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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] Jan 16, 1991

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 9920.
January 16, 1991
The Fifth Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1990-91 was held on Wednesday, January 16, 1991 at
8.00 p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Present: Vice-President D. R. Birch, (Acting Chairman), Mr. D. A.
Anderson, Dr. A. P. Autor, Miss M. D. Bain, Mr. J. A. Banfield, Dean C. S.
Binkley, Dr. D. M. Brunette, Professor P. L. Bryden, Rev. P. C. Burns, Dean
P. T. Burns, Mr. R. Bush, Dr. D. G. A. Carter, Professor E. A. Carty, Dr.
R. L. Chase, Dr. S. Cherry, Dr. T. S. Cook, Dr. K. Dawson, Dr. G. W. Eaton,
Dr. A. J. Elder, Mr. E. B. Goehring, Dean J. R. Grace, Dr. S. E. Grace, Dr.
R. D. Guy, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. J. F. Helliwell, Dean M. J. Hollenberg,
Dr. M. Isaacson, Miss W. A. King, Mr. O. C. W. Lau, Mrs. L. Lohia, Miss
S. A. Mair, Dean M. P. Marchak, Dean B. C. McBride, Dr. H. McDonald, Mr.
R. H. McGowan, Mr. B. V. McGuinness, Dr. J. A. McLean, Dean J. H. McNeill,
Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dr. A. G. Mitchell, Mr. J. A. Moss, Mr. M. D. Nikkei, Dr.
L. Paszner, Dr. R. J. Patrick, Ms. B. M. Peterson, Professor R. S. Reid, Dr.
P. Resnick, Mr. M. M. Ryan, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr. L. de
Sobrino, Dr. L. J. Stan, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Ms. H. Swinkels, Mr. B. Taylor,
Dr. R. C. Tees, Mr. G. A. Thorn, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Dr. D. A. Wehrung, Dr.
R. M. Will, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Ms. N. E. Woo.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
President D. W. Strangway, Chancellor L. R. Peterson, Mr. S. Alsgard, Dr.
M. A. Boyd, Miss A. L. Callegari, Mr. N. A. Davidson, Dr. J. D. Dennison,
Ms. A. Ironside, Dr. S. Katz, Dr. J. G. T. Kelsey, Dr. M. M. Klawe, Dr.
S. C. Lindstrom, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Mr. J. R. G. McQueen, Dean A. Meisen,
Mr. B. D. Prins, Dean J. F. Richards, Dean P. B. Robertson, Mr. A. J. Scow,
Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Dr. A. Van Seters, Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr.
Minutes of previous meeting
Dr. Tees      ) That the minutes of the Fourth regular
Dr. Sobrino   ) meeting of Senate for the Session 1990-91,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
It was pointed out that on page 9877 the sentence which reads: "He felt
that either an Astronomy, Geology, or Geography course should be taken in
the first year of the majors and honours programs..." should read: "He felt
that a Geology course should be taken at some time in the majors or honours
programs...".
The motion, with the revision noted, was put and carried. 9921.
January 16, 1991
Chairman's remarks and related questions
Campus Plan
Dr. Birch stated that at the suggestion of the Senate Committee on
Academic Building Needs, members of Senate would be informed of various
dates and places where they would be able to hear a presentation by Campus
Planning and Development on the campus plan.
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations - subject,
where applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented
without formal reference to the President and the formal agreement of the
President; and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new programs be
asked to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
(i) Proposal of the Faculty of Education to establish the Dorothy Lam
Chair in Special Education, and the David Lam Chair in Multicultural
Education.  (pp.9822-3)
(ii) Proposal from the Health Sciences Co-ordinator to establish a Centre
for Health Service Policy and Research.  (pp.9823-4)
(iii) Establishment of the following Chairs:  (pp.9862-3)
Applied Science
Chair in Mining and the Environment
Clifford Frame Chair in Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
Comineo Chair in Minerals and the Environment (with Science)
Arts
Maclean Hunter Chair in Non-Fiction and Business Writing
Patricia F. Rodgers Chair in Applied Ethics
Medicine
Jack Bell Chair in Schizophrenia
Louise A. Brown Chair in Neuroscience
E. W. Hamber Chair in Medicine
Sauder Family Chair in Paediatric Infectious Diseases
Science
Comineo Chair in Minerals and the Environment (with Applied Science)
Sauder Family Chair in Viral Diseases of Children
Warren Chair in Nuclear Physics
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Dr. Will, chair of the Committee, presented the recommendations of the
Committee on the following proposals: 9922.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee  (cont
inu
ed)
Enrolment
quotas
for 1991-
-92
1986-87
1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
1990-91
1991-92
Arts 1
1,500
1
,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
Arts 2
450
450
450
450
450
450
Arts 3
300
300
300
300
300
300
Agric. Science
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Applied Science
450
450
450
450
450
450
Architecture
46
45
45
45
45
45
Aud. & Speech Sc.
20
20
25
25
30
30
Commerce & Bus.
Admin.
390
390
390
39 5
395
39 5
Dentistry
40
40
40
40
40
40
Education -
Elem.
n/a
125
225
290
414
336*
-
Sec.
n/a
120
165
220
330
355*
-
NITEP
n/a
30
30
30
30
30
Fam. & Nutr.
, Sc.
n/a
n/a
n/a
20
36
36
Fine Arts
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Forestry
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Land. Arch.
20
20
20
20
20
20
Law
240
240
240
240
240
240
Lib. Arch. &
Info. Studies
45
45
60
57
62
70*
Medicine
120
120
120
120
120
120
Music 1
n/a
56
67
60
60
56*
Music 2 & 3
n/a
n/a
33
32
44
30*
Nursing
80
80
80
160
160
160
Pharmacy
140
140
140
140
140
140
Phys. Ed. 1
n/a
n/a
n/a
65
65
65
Phys. Ed. 2
n/a
n/a
n/a
60
60
60
Phys. Ed. 3
n/a
n/a
n/a
45
45
45
Rehab. Med.-
- O.T.
24
24
30
35
35
35
- P.T.
26
26
30
35
35
35
Science
1,400
1
,400
1,400
1,312
1,312
1,312
Social Work
- Post B.A.
, lYr.
35
35
35
35
30
- Post B.A.
, 2Yr.
35
35
35
50
50
- B.S.W.
30
30
30
12
30
85*
♦denotes changes
Dr. Will explained that the reason for the reduction in the quota for
Elementary Education was that, in seekinq to address teacher shortages,
the Faculty had exceeded the expansion for which it was funded this year.
He noted that the quota was subject to revision should the Faculty find
itself funded for additional enrolment. With respect to the quota of 355
for Secondary Education, Dr. Will stated that this represented current 9923.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Enrolment quotas for 1991-92 (continued)
capacity, and again, should the funding change, there would probably be
an adjustment in the number of students that the Faculty admits.
The increase of eight in the quota for Library, Archival and
Information Studies was explained by the fact that the School received
additional resources in connection with the new Masters Program in
Archival Studies, which will enable them to admit more students.
Dr. Will requested that approval of the revised quotas for the School
of Music be deferred. He explained that the School had not reached its
quota through direct admissions from Grade 12 or through transfers from
the colleges into second and third year. He said that this raised the
question as to whether quotas that had not been met for a number of
years served any purpose. He stated that the Committee would be
discussing this matter with the Director of the School, together with
the proposal to reduce the number of transfer students, before making
recommendations to Senate.
With regard to Social Work, Dr. Will stated that the School has had a
very substantial reduction in faculty resources over the last nine years
and the quotas were being reduced in keeping with the present resources.
Dr. Will      ) That the enrolment quotas for 1991/92
Dr. Elder     )  be approved.
Dean Marchak drew attention to the quotas for Schools within the
Faculty of Arts and suggested that in future quotas for Schools within 9924.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Enrolment quotas for 1991-92 (continued)
the Faculty of Arts be neqotiated in conjunction with the Dean, who is
responsible for allocating resources, in order to ensure that realistic
quotas are set.  Dr. Will assured Senate that in future, the Senate
Admissions Committee would consult the Dean.
The motion was put and carried.
Admission  requirements  for  British  Columbia/Yukon Secondary  School
Applicants - Survey Mathematics 12
The Committee recommended that a new course in Mathematics, Survey
Mathematics 12, be recognized by The University of British Columbia as
eligible for inclusion as one of the eight subjects used in determining
the GPA for admissions purposes.  Dr. Will explained that this did not
change in any way the Mathematics that is required as a prerequisite for
almost all the Faculties except the Faculty of Arts (with the exception
of Honours Psychology, Physical Geography and Economics).   He noted
that Simon Fraser University and the University of Victoria had accepted
this course for admissions purposes, and that the success of this course
was very much dependent upon whether UBC recognizes it for this
purpose.  He did note, however, that the Admissions Committee was in the
process of reviewing the admissions criteria and the eight subjects used
to determine admission to UBC, and that the list of courses could change
as a result of this review.
Dr. Will      ) That Survey Mathematics 12 be added to
Dr. Elder     ) the list of approved Grade 12 courses
for admission to the University.
On behalf  of  the Faculty of  Science,  Dean McBride expressed
reservations about the proposal.  He stated that the Faculty was
concerned that the course was not provincially examinable.  He stated
that although the Department of Mathematics agreed that there is room in 9925.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Admission  requirements  for  British  Columbia/Yukon  Secondary  School
Applicants - Survey Mathematics 12 (continued)
the curriculum for a course such as this, they were concerned about the
latitude that individual teachers have in choosing topics from the
syllabus,  since  this  would  result  in  students  having  different
backgrounds.  He stated that the Faculty of Science would not like to
see this course used in the calculation of a GPA.
Dean Sheehan spoke in favour of the proposal stating that it would
allow more students to take a mathematics course at the grade 12 level,
and that it would allow those students who already take Mathematics 12
to take additional Mathematics if they wished. She stated that students
who did not now go on from Mathematics 11 to Mathematics 12 may very
well be enticed by a course that is a survey type course. She said she
understood that the course was going to replace both the Geometry and
the Probability and Statistics 12 courses and stated that the BCAMT
considered these courses, particularly the probability and statistics
course, to be of less academic value and less defined curricula than the
survey mathematics course. She stated that spot checks had been done at
schools in West Vancouver, North Vancouver, and the Lower Mainland and
all were of the opinion that the survey mathematics course will be
valuable to students going on to a wide variety of careers, both through
post-secondary education and directly into the work force. In
conclusion, Dean Sheehan stated that she thought the Ministry of
Education had determined that all Grade 12 courses will be examinable,
and that eventually the survey mathematics course will fit into that
category. She stated that it was understandable that the syllabus might
be a bit flexible while the course was being developed. However, she
was concerned that if the University were to wait until the course had 9926.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Admission  requirements  for British Columbia/Yukon Secondary School
Applicants - Survey Mathematics 12 (continued)
been defined, the development of it would not take place, since Grade 12
students would not take the course if they were not going to receive
admission credit for it.  This would then make the necessary development
process much more difficult.
The motion was put and carried.
Admission  requirements  for  British  Columbia/Yukon  Secondary  School
Applicants - Hebrew 11
The Committee recommended that the course Hebrew 11, taught only at
the Maimonides School, be accepted as satisfying the requirement for an
approved language 11.
Dr. Will      ) That Hebrew 11 be accepted as satisfying
Dr. Elder     ) the requirement for an approved language 11.
Dr. Will stated that the Committee had received ample documentation
concerning this course and was satisfied that it was equivalent to a
lanquaqe 11.
The motion was put and carried.
Admission to the School of Social Work
The Committee recommended approval of the followinq changes to the
Calendar statement concerning admission to the School of Social Work:
'1. Admission to the B.S.W. program is open to persons with a B.A. or
equivalent degree and to persons with a minimum of two years of the
Bachelor of Arts program at The University of British Columbia, or
its equivalent at another university or community college.
2. Applicants to this program will be required:
(a) to have achieved at least a 65% average in course work during
the academic year (or equivalent) preceding application for
admission; 9927.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Admission to the School of Social Work
2. Applicants to this program will be required: (continued)
(b) to have completed a 3 credit course in statistics;
(c) to have completed at least 6 credits of course work dealing with
contemporary social issues and 6 credits of course work dealing
with the dynamics of human behaviour, individual or collective.
A list of qualifying courses may be obtained from the School;
(d) to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the School, personal
potential and suitability for a career in social work.
3. The deadline for application for admission to the B.S.W. program is
February 28. Application forms must be obtained from the School.
4. For students considering application to the program, the School's
faculty provides a consultant and advisory service.
5. Given resource limitations, the School may not be able to accept all
applicants who meet the foregoing admission requirements.
6. The B.S.W. program comprises 60 credits for students who enter with
a Bachelor's degree and 66 credits for those entering the program
without a Bachelor's degree or equivalent."
Dr. Will     ) That the proposed changes to the
Mr. Sugimoto  )  Calendar statement concerning admission
to the School of Social Work be approved.
Carried
Faculty of Dentistry - Admission to the Bachelor of Dental Sciences -
Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program
Dr.  Will  informed  Senate  that  consideration  of  the  admission
requirements for the Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program was being
withheld at the request of the Dean of Dentistry due to his inability to
be present at the Senate meeting.
Education Abroad Programs
It was stated in the report that in April 1990, Senate adopted the
following guideline:
"Senate should play an active role in advancing reciprocal Education
Abroad Programs with foreign academic institutions and should review
each program before a formal agreement is concluded.  An appropriate 9928.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Education Abroad Programs (continued)
Senate Committee should examine the calendar of the foreign
institution and other relevant documentation and report to Senate so
that Senate can make an informed decision on whether or not to
approve an agreement with a foreign host institution for a specified
period of time (i.e. 5 years)."
The Committee recommended that Senate approve agreements with the
following institutions for a period of five years:
University of California (USA - all nine campuses)
Hastings College of the Law, UCal (USA)
University of Copenhagen (Denmark)
Ritsumeikan University (Japan)
University of Hong Kong
Chinese University of Hong Kong
Yonsei University (Korea)
Dr. Will      ) That agreements with the institutions
Dean Burns    )  listed be approved for a period of
five years.
Dr. Will explained that, as stated in the report, Senate undertook
the approval of the academic exchange programs that UBC was making with
a number of overseas institutions.  The Senate Academic Policy Committee
thought that the Admissions Committee was the appropriate committee to
consider  such proposals because these exchange students would be
entering into classes here and it was therefore felt that it was a
concern of the Admissions Committee.  He stated that the Committee had
looked at a number of these exchange programs, had examined the
Calendars, had looked at the opportunities likely to be provided to
UBC's undergraduate students, and had subsequently approved the list
which was now before Senate.
Dean Marchak referred to the University's agreement with Ritsumeikan
University and drew Senate's attention to the fact that this agreement
was in place prior to the establishment of Senate's guidelines. Dean
Marchak said that the Faculty of Arts would meet the requirements of the 9929.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Education Abroad Programs (continued)
agreement because it was too late to do otherwise. She noted, however,
that the Faculty was faced with an agreement that affects the academic
conditions of the Faculty of Arts and that those agreements were reached
without full consultation with the Faculty and the Departments within
the Faculty. Dean Marchak said she would urge that, in future, the
President, the International Liaison Office, and the Vice President
Academic fully consult with the Faculty and academic departments
concerned before any agreement is reached with a university abroad. She
stated that in principle she was fully in favour of such agreements
provided the Faculty and departments concerned had been consulted.
Dr. Will stated that the Committee had not seen the information on
Ritsumeikan University, but he did feel that it was the responsiblity of
the Senate Admissions Committee to uphold the standards of instruction
in the various classes and to see that students are not admitted that do
not meet the Senate approved criteria for admission.
Dr. Birch observed that the Ritsumeikan agreement was different in
nature from those listed. He stated that those listed provide a
framework in which students go to spend a term or a year abroad,
undertaking something from the regular curriculum of the other
institution which will be chosen in consultation with their own Faculty
to meet the requirements of their degree. He said that Ritsumeikan was
the only one for which UBC was providing a specially tailored program
and he assured Senate that although there had been a number of problems,
the Dean of Arts, who had had negotiations with representatives of 9930.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Education Abroad Programs (continued)
Ritsumeikan University, would ensure that the integrity of the Faculty
of Arts and UBC would be upheld.
Dean Burns in re-emphasizing the remarks of the Dean of Arts, stated
that it was inconceivable that the University would willingly, in the
future, go forward with an exchange agreement that involved academic
commitment without consultation with the academic unit concerned.
In response to a query by Dr. Elder, Dr. Birch explained that the
agreement to bring 100 students from Ritsumeikan University to UBC was
not part of the Education Abroad Program agreement. He stated that
under the Education Abroad agreement with Ritsumeikan, which was already
in place, there were several Ritsumeikan students at UBC this year in
the Faculty of Arts, and two UBC students were studying at Ritsumeikan.
He explained that Ritsumeikan had entered into a joint venture with UBC
under which they had advanced half the cost of building a residence, the
remaining half being UBC's contribution. It was intended that the
residence would accommodate 100 Ritsumeikan students a year and 100 UBC
students. The Japanese students would have as a major part of their
program, English as a second language, although they will have studied
fairly intensively English as a second language for the first year and a
half of their program at Ritsumeikan University. He stated that, in
addition, the program has two core academic fields: Pacific Rim Studies
and Cross-cultural Studies. He stated that there had been some problems
in coming to a mutual understanding of what is intended as far as cross
cultural communications is concerned. Clearly the intent from
Ritsumeikan's point of view is to have a significant number of their 9931.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Education Abroad Programs (continued)
graduates over time who have had a Canadian experience and some greater
understanding of English and another culture as a result, and who have
studied not only with Japanese students but also with Canadian
students. He stated that this was problematic since the intent was that
the two elements in the core program be taught both by Ritsumeikan
faculty coming to UBC and by UBC faculty members and be open to both
Ritsumeikan and UBC students. It turns out that this element and the
experience of working in the same context as Canadian students is, from
their point of view, a very important element in the experience to be
provided their students. He stated that it was absolutely essential
that units and faculty members concerned be involved before an agreement
is reached, and that, of course, had been problematic in this case.
Another concern was whether the admission requirement in English be
honoured so that neither the Ritsumeikan nor the UBC students are held
back. He stated that those students from the 100 who also fully meet
all other admission requirements for any given Faculty are expected to
be able to register for one or possibly two courses in that Faculty. He
reiterated that Senate was being asked to approve the Education Abroad
Programs, which is essentialy an exchange by which UBC students studying
in the host university would be eligible for UBC scholarships, would pay
UBC fees, and would be treated as UBC students. Students coming to UBC
from the other universities would pay the fees of their university and
would be studying at UBC for credit towards their degree. In conclusion
Dr. Birch stated that the Ritsumeikan agreement (not now before Senate)
was signed by representatives of UBC last year, and recently members of
the Faculty of Arts had been working to catch up with an agreement that 9932.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Education Abroad Programs  (continued)
had been under development for two years and about which they had had a
good deal of information for almost a year.
In response to a query concerning TOEFL scores, Dean Marchak stated
that apparently the International Liaison Office had no knowledge of
what the Ritsumeikan University TOEFL scores were when the agreement was
reached. Although Dean Marchak did not have the scores available she
stated that they were somewhere in the range of about 430 to 500, and
noted that the requirement in the Faculty of Arts is 580. It was the
estimation of the people negotiating at Ritsumeikan that eleven students
at the present time were above 550. Dean Marchak stated that this would
create problems since the subjects had to be taught in the English
language and the agreement reached includes a requirement that the
courses be taught for credit in the Faculty of Arts with Faculty of Arts
students in them. Dean Marchak stated that, having inherited the
agreement, she was willing to teach the Ritsumeikan students but she was
not prepared to put those students in a credit course with UBC
students. In discussions with Ritsumeikan, they indicated that they
wished their students to be in the same classes since their main concern
was that their students learn how to function in a North American
classroom. Dean Marchak stated that it was hoped that by next year this
problem could be alleviated by establishing an interdisciplinary course
to teach 100 Ritsumeikan students and 100 UBC students on something such
as relations between Japan and North America, and possibly part of it
could be taught in Japanese.
In conclusion, Dean Marchak stated that where academic standards are
involved, agreements must not be reached by people who are not
themselves academics. 9933.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Education Abroad Programs  (continued)
Dr. Elder requested that a report on the agreement between
Ritsumeikan University and UBC concerning the 100 students be brought to
Senate at some future meeting. Dr. Birch confirmed that this could be
brought to Senate for information.
The motion to approve the Education Abroad Program agreements with
the institutions listed, for a period of five years, was put and carried.
Admission requirements for a Master of Science Program in Occupational
Hygiene
It was stated in the material circulated that to be admissible to the
program students should have completed a bachelor's degree in such areas
as physical or health sciences, engineering or related fields.  Before
commencing this program, students should have completed university level
courses or have equivalent background in calculus, physics, organic
chemistry, biology and statistics.  Prospective students should consult
with   a   Faculty   representative   regarding   other   recommended
pre-requisites.  Provision may be made for some students to take
prerequisite courses as co-requisites in conjunction with the proqram,
extending the courses over a full two year period.
Dr. Will      ) That the admissions criteria for the
Dean Grace    ) Master of Science Program in Occupational
Hygiene be approved.
Carried
1989 NITEP Admissions Academic Results
The following report on NITEP Admissions Academic Results had been
circulated for information: 9934.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
1989 NITEP Admissions Academic Results  (continued)
1. NITEP reviewed 35 applications and 23 people registered for the
program.
2. A breakdown of students averages shows:
4 - lst class standing
14 - 2nd class standing
2 - pass standing
2 - failed
1 - withdrew.
3. Of the 23 students, 16 completed all UBC courses which they attempted.
French Immersion Courses
Dr. Will drew Senate's attention to the fact that the Ministry of
Education will be examining in the French Immersion Program, subjects in
Biology, Chemistry, Western Civilization, Geography, History, Physics
and Social Studies. He stated that since this was not a substantive
matter the Committee recommended that in the Calendar listing for the
English course counterparts a footnote be added, in parenthesis, that
this also applies to the French Immersion courses that will be offered
by the Ministry this year.
Curriculum Committee  (see Appendix)
Dr. Sobrino, Chair of the Committee, presented the report.
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, subject to the following:
PLNT 408 (3) Agronomy - change description to read: "Management,
production, conservation of agronomic crops. Emphasis is on agronomic
crops used primarily for forage. Principles of production of food, oil
and fibre crops, seed production technology and the use of agronomic and
native species in revegetation and reforestation are also included.
Prerequisites..." 9935.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee  (continued)
Faculty of Arts
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Arts, with the exception of the proposed deletion of History
351, 420, 429, 442, subject to the following:
Political Science 349 - delete the following words from the course
description: "...deemed essential to a well-grounded undergraduate
education..."
The title of SOWK 335 should read: Fundamentals of Social Analysis for
Social Work
The title of SOWK 336 should read: Theoretical Foundations of Social
Work I.
The title of SOWK 435 should read: Behavioural and Social Issues in
Social Work Practice
Dr.  Sobrino  explained  that  the  reason  the  Committee  was  not
recommending the deletion of History 351, 420, 429, 442, was because the
only rationale given was lack of resources and the Committee does not
accept rationales that are not academic.
Dr. Sobrino drew Senate's attention to the new admission statement
capping enrolment in Majors and Honours programs in the Department of
Political Science. He stated that although the Committee recommended
approval of this proposal it did wish to express its concern about the
capping of programs in general.
Dr. Sobrino noted that the splitting of Psychology 316, a statistics
course, into three courses had led the Department of Statistics to
express its concern at the proliferation of statistics courses. He
stated that although the Committee was recommending approval, it would
be looking into this problem. 9936.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee  (continued)
Faculty of Dentistry - Degree Completion Program in Dental Hygiene
(B.D.Sc.)
Dr. Sobrino informed Senate that, at the request of the Dean of
Dentistry, the proposal to offer a Degree Completion Program in Dental
Hygiene was being withheld.
Faculty of Education
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Education, with the exception of Education 301 which had been
withdrawn by the Faculty.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Graduate Studies, with the exception of the proposal to
change the Pathology Graduate Program to part-time which was being
withheld pending consultation with the Department of Pathology.
The Committee also recommended approval of a Master of Science
Program in Occupational Hygiene.
Faculty of Medicine
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Medicine, with the exception of the proposed transfer of 500
and 600 level Pathology courses to the Division of Medical Microbiology
which have not yet been approved by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. 9937.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
School of Physical Education and Recreation
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
School of Physical Education and Recreation.
School of Rehabilitation Medicine
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
School of Rehabilitation Medicine.
Dr. Sobrino   ) That the proposals of the Faculties of
Dean Hollenberg)  Agricultural Sciences, Arts, Education,
Graduate Studies, Medicine, Pharmaceutical
Sciences, and the Schools of Physical Education
& Recreation, and Rehabilitation Medicine, be
approved.
Dean Marchak referred to the proposed deletion of History 351, 420,
429, 442, and explained that the Faculty, after a rigorous review of its
offerings, had requested Departments to delete those courses which they
cannot teach with their present faculty, or where, as in the case of
History 420 Evolution of the Canadian Constitution, there are other
courses which cover the area adequately, thereby making the course
redundant.
In amendment:
Dr. Tees      ) That History 351, 420, 429, 442 be deleted.
Dean Marchak  )
In response to a query by Rev. Burns concerning History 420, Dean
Marchak assured Senate that there were courses in Political Science,
such as Political Science 402, and also courses in Canadian history that
cover the Canadian constitution. 9938.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
In response to a query by Mr. McGowan as to whether a student majorinq
in History could be assured of a place in a course such as Political
Science 402, Dr. Elder stated that the she could not give that assurance
as approval of students' major programs should be obtained from the
departmental advisors.
The amendment was put and carried.
The motion, as amended, was put and carried.
Proliferation of statistics courses and the capping of enrolment in
majors and honours programs in Political Science
Dr. Sobrino informed Senate that the Curriculum Committee would be
re-establishing its Subcommittee on Statistics in order to deal with the
problem of the proliferation of statistics courses.
With regard to the capping of enrolment in majors and honours
programs, Dr. Sobrino informed Senate that there were now three programs
in the Faculty of Arts that have some kind of capping either by number
of students or by the minimum mark required. He stated that the
Committee was very concerned about the possibility that a student who
satisfies all the minimum requirements of the Faculty of Arts may in
fact be incapable of continuing because he or she does not satisfy the
requirements needed for any of the individual programs in the Faculty.
For this reason the Committee had requested Dr. Sobrino to qive notice
of the following motion:
"That the Faculties take the necessary steps to ensure that the
capping of enrolment in specific programs does not prevent students
who have met the advancement requirements of a Faculty from
continuing their studies in some program within the same Faculty." 9939.
January 16, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate  (continued)
Nominating Committee
Dr. Elder, Chair of the Committee, informed Senate that Mr. Lau had
resigned from the Committee on Elections and that the Nominating Committee
recommended that Miss Sarah Mair replace Mr. Lau on that committee.
Dr. Elder     )  That Miss Mair replace Mr. Lau on the
Mr. Thorn      ) Senate Committee on Elections.
Carried
General Academic Regulations
The Registrar presented the following proposed changes and additions to
Calendar entries for insertion in the 1991-92 Winter Session Calendar had
been circulated:
"1. Freedom from Harassment and Discrimination
That the following new calendar entry, prepared by the Race Relations
Committee and amended by the Deans and Vice Presidents, be inserted
following the paragraph headed ACADEMIC FREEDOM on P21 of the 1990-91
Calendar:
Freedom from Harassment and Discrimination
The University of British Columbia is committed to ensuring that all
members of the university community - students, faculty, staff, and
visitors - are able to study and work in an environment of tolerance
and mutual respect that is free from harassment and discrimination
based upon ancestry, country of origin, ethnic origin, gender, sexual
orientation, creed, citizenship, age, or disability.
The University may initiate appropriate action against individuals or
groups whose behaviour amounts to discrimination or harassment or
whose behaviour threatens that environment of mutual respect and
tolerance.
2. Grading Practices
That the entry on P. 23, Col. 1 of the 1990-91 Calendar be revised as
follows:
The first paragraph be replaced by:
Individual courses are normally graded as follows: 9940.
January 16,   1991
General Academic Regulations
2. Grading Practices (continued)
Percent
90-100
8 5-89
80-84
76-79
72-75
68-71
64-67
60-63
55-59
50-54
0-49
Letter-Grade:
A+
A
A-
B+
B
B-
C+
C
C-
D
F*
♦For those Faculties and Schools where the passing grade is higher
than 50%, failing grades will be assigned a letter grade of F.
That the second paragraph be revised to read as follows (new wording
underlined)
The Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, and Graduate Studies, and the
Schools of Library and Archival Studies, Nursing, and Rehabilitation
Medicine, define Fail (F) as below 60%. Some courses are graded as P
(requirements of subject completed satisfactorily, no quality grade
assigned) or F. Such courses are excluded from the calculation of
averages.  Some Faculties indicate degree standing on graduat ion
Class I, 80% or
based on the average for the degree as follows:
over; Class II, 65% to 79%; Pass, 50% to 64%
That the third and fourth paragraphs remain unchanged.
That the last paragraph be amended to read as follows:
A student .... "Aegrotat" standing (AEG). This standing gives full
credit for the course concerned. A letter grade will be awarded and
will be converted to a minimum percentage grade for that category for
the calculation of averages.
3. Examination Results
That the following entry replace that on P.23, col. 2 of 1990-91:
Calendar (new wording underlined)
Results of the final examinations in April are mailed to students in
the graduating classes by the time of Convocation, and to students in
the lower years by approximately June 15. Any student who must meet
an application date for another institution prior to June 15 should
inform the transcript clerk in the Registrar's Office in order that
arrangements may be made to meet the deadline.
Results of final examinations in Term 1 of the Winter Session, in
Summer Session, and in Guided Independent Study courses, are mailed
to students as soon as possible after they are approved. 9941.
January 16, 1991
General Academic Regulations  (continued)
4. Supplemental Examinations
That the following entry replace the fifth paragraph under the
heading of Supplemental Examinations on P.23/24 of the 1990/92
Calendar (new wording underlined):
In the Summer Session a student who satisfactorily completes a
6-credit course will be granted a supplemental examination in a
second subject if the final mark is not less than 40% in the second
subject
5. Transcript of Academic Record
That the entry on P.24, in the 1990-91 Calendar be revised as follows:
That the first paragraph be deleted.
That the third paragraph be revised to read as follows (new wording
underlined):
Each transcript will include the student's complete record at The
University of British Columbia. Since credit earned is determined on
the results of final examinations, a transcript will not include
results of mid-term examinations.
The remaining paragraphs will remain unchanged.
6. Spring Session, Summer Session
That the entry under this heading on P.25 of the 1990-91 Calendar be
revised to read as follows:
That the heading be changed to SUMMER SESSION and paragraphs numbered
1 and 2 be revised to read:
1. The maximum number of credits for Summer Session in any one
Calendar year, is normally 12.
2. All students desiring to obtain formal credit for work done
in Summer Session must be eligible for admission on the
same basis as for Winter Session.
The paragraph numbered 3. remains unchanged.
7. Extra Sessional Credit Courses
That the entry under this heading on P.25 of 1990-91 Calendar be
moved to precede the entry for Summer Session (above) and divided
into two sections, to read as follows:
OFFICE OF GUIDED INDEPENDENT STUDY
This office is responsible for the administration of degree
credit courses offered through guided independent study
(distance education) formerly Correspondence Courses. 9942.
January 16, 1991
General Academic Regulations
7. Extra Sessional Credit Courses  (continued)
OFFICE OF EXTRA-SESSIONAL STUDIES
This office is responsible for the administration of degree
credit courses offered in the evenings during the Winter
Session; all courses offered during the Summer Session; and the
Directed Study Abroad Program.
8. Student Discipline
That, as recommended by Dr. A.J. McClean, Associate Vice-President
(Academic) the description of Offences under the heading of STUDENT
DISCIPLINE, on P.25 of the 1990-91 Calendar, be revised as follows:
For Offence 2 substitute the following:
2. Submitting the same essay, presentation or assignment more
than once, whether the earlier submission was at this or
another institution, unless prior approval has been
obtained.
For Offence 5 substitute the following:
5. Submitting false records or information, in writing or
orally, or failing to provide relevant information when
requested.
For Offence 8 divide into two, renumbered 8 and 9, as follows:
8. Damaging, removing or making unauthorized use of University
property or the personal property of faculty, staff,
students or others at the University. Without restricting
the generality of the meaning of "property" it includes
information, however it be recorded or stored.
9. Assaulting individuals, including conduct which leads to
the physical or emotional injury of faculty, staff,
students or others at the University, or which threatens
the physical or emotional well being of faculty, staff,
students or others at the University.
Add the following as Offence 10:
10. Attempting to engage in or assisting others to engage in or
attempt to engage in conduct in respect of which
disciplinary action may be taken.
Renumber the existing Offence 9 as Offence 11."
The Registrar explained that the majority of the proposals were changes
necessitated by issues which Senate had already agreed to, in particular the
change in grading practices, the change from units to credits, the combining
of a number of sessions, the elimination of a number of sessions, and the
combining of the Spring and Summer Session into one session to be named
Summer Session. 9943.
January 16, 1991
General Academic Regulations (continued)
Rev. Burns    ) That the recommended changes and
Dean McBride  )  additions to the 1991-92 Calendar
be approved.
Dr. Cook drew attention to the proposed statement on student discipline
and suggested that this item be referred to the Senate Committee on Student
Appeals on Academic Discipline.
Dr. Elder     ) That the proposed revisions to the Calendar
Dr. Cook     ) statement on Student Discipline be approved
for inclusion in the Calendar, subject to the
approval of the Senate Committee on Student
Appeals on Academic Discipline.
Carried
Professor Bryden referred to the proposed Calendar statement on freedom
from harassment and discrimination and the statement on Academic Freedom
which currently appears in the Calendar.  He stated that most American
universities  that  had  introduced this  kind  of  resolution  into their
disciplinary process had immediately found that there is a conflict between
broad notions of academic  freedom and broad notions of  freedom from
harassment and discrimination.  He felt that the statement said, in effect,
that we think that freedom from harassment is a good idea, academic freedom
is a good idea, but we don't know how to resolve one or the other, or any
kind of conflict between these two, but we trust the President to do that
for us.  He felt that Senate ought to be responsible for finding a
resolution to the conflict between these generalized statements.
Dean Burns stated that he felt that statements on academic freedom, and
freedom from harassment and discrimination were valuable, but that he had
difficulty understanding the full range of the statement. He queried the
difference between ancestry and ethnic origin, and also pointed out that the
inclusion of age was inappropriate since the University does, lawfully, 9944.
January 16, 1991
General Academic Regulations  (continued)
discriminate on the grounds of age. He stated that it was unclear as to why
age had been included. Dean Burns also drew attention to the sentence which
reads: "The University may initiate appropriate action against individuals
or groups whose behaviour amounts to discrimination or harassment or whose
behaviour threatens that environment of mutual respect and tolerance." and
stated that he wanted to know who would be deciding what, and he felt that
students ought to know since this statement would be more likely to affect
students than faculty. He pointed out that "appropriate action" did not
signify whether this was criminal action, disciplinary action, or whether a
student's grade would be affected. He also questioned the meaninq of the
word "groups". He concluded that this statement could be used against
students who demonstrate against unpopular speakers. He cited as an example
students protesting against a speaker in favour of apartheid, and stated
that although this was not harassment in the real sense, the statement could
be used against protesters. Should this happen, he felt that he could make
a case that the University had interfered with the environment of mutual
respect and tolerance. In conclusion, Dean Burns stated that he was
concerned about the conflict between academic freedom on the one hand and
harassment and discrimination on the other, and although the balance was a
fine one he was not at all sure that the balance expressed here was the
right one. He stated that he would prefer to see the statement further
defined so that Senate could understand exactly what the powers were.
Dr. Will supported the idea of a statement on harassment and
discrimination but felt that the one before Senate was not as precise as it
should be. He said that there was a lack of legal definition and that the
offences had not been spelled out. Dr. Will stated that from his experience
on Senate appeals committees he had learned from lawyers that it was very 9945.
January 16, 1991
General Academic Regulations (continued)
important that offences be identified, and also that the process be
identified so that when a student is charged with an offence he or she would
know exactly who was going to judge them, what the safeguards were, and what
the range of penalties would be. He also thought that since the University
already had a statement on sexual harassment that there ought to be some
cross-referencing to tie the two statements together.
In amendment:
Dr. Will      )  That the sentence which reads: "The University
Dean Marchak  ) may initiate appropriate action against
individuals or groups whose behaviour amounts
to discrimination or harassment or whose behaviour
threatens that environment of mutual respect and
tolerance." be deleted.
Speaking in support of the amendment, Mr. Anderson stated that he felt
that the wording "based upon ancestry, country of origin, ethnic origin,
gender, sexual orientation, creed, citizenship, age, or disability" was
ambiguous and should also be examined.  He felt that with statements such as
this there was always the expectation that what is not forbidden is
therefore permitted.
The amendment was put and carried.
Dr. Elder drew attention to item 6. Spring Session, Summer Session, and
noted that although the report stated that paragraph 3. remains unchanged
this was not in fact correct. She stated that paragraph 3 which reads: "A
student who has obtained fail standing during the last Winter Session
attended may not enrol in Summer Session." was workable when Summer Session
commenced in July but that it will not work when the Summer Session begins
in May because examination results from the Winter Session would not be
available in time for students to enrol. The Registrar agreed to re-word
this item. 9946.
January 16, 1991
General Academic Regulations  (continued)
Dr. Sobrino suggested that, in view of earlier comments, it would
perhaps be better if the statement on freedom from harassment and
discrimination were to end with the words "...harassment and discrimination"
until the matter had been reviewed.
In amendment:
Dr. Sobrino   ) That the statement on Freedom from
Mr. Anderson .) Harassment and Discrimination read:
"The University of British Columbia
is committed to ensuring that all
members of the university community
- students, faculty, staff, and
visitors - are able to study and work
in an environment of tolerance and
mutual respect that is free from harassment
and discrimination."
Dr. Will stated that he did not think the statement should be just
shortened and left at that, and he asked for assurance that it would be
referred to an appropriate committee of Senate, such as the Academic Policy
Committee, to be brought back for the following year's Calendar in a more
acceptable form.
Professor Bryden said that he supported the idea of a policy on
harassment and discrimination but emphasized that the issues ought to be
carefully examined. He also stated that it would be more appropriate if
such a proposal were to come from a committee of Senate since the Registrar
was not in a position to argue for it.
It was agreed that the shortened version of the statement be included in
the 1991-92 Calendar and that the Academic Policy Committee be requested to
look into this matter and present a more detailed proposal to Senate.
The amendment was put and carried. 9947.
January 16, 1991
General Academic Regulations  (continued)
The motion to approve the recommended changes and additions to the
1991-92 Calendar, as amended, was put and carried.
Other business
Closing of the University
Dr. McLean referred to the recent cancellation of classes due to bad
weather and stated that since many faculty, staff and students arrive at
the University before 7.00 a.m., in future a more timely decision on the
closing of the University would be appreciated.
Engineering Forum
Mr. Nikkei, student representative of the Faculty of Applied Science,
announced that in response to the problems caused by the EUS newsletter in
March of last year, the Engineering Undergraduate Society had set up a
Rights and Freedom Forum to take place on January 31, 1991 from 12.30 to
2.30 p.m. in the Student Union Building Auditorium, and invited members of
Senate to attend.
The meeting adjourned at 10.15 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, February
20, 1991.
Secretary
Confirmed
Chairman 9948.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Agricultural Economics
Change footnotes (p.47, col.l):
3. ECON 306 or AGEC 310 may be substituted for ECON 201, and ECON 307
may be substituted for ECON 202, with Department head approval.
7. Students may choose from 300 or 400 level courses in the Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences, the Department of Economics, and from Comm
297/397, 393, 396, 457 and 458.
Change Second Year program, (p.47, col.l):
Agricultural Sciences Electives1 9
AGEC 201 3
AGEC 258 3
AGEC 2602 3
ECON 201 and 2023 6
Breadth Electives4 6
Management/Applied Economics Electives _3
Credits 33
Bio-Resource Engineering
New course    BIOE 490 (3) Advanced Biological Waste Systems Design and
Management
Deletion      BIOE 366
Change in Programs (Second and Third Years):
Second Year
Replace CIVL 215 by CHML 251
Move BIOE 285 from 2nd Term to lst Term
Third Year - effective September, 1992
Replace BIOE 366 by CHML 351
Food Science
Changes  FOOD 258 - change title and description
FOOD 301 - change hours
Soil Science
Change   SOIL 311 - change description 9949.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES  (continued)
Plant Science
Program change:
Proposed Calendar Description
PLANT SCIENCE
The department offers opportunities for study leading to Doctoral and
Master's degrees and to the degrees of Bachelor of Science In Agriculture,
B.Sc. (Agr.), and Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, B.L.A. For Information
on the Ph.D. and M.Sc. degree programs, see the Faculty of Graduate Studies
section of this calendar.
Information on the B.L.A. degree program is given at the end of the Agricultural Sciences section of this calendar.
Fields of study for the B.Sc. (Agr.) degree include agronomy, range management, horticulture, crop physiology, plant pathology, weed science, genetic
engineering, plant breeding, applied entomology, and tissue culture, with
teaching and research facilities in the main Agricultural Sciences building
(H.R. MacMillan Building), the Plant Science Annex, the Horticulture Building
and greenhouses, and the Totem Park Field Station (which houses the landscape
architecture studios) with Its associated arable lands on the Totem and South
Campus Fields.
Second Year
AGSC 2132' 3 3
Agricultural Sciences Core
Requirements2* 4 9
CHEM 230 6
PHYS 110 or 115 or 1201 6
BIX 2013 3
PLNT 259 3
Unrestricted Electives9 _3
33
First Year
AGSC 100
0
AGSC 110
3
BIOL 101 or 102
6
CHEM 103 or 110 or 120
6
ECON 1001
6
MATH 100, 120 or 140
3
MATH 101, 121 or 141
3
ENGL 1001
6
33 9950.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Plant Science
Program change:  (continued)
Third & Fourth Years
AGSC 300
2
AGSC 4105
3
Breadth Electives6
6
Ecology^
3
PLKT 321 or Equivalent
3
PLNT 324
3
PLNT 331
3
PLNT 3363
3
PLNT 338
3
PLNT 4235
2
PLNT 498 or 49$
3 or
6
Program Electives8
24 or
27
Unrestricted Electives9
12 or
6
70
Notes:
1. Students enroling In CHEM 110 or 120 require a suitable Phvsics course as
a co-requlslte and therefore may be given permission to defer ENGL 100 or
ECON 100 until second year.
2. Some or all of these requirements may be deferred to third year but no
later.
3. Students specializing in Rangeland Resources are recommended but not
required to take AGSC 213, BIOL 201, and PLNT 336.
4. Students are required to take a minimum of nine credits of courses
offered outside the Department of Plant Science but within the Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences. In order to meet this requirement, students In
the Department of Plant Science are required to take SOIL 200 In second
year. The remaining six credit minimum should normally be selected from
the following: AGEC 201 or 258, ANSC 258, BIOE 258, FOOD 258 or 259,
SOIL 204. AGEC 258 and ANSC 258 are both required of students
specializing In Rangeland Resources.
5. Students may not register for these courses before fourth year. However,
they should note the requirements for PLNT 498 and 499 described In the
section of the Calendar dealing with Courses of Instruction. PLNT 499
■ay require PLNT 322, or suitable equivalent, as a prerequisite.
6.  Each student's program must contain a minimum of 6 credits of electives
chosen from the humanities, creative and performing arts or social
sciences and approved by the Academic Advisor. 9951.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Plant Science
Program change:  (continued)
7. Students are required to complete one course In ecological principles.
Recommended courses Include BIOL 303, FRST 205, or equivalent.
8. Students should select an appropriate academic curriculum, as approved by
a Department Academic Advisor. At Least 12 credits of the program electives must be at the 400 level or above. Students registering for PLNT
499 may require PLNT 322, or suitable equivalent, as a prerequisite.
9. These electives may be chosen to develop additional depth In a specific
field of Interest in plant biology, to provide additional breadth of
knowledge In science or agriculture, or to pursue general Interests In
arts and humanities.
Rangeland Resources
In addition to the requirements listed above, students specializing In Range-
land Resources are required to take the following courses: ANSC 421 (3)
BIOL 302 (3), ECON 370 (3), PLNT 258 (3) PLNT 304 (3), 326 (3), 401 (3), 404
(3), 408 (3). Recommended electives include AGEC 374 (3), ANSC 322 (3), FRST
442 or GEOG 370 (3), SOIL 416 (3).
Entomology
Courses of study In entomology are offered through the Department of Plant
Science, the Faculty of Forestry and the Biology Program. The Department of
Plant Science offers courses In economic entomology, Insect ecology. Insect
physiology, pesticides, biological control and plant disease vectors.
Forestry offers courses In insect ecology and the special problems of forest
entomology and forest protection. The Biology Program offers an Introductory
course in general entomology, and courses In Insect ecology and physiology,
cross-listed with Plant Science. The Department of Zoology maintains a
museum collection and specialized library.
At the graduate level, research guidance is available In problems relating to
classification, structure, function and bionomics of insects, as well as In
specialized areas such as biological control, genetics and plant-Insect
relationships. There are also opportunities for graduate study In population
biology, ecological genetics and mathematical modelling of biological processes. Cooperative research on ultra-structure, biology and population dynamics of plant-disease vectors can be arranged with the Vancouver Research
Station of Agriculture Canada, located on caucus.
The following description should replace the current calendar description on
page 360, column 2.
NOTE: Biology 101, 102 or 103 Is a prerequisite for all Plant Science
courses except Plant Science 259. 315. 316, 321, 322. and 410. Plant Science
259 Is normally an additional prerequisite for a 11 300 and 400 level courses
except Plant Science 315, 316, 321, 322, and 410. 9952.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Plant Science  (continued)
Deletions PLNT 110, 400, 405, 406, 407, 412, 426, 433, 437, 438
Changes  PLNT 324 - change title and description
PLNT 331, 404 - change description and hours
PLNT 408 - change title, description and hours
PLNT 410 - change number, title and description (formerly 314)
PLNT  411,  414  -  change  title,  description,  hours  and
prerequisite
PLNT 417 - change descripion, hours and prerequisite
PLNT 418 - change title and description
PLNT 424 - change  number,  title,  description and hours
(formerly 325)
PLNT 432, 435 - change description and hours
PLNT 499 - change description and prerequisite
New     PLNT 409 (3) Turf Management
B.L.A. Program
Changes  LARC 320, 420 - change title
FACULTY OF ARTS
Anthropology and Sociology
Change in Program Statement:
Under  ANTHROPOLOGY;  under  both  Major  and  Honours,  change  the
statement, "Three units from among Anthropology 302-304 ..." to read:
Six credits from among Anthropology 302-304, 315, 350-353, 401-405.
New      SOCI 328 (3/6)d   Sociological Data Analysis
Changes  SOCI 465 - change in credits to: (3/6)d
Change to List A and B
Move the following courses from List B to List A:
Anthropology 200
Sociology 200
Asian Studies
Deletion ASIA 309
Cross listing with History:
Change   ASIA 360 - change in title, add: Same as HIST 389.
ASIA 322 - add: Same as HIST 386. 9953.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Asian Studies  (continued)
New     ASIA 424 (3-6)d Topics in Classical Japanese Literature
Changes  CHIN 413, 414 - change in title, description
New     JAPN 104 (6)   Basic Japanese Grammar
Classical Studies
Deletion  CLST 304
New     CLST 311 (3)   Women in Antiquity: in Bronze Age, Classical
Greek, and Hellenistic Cultures
CLST 312 (3)   Women in Antiquity: in the Roman World of
Republican  and  Imperial  Times,  Pagan  and
Christian
Change in Honours - program statement:
Change last paragraph to read:
The Department is prepared to arrange Honours programs in collaboration
with other departments  (e.g. French, Hispanic and Italian Studies,
English, Religious Studies).
English
Changes  ENGL 201, 450 - change in description
Change in program requirements:
Under Requirements for the Language Emphasis - program, change 3 to
read:
3.  At least 12 more credits from the following list 304, 306, 307,
321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 340, 341, 350 etc.
New      ENGL 308 (3)   The  Theory  and  Application  of  Rhetorical
Criticism
Fine Arts
Change in program description
Third Year
At least 36 credits ... Fine Arts 340 or 343 (6 credits)
Changes  FINA 281 to 290, 373, 375 - change in hours
FINA 487 - change in number, prerequisite (formerly 486)
FINA 289 - change in description, hours
New     FINA 386 (6)   Intermediate Photography
FINA 390 (6)   Studio Media: Photography
FINA 486 (9)   Advanced Photography 9954.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
French
Change
New
FREN 330 change in number (formerly 416)
FREN 354, 460, 462, 464 - change in prerequisites
FREN 37 0 (3)
FREN 440 (3)
FREN 441 (3)
FREN 476 (3)
FREN 477 (3)
Introduction to French Linguistics
Computer Applications for French
Computer Applications for French, II
Description of Spoken French - Method of
Syntactic Analysis
Description of Spoken French - Application to
a Corpus
Changes
FREN 411, 417, 419 - change in hours, credits to: (3/6)d
FREN 407, 408, 409, 410, 412, 414, 415, 418, 425, - change in
description, hours, credits to: (3/6)d
FREN 456 - change in description, credits to: (3/6)d
FREN 430 - change in number, prerequisite (formerly 421)
FREN 472 - change  in description,  hours,  prerequisites,
credits to: (3.6)d
FREN 473, 475 - change in hours, prerequisite, credits to:
(3.6)d
Change in Literature Requirement Statement
Under Literature Requirement change third paragraph to read:
French 220, 330, and all 400-level literature courses in French except
401, 420, 499.
Change in program statement
Under Major in French with emphasis on Language
Third and Fourth Years
French 352 and 370 and either 450 or 452, and ...
Under Honours in French with emphasis on Language
Third and Fourth Years
six credits in literature courses numbered 300, 330, 407-430 ...
Under Major in French with emphasis on Literature
Third and Fourth Years
...literature courses numbered 300, 330, 407-430.
Under Honours in French with emphasis on Literature
Third and Fourth Years
... literature courses numbered 300, 330, 407-430.
Under Notes, change first sentence to read:
French 202 or its equivalent ... literature courses numbered 300, 330,
401 and above. 9955.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
French  (continued)
At the end of the French entry add:
A brochure describing each year's offerings of the Department of French
in more detail is available from the departmental office. Students
should obtain and consult this brochure before selecting courses.
Geography
New     GEOG 316 (3)   Geography of Natural Hazards
Changes  GEOG 110 - change in title, description, hours
-GEOG 200, 300 - change in title, description
Germanic Studies
New      GERM 304 (6)   Intensive Advanced German I
GERM 320 (3/6)d German  Literature  from  the  Post-Romantic
Period to 1900
GERM 321 (3/6)d German Literature from 1900 to the Present
GERM 350 (3/6)d Enlightenment and Classicism
GERM 351 (3)   The Romantic Period
GERM 450 (3)   German Literature of the Middle Ages
GERM 451 (3)   German Literature of Renaissance and Baroque
Changes  GERM 100 - change in description, hours
GERM 104 - change in title, description, hours
GERM 110 - change in description, prerequisite
GERM 200, 300, 310 - change in title, description, prerequisite
GERM 204 - change in title, description, prerequisite, hours
GERM 210 - change in description, hours, prerequisite
GERM 410 - change in title, description
Deletions GERM 320, 350, 450
Changes to List A
Change the list under German to read:
German 100 (6), 104 (12), 110 (6)*, 200 (6)*, 204 (12)*
Changes to List B
Change the list under German to read:
German 210 (6), 300 (6), 304 (6)
Changes to Program description
Under GERMANIC STUDIES make the following changes:
No previous knowledge:   German 100 and 204,
or German 104 and 300 (or 304)
or German 100 and 200 (to be followed by German
300 in third year)
With Grade 11 or 12:     German 200 and 300 (or 304)
or German 204 and 310
With Untutored knowledge of German: German 110 and 210 9956.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Germanic Studies  (continued)
Students with secondary-school German or German-language background will
be required to take a placement test before the beginning of classes.
Third and Fourth Years:
German 300 or 304 (if not taken in second year), 310, 320/321, 350/351,
450/451, and six additional credits of German courses 402-423.
Honours in German
• • •
Third and Fourth Years
German 300 or 304 (if not taken in second year), 310, 320/321, 339,
350/351, 439, 450/451, and six additional credits of German courses
402-423.
Students may submit a six credit Honours essay (German 449) in place of
330 or any other six credits of senior work, aside from required courses.
A course in European history with emphasis on German-speaking
countries.  See Honours adviser.
One university-level course in a language other than English or German.
Notes:1. Courses are offered in German and in Germanic Studies, the
latter including an elementary and an intermediate course in
Swedish.
2. Literature courses numbered 402 or above are not normally
given every year. The Department should be consulted as to
whether three-credit courses will be given in the first or
second term.
History
New      HIST 352 (6)  The Social History of Latin America Since 1760
HIST 353 (6)  Politics and Society in Latin America Since
1820
HIST 452 (3)  Selected Topics in the History of Mexico
Changes   HIST 250 - change in number, description (formerly 350)
HIST 387, 388 - change in description
HIST 443 - change in title, description, credits to: (6)
Deletions HIST 351, 420, 429, 442
Change to List B
Under History in List B, add: 250 (6) 9957.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
Latin American Studies
New Thematic Option for General B.A. Program:
Calendar Statement:
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Several courses in the Faculty of Arts have Latin Ameircan content.
Students may wish to approach Latin American Studies as a Thematic
Option with the General B.A. Program.  This course of studies is
designed to provide a coherent and  interdisciplinary program for
students with an interest in Latin America.  Students will normally
enter the program after completing their first sixty credits.  Before
entering  the  Latin American Studies Thematic Option  students are
required to complete either Hisotry 250, Spanish 211 or Anthropology 202
(when applicable) and twelve credits of Spanish or Portuguese.
Three distinct programs are available:  Latin American Art;  Latin
American Literature; and Latin American History.  A detailed brochure is
available in the General B.A. Office.
Courses on Latin America:
Anthropology 323, 353
Fine Arts 363, 365, 463, 465
Geography 395, 495
History 352, 353, 450, 451, 452
Portuguese 307, 392
Spanish 305, 312, 363, 464, 467, 468
Examples of other courses which may have Latin American content (check
with Departments:
Anthropology 411
Geography 352
Students interested in the Latin American Studies Thematic Option should
contact Dr. Shirley Sullivan in the General B.A. Office at 228-4067.
Change in program requirements
Under General Program at the end of the column change the paragraph to
read:
... degree programs (such as Canadian studies, Latin American studies,
native studies, ethnic studies, ...
Mathematics
Change in Calendar statement
Under Honours change list to read:
Pirst and Second Years1
Mathematics 120 and 121 (or 100 and 101)
Mathematics 22 3 and 315
Mathematics 226 or 2002
Mathematics 227 or 201
Mathematics 2202 9958.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Mathematics (continued)
Third and Fourth Years:
Mathematics 300, 320, 321, 322, 323 (15 credits)3
15 credits2 from Math 400-403, 414-429, 440, 4494
9 additional credits of Mathematics courses numbered 300 or above.
Notes
icomputer Science 124/126 (or 118), Physics 120 (or 115 or 110), and
Physics 200 or 206 are recommended.
2Students obtaining a second-class mark in Math 226 are not required
to take Math 220.
3A second-class overall average is required in these 30 credits to
obtain an Honours degree.
4Math 449 is highly recommended.
• • •
Special Honours Programs in Mathematics and Another Subject
• • •
Third and Fourth Years:
Mathematics 320 and 321 (6 credits)1
9 credits1 chosen from Math 300, 301, 316, 322, 323, 331
12 credits1 chosen from Math 400-403, 414-429, 440, 449.
Other subject: as specified by the other department.
Note:
1A second class overall average is required in these 27 credits to
obtain an Honours Mathematics degree.
Political Science
Change in Program statement:
Change entry under Requirements for the B.A. degree to read:
Major
Second Year
Political Science 200,  and two from 220,  240,  260.  Students are
normally expected to complete these requirements in their second year,
and must have completed at least two of the courses before applying for
admission to the program.
Third and Fourth Years
60 credits, including:
Political Science 349 and 380, normally to be completed in the third
year of the program (Political Science 340 may be taken in lieu of
Political Science 349);
24 additional credits from Political Science courses numbered 300 and
above (21 credits if Political Science 340 is taken);
30 additional credits, of which at least 12 must be taken in departments
other than Political Science. 9959.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Political Science  (continued)
Honours
Second Year
As for the major.
Third and Fourth Years
72 credits, including:
Political Science 340, 380, 390, 490, 491;
9 additional credits from Political Science courses numbered 300 and
above;
30 additional credits, of which at least 12 must be taken in other
departments.
Admission and Promotion
Admission is not automatic to either the Major Program or Honours
Program in Political Science. Students must submit a formal
application. Because there are a limited number of spaces, some
applicants who satisfy the minimum prerequisites may not be admitted.
Students comtemplating a Major or Honours Program in Political Science
are strongly encouraged to seek information and advice from the
department at the end of their first year. Applications for admission
to either program should be submitted by mid-June prior to registering
for the third year. (Specific deadlines will be published each year in
the Program Planning and Advising Information guide.) Application
forms, which are available from the Political Science Department office,
should be accompanied by official transcripts from all post-secondary
institutions attended.
Major Program
Selection for admission to the Major Program will be based on overall
standing (average) in the best 48 credits earned to date toward the B.A.
program. These 48 credits must include all courses taken in Political
Science, as well as English 100 (or its equivalent). The minimum
standing for admission to the Major program will vary from year to year
according to the number of applicants and the number of seats available
in the 300-level required courses.
Admission and Promotion
Major Program (continued)
Promotion to the fourth year of the Major Program will be automatic for
students in the third year of the program whose work meets university
standards for continuing. For students not in the third year of the
program, admission to the fourth year will be allowed, in exceptional
circumstances, for (a) transfers from colleges or other universities or
(b) students at UBC who have performed well in Political Science courses
in their third year but are not in our Major Program. Selection of
applicants from these categories will be based on overall standing
(average) of the best 72 credits earned to date toward the B.A.
program. These 72 credits must include all Political Science courses
and English 100 (or its equivalent). 9960.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Political Science  (continued)
Honours Program
To be accepted into the Honours Program, students normally require a
first-class mark in at least one Political Science course and a 75%
average overall in their second year.
Promotion to the fourth year of the honours program requires (a) a
first-class mark in at least one Political Science course during the
third year, (b) a minimum of 75% in Political Science 390 and (c) a 75%
average overall in th third year. Occasionally, an outstanding student
from the third-year Major Program may be admitted directly to
fourth-year Honours.
Graduation in the Honours Program normally requires (a) a first-class
mark in at least one Political Science course during the fourth year,
(b) a minimum of 75% in both Political Science 490 and 491 and (c) a 75%
overall average in the final two years. Students not meeting these
standards but nevertheless satisfying all other university requirements
for graduation will be awarded a B.A. in the Major Program.
New
POLI 349 (3)  Modern Political Philosophy: Concept,
and Thinkers
Themes
Changes
POLI 260 -change in hours, credits to: (3)
POLI 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 360, 361, 364, 385 - change in
hours, credits to: (3/6)d
POLI 340 - change in description
Deletion  POLI 280
Psychology
New
PSYC 333
(3)
Memory:  Historical,  Clinical and
Cognitive
Perspectives
PSYC 3 34
(3)
Memory:  Biological,  Developmental
Social/
Personality and Applied Perspectives
PSYC 336
(3)
The Psychology of Language I
PSYC 337
(3)
the Psychology of Language II
PSYC 314
(3)
Health Psychology
PSYC 355
(3)
Fundamentals of Cognitive Science
PSYC 302
(3)
Infancy
Changes
PSYC 316
- split into three courses:
PSYC
317
(3) Research Methods and Design
PSYC
318
(3) Analysis of Behavioural Data
PSYC
464
(3) Advanced   Research   Methods
in   the
Behavioural Sciences
Deletion
PSYC 409 9961.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Psychology (continued)
Change in degree requirements
Under Requirements for the B.A. Degree - change to read:
Major
• • •
Third and Fourth Years
Psychology 316 or Psychology 317 and 318 (to be taken in third year)
At least 24 additional Psychology credits including:
at least 6 credits of:   Psychology 300, 301, 302, 303, 305, 308, 314,
336 or 337;
at   least  6 credits of: Psychology  304,   306,   307,   309,   310,   313,   333,
334 or  360.
Note: Students who are contemplating graduate studies or other
research activities in Psychology are urged to take
Psychology 464 in addition to the above minimum requirements
for the B.A. degree.
Under Honours - change to read:
• • •
Third Year
A minimum of 36 credits taken concurrently including:
Psychology 312 and either 316 (Honours Section) or 317 and 318.
Fourth Year*
A minimum of 36 credits taken concurrently including Psychology 449 and
at least six credits of a Psychology laboratory course numbered above
400.
* In addition, during third and fourth years, and Honours student must
take: at least 12 credits of: Psyc 300, 301, 302, 303, 305, 308, 314,
336 or 337, and at least 12 credits of: Psyc 304, 306, 307, 309, 310,
313, 333, 334, or 360.
Under General prerequisites for all 300- and 400-level courses: change
to read:
• • •
1.  Psychology  100,  200,,  260,  or  206 all  serve  as  acceptable
prerequisites for 300, 301, 302, 305, 308, 320, 321, and 336.
Religious Studies
New      RELG 311 (3)  Jewish Literature in Translation
RELG 312 (3)  Jews and Judaism in Canada
RELG 480 (3)  Women and Religion
Changes   RELG 308 - change in number, title and description (formerly
208) 9962.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Religious Studies  (continued)
Change in Program Statement:
Under Requirements for the B.A. Degree - change to:
Major
First and Second Years
A minimum of 6 credits of Religious Studies 100, 202, 204, 205
Third and Fourth Years
30 credits to be selected from Religious Studies courses numbered 300 or
above.
Subject to the approval of the Department, a maximum of 12 credits of
the following courses may be accepted for credit toward a major in
Religious Studies:
ANTH 333 The Analysis of Myth
ANTH 415 Religion and Society
ASIA 325 History of Chinese Thought
ASIA 360 The Making of the Sikh Tradition
CLST 305 Classical Myth and Religion
ENGL 311 Literature of the Bible
FINA 353 Buddhist Art of Japan
HIST 372 Ideas and Institutions of the Middle Ages
ITST 310 The Divine Comedy in Translation
LATN 305 Medieval Latin
MUSC 327 Liturgical Music I
MUSC 427 Liturgical Music II
PHIL 373 Medieval Philosophy A
PHIL 383 Medieval Philosophy B
SOCI 463 Sociology of Religion
Honours
Admission
A minimum of 6 credits of Religious Studies 100, 202, 204, 205.
Third and Fourth Years
A program will be devised for each student, consisting of 36 or more
credits and including a graduating essay, Religious Studies 499.
Continuation in fourth-year Honours is conditional upon maintaining at
least second-class standing.
Students who intend to do graduate work are advised to choose an area of
concentration (see below) in the third and fourth years and to acquire
some proficiency in the appropriate cononical language(s). For
languages other than Arabic and Hebrew, see the listings of the
appropriate department. 9963.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Religious Studies  (continued)
Areas of Concentration (for Major and Honours):
a) Asian Religions: 204, 354, 361, 364, 365, 366, 367, 430, 452,
ASIA 360
b) Christianity (Post Biblical): 205, 315, 321, 323, 326, 327, 420,
421, 422
c) Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East: 300, 303, 306, 403; HEBR
305, 405
d) Islamic Studies: 202, 340, 341, 448, 449; ARBC 300, 400
e) Judaic Studies: 202, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 407, 408, 409
f) Near Eastern Languages and Literature: 202; ARBC 300, 400; HEBR
305, 405; courses from areas c) or d)
g) New Testament: 202, 303, 314, 414, 415.
Changes to Lists A and B
Delete from List B: Religious Studies 205 (3)
Add to List A: Religious Studies 205 (6), Arabic 300 (6)
Add to List B: Arabic 400 (6)
Theatre and Film
Change all "Theatre" Calendar entries to: "Theatre and Film"
Add "Theatre" or "Film" or "Theatre and Film" after each faculty
member's name, as appropriate.
p. 163, col.  2,  (1990/91 Calendar) under THEATRE, change paragraph
starting "The Department of Theatre ..." to: "The Department has a ..."
p. 97, col 2, under THEATRE change the first paragraph to read:
"The Department of Theatre and Film offers programs of study that lead
to the degrees of Ph.D., M.A., M.F.A., B.A., and B.F.A."
Second paragraph: change "four distinct" to "three distinct".
Delete 2.B.A. in Theatre (Film.Television) from the list.
Delete lines: "Major in Film/Television" down to "Honours in Theatre"
p.  98,  col.  1,  delete section "Requirements for the Diploma  in
Pilm/Television Studies
New Calendar entry:
FILM
The Department of Theatre and Film offers programs of study that lead to
the degrees of M.A., M.F.A., B.A., and the Diploma in Film/Television
Studies.
Major in Film/Television
The selection of students for admission to the Film/Television Major
program normally takes place during the week after term finishes (end of
April, beginning of May).  Prospective candidates should contact the
Department of Theatre and Film to learn of admission requirements and to
make appointments for interviews. 9964.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Theatre and Film
New Calendar entry:  (continued)
Second Year:
Film 230
Third and Fourth Years
Film 330, 333, 431, 433
Six credits chosen from Theatre 305, 310, 320, 345, 351, 354, 400, 410,
451, 454.
Requirements for the Diploma in Film/Television Studies:
(Same as present entry, p. 98, col. 2)
• • •
First Year Second Year
FILM 230 FILM 431
FILM 330 FILM 433
FILM 333
Changes to List B
Delete after the "Theatre" entry: 230(3), and 233(1.5)
Add after "Family Science" a new entry:
Film 230 (6), 233(3)
Changes to Course Offerings list
Delete from the list under Theatre (THTR) the following course entries:
230, 233, 330, 333, 334, 431, 433, 434, 531, 532, 533, 534 and 535.
Insert a new heading on the appropriate page as follows:
Film (FILM)
(Faculty of Arts)
List under this heading all the course entries deleted from the
THEATRE listing.
New      THTR 415 (3/6)d  Studies in Women and Theatre/Film
Women's Studies
Change in program statement:
Change present entry to read:
WOMEN'S STUDIES
The Faculty of Arts offers a program of study that leads to the degree
of B.A.  Detailed descriptions of the program, courses, and other
information are available from the Chair of the Women's Studies
Coordinating Committee,  (name), telephone #.  Students majoring in
Women's Studies must have their courses approved each year by the
Coordinating Committee. A double major is encouraged.
Major
First and Second Years
Women's Studies 222 is required.  Women's Studies 224 (which fulfills
the  literature  requirement)  and  Anthropology/Sociology  213  are
recommended. 9965.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Women's Studies
Change in program statement:  (continued)
Third and Fourth Years
Women's Studies 322 and 324 (to be taken in third year).
Either Women's Studies 422 or 424 (one is required and both are
recommended; to be taken in fourth year).
At least 15 additional credits from courses eligible for credit toward a
major:
Women's  Studies  422 or  424  (whichever  was  not  taken  as  a
requirement)
Women's Studies 425 (can be repeated for credit)
Anthropology or Sociology 312
Classical Studies 311, 312
Family Science 442
French 419 or 422
Psychology 320
Religious Studies 480
Slavonic Studies 446
Sociology 414
Theatre 415
(Note:)   Women's Studies 300 may not be taken for credit toward the
major).
Courses of related interest but not counted toward the major:
Anthropology 214, 409; Economics 360; Family Science 322, 414; History
329, 443; Sociology 214, 240, 310, 361. Students should consult the
Women's Studies Committee for additional relevant courses in a given
year.
New
WMST 300 (3)
WMST 322 (6)
WMST 324 (6)
WMST 422 (3)
WMST 424 (3)
Introduction to
Gender
Relations
Women's Studies
in the
Social Sciences
Women's Studies
in the
Humanities
Advanced Research Seminar
in Women's Studies:
Social Sciences
Advanced Research Seminar
in Women's Studies:
Humanities
WMST 425 (3/6-12)d Special Topics in Women's Studies
Family and Nutritional Sciences
Change    FMSC 320 - change in credits to (3/6)d
Music
New
MUSC 150 (4)
MUSC 166 (1)
MUSC 169 (1)
MUSC 363 (4)
Large Instrumental Ensemble
Intensive Chamber Ensemble
Intensive Specialized Chamber Ensemble
History and Repertoire of the Guitar
and
Related Instruments
Deletions MUSC 150, 152 9966.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music  (continued)
Changes   MUSC 153 - change in hours, credits to: (4)
MUSC 154 - change in hours, credits to: (3)
MUSC 155 - change in credits to: (3)
MUSC 300, 301 - change in description
MUSC 409 - change in hours, credits to: (3/6)d
MUSC 414 - change in number (formerly 415)
MUSC 415 - change in number (formerly 414)
Changes in B.Mus. Major programs
MAJOR.IN PIANO
(100)
(101)
(105)
(120)
(121)
(136)
(193)
(100)
First Year
Theory of Music
Theory of Music
Aural Skills I
History of Music
History of Music
Piano Repertoire I
Music Perform;
^-Large Ensemble       3
Enalish 6
I              2
(200)
i:         2
(201)
2
(205)
I            3
(220)
II          3
(221)
I            4
(236)
e(Piano)5
(292)
(161)
Second Year
Theory of Music III
Theory of Music IV
Aural Skills II
History of Music III
History of Music IV
Piano Repertoire II
Music Performance (Piano)
-Large Ensemble or
Piano Chamber Ensemble
Literature Requirement
Hen-Music Elective
or
Third Year
(300) Theory of Music V
(301) Theory of Music V
(394)        Music Performance
(Piano Recital )
(1*9)       Keyboard Harmony and
Transoosition
(249)       Keyboard
AccomDanyinc I
(161)        Piano Chamber
Ensemdes
Music Elective
Non-Music Elective(s)
8
c
3
c
ir
Fourth Year
(440)        Piano Teaching Methods
and Materials
(<194)-      Music Performance
(Piano Recital)
(349)        keyboard
Accompanying II
(161)        Piano ChamDer
Ensembles
Non-Music Elective(s)
Music Elective
2
6
2
12
7T
*Large Ensemble:   Students may elect any one of Music 150 (Orchestra), Music 152
(Wind Ensembles),  Music  153 (University Singers) or Music 154 (University Choral
Union), with the permission of the School.
^Students may substitute Music 233 (Accompanying on the Harpsichord I) for Music
349. APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes in B.Mus. Major programs (continued)
MAJOR IN ORGAN
9967.
January 16, 1991
First Year
(100) Theory of Music I
(101) Theory of Music II
(105)        Aural  Skills  I
(120) History of Music I
(121) History of Music II
(193)       Music Performance(0rgan)6
(171)        Piano
^■Large Ensemble 3
(100) English 6
Ncn-'lusic Elective(s)      6
2
(200)
2
(201)
2
(205)
3
(220)
3
(221)
6
(293)
2
(271)
3F~
Second Year
Theory of Music III 2
Theory of Music  IY 2
Aural Skills II 2
History of Music III 3
History of Music IV 3
Music Performance(Organ) 6
Piano 2
Large Ensemble 3
Literature Requirement 6
Non-Music Elective(s) 6
Third Year
(200) Theory of Music V
(201) Theory of Music VI
(294)   Music Performance
(Organ Recital)
(1«1S)   Keyboard Harmony
and Transposition
(311)   Conducting
(452)   History of Keyboard
Music I
(452)   History of Keyboard
Music I-
delicious Studies
3
3
2
4
Fourth Year
^Theory Electives
(494)        Music Performance
(Organ Recital)
Non-Music Elective(s)
Music History Elective
(232)        Harpsichord Accomo.
6
8
6
6
2
TT
Za
*Large Ensemble:  Students will  enrol   in either Music 152  (University Singers)
Music 154 (Choral  Union), with the permission of the School.
^Religious Studies:  To be elected after consultation with the Department of
Religious Studies and School  of Music.    Students are also advised to take one
more non-credit courses from one of the theological  colleges on campus after
consultation with the School  of Music and the college concerned.
-Students will cnoose two courses from Music 410-415.
or
or 9968.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes in B.Mus. Major programs (continued)
MAJOR IN GUITAR
First Year
Second Year
(100)
Theory of Music  I
2
(200)
Theory of Music III
2
(101)
Theory of Music II
2
(201)
Theory of Music IV
2
(105)
Aural   Skills  I
2
(205)
Aural  Skills II
2
(120)
History of Music I
3
(220)
History of Music III
3
(121)
History of Music II
3
(221)
History of Music IV
•>
(193)
Music Performance
(Guitar)
6
(293)
Music Performance
(Guitar)
6
(171)
Ipiano
2
(271)
1Piano
2
^Large Ensemble
3
^Large Ensemble
3
(160)
3Small Ensemole
2
(160)
3Smal1 Ensemble
2
(100)
English
6
Literature Requirement
6
Non-Music Elec-ivefs)
3
Non-Music Elective(s)
3
3T
34-
Third Year
(300)
Theory of Music V
*3
(301)
Theory  of Music VI
3
(294)
Music Performance
(Guitar Recital)
8
(363)
History & Repertoire
of Guitar
4
JSmall  EnsemDle
2
Music Electives
6
Non-Music Electives
6
Fourth Year
(494)       Music Performance
(Guitar Recital)
■^Smal 1 Ensemble
Music Electives
Non-Music Elective(s)
8
2
6
i:
TT
IF
Ipiano: The secondary instrument must be piano unless the student passes the piar.;
oroficiency examination at the end of the first year;
2Large Ensemble: Students may elect any one of Music 150, 152, 153, or 154, with
the permission of the School.
3It is often desirable that students take the guitar ensemble section of Music
160 in each of the first and second years, and that they either continue with the
ensemble or elect one of the following in each of the third and fourth years:
Music 156, Music 163, Music 165. Should appropriate small ensemble courses not be
available in any given year, the required credits will be waived and the Music
Elective requirement increased correspondingly.4Small Ensemble: Students will be
placed in one of the Small Ensembles (Collegium Musicum, Asian Music Ensemble,
Contemporary Players, or String Chamber Ensembles). APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes in B.Mus. Major programs  (continued)
MAJOR IN VOICE
9969.
January 16, 1991
First Year
(100) Theory of Music  I
(101) Theory of Music  II
(105)        Aural  Skills  I
(120) History of Music I
(121) History of Music  II
(193)       Music Performance(Voice)6
(171)        ipiano
^Large Ensemble 3
(170) Lyric Diction 2
(100) Enalish 6
2
(200)
2
(201)
2
(205)
3
(220)
3
(221)
6
(293)
2
(271)
Second Year
Theory of Music III 2
Theory of Music IV 2
Aural  Skills II 2
History of Music III 3
History of Music IV 3
Music Performance(Voice) 6
Piano 2
Large Ensemole 2
Literature Requirement 6
-Italian 6
Third Year
Fourth Year
(300)
Theory of Music V
"5
(493)
Music Performance
(Voice Recital)
8
(301)
Theory of Music VI
1
(465)
Song Reoertoirte II
2
(394)
Music Performance
(442)
Song Interpretation
(Voice Recital )
8
& Accompaniment
d
(36=)
Song Recertoire I
2
Large Ensemole
•3
W
Large Ensemble
-German
3
dChamoer Ensemble
2
6
-Music Elective
6
Non-Music Elective(s)
6
-French
6
Ji
Oi
iPiano: A minimum of two years of study regardless of entering level.
zLarge Ensemble: Students will enrol in either Music 153 (University Singers) or
Music 154 (University Choral Union).
^Languages other than English: In certain cases students may concentrate on one or
two of the languages required, and the indicated sequence may be altered.
^Chamber Ensembles: Students will elect either Music 155 (Chamber Singers) or
Music 157 (Vocal Collegium Musicum Ensemble).
5 Music 441 (vocal Techiniques) or Music 311 (Choral Conducting) are highly
recommended electives. APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes in B.Mus. Major programs  (continued)
MAJOR IN OPERA
9970.
January 16, 1991
First Year
(100)
Theory of Music I
•
(200)
(101)
Theory of Music II
2
(201)
(105)
Aural  Skills  I
2
(205)
(12C)
History  of Music  I
3
(220)
(121)
History of Music 11
3
(221)
(192)
Music Performance(Voice
)4
(292)
(171)
1Pi ano
2
(271)
(125)
ODera Repertoire I
2
(235)
(100)
English
21 tali an
6
6
Laroe Ensemble
3
Second Year
Theory of Music III
Theory of Music IV
Aural Skills II
History of Music III
History of Music IV
Music Performance(Voice)
Piano
Opera Repertoire II
Large Ensemble
Literature Requirement
2Ge rma n
c
r*
C
"5
4
2
2
6
c
(300)
(201)
(229)
(292)
(225)
(226)
(I/O
Third Year
Theory of Music V
Theory of Music VI
Opera Workshop I
Music Performance(Voice)
ODera Repertoire  III 2
Opera Theatre Techniques4
Lyric Diction 2
3
(493)
•}
(429!
6
(423)
c
(425)
£=•-
encn
TT
Fourth Year
Music Performance  (Voice)
Opera Workshop II
History of Opera
Opera Reoertoire IV
Music Elective
^Non-Music Elective(s)
33"
-Diano: A minimum of two years'  study regardless of entering level.
2Foreign languages:   In certain cases students may concentrate on one or two of f
languages required, and the indicated sequence may be altered.
-Non-Music Elective(s):  To be chosen in consultation with opera division advise- 9971.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes  in B.Mus.  Major programs     (continued)
MAJOR  IN ORCHESTRAL  INSTRUMENT
First Year
(100)
Theory of Music I
2
(20C)
(101)
Theory of Music  II
2
(201)
(10=)
Aural  Skills  I
2
(205)
(120)
Hi star/  of Music  I
3
(220)
(121)
History of Music  II
3
(221)
(192)
Music Performance
6
(292)
(1711
-°i a no
2
(271)
'Larca Enssriole
4
-Smal1 E.nsemDle
I
(iOC)
Enol is."
6
Second Year
Theory of Music III 2
Theory of Music IY 2
Aural Skills II 2
History of Music III 3
History of Music  IV 3
Music Performance 6
i°iano 2
'Large Ensemole A
-Small E.nsemole(s) a
Literature Requirement 6
Third Year
(2CC)        "heory of Music V 3
(201;        Theery  of Music VI 2
(29-)        Musi- Performance
(P.ecital) 3
^_jrne Er.semole a
-Smal"  ;rsemo'ie;s'i 5
'!cn-"usic E'ective(s)      ll
Fourth Year
(49^;       Music Performance
(.Recital)
^.arce Enseal e
Snail  Ensemole(s)
"Music Elective
Non-'-'usic E!ective(s]
i3ianc:  "he secencary instrument must be piano unless tr.e student passes the piano
proficiency examination at the end of the first year.
^Large E.-.semole:  String students will  enroll  in Music 150 (Wind Ensemcles) or
Music 150 (Crcr.estra). Admission to either is by audition.
- Small EnscTtle:  A minimum of three years of Music 160 (String Chamber Ensemoles)
or Music  152 (Wind and Percussion Chamoer Ensembles) is  reauired.    All  students
:nust take a crsoits of Soecialited Ensemole:    Music 151 (Chamoer Orchestra), Music
159 (Chamoe- Strings), or Music 305 (Readings in Orchestral Seoertoire).    If
possible,  two of these credits should be in Music 151.    wind students are required
to taxe at least two credits of Music 305.
4 Music Elective: Music 309 (Instrumentation), Music 210 (Orchestration) and Music
212 (Instrumental Conducting) are highly recommended as especially appropriate to
this Major.    Additional credits of ensemble are not permitted for fulfilling the
Music Elective requirements.
sMusic Elective: Music 309 (Intrumentation) and 310 (Orchestration) are highly
recommended as esoecially aopropriate to this Major. Additional  units of ensemble
are not permitted for fulfilling the Music Elective requirement except Musuc 155
and 157 (Collegium Musicum Ensembles), Music 163 (Contemporary Players), and Music
16J (Stage 3anj).   (As noted under Performing Organizations, no more than half of
the small  enserr.o'e credit for the B.Mus. degree ray be  in Music 164.) 9972.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes in B.Mus. Major programs (continued)
MAJOR IN GENERAL STUDIES
(100)
(101)
(105)
(120)
(121)
(182)
(100)
First Year
Theory of Music I
Theory  of Music  II
Aural  Skills I
History  of Music   I
History of Music II
^Music Performance
^Concentration)
'Music Performance
.(Secondary)
-Large Ensemole
Eng"isn
aMon-Music E"ective(s)
Second Year
(200) Theory of Music III
(201) Theory of Music IV
(205)       Aural Skills II
(220) History of Music III
(221) History of Music IV
(282)       ^Music Performance
(Concentration)
(271)       'Music Performance
(Seconoary)
^Larne Enserule
Literature Requirement
4tlon-Music Elective(s)
2
2
2
3
3
Third Year
(3CC1        Theory  of Music V
(2C1)        Theory of Music VI
(282)        :Mu3i: Performance
(Concentration)
f'.jrge Ensemole
;,;Small  Ensemole
=,£Music Electives
^Non-Music E";ective(s)
14
6
Fourth Year
(A82)        ^Music Performance
(Concentration)
^Lajne Ensemole
3,'Small  Ensemole
-,6Music Electives
4Non-Music Elective(s)
iv
iThe concentration instrument is usually the one on which the student is most
comoetent, ana on wnicn the student auditioned to enter the School.
'The secondary instrument is normally piano in the first two years unless the
concentration is a keyboard instrument. Students with minimal keyboard experience
will be olacsd initially in Piano 141, and will in the second year take Piano 2*1
(class) or 271 (private), as detenained by the level of achievement in 141.
Students with some previous piano experience nay be excused from all or part of
the piano requirement by showing satisfactory proficiency in all of the
second-year secondary piano requirements: technique, repertoire, keyboard harmony,
score reading, sight reading, and transposition.  (For details, consult the facult;-
coordinator, keyboard performance division.)
^The large and small ensembles chosen are normally those most appropriate to the
student's concentration instrument. Substitutions can occasionally be made after
consultations with the student's adviser, and with some consideration being given
to the needs of the ensembles.  Students with concentration in historical
instruments will take six credits of small ensemble (usually Collegium Musicum,
starting in the second year) and six credits of large ensemble.
*The non-Music electives may be freely chosen, except that at least twelve credi--
rajst be in the same department, with at least six of these at the 200-level  or
higher.   If English is chosen to fill  this requirement then twelve credits must be
selected beyond those necessary to complete the literature requirement. 9973.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes in B.Mus. Major programs  (continued)
MAJOR IN GENERAL STUOIES (Cont'd)
J In each of third and fourth years a total of 14 credits, comprised of small
ensemole and music electives, must be taken with a minimum of 2 credits and a
maximum of 6 credits of small ensenole.   The 2 credit small ensemble Binimun may
be waived if inaoproon'ate to the concentration instrument or to the needs of the
stuaent, or if instruction is unavailable.    If waived on request of the student,
or oy secision of the Director, School  of Music, the Music Electives will be
increased fron twelve to fourteen credits.    Extra credits of large ensecSle beyond
those required for this fUjor may not be used as Music Electives.
°Stucents may cnoose a maximum of six credits of additional large or small
ensemole won* as part of the Music Elective requirements, provided authorization
is given by the Director, School of Music, for small-ensemble instruction beyond
the reauired credits. Any numoer of credits in this area may be elected, agaiir
assuring aoni-i strati ve permission for elective small-ensemole study, where the
stuaent'wisnes to exceed the total 128-cresit retirement. Students with keyboard
concentrations must take Music 149. Those with harpsichord concentrations must
take Music 223 and 222. Those wisninc to concentrate on historical instruments are
aovisec to tax" twelve treaits of music history courses (from Music 250, 252, 252,
2£<i,  sna 25:1 as part of their Music elective. Provided author:sation is given by
tne Director. School of Music , stuoents may take a maximum of 3*o crsoits of
Music Psr-3rr.ap.ee (SeconGary! in eacn of tne tnirc and fourth years, in partial
fulfillment of tne Music I"active recuirerr.er.t3 in those years.
MAJOR IN GENERAL STUOIES:  ELEMENTARY EDUCATION STREAM
Ai:   rears:  la roe ensemole:  for instrumental  concantrators,  one of these,  in the
four /ears, sust oe a cnoir, anc tne remaining three will se orchestra or wind
syranony, as aoorccriate.
Stucer.ts sneulo consult tne faculty of Education -eouirements for aomission to the
• Tescner Education Program.
Second Year:  Stucents must also taxe Music Eoucation 106,  two credits,  for a total
of 25 crecits.
Third Year
,'2CC)       Theory of Music V
;2C1!       Theory of Music V!
^Music Electives
Concuctino
(211 or 212:
i2S2!       Music Performance
Large Ensemole
Instrumental Class
(Music 102,  112, or 122)
Mon-Music Elective(s)
Music Education
Electives
Fourth Year
'Music tlective(s)
(^62!       Music Performance
taroe Ensemole
JMusic 121
Instrumental Class (Musi
1C2, 112,  or 122!
Non-Music Elective is)
Music Eoucation
Electives
2
2
2
12
Uny aoprooriate history, theory, or comoosition course may be elected.    A maxim;-;
of 2 creoits of small ensemole and 2 credits of secondary performance may be
jlected.
'The music elective(s) in fourth year must be in history, theory, or composition.
JStudents are required to take Music 121 (Class Voice) if they have had no
previous vocal  instruction. Vocal  concentrators will   take an appropriate level  of
some secondary instrument. Vocal secondaries win take the appropriate level of
voice secondary. 9974.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY  OF  ARTS
Music
Changes  in B.Mus.  Major programs     (continued)
MAJOR IN GENERAL STUDIES: SECONDARY EDUCATION STREAM
All years:!!) Large ensemble: for instrumental concentrators, one of these, in the
four years, must be a choir, and the remaining three will be orchestra or wind
syttphony, as aoprooriate.
(2) Non-Music Electives: students should consult the Faculty of Education for
distribution requirements.
First year: Students must also take Music Education 106, 2 credits.
.Second year: Students must also take Music 122 (Class Woodwinds), 2 credits.
Third Year
(300)
Theory of Music V
3
(432
(301)
Theory of Music VI
3
(211 or
Conducting
4
312)
(112)
Class Brass 4
Percussion
2
(209)
Instrumentation
2
(382)
Music Performance
(Concentration)
4
(401
(271)
Music Performance
(3C2
(Seconcary)
2
(303
Large E.nsemDle
J
,Small  Ensemole
2
^■Music    Electives
4
Non-Music Elective(s)
(see aoove)
6
JO
Fourth Year
Music Performance
(Concentration)
^Music Performance
(Secondary)
Large Ensemble
Music Elective
Non-Music Elective(s)
(see above)
Music Education
Music Education
Music Education
2
4
4
31
* Two credits of tne Music Elective may be in additional  small ensemble work.
?
usic 102 (Class Strings) is recommended as an elective for string players.
Voice concentrators take an appropriate level of their secondary instrument;
those with previous secondary voice instruction, take an aoprooriate level of
voice or of the secondary instrument begun in the third year; those without
previous voice instruction, take Music 131 (Class Voice).
•^Students with some background in strings are strongly encouraged to take Music
102 (Class Strings). Otherwise, any course of the correct credit value, apart fr;
private performance instruction, may be selected. 9975.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes  in B.Mus.  Major programs     (continued)
MAJOR  IN MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE
(100)
(101)
(105)
(120)
(121)
(182)
(100)
First Year
Theory of Music I
2
(200)
Theory of Music II
2
(201)
Aural Skills I
2
(205)
History of Music I
3
(220)
History of Music II
j
(221)
*Music Performance
4
(282)
^Larqe Ensemole
3
English
5
-French or German
0
Second Year
Theory of Music III .2
Theory of Music IV 2
Aural Skills II 2
History of Music III 3
History of Music IV 3
Music Performance 4
Large Ensemble 3
Literature Reouirement 6
French or German 6
IT
(20C)
(2C1)
(282)
Third Year
Theory cf Music V
Theory of Music VI
Music Performance
^Chameer Ensemole
5Music History
6History
Fourth Year
'Theory Electives 6
(482)        Music Performance 4
Qhamoer Ensemole 2
5Music History 12
8Non-Music Elective(s) 12
iMusic Performance: Stuoent: must stucy in some field of performance, which must
include piano unless the st-aent can demonstrate proficiency commensurate with
reouirements of Music 2«1 (Class Piano II) to we satisfaction of the keyboard
division. (For details of reouirements of Music 2*1, address inquiry to the
faculty coorainator, keyboarc performance division.) Performance fields include
voice, piano, orchestral  instruments, and some historical  instruments such as
harpsicnoro, lute, viola da gamoa, early flutes, recorder, and other instruments
as instruction is available.
2Large Ensemole: Students will enrol in Music 150 (Orchestra), 152 (Wind
Ensemoles), 153 (University Singers), or 154 (University Choral Union), depending
ypon the student's major performance field.
■^Languages other tnan English:  If one of these languages was studied in secondary
school, it is recommended that the other be taken at the University.
^Chamoer Ensemole: To be elected depending upon the student's performing field.
|Music History: to include Music 350, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357.
"History: While there is no limit to the amount of political and social history
the musicologist should know, the student is advised to take at least one general
history course after consultation with the School  of Music.
7Theory Electives: Students will choose two courses from Music 410-415; in
exceotional circumstances Music 402, Special Projects, may be substituted for one
of both of these.
°A course in the history of fine arts is strongly recommended.
'If Music 102, 282, 3G2, or 482 are chosen, the student is expected to meet jury
requirements. 9976.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Music
Changes in B.Mus. Major programs (continued)
Major in Music Theory
(100)
(101)
(105)
(120)
(121)
(182)
(141)
(100)
First Year
Second .Year
Theory  of Husic  I
2
(200)
Theory of Music III
2
Theory of Music II
2
(201)
Theory of Music IV
2
Aural  Skills I
2
(205)
Aural  Skills II
2
History of Music  I
3
(220)
History of Music III
3
History of Music  II
(221)
History of Music IV
3
^Music Performance
4
(282)
^Music Performance
4
'Class Piano
2
(241)
Class Piano
2
Large Ensemole
3
Large Ensemble
2
English
6
Literature Requirement
3Non-Music Elective(s)
6
JMon-Music Elective(s)
6
6
TT
Third Year
(300)
Theory of Music V
3
(301)
Theory of Music VI
3
(309)
(107)
Composition I
0
(482)
(382)
AMusic Performance
4
Large or Small
2
Ensemole
tKeyooarc Harmony
2
^Non-Music Elective{s)
12
Fourth Year
^Theory Electives
Orcnestration
^Music Performance
Large or Small
Ensemble
-Music Elective(s)
^Theory Project
3Non-Music Elective(s)
or
or
6
4
e.
it
^The music performance reouirements will be fulfilled by four years of study on
the student's principal instrument.
'Class Plane 141 and 24i will be required of students whose principal instrument
is not a keyboard instrument. The purpose is to preoare students for the study
of keyboard harmony in the tnird year. Students with some keyboard background may
be allowed to take Piano 171 and 271 instead. Students whose principal instrument
is a keyboard instrument will not study a secondary instrument except as an extra
course.
3The program provides for 30 credits of non-Music electives, or 27 credits of
non-Music electives and Physics 341. Physics 341 must be taken if offered.
Students must have at least 12 credits in one department other than Music.  If
English courses are elected to complete this 12 credit concentration requirement,
they must be in addition to English 100 and the literature requirement.  In
addition to these elective requirements, it will be advisable for students.
contemplating graduate study in theory to study some German.
^Students with the required keyboard proficiency may meet the keyboard harmony
requirment of the third year by taking Music 149. Other students should take Musi:
343 or its equivalent as provided by the School.
5Fourth-year students have the option of choosing 6 credits of music electives ar
doing a one-term (3 credit) 402 project, or of choosing ony 3 credits of music
electives and doing a two-term project (as Music 449, for 3 credits). Appropriate
scope for the project will be the determining factor here, and will be decided b><
the student and the adviser 1n consultation,
"students will choose two courses from Music 410-415.
'If Music 182, 282, 382, or 482 are chosen, the student is expected to meet jury
requirements. 9977.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
Social Work
Change to program statement:
Under Admissions change to read:
1. Admission to the BSW program is open to persons with a B.A. or
equivalent degree and to persons with a minimum of two years of the
Bachelors of Arts program at The University of B.C., or its
equivalent at another university or community college.
2. Applicants to this program will be required:
(a) to have achieved at least a 65% average in course work during
the academic year (or equivalent) preceding application for
admission;
(b) to have completed a 3 credit course in statistics;
(c) to have completed at least 6 credits of course work dealing
with contemporary social issues and 6 credits of course work
dealing with the dynamics of human behaviour, individual or
collective. A list of qualifying courses may be obtained
from the School;
(d) to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the School, personal
potential and suitability for a career in social work.
3. The deadline for application for admission to the B.S.W. program is
February 28. Application forms must be obtained from the School.
4. For students considering application to the program, the School's
faculty provides a consultant and advisory service.
5. Given resource limitations, the School may not be able to accept
all applicants who meet the foregoing admission requirements.
6. The B.S.W. program comprises 60 credits for students who enter with
a Bachelor's degree and 66 credits for those entering the program
without a Bachelor's degree or equivalent.
Pattern of Courses in the B.S.W. Program
Year 1 Credits
SOWK 300  Canadian Social Policy I 6
SOWK 305  Social Work Practice I 6
SOWK 315  Practicum I 6
SOWK 320  Introduction to Social Work Research 3
SOWK 335  Fundamentals of Social Analysis for
Social Work 3
SOWK 336  Theoretical Foundations of Social Work I 3
SOWK 337  Theoretical Foundations of Social Work II 3
Arts - Elective courses in the Faculty of Arts (6)
(required of students admitted without a Bachelor's
degree)* 30 (or 36) APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Social Work  (continued)
Change to program statement:
Pattern of Courses in the B.S.W. Program  (continued)
Year 1
SOWK 400
SOWK 405
SOWK 415
SOWK 420
SOWK 4 30/
or
Electives
SOWK 435
SOWK 440
9978.
January 16, 1991
Canadian Social Policy II
Social Work Practice II
Practicum II
Social Work Research
Special Studies in Social Work and/or
courses offered in the Faculty of Arts
preferably in the social sciences and
humanities **
Behavioural and Social Issues in Social Work
Practice
Integrative Seminars in Social Work
Credits
3
6
6
3
30
* These elective courses are required for students who enter the
program without a B.A. or equivalent degree. Such courses must be
numbered 300 or above. They may be taken either during a summer
session or during the regular fall and winter sessions. Details on
qualifying electives are available on request from the School of
Social Work.
**  Details on qualifying courses available.
Changes   SOWK 300, 305, 400, 405 - change in title, description
SOWK 320 - split into two courses:
SOWK 320 (3)  Introduction to Social Work Research
SOWK 420 (3)  Applied Social Work Research
SOWK 336 - change in title, description, prerequisite
New SOWK 335 (3)
SOWK 337 (3)
SOWK 435 (3)
SOWK 440 (3)
Deletions SOWK 335, 410
Fundamentals of Social Analysis for Social Work
Theoretical Foundations of Social Work II
Behavioural and Social Issues in Social Work
Practice
Integrative Seminars in Social Work
Change in grading system:
SOWK 315, 415 - change from numeric percentage to pass/fail. 9979.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals (continued)
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Social and Educational Studies
Change Curriculum and Instructional Studies 361 to:
Social Studies Education 361  (3 credits)  Introduction to
Curriculum and Instruction in Law-related Education
Change   EDUC 440 now (3/9 credits)d
Early Childhood Education
Change     Early Childhood Education  405,  415  - change  title  and
description
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Administrative, Adult and Higher Education
New     AAHE 508 (3-12)c  Review of Research in Educational Methods
AAHE 565 (3/6)d   Special Course in Subject-matter Field
AAHE 601 (6/12)d  Doctoral Seminar
Deletion  EADM 601
Agricultural Economics
New      AGEC 520 (3)   Land and Forest Resource Economics
Anthropology
New     ANTH 506 (3/6)d   Current Research in Anthropology
ANTH 513 (3-6)d   Advanced Studies in Feminist Anthropology
ANTH 548 (0)      Major Essay
Audiology and Speech Sciences
New      AUDI 595 (0) M.Sc. Major Essay
Chemical Engineering
New     CHML 506 (3)   Industrial Process Engineering
Civil Engineering
New      CIVL 502 (2) Structural Stability
CIVL 504 (2) Seismicity and Seismic Design Parameters
CIVL 505 (2) Earthquake Resistant Structures I
CIVL 506 (2) Earthquake Resistant Structures II
CIVL 579 (2) Geosynthetics
CIVL 596 (6) project in civil Engineering 9980.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Civil Engineering  (continued)
Changes
CIVL
CIVL
CIVL
CIVL
572 •
CIVL
CIVL
CIVL
CIVL
CIVL
CIVL
Deletions CIVL
507, 533 - change in description
508, 577 - change in description, prerequisite
509 - change in title, description, prerequisite, credits
to: (3)
510, 511, 513, 514, 516, 517, 518, 529, 531, 535, 566,
- change in title, description
537, 538 - change in description credits to: (3)
540, 546 - change in title, description, credits to: (3)
541 - change in title, description, prerequisite, credits
to: (3)
551 - change in title, description, prerequisite
547 - delete prerequisite
567 - change in title
500, 501, 519, 532, 542, 543, 545, 549
New Program
Professional Partnership Program
Students may complete all or part of the work for their graduate degrees
in a joint industry-university partnership program. Students spend part
of their time working for industry or government and the rest at
university, with joint supervision from faculty members and industry
representatives. M.Eng. students are required to take the project
course CIVL 596, but all other requirements for the degrees remain as
outlined above.  Details may be obtained from the Department office.
Commerce and Business Administration
New
COMM
547
(0)
COMM
550
(3)
COMM
560
(3)
COMM
561
(3)
COMM
644
(3)
COMM
643
(3)
MBA Major Essay
Seminar in Financial Statement Analysis
Internship in Arts Administration
Law and the Arts
Advanced Topics in Transportation
Workshop in Transportation and Utilities
Changes  COMM 544, 545 - change in title
Computer Science
New
CPSC 513 (3)
CPSC 516 (3)
Integrated Systems Design
Computational Geometry
Changes  CPSC 512 - change in title, description
Education
New      XXXX 590 (0 credits) Major Paper" in the following
departments/divisions:
ADED, ARTE, BUED, CSED, CNPS, EADM, EDED, EDCI, EDST, EDUC,
ENED, EPSE, HIED, HMED, INED, LIBE, MAED, MLED, MUED, READ,
SCED, SSED. 9981.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (continued)
Educational Psychology and Special Education
Changes  EPSE 501, 515, 568, 584 - change   in   title,   description,
prerequisite
EPSE 535 - split into two courses:
EPSE 534 (3) Assessment and Interpretive Processes in
School Psychology: Academic Assessment
EPSE 535 (3) Assessment and Interpretive Processes in
School Psychology: Social and Emotional
Assessment
EPSE 502, 509, 585 - change in title, description
EPSE 604 - change in description
EPSE 510 - editorial changes
EPSE 601 - change in credits to: (6)
English
Major Essay
New
ENGL
548
(0)
Changes
ENGL
549
- c
Forestry
New
FRST
520
(3)
FRST
581
(3)
FRST
548
(0)
French
New
FREN
548
(0)
Geography
Land and Forest Rsesource Economics
Forest Products Marketing/Management
Major Essay
Major Essay
New      GEOG 548 (0)      Major Essay
Geophysics and Astronomy
New     GEOP 526 (3)   Theory of the Earth
Germanic Studies
New      GERM 548 (0)      Major Essay
Change   GERM 547 - change in number (formerly 548) 9982.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (continued)
Health Care and Epidemiology
Change of Program title and description:
M.H.A. (Master of Health Administration)
An M.H.A. program is offered that is specifically designed to provide
the educational basis for individuals desiring to pursue careers in
Health  Services  Administration  (policy,  planning  and  management).
Program requirements can be completed in two years of  full-time
attendance.  The program requires 57 credits of study with elective
course work available within the Department as well as in other
Departments and faculties.
The program is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for
Health Services Administration.
Application deadline is April 30.  A detailed brochure is available on
application to the Department.
New      HCEP 505 (3) Financial Management in Health Care
HCEP 523 (3) Operations Research in Health Care
HCEP 541 (0) Health Management Forum
HCEP 599 (0) Major Essay
Changes  HCEP 540 - change in credits to: (0)
HCEP 545 - change in credits to: (3)
Hispanic and Italian Studies
New ITAL 548 (0) Major Essay
RMST 548 (0) Major Essay
SPAN 548 (0)      Major Essay
Language Education
Change in Program Title from "Library Education" to:
Teacher Librarianship
Change   LIBE 527 - change in title, description, credits (to: 3/6)d
Library, Archival and Information Studies
Change Calendar statement to read:
Language Requirement
Where the native language of the applicant is not English, demonstrated
facility in both the oral comprehension and the writing of English is a
prerequisite for admission.  Students will be required to complete a
satisfactory TOEFL or Michigan test before any offer of admission can be
made.
A knowledge of languages in addition to English is of the greatest
benefit in the work of the information professional, which sometimes
requires the interpretation of documents and bibliographic data in many
languages.   Therefore  the  study  of  foreign  languages  at  the
undergraduate level is strongly recommended. 9983.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Library, Archival and Information Studies  (continued)
Change in degree requirements:
Under Requirements for the Degree (1.) change the paragraph under the
course list beginning "All elective courses ..." to read:
All elective courses ... balanced program.  Courses other than those
designated as LIBR at this University may be applied to the M.L.S.
program,  whether taken at this or another institution; they may,
however, total no more than six credits of the required sixty.
Change the first paragraph of (2.) starting half way down to read:
...Other courses may be credited as stated under (1) above; they may,
however, total no more than three credits of the required thirty.
Permission to apply ...
Changes  LIBR 604 - change in credits to (3)
New      LIBR 698 (0)   Major Essay
Linguistics
New      LING 514 (3)   Advanced Research Seminar in Phonology
LING 524 (3)   Advanced Research Seminar in Syntax
LING 548 (0)   Major Essay
Changes  LING 530 - change in credits (to: 3-12)d
LING 525 - change in credits (to: 3/6)d
Mathematics
Deletions MATH 500 to 518
520 to 522
525 to 527
529 to 541
556
Change   MATH 547 - change in number (formerly 524)
New
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
500
501
502
503
504
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(9)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Mathematical Logic
Algebra I
Algebra II
Algebraic Structures I
Algebraic Structures II
Measure Theory and Integration
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
Complex Analysis I
Complex Analysis II
Functional Analysis
Operator Theory and Applications
MATH
MATH
Quantum Theory
Statistical Mechanics 9984.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Mathematics (continued)
New
MATH
514 (
515 (
516 (
517 (
518 (
519 (
3)
3)
3)
3)
3)
3)
Ordinary Differential Equations I
MATH
Ordinary Differential Equations II
MATH
Partial Differential Equations I
MATH
Partial Differential Equations II
MATH
Nonlinear Differential Equations
MATH
Fluid Mechanics I
MATH
520 (
3)
Fluid Mechanics II
MATH
521 I
3)
Numerical Analysis I
MATH
522 <
3)
Numerical Analysis II
MATH
525
3)
Differential Geometry I
MATH
526 (
3)
Differential Geometry II
MATH
527 (
3)
Algebraic Topology I
MATH
528 (
3)
Algebraic Topology II
MATH
529 (
3)
Differential Topology
MATH
530
3)
Geometric Topology I
MATH
531
3)
Geometric Topology II
MATH
532 <
3)
Algebraic Geometry I
MATH
533
3)
Algebraic Geometry II
MATH
534 <
3)
Lie Theory I
MATH
535
3)
Lie Theory II
MATH
537 1
3)
Algebraic Number Theory I
MATH
538
3)
Algebraic Number Theory II
MATH
539 I
3)
Analytic Number Theory I
MATH
540
3)
Analytic Number Theory II
MATH
541
3)
Harmonic Analysis I
MATH
542
3)
Harmonic Analysis II
MATH
544
3)
Probability I
MATH
545
3)
Probability II
MATH
550
3)
Methods of Asymptotic Analysis
MATH
551
552
553
3)
3)
3)
Perturbation Methods for Differential Equations
MATH
Introduction to Dynamical Systems
MATH
Advanced Dynamical Systems
MATH
554
557
3)
[3)
Symmetries and differential Equations
MATH
Linear and Nonlinear Waves
MATH
560
[3)
Mathematical Biology I
MATH
561
(3)
Mathematical Biology II
MATH
562
589
[3)
(0)
Introduction to Mathematical Neurobiology
MATH
M.Sc. Major Essay
MATH
591
600
[2)
[2-6)c
Graduate Seminar in Applied Mathematics
MATH
Topics in Algebra
MATH
601
(2-6)c
Topics in Analysis
MATH
602
(2-6)c
Topics in Geometry
MATH
603
(2-6)c
Topics in Topology
MATH
604
(2-6)c
Topics in Optimization
MATH
605
(2-6)c
Topics in Applied Mathematics
MATH
606
607
(2-6)c
(2-6)c
Topics in Differential Equations
MATH
Topics in Numerical Analysis
MATH
608
[2-6)c
Topics in Probability APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Mathematics  (continued)
9985.
January 16, 1991
MATH 609 (2-6)c Topics in Mathematical Physics
MATH 610 (2-6)c Topics in Pure Mathematics
MATH 611 (2-6)c Topics in Functional Analysis
MATH 612 (2-6)c Topics in Mathematical Biology
MATH 620 (2-6)c Directed Studies in Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
New      MECH 505 (3)
MECH 549 (0)
MECH 587 (3)
MECH 588 (3)
Industrial Acoustics and Vibrations
Major Essay
Fracture Control for Design
Fatigue
Changes  MECH 561, - change in title, description, credits to: (3)
Deletions MECH 581, 582, 583, 584
Change in Program
Bio-Medical Program
Add to Calendar statement (addition underlined)
"Students may carry out research ... the Department
Engineering or the Department of Physics."
of Mechanical
Metals and Materials Engineering
Changes  MMAT 556 - change in credits to: (2), add prerequisite
MMAT 577 - add prerequisite
Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
New
MMPE 565 (2)
MMPE 566 (3)
MMPE 578 (3)
MMPE 597 (6)
Rock Fragmentation
Advanced Coal Preparation
Industrial Expert Systems
Engineering Project
Changes  MMPE 577 - change in credits to:
Change in Calendar statements:
(3)
M.A.Sc. - change to read:
This program combines research and course work and requires a total of
30 credits. A research thesis is assigned between 6 to 12 credits by
the Head of Department in consultation with the Research Supervisor.
M.Eng.  (part-time or full-time)
This program is a course work Masters program intended for engineers who
wish to upgrade their skills or develop new expertise in a particular
specialized subject area. A total of 30 credits of course work are
required, 24 of which must be 500 level graduate courses. An
engineering report must be submitted as part of an oral examination to
complete the degree. 9986.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
M.Eng.  (part-time or full-time)  (continued)
Mining
. Mining Methods and Design
. Rock Mechanics
. Mineral Economics
Mineral Processing
. Coal Preparation
. Simulation and Control
. Environmental Protection/
Occupational Health
Each of these programs of study consists of 18 credits of core subjects
at the graduate level, 6 credits minimum of optional graduate level
courses and 6 credits maximum of undergraduate level (300 or 400 series)
courses. Details of course selection strategies can be obtained from
the Head of Department or the Graduate School Coordinator. Course
substitution to these approved programs can be arranged with the
approval of the Head of Department.
For students conducting their studies on a part-time basis while
maintaining employment with a company, MMPE 597 Engineering Project (6
credits) is intended to be used to conduct a field study in close
collaboration with an academic advisor.
Ph.D. - no change
Nursing
New      NURS 595 (0)   M.S.N. Major Essay
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Change of Program Title and Description to:
OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY - Ph.D. and M.Sc. Degrees
(Reproductive and Developmental Sciences)
The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology offers M.Sc. and Ph.D.
programs in: (1) Reproductive Science; (2) Perinatal and/or
Developmental Biology. The areas of research include: reproductive and
placental endocrinology, cellular and molecular biology, immunology of
reproduction, fertilization and embryonic development, perinatal
metabolism fetal and neonatal physiology. Prerequisites: BIOC 300;
PHYL 301 or ZOOL 303 or ANSC 320.
Pathology
New
Changes
PATH 547 (3)
Techniques
in
Molecular
Biology
and
Experimental Pathology
PATH 500 - change in credits to: (2-8)d
PATH 548 - change in credits to: (l-12)c 9987.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (continued)
Pharmaceutical Sciences
New     PHAR 514 (6)   Advanced Drug Delivery Systems
PHAR 551 (6)   Pharmacy in Canada
PHAR 552 (6)   Issues in Pharmacy Administration
Physical Education and Recreation
New      PHED 590 (3)   Seminar in Research on Teaching in Physical
Education
PHED 595 (0)   Master's Major Essay
Plant Science
Change   PLNT 511 - change in title, description
Deletions PLNT 500, 505, 512, 514, 521, 526, 527
Religious Studies
New     RELG 548 (0)   Major Essay
Science
New     XXXX 589 (0) M.Sc. Major Essay in the following departments:
Computer Science, Geological Sciences, Oceanography
Social Work
New     SOWK 546 (3/6)d Methods for Popular Sector Organizing
SOWK 548 (0)   Major Essay
Changes  SOWK 551, 552 - change in credits to: (3/6)d
Change in Calendar Statement:
SOCIAL WORK - MSW Degree - change to:
SOCIAL WORK - MSW Degree and Interdisciplinary Studies Ph.D. and
add the following:
The School offers advanced clinical and social development studies in
social work. The program involves a minimum of 30 credits of study of
which 6 credits are required in each of the following areas: (1)
theoretical foundations of social policy analysis, (2) research, (3)
practice, and (4) thesis or directed field studies.
The School also participates in a doctoral program of individual
interdisciplinary studies which is offered by the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. The Faculty encourages applicants to spend at least one term
as a graduate student in the School before applying. Acceptance is
contingent upon excellent academic performance and the development of an
interdisciplinary research proposal acceptable to the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. 9988.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (continued)
Theatre and Film
Calendar statement:
FILM - M.A. and M.F.A. Degrees
(list Faculty)
The Department of Theatre and Film offers opportunities for advanced
studies leading to the M.A. degree in history/theory/criticism and the
M.F.A. degree in production. Each is a two year course of studies and
requires, as a prerequisite, an undergraduate degree in film/television
or the equivalent. Further information about graduate programs can be
obtained from the Department's Handbook.
M.Sc. Program in Occupational Hygiene
Calendar Statement
An interdisciplinary program is offered leading to the degree of M.Sc.
Students may follow either of two options: (1) 36 credits of courses and
a 6-credit project, requiring a minimum of 16 months of full-time study
or an equivalent amount of effort on a part-time basis; (2) 30 credits
of courses and a 12-credit thesis, generally requiring 20-24 months of
full-time equivalent work. The program focusses on such areas as hazard
identification, analysis and control; toxicology; epidemiology;
industrial process analysis; ergonomics; worker safety, etc. Graduates
are expected to practise as occupational hygienists in the government,
para-government and industrial sectors. To be admissible, students
should have completed a bachelor's degree in such areas as physical or
health sciences, engineering or related fields. Before commencing the
program, students should have completed university-level courses or have
equivalent background in calculus, physics, organic chemistry, biology
and statistics. Prospective students should consult with a Faculty
Representative regarding other recommended prerequisites. Provision may
be made for some students to take prerequisite courses as co-requisites
in conjunction with the program, extending the courses over a full
two-year period.
New Courses
OCCH 501 (3) Introduction to Occupational Hygiene and Safety
OCCH 502 (3)
OCCH 503 (3)
OCCH 504 (3)
OCCH 595 (0)   	
OCCH 598 (6) Project
OCCH 599 (12) M.Sc. Thesis
OCCH 505 (3) Ergonomics and Safety
CHML 506 (3) Industrial Process Engineering
MECH 505 (3) Industrial Acoustics and Vibrations
OCCH 4 01 (3) Introduction to Occupational Hygiene and Safety
Chemical and Biological Hazard
Measurement
Chemical and Biological Hazard
Control
Advanced Hygiene Practice
Occupational Health and Safety
Seminar 9989.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Pathology
Transfer of the following course listings from Pathology to Medical
Microbiology:
MMIB 417, 427, 437, 447, 457, 720, 721, 722, 723, 724, 726
Change
New
PATH 230, 300 - merge into one course:
PATH 300 (6)   Background to Medical Laboratory Science
MMIB 327 (6)
Bacteriology, Mycology, Virology and
Parasitology
FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Program changes:
First
Year
CHEM 2 30
3.0
MICB 200
3.0
PHAR 100
2.0
OHAR 211
4.0
ENGL 301
1.5
Elective*
3.0
16.5
♦Recommended electives could include Economics 100, Psychology 100,
Commerce courses, Languages, Humanities, Philosophy 407, 414, 437,
Science courses.
Second Year
ANAT 390
2.0
BIOC 300
3.0
PHAR 200
2.0
PHAR 311
2.0
PHAR 3 35
2.0
PHYL 301
3.0
PHYL 302
1.5
Elective
1.5
17.0
Calendar revision:
Graduate Studies)
Requirements for Registration (p.220, col.l, under
Registration with the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia:
(a) Student Registration
It is required that students register with the College of
Pharmacists of British Columbia during their first year in the
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. This registration will be
completed during the first week of the Fall Term. Proof of such
registration will be a requirement for admission to the
Professional Practice Laboratory. 9990.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES  (continued)
New       PHAR 100 (2) Professional Practice I
PHAR 211 (4) Drug Delivery Systems I
PHAR 200 (2) Professional Practice II
PHAR 311 (2) Drug Delivery Systems II
Deletions  PHAR 110, 210
Changes    PHAR 310 - change in title and prerequisites
PHAR 325, 402, 403, 452, 469 - change in prerequisites
PHAR 435 - change in description and time of offering
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION
Changes in Programs
Motor Performance and Control
Add "(PHED)" to Program Elective in Year 3
Delete "Elec^" ^n "Arts/Science Elec^" in Years 2 and 4
Delete NOTE #1, and change NOTE 2 to "NOTE 1"
Change 2 to "1" after "Program Electives (PHED)" in Year 4
Instruction and Coaching
Change NOTE 2 to read:   "A second concentration in a teaching area is
also required by the Faculty of Education."
Change NOTES 3 and 4 to NOTES 4 and 5
Add new NOTE 3:   "Commerce  courses  are  only  available  to  those
students selecting a second concentration in Business
Education in the Faculty of Education."
Leisure and Sport Administration
Delete the word "Commerce" from the statement Arts/Science/Commerce in
Years 3 and 4 and NOTE 1
General Studies in Physical Education
Delete the word "Commerce" in Years 2,3 and 4.
Course change  PHED 355 - change in description, prerequisite
Changes in Calendar statements
Course of Studies
First paragraph, last sentence to read:
"Program approval is required for all students (first year students
and second and third year transfer students) enrolling in the
School of Physical Education and Recreation for the first time.
First paragraph, add the following sentence:
"It is highly recommended that students seek assistance from the
Advising Office of the School before selecting Program Electives
(PHED) and Arts/Science courses." 9991.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION  (continued)
Change NOTE 2, to read:
A total of 48 to 66 credits of Arts, Science and/or Commerce
courses is required, including 12 credits of English. A minimum of
12 credits of 300- or 400-level courses must be taken within one
general area of Arts, Science, or Commerce. Courses in other
Faculties may be credited toward the B.P.E. degree only with prior
written approval of the Senior Faculty Adviser of the School."
NOTES 3, 4 and 5 become NOTES 5, 6 and 7 respectively
New NOTE 3:   "The following terms apply to all programs of study:
PHED Elective - a course of the student's choice from
all 300- and 400-level PHED courses.
Program Required (PHED - courses selected from a list
of specific PHED courses designated by a program of study.
Program Elective (PHED) - PHED courses that normally
complement a program of study and are usually chosen in
consultation with the Advising Office of the School.
New NOTE 4: PHED 355 (Pield Experience). Prerequisites for each
PHED 355 section are listed in the Program and Advising
Information Booklet. Each program of study requiring
PHED 355 has a specific section requirement. Students
must taken the section relevant to their program of
study.  Prerequisites may not be taken concurrently.
Revised Calendar Statement:
THE SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION
Admission Requirements
no change
Application Deadline
no change
B.P.E. Degree Program
no change
General Requirements for the Degree of B.P.E.
Students  in all years are normally subject to General Academic
Regulations in addition to others identified by the School.
English Composition Requirement
no change
Performance Requirement
no change 9992.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION  (continued)
Part-time Study
Currently it is extremely difficult to complete a B.P.E. on a part time
basis as there are only a minimum number of courses offered in the
evenings and during the Summer session. Part-time students should
discuss their proposed programs with an adviser. Course prerequisites
apply to part-time as well as to full-time students.
Transfer Students
Students who are accepted by transfer from other institutions must
normally complete all remaining courses toward their B.P.E. degree at
UBC. The University will not grant a degree for studies that represent
less than the equivalent of two regular winter sessions (66 credits). A
maximum of 66 credits of transfer credit will normally be granted. It
is recommended that transfer students seek advising prior to
registration.
1) In general, transfer credit is limited to the initial two years of a
degree program. Credit at a more senior level is possible if prior
written permission has been granted by the Senior Faculty Adviser of the
School.
2) A student wishing to take courses at another institution and
transfer the credit toward a B.P.E. degree must first obtain written
permission from the Advising Office of the School. It is the student's
responsibility to see that an official transcript is forwarded to the
Admissions Office of the Registrar.
Registration and Program Approval
Students are reminded of the University rule regarding program
responsibility. Students are responsible for the completeness and
accuracy of registration as it is related to the regulations of the
program of study in which they are enrolled.
Revised Calendar Statement:
The following is a summary of the registration procedures for Physical
Education and Recreation students. Complete information may be obtained
from the Program Planning and Advising Information Booklet.
1) First year and transfer students are required to choose a program of
study and obtain program approval before registering through TELEREG.
If prior approval is not possible, students may seek program approval
immediately after registering.
2) Students should be careful to choose elective credits appropriate to
their selected programs of study.
3) Students are encouraged to make all course changes through TELEREG
whenever possible. In order to gain admission into a "full" physical
education course while TELEREG is open, a student may complete a
force/add form available in the Advising Office. 9993.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION  (continued)
4) Except in special circumstances, a one-term course may be added or
dropped from a student's program within the first two weeks after the
beginning of the course and a two-term course within the first three
weeks; no record of the dropped course will appear on the student's
transcript. A student may also withdraw from the one-term course up to
the end of the sixth week and from a two-term course up to the end of
the twelfth week. The withdrawal will be recorded on the transcript by
a standing of "W" and will not be included in computing averages.
Prerequisites
It is generally considered that 100-level Physical Education courses are
prerequisites to 200-level courses and that 200-level courses are
prerequisites to 300- and 400-level courses. However, 300- and
400-level courses may be taken in any sequence unless otherwise
specified in the course descriptions in the UBC Calendar. Students who
do not have proper prerequisites for a course can have their
registration cancelled automatically.
Electives
Electives are selected to complement the chosen program of study as well
as to broaden the student's general education. Many upper (300/400)
level courses require lower (100/200) level prerequisites therefore all
electives should be selected carefully. All non-PHED electives in the
third and fourth year must be at the 300-level or higher (see NOTE 3 -
Course of Studies).
Overloading
A student must apply in writing to the Senior Faculty Adviser of the
School for permission to register in more than 36 credits of work in a
Winter Session.
Graduation Standing
In the B.P.E. program, the categories of degree are: class 1 (80-100%),
class 2 (65-79%), and pass (50-64%), calculated on the required work of
the third and fourth years.
Supplemental Examinations
SUPPLEMENTALS are not a right but a PRIVILEGE granted by the Director
after consideration of a student's complete academic standing. A
student who has written final examinations but failed a course or
courses in the Winter, or Summer sessions or correspondence courses, may
be granted permission to write supplementals in courses for which
supplemental examinations are provided. In courses in the School of
Physical Education and Recreation, supplemental examinations will
usually be available only if regularly scheduled examinations (December
and/or April) account for 40% or more of the final grade in the course.
Supplemental examinations for Winter Session are given in late July or
early August.  Students who fail a final examination in December cannot 9994.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION  (continued)
take a supplemental examination prior to this period because this
privilege is based on the student's complete academic standing, which is
determined after final examinations in April.
Eligibility
1) In the Winter session, normally the student must have:
a) passed required laboratory work
b) written the final examination and obtained at least 40%
standing in the course in which the supplemental is granted,
and
c) obtained a 60% average in the number of credits of course work
required for satisfactory standing in the same academic
session.
d) may usually only write a supplemental examination if the
regularly scheduled examinations (December and/or April)
account for 40% or more of the final grade in the course.
2) In an extrasessional (Summer) or correspondence course, general
university regulations apply (see general information section of
this calendar).
3) In all but the final (graduating) year, a candidate who has been
granted a supplemental may write it only once. A student who fails
a supplemental examination must repeat the course or take a
permissible substitute. However, in the graduating year a
supplemental examination may be written twice with permission from
the Director.
4) Students who are unable to meet the requirements because of medical
or other approved reasons may, at the discretion of the School and
with the approval of the Senior Faculty Adviser, be granted
deferred examinations. Such privilege will be considered only if
the student submits a written application to the Director before
the end of the official examination period in question.
5) When deferred or supplemental examinations are granted, students
must complete requirements prior to attendance at the next regular
session. The School may require that additional work be undertaken
in the Summer Session.
Withdrawal
A student who withdraws from the University must seek permission from
the Senior Faculty Adviser of the School. With permission from the
School, the Registrar will then grant Honorable Dismissal and decide
whether or not there may be a refund of fees. The term Honorable
Dismissal does not refer to academic standing. It simply means that, at
the time of withdrawal, the student was in no disciplinary difficulty.
Probation
Probationary status will be assigned to a student:
a)  who is readmitted to the School after having been required to
withdraw
OR 9995.
January 16, 1991
APPENDIX
Course and curriculum proposals
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION  (continued)
b) who passes the Winter session, but fails in more than 6 credits of
work or fails to achieve an overall average of 55% on all courses
attempted.
The following regulations apply to probation students:
1) deficient program courses must be repeated during the year of
probation.
2) year status will be that of the majority of the credits being taken.
3) must have program approved by an adviser prior to registration.
4) students who do not pass the deficient courses within the
probationary academic year will have their academic records
reviewed and may be asked to withdraw as regular students from the
School until the course deficiencies are made up.
Unsatisfactory Standing
no change
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
English Composition Requirement - delete "Students who have not satisfied
the requirement at the time of admission to the program must do so within
one academic year of admission to the School of Rehabilitation Medicine."
New courses     RHME 441 (1 credit) A Manual Therapy Approach to the
Assessment   and   Treatment   of   Individuals   with
Musculoskeletal Dysfunctions of the Lumbar Spine and
Pelvis
RHME 442  (1 credit)  Spinal Cord Injury:  Issues of
Rehabilitation
RHME 443 (1 credit) Sports Physical Therapy
RHME 445 (1 credit) The Physical Therapy Management of
Children with Developmental Disabilities
Change RHME 408 - change in title and description
RHME 430 - change description and credits (now 6 credits)
RHME 206 - change title and description
Additions      Add RHME 441, 442, 443, 445 as options for a fourth year
elective
Division of Occupational Therapy
Program change: Second Year - SOCI 214 replaces SOCI 200, 210, 220
- Delete PHYL 301
Third Year - change elective from 6 credits to 3 credits
Fourth Year - Delete RHME 417
Division of Physical Therapy
Program change: Second Year - Delete PHYL 301
Fourth Year - Delete SOCI 200, 210, 220, and RHME 417

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