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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] Dec 12, 1984

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Array 8280.
December 12, 1984.
The Fourth Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1984-85 was held on Wednesday, December 12, 1984 at
8.00 p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Present: Vice-President R. H. T. Smith (Chairman), Mr. J. L. Armstrong,
Dr. E. G. Auld, Dean D. R. Birch, Mr. 3. Blom, Dr. T. H. Brown, Rev. P. C.
Burns, Mr. G. D. Burnyeat, Miss E. T. Busza, Miss B. C. Chant, Dr. D. J.
Connor, Dr. T. S. Cook, Ms. L. M. Copeland, Dr. J. D. Dennison, Dr. A. J.
Elder, Dr. J. A. S. Evans, Dean C. V. Finnegan, Mr. R. M. Finnigan,
Mrs. E. D. Fulton, Dr. 3. Gaskell, Dr. J. H. V. Gilbert, Dr. M. A. Hickling,
Dr. K. J. Holsti, Mrs. C. J. R. Jillings, Mr. 3. T. Kelsall, Dean R. W.
Kennedy, Dr. J. P. Kimmins, Mr. S. King, Mr. J. Kulich, Dr. D. S. Lirenman,
Dr. D. Lupini, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Mr. B. Mah, Acting Dean B. E. March,
Dr. H. 3. Matheson, Dr. B. C. McBride, Mr. J. M. McConville, Mr. D. Mclnnes,
Mr. M. G. McMillan, Dr. J. H. McNeill, Mr. A. J. Pearson, Mrs. G. E. Plant,
Dean B. E. Riedel, Mr. 3. M. Rutherford, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Mr. 3. A.
Smitton, Dr. L. de Sobrino, Dr. R. A. Spencer, Dr. 3. K. Stager, Dr. J. R.
Stein, Dean P. Suedfeld, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Dr. P. R. Tennant, Dr. R. C.
Thompson, Dean W. A. Webber, Dr. L. S. Weiler, Dean R. M. Will, Dr. D. LL.
Williams, Dr. J. L. Wisenthal, Mr. R. A. Yaworsky.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
President K. George Pedersen, Chancellor R. W. Wyman, Dr. C. E. Armerding,
Dr. T. M. Ballard, Dean G. S. Beagrie, Dr. N. R. Bulley, Miss D. J. Chow,
Mr. A. L. Clarke, Dr. D. Donaldson, Mr. M. D. Friesen, Dr. D. F. Robitaille,
Dr. E. S. Schwartz, Dr. R. Stewart, Dr. A. Van Seters, Dr. 3. Vanderstoep,
Dean L. M. Wedepohl, Miss N. E. Woo.
Minutes of previous meeting
Dr. Stager )   That the minutes of the Third regular
Dean Riedel )   meeting of Senate for the Session
1984-85, having been circulated, be
taken as read and adopted.
Carried
Business arising from the Minutes
Report on Enrolment 1984-85 (p.8275)
As requested at the previous meeting a report on the enrolment as at
December 1, 1984 was circulated for information. 8281.
December 12, 1984.
Prizes, Scholarships and Bursaries
Dr. Williams ) That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A')
Dean Will   ) be accepted subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors and that letters of thanks
be sent to the donors.
Carried
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Faculty of Medicine - B.M.L.Sc. change in admission requirements
The Admissions Committee recommended approval of the following:
"Pathology, BMLSc. program p.194, Col. 2
Candidates for admission must have graduated from an approved
Institute of Technology (or College) with an approved two year
program in Medical Laboratory Technology, plus one year of
in-hospital training in a CM.A. approved hospital laboratory. They
must have graduated with the Canadian Society of Laboratory
Technologists R.T. (general) diploma. They must, in addition, have
passed English 100 (or equivalent) OR the English composition test
and gained credit in one of options a"yor b):
a) Chemistry 230 (or its equivalent) plus one of
Chemistry 205, Chemistry 201 or any other second year level
physical chemistry course.
b) Chemistry 230 (or its equivalent) and 3 units of arts
electives.
Candidates admitted under option b) must complete
Chemistry 205 in the first year of the program."
Dean Finnegan )   That the proposed change in admission
Dean Webber  )   requirements for the B.M.L.Sc. degree
program be approved.
Carried
School of Nursing - change of application deadline date
The committee recommended approval of a proposed change in the
deadline date for application for admission to the B.S.N, program. The
Calendar entry to read as follows: 8282.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
School of Nursing - change of application deadline date (continued)
The last day for submission of applications for
admission to the four year B.S.N, program for
the Winter Session beginning the following
September is May 31st, with necessary documents
and official transcripts to be in the
Registrar's Office by June 30th.
Dean Finnegan )   That the proposed change of
Dean Riedel  )   application deadline date for
admission to the B.S.N, program
be approved.
Carried
School of Rehabilitation Medicine - addition of a documentation deadline
date
The committee recommend approval of the following proposal from the
School of Rehabilitation Medicine:
That a documentation deadline date of June 15th be
included in the Calendar as part of the admission
requirements for the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine.
Dean Finnegan )   That the proposed addition of a
Dean Webber  )   documentation deadline date be approved.
Carried
Curriculum Committee (See Appendix 'B')
Dr. Thompson presented the report. The committee recommended approval
of a course change submitted by the School of Architecture; curriculum
proposals submitted by the Faculty of Education, with the exception of Art
Education 321 and 331 and Music Education 321 and 331; a Ph.D. program in
Oral Biology submitted by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, with the
proviso that the program be reviewed by the Faculty of Graduate Studies in
five years time; new courses and course changes submitted by the Faculty 8283.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
of Graduate Studies;  new courses, and a calendar statement for the
Residency Training Program in Paediatric General Surgery submitted by the
Faculty of Medicine; course changes submitted by the School of Physical
Education and Recreation and new courses and course changes submitted by
the School of Rehabilitation Medicine.
Dr. Thompson )
Dr. Tennant )
Dr. Thompson )
Dean Birch  )
That the proposal of the School of Architecture
be approved.
Carried
That the proposals of the Faculty of
Education (excluding Art Education and
Music Education 321 and 331) be approved.
Carried
Dr. Thompson )
Dean Suedfeld)
That the proposal of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to offer a Ph.D. program in Oral Biology
be approved, with the proviso that the program
be reviewed by the Faculty of Graduate Studies in
five years time.
Carried
Dr. Thompson )
Dean Suedfeld)
That the proposed new courses and course
changes submitted by the Faculty of Graduate
Studies be approved.
Carried
Dr. Thompson )
Dean Webber )
That the proposals of the Faculty of Medicine
be approved.
Carried
Dr. Thompson )
Dean Birch  )
That the proposals of the School of Physical
Education and Recreation be approved.
Carried 8284.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
Dr. Thompson )   That the proposals of the School of
Dean Webber )   Rehabilitation Medicine be approved.
Carried
Library Committee - Library Hours of Operation
Dr. Wisenthal, Chairman of the committee, presented the following report
which had been circulated for information:
"At its meeting of November 21, the Senate Library
committee examined the "urgent problems caused by this
year's reduction in the Library's opening hours", as
instructed in the motion approved by Senate on
Wednesday, November 14, 1984 (Senate Minutes, p.8275).
In its discussion, the committee acknowledged the
severity of the problems but was also influenced by a
number of other factors:
1. The Library's operating budget was reduced by
$379,000 in 1982/83 and by $400,000 in 1984/85. The
committee had been consulted about the service
implications of potential reductions and had advised
that the highest priority should be given to the
protection of the collections budget. Accordingly,
collections funding has not been reduced. The next
highest priority for the committee and the Library
administration has been to maintain Library
operating schedules. Until the current year, it was
possible to avoid reductions in operating hours by
making cuts in almost all other library programs.
The Reading Rooms Division was eliminated, the
Ecology Branch Library was closed, and substantial
reductions to administrative, processing,
collections, and reference staffing were made. The
equivalent of 31 full-time positions - many of them
for senior and specialist staff - has been
eliminated. This does not include serious
reductions that were also made in health science
library funding for the operation of the teaching
hospital libraries. Reductions to library hours
were made only after other possibilities had been
exhausted. 8285.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee - Library Hours of Operation (continued)
2. Many of the regular staff positions eliminated have
a direct relationship to the Library's ability to
maintain a long operating schedule. Since the use
of the Library has increased again this year, staff
needed to meet service demands during peak hours of
use are already insufficient and would be further
depleted by deployment over a longer opereating
schedule. The present hiring freeze will result in
additional losses of staff at junior levels, where
turnover is greatest, and will most certainly affect
the availability of regular staff for evening and
weekend schedules.
3. In view of the strong probability that further
reductions in programs and services will be required
in 1985/86, the committee believes that it would be
unrealistic to extend operating schedules in the
current year. It does, however, support the
continuation of measures taken to increase hours
just prior to and during examination periods.
Reductions in Library Hours, Fall and Winter Sessions:
Total Hours
Total Hours
Hours Lost
per week in
per week in
per week in
1983/84
1984/85
1984/85
MAIN
88
78
10
Fine Arts
85
78
7
Government Publications
59
55
4
Maps
48
45
3
Reserve Books
88
78
10
Special Collections
50.5
47.5
3
Asian Studies
62.5
59.5
3
Biomedical Branch
92
75
17*
Crane
56
52
4
Curriculum Laboratory
78
75
3
Data
35
35
—
Hamber
92
75
17*
Law
94
78
16**
MacMillan
77
75
2
Mathematics
72
66
6
Music
78
75
3
Sedgewick
100
100
—
St. Paul's
92
75
17*
Social Work
67
65
2
Wilson
66
66
—
Woodward
94
78
16
Total opening hours
1,574
1,431
Total hours reduced
143
Percentage reduction
9.0% 8286.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee - Library Hours of Operation (continued)
*Funds for the operation of the libraries in the
teaching hospitals are provided separately from the
Library budget. Sufficient additional funds were made
available through the Faculty of Medicine to restore 9
hours per week in each hospital branch until March 31,
1985.
**Funds provided by the Faculty of Law and by the Law
students will allow the Law Library to remain open an
additional 5 hours per week in November, March and
April for the current year only.
Note: All campus libraries will resume last year's
schedule during the month of December because of
examinations. If funds permit, a similar extension
will be made in April for final exams."
In response to a query Mr. Mclnnes explained that the reduction in hours
of operation for the Law Library and the Woodward Biomedical Library
brought them in line with the hours of operation of the Main Library.
Dr. Wisenthal )   That the report of the Senate Library
Mr. McMillan )   Committee be received for information.
Carried
Library Committee - Library Space Needs
Dr. Wisenthal presented the following report:
"The most critical problem confronting the University Library
is the need for space to accommodate the growth of the
collections. The Library Committee wishes to bring the
issue to the attention of the new Senate so that the
dimensions and urgency of the problem may be understood and
so that Senate may encourage action leading to a solution.
The background on the Library space situation is outlined
below. Briefly, it was considered urgent enough five years
ago to call for the establishment of a President's
Committee on Library Space Requirements. That Committee
urged that an immediate start be made on the lengthy
planning and development process for a new Library. The
resulting proposal was rejected by the Universities Council
of British Columbia. In the meantime, while the situation
has continued to worsen, other partial measures have been
taken. But action is still required to relieve a serious
and growing problem. 8287.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee - Library Space Needs (continued)
Considering the unlikelihood at the present time that the
necessary funds for library expansion will be available from
the Provincial Government, the following motion is
recommended by the Senate Library Committee for the approval
of Senate:
Whereas the President's Committee on Library Space
Requirements recommended in April, 1980, that work should
begin as soon as possible on the planning and construction of
new library space, and in consideration of the time elapsed
since a building proposal was advanced by the University and
the growing urgency of the need for space, Senate recommends
to the President that the highest possible priority be given
to new library space in the University's plans for capital
fund-raising.
Background
Accommodation of library collections growth at UBC has
historically been provided for through additions to the Main
Library and the founding of specialist branches elsewhere on
campus. It was acknowledged towards the end of the 1970s
that further additions to the Main Library would pose as many
problems as they might relieve, and that further
ramifications of the branch system would not be economical in
view of diminishing finances.
In April 1980 the President's Committee on Library Space
Requirements reported that the Library's space problem was
acute and that a start should be made at once towards a
library building to provide space for the ensuing decade.
Two basic options were presented as needing further
exploration: a centralizing plan, and one which would lead
to a separate science library.
The Library Development Proposal prepared jointly by the
offices of the Facilities Planner and the Librarian outlined
five possible realizations of the two basic options:
- Under Plan A, the first version, A-l, foresaw an
underground link between Main and Sedgewick together with
extensive renovations and partial reconstruction of the
Main Library.
- A-2 was similar except that only the "heritage" element of
the Main Library would be preserved and everything else
would be rebuilt.
- A-3 would build a replacement central library on the
Mathematics site.
- B would develop a science library on the Animal Resource
Ecology site.
- B-l would be Plan B plus a concurrent redevelopment of the
Main Library. 8288.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee - Library Space Needs (continued)
The plan adopted by the University and proposed to the
Universities Council of British Columbia in 1981 was A-2, an
underground development between Main and Sedgewick with a
reconstructed Main Library, retaining only the original
Library building. The $50 million it was estimated to cost
was justified partly on the basis of the UBC Library's
serving as a provincial resource. The answer from UCBC in
1983 was that there was no money but in any case Council
could not endorse a plan which would have demolished space
still usable for other purposes.
Meanwhile, collections growth has continued to fill existing
space. Since the President's Committee was appointed in July
1979 the collections have increased by 475,000 volumes, a
quantity equal to the combined total of the Woodward and
Sedgewick libraries. Almost all the branch libraries are
full to overfull, and the Main Library remains in a very poor
state - overcrowded, inefficient, costly to operate, and
unsafe under today's building code.
Since the UCBC answer put an end to the 1981 proposal, the
Library has turned to other possible and partial answers to
the space problem. One has been to convert the seventh level
of the Main stacks into storage space and in the summer and
fall of this year to relegate a further 65,000 volumes to
limited-access storage, bringing to 175,000 the number of
main stack volumes in storage. While moving volumes to
closed storage is most unpopular with users and incurs costs
to the Library of about $2 per volume, the recent move was
essential to thin out materials in the stacks and to provide
a limited amount of space for growth. No further areas are
available in the Main Library for conversion to closed
storage.
The other approach has been to consider, and in some cases
reconsider, alternative sites and buildings that would
postpone the day of absolute fullness. Five main
alternatives to the plan put forward in the 1981 proposal
have been considered recently.
1. Plan A-3, a new central library on the site of the
Mathematics buildings. As outlined in the proposal, the
ultimate size of the building could be 350,000 net
assignable square feet. While very attractive from the
Library viewpoint, with more advantages than any other
alternative, it has three important disadvantages: the
high overall cost of the project; the additional cost and
delay of relocating the present occupants; and the
anticipated reluctance of the mathematicians to be moved.
This and the plan recommended to UCBC are the only ones
that would adequately answer the long-term needs of the
Library. 8289.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee - Library Space Needs (continued)
2. Plan B, a science library on the site of the Animal
Resource Ecology huts, has been explored to the extent
of conceptual drawings which show a building of 104,000
net assignable square feet. Drawbacks are that in
itself it would do little to relieve the worst space
problem, that of the Main Library; and that it would
be less conveniently sited for some of its principal
users.
3. An annex across the East Mall from the Library. This
would be a very partial response to the need since the
site would support only a small building and the
location would impose some unfortunate compromises in
the way the space could be laid out and used.
Conceptual drawings have been prepared for a building
of 44,000 net assignable square feet.
4. Further expansion and rebuilding of the existing
Library. The drawbacks would certainly outweigh the
advantages. Costs would be high, dislocations over
several years very disruptive, and there are grave
doubts whether the end result would be workable.
Conceptual drawings exist for an addition of 55,000 net
assignable square feet.
5. A medium-sized library of about 110,000 net assignable
square feet on the site occupied by the Bus Stop
cafeteria and the former bookstore. This is a good
location for a building to accommodate diverse library
departments. While not a complete solution, it would
provide substantial relief to the pressure on the Main
Library.
The Senate Library Committee has been examining
alternatives for new library space over the past five
years. The new Committee proposes to study the matter in
further detail, and to make a recommendation to the
President on the choice of site.
The President's Office has taken a strong interest in the
Library space problem and has been trying to find
solutions. Discussions are taking place with the
Universities Council and possible sources of outside
funding are being explored. Throughout the University
there has been a widespread recognition that the problem
demands resolution and will continue to grow in severity
until a solution is found." 8290.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee - Library Space Needs (continued)
Dr. Wisenthal informed Senate that in June of 1983 President Kenny wrote
to the Universities Council of British Columbia at the request of the
Library Committee asking what had happened to the University's 1981
proposal. In July 1983, the Chairman of U.C.B.C, Dr. Gibson, wrote a
letter to the President of the University, by then Dr. Pedersen, and the
statements in our report about the position of U.C.B.C are based on this
July 1983 letter, which was explicit. The next part of this story
involves a letter dated December 10, 1984: a letter from the Secretary of
U.C.B.C to the Secretary of Senate. This was a response to our report.
Dr. Southern states that "Council has at no time formally rejected the
proposal, nor endorsed an alternative solution. It would be more accurate
to say that the plan was taken under advisement by Council... The funding
for university capital projects is under review by the government.
Council intends to address again the UBC library at an appropriate time in
this process. In the interim, the chairman of Council has maintained an
active interest in pursuing alternative sources of funding for this
project while keeping the UBC President informed of this activity."
Dr. Wisenthal felt that it should be recorded first of all that the
Chairman of UCBC has indeed been active in attempting to assist the
University Library in its space needs but it should be understood at the
same time that we ought not to be optimistic about U.C.B.C's position
with respect to Plan A2 which was submitted in 1981. 8291.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee - Library Space Needs (continued)
We are, however, glad to have the assurance of the Council that
Dr. Gibson's 1983 letter is not to be interpreted as a rejection of the
1981 plan, although there is a subtle distinction between rejecting
something and taking it under advisement indefinitely.
Dr. Wisenthal )   Whereas the President's Committee
Dr. Evans    )   on Library Space Requirements
recommended in April, 1980, that
work should begin as soon as possible
on the planning and construction of
new library space, and in consideration
of the time elapsed since a building
proposal was advanced by the University
and the growing urgency of the need for
space, Senate recommends to the President
that the highest possible priority be
given to new library space in the
University's plans for capital fund-
raising.
Following a brief discussion, the mover and seconder agreed that the
words "...the highest possible..." be replaced by "...a very high...".
Dr. Spencer expressed concern that, in the last five years, the volume
of books added to the Library was equivalent to the combined space of the
Woodward and Sedgewick libraries. He felt that the University could not
continue adding, every five years, the volume of space equal to the
combined Sedgewick and Woodward Libraries. While recognizing that the
acquisition of books and their accessibility is absolutely vital to the
University he felt that it was equally vital to continue the search for
some alternative means of storing and making accessible this information
rather than adding this volume of space every five years. 8292.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee - Library Space Needs (continued)
Concern was expressed that the building proposal was being put forward
by the Library Committee rather than the Academic Building Needs Committee.
Dean Will   )   That the motion be referred to
Dean Finnegan )   the Academic Building Needs Committee.
Carried
Committee on Elections
Dr. Lirenman presented the following report for information:
"Complaint in connection with the election of student representatives
to serve on a committee to advise the President on the selection of a
Dean of the Faculty of Science
The membership of committees to advise the President on the selection
of Deans of Faculties, approved by Senate, March 19, 1975, provides
for the student representatives (two in this case) to be nominated
from and elected by the registered students in the Faculty of Science
and graduate students associated with this Faculty; the nominations
and elections to be conducted by the appropriate Student Society
(Science Undergraduate Society in this case) in accordance with
procedures satisfactory to the Registrar.
The Senate Committee on Elections, established by Senate to hear
appeals on election irregularities, was called by the Registrar to
investigate a letter of complaint signed by three Science students to
the effect that the polls on the day of voting had been closed when
they went to vote at 3.30 p.m.
Committee procedures
The Chairman invited the complainants to present their appeal. They
reported that the only official announcement of the polling had been
made in the SUS News at the time the call for nominations was made and
that as far as polling was concerned only the date and location had
been given. The complainants also indicated that they felt the
location of the poll in the Hebb Theatre was inappropriate in that
only students taking classes in the building would have been likely to
vote.
The Science Undergraduate Society representatives were invited to
present their response to the complaint. They reported that the polls
had been open from 9.30 a.m. until 3.10 p.m.; that this was a longer
period than the SUS normally would have for polling and the number of
voters (91) was, in fact, greater than usual. In addition, they
reported that, due to difficulties in recruiting volunteers to man the
poll, it had been impossible to establish polling hours in sufficient
time to advertise. 8293.
December 12, 1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Elections (continued)
"The two SUS representatives had personally manned the poll at separate
times and reported that the majority of voters came into the building
to vote rather than from the class-rooms in the building.
Decision of the Committee
The Committee was satisfied that there had been no deliberate
violation of procedures on the part of the SUS representatives who had
run the election. However, the majority of the members of the
Committee were of the opinion that the lack of advertised polling
hours constituted an irregularity such that the results of the
election should be put aside. The Committee, therefore, resolved that
the SUS be instructed by the Registrar to reconduct the polling with
the same seven candidates and to advertise the day, location and hours
of polling."
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
Establishment of the Alumni Chair in Management Science and the Advisory
Council Chair in Consumer Behaviour
In connection with the Alumni Chair in Management Science, it was stated
in the material circulated that a number of alumni had contributed to an
endowment to establish a Chair in Management Science. Additional
donations will complete the funding. The objective of the gift is to
support research activities within the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration.
With reference to the Advisory Council Chair in Consumer Behaviour, it
was stated that a number of individuals (past and present) of the Advisory
Council had contributed to an endowment to establish a Chair in Consumer
Behaviour. Additional donations will complete the funding. The objective
of the gift is to support research activities within the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration
Dean Lusztig   ) That the proposal of the Faculty of
Acting Dean March) the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration to establish the
Alumni Chair in Management Science and
the Advisory Council Chair in Consumer
Behaviour be approved.
In response to a query as to whether proposals to establish Chairs
should be brought to Senate before or after the money had been raised,
the Chairman suggested that this procedural issue would be clarified and
reported to Senate for information at some future date. 8294.
December 12, 1984.
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
Establishment of the Alumni Chair in Management Science and the Advisory
Council unair in consumer tsenaviour (continueo)
In response to a further query concerning the definition of a Chair,
Dean Lusztig stated that it varied around the campus. In the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration there were two types; an endowment
of $750,000 or more would cover both salary and research support required
by the Faculty member, whereas an endowment of $125,000 would cover only
the research support required by the Faculty member.
Dean Suedfeld stated that at most universities when a Chair was endowed
it clearly meant that there was an endowment sufficient to cover the
salary of a professor as well as, perhaps, research funds and secretarial
support etc. He felt it was misleading to call a Chair something which is
really a research fund and suggested that Senate might consider making
some rules as to what Chairs are as opposed to other kinds of donations to
the University or a Faculty.
Dean Lusztig stated that Chairs that supported research functions were
very common in other institutions, particularly in the U.S.A.
Dr. Weiler pointed out that there were a number of Chairs available in
Canada that did not carry full salaries.
The motion was put and carried.
Other business
Report of the Senate Budget Committee
Dr. Scudder reported that the President had asked the Senate Budget
Committee for its advice on program discontinuance. He stated that this 8295.
December 12, 1984.
Other business
Report of the Senate Budget Committee (continued)
was discussed at meetings of the committee held on October 22 and
November 20, 1984. At the November 20 meeting, the committee adopted the
following resolution and reported it to the President:
"Every responsible effort will be made to allow students to complete the
program in which they are enrolled, bu the University cannot give an
absolute commitment that it will never discontinue a program before
students have completed it."
In response to a query, the Chairman explained that the issue to which
the Senate Budget Committee responded was a direct request to the
President in the form of a letter asking for the President's undertaking
that the University would give an irrevocable commitment that a student
admitted to a program would always be permitted to complete that program.
The President asked the Senate Budget Committee for its advice on this
general policy issue in terms of how to respond to that particular
request. It was not necessarily related to any specific budget proposal.
Some members expressed concern that the issue was directed primarily to
the Budget Committee rather than to the Senate.
Mr. Burnyeat gave notice of motion to the effect that the question of
whether the University should be called upon to give an undertaking to
existing students that they will be allowed to complete their programs be
referred to the Senate Curriculum Committee for its views and report back
to Senate.
Dr. Sobrino presented the following notice of motion:
"As we all know, there is a very real possiblity that a decrease in funds
may force the University to reduce its academic offerings. It is 8296.
December 12, 1984.
Other business
Report of the Senate Budget Committee (continued)
imperative that the Senate institute procedures that will enable it to
discharge its academic responsibility in the above eventuality.
The Senate Budget Committee, which is advisory to the President is
studying ways in which possible reductions could be performed. Its
findings would also be very useful to the Senate.
Notice is therefore given of the following motion to be put at the
January meeting of the Senate.
That the Senate Budget Committee be instructed to make available to the
Senate Curriculum Committee the information that the Curriculum
Committee needs to allow it to recommend to Senate any changes in
academic programs that may be required as a result of limitations in
funding."
Report of the Senate Nominating Committee
Dr. Elder reported that the Nominating Committee recommended that
Miss Barbara C Chant replace Mr. W. P. Pegler as student representative
on the Admissions Committee and the Library Committee.
Dr. Elder    )  That the recommendations of the
Mr. Rutherford )  Nominating Committee be approved.
Carried
Dean B. E. Riedel
Dr. McNeill paid tribute to Dean Riedel on the occasion of his
retirement from U.B.C.  He noted that Dean Riedel had served U.B.C for
sixteen years and had built the finest Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
in Canada.  He asked Senate to join him in recognizing the contributions
of Dean Riedel to the Senate and to the University, to thank him for those
contributions, and to wish him many happy years of retirement.
On behalf of all members of Senate, the Chairman extended his good
wishes to Dean Riedel. 8297.
December 12, 1984.
Report of the Tributes Committee (in camera)
Memorial Minute
The following memorial statement had been prepared in accordance with
the custom of Senate in recognition by the University and Senate of the
late Dennis McNeice Healy.
MEMORIAL MINUTE
DENNIS McNEICE HEALY (1911-1984)
Dennis McNeice Healy was born in Bethune, Saskatchewan in 1911. He was
graduated from the University of Alberta in 1931 and later received his
Licence es lettres and Doctorat from the University of Paris.
His academic career began in 1935 with his appointment as Instructor, and
later Professor and Head of the Department of French at the University of
Alberta. However, he interrupted his career to serve with distinction in
the Canadian Army intelligence service during the second World War. He
was awarded the Order of the British Empire in recognition of outstanding
service behind enemy lines.
After teaching at the University of Long Island, Dennis Healy accepted the
position of Professor and Head of the Department of Romance Studies at
this University in 1962. After the untimely death of Kasper Naegle, Dr.
Healy was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Arts. He resigned this
position in 1968 to become Vice-President at York University. Dennis
Healy was a member of the Senate from 1965 to 1968.
Dr. Healy's distinguished career culminated later by his appointment to
the position of Principal of Bishops University.
Dennis Healy was, above all, a teacher. He loved the language and the
literature of his discipline. He excelled in the classroom, sharing with
his students a deep respect for excellence as a constant goal. To his
colleagues he was a loyal friend, an effective administrator and a valued
scholar.
To his wife, Eileen, and his family, the Senate of this University extends
its deepest sympathy. 8298.
December 12, 1984.
Report of the Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute (continued)
Dr. Dennison )   That the memorial statement for
Dean Will   )   Dennis McNeice Healy be spread on
minutes of Senate and that a copy
be sent to the relatives of the
deceased.
Carried
The meeting adjourned at 9.30 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday,
January 16, 1985.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 8299.
December 12, 1984.
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate
Judith Anderson Memorial Bursary - One or more bursaries to a total of
approximately $2,000 have been provided in memory of Judith Sharon
Anderson, B.A. 1964, B.Ed. 1975 (University of Toronto), M.A. 1970, by her
husband Douglas Ogle. The awards will be made to female students of good
academic standing entering their third year with a major in English
literature. Preference will be given to Canadian citizens or Permanent
Residents. (The awards will be available in the 1985/86 Winter Session.)
Robert G. S. Arthurs Memorial Prizes - Prizes to a total of $1,500 have
been made available by Mrs. Mary E. Arthurs in memory of her husband. The
prizes, normally in the amount of $250 each, are offered to encourage
students taking courses in Russian language, literature and culture and
will be awarded as follows:
a) to the top student in Russian 200 (Second-Year Russian);
b) to the top student in Russian 300 (Intermediate Russian);
c) to the top student in Russian 400 (Advanced Russian);
d) to the top student in Russian 325 (Russian for Reading Knowledge);
e) to the top student in Slavonic Studies 106 (Introduction to
Russian Culture); and
f) to the top graduating student in courses in Russian Language and
Literature.
The awards will be made on the recommendation of the Department of
Slavonic Studies. (The awards will be available in the 1985/86 Winter
Session.)
Leon Fus Memorial Prize - A prize in the amount of $200 will be awarded
annually to the best student in Polish studies (language, literature or
history) in memory of Leon Fus, a distinguished leader of the
Polish-Canadian community in Vancouver. The prize established by his
family and Polish and Canadian friends, will be awarded on the
recommendation of the Department of Slavonic Studies. (This award will be
available in the 1985/86 Winter Session.)
John Stewart Memorial Scholarship - A scholarship in the amount of $300
has been established in memory of John Stewart. The award will be offered
annually to a student in the Department of Music, and will be made on the
recommendation of the Department. 8300.
December 12, 1984.
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Change ARCH 424 - change in description
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
Change program descriptions:  Fifth Year - 3-9 units chosen from ...
Business Education 410; ... Computing Studies Education 317, 400; ...
Education 380, 396**, 413, 479; ... Special Education 312, 313, 314, 316,
317, 318, ...
Programs in Secondary Education for Graduates - ... 4.5 - 7.5 units chosen
from ... Business Education 410; ... Computing Studies Education 317, 400;
...Education 380, 396**, 413, 479; ... Special Education 312, 313, 314,
316, 317, 318, ...
Department of Mathematics and Science Education
Change program description and units - Computer Science Concentration and
Maj or:
Concentration - First and Second Years: Computer Science 114, 116 or 118,
215, and 220; Mathematics 100 or 111, and 101. Mathematics 205 and 221
are recommended as electives ...
Major - First and Second Years: Computer Science 114, 116 or 118, 215,
and 220; Mathematics 100, 101, 205, and 221...
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Ph.D. Program in Oral Biology
The Department offers the opportunity for advanced study in a number of
areas related to oral biology including: oral and cellular immunology,
basic and applied biology of cells of the periodontium, oral microbiology,
craniofacial growth and development, oral sensorimotor function and
connective tissue biochemistry. The department has good research funding
and is well equipped to carry out advanced research. Students will
normally be required to take ORBI 500 (Research Seminars in Oral Biology),
ORBI 501 (Craniofacial Biology) and ORBI 502 (Biology of Oral Tissues)
during their first year. In addition, students will be required to pass
both a written and an oral comprehensive examination. The program will be
open to those who have completed a D.D.S., D.M.D., M.D., D.V.M. or their
equivalents and to students who have obtained an M.Sc. in Dental Science
or a related discipline. (M.Sc. students to have a First Class average).
Program in Clinical Engineering
Change: Replace HCEP 404 with HCEP 533 The Delivery of Primary Health
Care - plus at least 5 units of approved graduate level engineering
courses. 8301.
December 12, 1984.
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (continued)
Community and Regional Planning
Change PLAN 531 - change in units from (3) to (1.5/3)c
Dentistry
Change DENT 599 - change in units from (3-6) to (6)
Educational Psychology & Special Education
New course        SPED 516 (1.5) Seminar in the education of the
creative and gifted learner
Health Care and Epidemiology
Change
Oral Biology
New courses
Change
Surgery
Changes
HCEP 502 - change in title, description, units and
number (previously HCEP 425)
ORBI 500 (3) Research Seminars in Oral Biology
ORBI 501 (3) Craniofacial Biology
ORBI 502 (3) Biology of Oral Tissues
ORBI 561 (1-3) Directed Studies in Oral Biology
ORBI 649 Ph.D. Thesis
ORBI 503 - change in description
SURG 504, 505, 548 - change in units
SURG 502 - change in title and description
Deletion SURG 503
Wood Science and Harvesting
Change
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Surgery
New courses
FRST 584 - change in description and units (now (l/2)d
SURG 758 Advanced Paediatric Surgery
SURG 782 Surgical Core
SURG 784 Advanced General Surgery I
SURG 785 Advanced General Surgery II
SURG 788 Seminar in Surgery 8302.
December 12, 1984.
APPENDIX 'B*
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF MEDICINE (continued)
Residency Training Program - Paediatric General Surgery
The objectives of the program in paediatric surgery are to provide
training for individuals interested in clinical practice in paediatric
general surgery as well as those interested in an academic career in the
discipline.
Prerequisites for entry into the program are the successful completion of
five years of residency training in general surgery. Two years of
training will consist of a first year in which eight months will be spent
in training in clinical paediatric general surgery, two months in
radiology and two months in pathology. In the second year, six months
will be spent in clinical paediatric general surgery, two months in the
special care nursery, two months in the intensive care unit and two months
in oncology. Training will be based at the Children's Hospital of British
Columbia.
The program has been reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of
the Faculty Residency Committee of The University of British Columbia.
The program director is Dr. G. C Fraser. Teaching staff contributing to
the program include five geographic full-time and three part-time staff.
Quality of the program will be assessed by annual reviews by the training
program committee, a faculty review every two to three years performed by
the Faculty Residency Committee, as well as by accreditation site visits
by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada every five to
six years. It is anticipated that the program will train one to two
residents at any one time.
Residents will be expected to complete the Royal College of Physicians and
Surgeons of Canada examinations in paediatric general surgery upon
completion of their training.
Psychiatry
New course        PSYT 452 (1.5) Seminars in Behavioural Sciences
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION
Changes PHED 260, 366, 455, 469, 499 - change in prerequisites
PHED 380 - change in title and description
PHED 430 - change from (l/3)d to (l-3)d
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
New courses       RHME 405 (1) The Application of Advanced
Instrumentation and Computer Technology
in Physical Therapy
RHME 418 (1) Occupational Therapy - Rehabilitation
Technology 8303.
December 12, 1984.
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE (continued)
Changes RHME 313, 314 - change in title and description
RHME 411, 412 - change in title, description, units
and hours
RHME 413 - change in description, units and hours
RHME 415 - change in units and hours
Deletions RHME 404, 406

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