Music.)
Earl and Margaret Rosester Ward Memorial Bursary - Bursaries totalling
$2,500 have been endowed in memory of Earl and Margaret Rosester Ward. They
are available to undergraduate or graduate students with financial need.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Weldwood of Canada Limited Bursary - A $1,000 bursary, given by Weldwood of
Canada Limited, is offered to forestry students in the second or higher year
in Harvesting or Resource Management. It is for a full time student with a
satisfactory academic record and financial need. Preference is given to
Canadian citizens and permanent residents. (Available 1990/91 Winter
Session.)
World University Service of Canada Bursary - A $2,500 bursary is offered by
the University to assist a student refugee to defray books and tuition
costs. It is made on the recommendation of the World University Service of
Canada, UBC Local Committee.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Jack Young Prize - A $300 prize has been endowed by John T. (Jack) Young,
B.Sc.(Hons.) '31, Professor Emeritus of Science Education. Dr. Young, a
graduate of Kitsilano High School, was an outstanding science teacher in
B.C. whose career extended over 56 years with 22 years in secondary schools,
two in elementary schools and 19 at UBC in Science Education. The prize is
awarded on the recommendation of the Department of Science Education at the
end of the extended practicum to a student demonstrating excellence in
teaching secondary science, at least some of which should have been at the
junior secondary level.  (Available 1989/90 winter Session.)

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