Open Collections

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] May 20, 1981

Item Metadata

Download

Media
senmin-1.0115728.pdf
Metadata
JSON: senmin-1.0115728.json
JSON-LD: senmin-1.0115728-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): senmin-1.0115728-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: senmin-1.0115728-rdf.json
Turtle: senmin-1.0115728-turtle.txt
N-Triples: senmin-1.0115728-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: senmin-1.0115728-source.json
Full Text
senmin-1.0115728-fulltext.txt
Citation
senmin-1.0115728.ris

Full Text

 7562.
Wednesday,  May 20,   1981.
The Ninth regular meeting of the Senate of The University of British Columbia for
the Session 1980-81 was held on Wednesday, May 20, 1981, at 8.00 p.m. in the Board and
Senate Room.
Present: President D. T. Kenny (Chairman), Chancellor J. V. Clyne, Dr. R. A.
Adams, Dr. C. E. Armerding, Acting Dean T. R. Bentley, Mrs. M. F. Bishop, Dr. T. H.
Brown, Mr. G. D. Burnyeat, Dr. K. O. L. Burridge, Dr. J. J. R. Campbell, Dr. J. Dahlie,
Dr. J. D. Dennison, Dr. D. Donaldson, Dr. A. J. Elder, Mr. D. B. Fields, Dean C. V.
Finnegan, Mr. C. Fulker, Dean J. A. F. Gardner, Dr. R. F. Gray, Dr. A. M. Hickling,
Mr. J. H. Holm, Dr. W. M. Keenlyside, Dr. R. F. Kelly, Dr. R. W. Kennedy, Dean W. D.
Kitts, Dr. A. Kozak, Dr. L. M. Lavkulich, Dr. D. S. Lirenman, Dean P. A. Lusztig,
Dean K. M. Lysyk, Mrs. A. Macdonald, Ms. C. E. McAndrew, Dr. A. J. McClean,
Dr. J. H. McNeill, Mr. J. F. McWilliams, Miss T. R. Murakami, Dr. J. F. Richards,
Dean B. E. Riedel, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. M. Shaw, Dr. J. G. Silver, Dr. C. E.
Slonecker, Mr. G. A. Smith, Dr. M. Smith, Dr. R. H. T. Smith, Dr. R. A. Spencer, Dr. R.
Stewart, Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs, Dr. P. Suedfeld, Mr. R. S. Szeliski, Dr. P. R. Tennant,
Miss C. L. V. Warren, Dean W. A. Webber, Dean L. M. Wedepohl, Mr. V. G. Wellbum,
Dean R. M. Will, Dr. D. LL. Williams, Dr. M. D. Willman, Dr. J. L. Wisenthal, and by
invitation Dr. V. C. Runeckles.
Observer:  Mr. J. A. Banham
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from Dean G. S.
Beagrie, Mr. W. H. Birmingham, Rev. P. C. Burns, Mrs. S. Dodson, Mr. B. A. Elliott,
Mr. H. J. Franklin, Dr. J. P. Martin, Dr. W. R. Morford, Miss R. E. Robinson, Dr. N.
Sutherland.
Minutes of the previous meeting
Dean Webber ) That the minutes of the Eighth regular meeting of
Mrs. Bishop     ) Senate   for   the   Session    1980-81,   having   been
circulated, be taken as read and adopted.
Carried 7563.
Wednesday,  May 20,   1981.
Senate membership
Declaration of vacancy
As required under Section 35 (6) of the University Act, the following vacancy on
Senate was declared:
Mr. J. J. Fitzpatrick - student representative of the Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences.
From the Board of Governors
Faculty recruitment and retention
Senate was informed that in response to the request from Senate that the Board of
Governors establish a joint Board/Senate committee to consider solution of the
difficulties in recruitment and retention of Faculty caused by the housing situation,
the Board of Governors had passed the following resolution:
"That the Board of Governors has designated the Property Committee of the
Board as the proper forum for discussion of housing problems; that the
Property Committee of the Board would welcome any suggestions or
comments which the Senate may wish to make concerning the housing
situation; and further, that the passing of this resolution does not preclude
liaison between the Property Committee of the Board and some designated
members of Senate."
Following a brief discussion it was agreed that Dean Webber and Dean Lusztig
would convey to the Board of Governors, through the Property Committee, the
academic concerns relating to the Faculty housing problem.
Establishment  of   Presidential   Advisory  Committee  for   the  recommendation  and
selection of candidates for the position of University Librarian
Senate was notified that the following resolution was passed by the Board of
Governors at its meeting of May I, 1981:
That, subject to approval by Senate, a President's Advisory Committee for
the recommendation and selection of candidates for the position of
University Librarian be established whose function and composition shall be
as follows:
Functions:
1. To consider candidates for the position of University Librarian
2. To advise the President on the choice of a University Librarian in order
that he may make an appropriate recommendation to the Board of
Governors. 7564.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
From the Board of Governors
Establishment  of  Presidential   Advisory  Committee  for  the  recommendation  and
selection of candidates for the position of University Librarian  (continued)
Membership of committee:
Chairman   -    President or his designate
Secretary   -    To be chosen by the committee from among its members
Members    -    Elected by professional librarian staff -2
* Elected by Senate (including at least one student)      - 3
Appointed by the President - 3
*ln accordance with past practice, the Nominating Committee of Senate will
nominate three members to be elected by Senate.
Dr. Shaw ) That Senate approve the proposed procedure for
Dean Webber  ) the recommendation and selection of a University
Librarian.
Carried
On behalf of Senate the Chairman offered congratulations to Mr. Basil
Stuart-Stubbs on his appointment as Director of the School of Librarianship.
The Chairman also paid tribute to Mr. Stuart-Stubbs, on his retirement as
University Librarian, stating that he had been a most impressive Librarian,
administrator and scholar.
In response Mr. Stuart-Stubbs expressed thanks and appreciation to past and
present members and Chairmen of the University Library Committee.
Financial problems and priorities within the University
Senate was informed that the following resolution had been passed by the Board of
Governors at its meeting of May I, 1981:
"That the Board invite the Senate Budget Committee, or another appropriate
committee of Senate, to discuss jointly with the Finance Committee of the
Board of Governors financial problems and priorities within the University so
that the Board might obtain the information and views of the Senate with
respect to these matters."
Dr. Shaw        ) That  the  President be  requested  to establish a
Dean Riedel  ) committee  to  discuss  jointly  with   the  Finance
Committee of the Board of Governors financial
problems and priorities within the University.
In seconding the motion, Dean Riedel emphasized that the committee use as its
framework the "The Mission of The University of British Columbia" statement which
has been approved in principle by the Senate.
The motion was put and carried. 7565.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Prizes, Scholarships and Bursaries
Mr. McWilliams  )     That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A') be
Miss Warren        )     accepted subject to the approval of the Board of
Governors and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried
Candidates for Degrees
In accordance with the procedure adopted at the November 14, 1979 meeting of
Senate, lists of candidates for degrees had been made available for inspection by Senate
members prior to the meeting.
Dean Riedel     )        That the candidates for degrees and diplomas as
Dean Gardner  ) approved by the Faculties be granted the degree
or diploma for which they were recommended, and
that the Registrar, in consultation with the Deans
and the Chairman of Senate make any necessary
adjustments.
Carried
Scholarships and Awards
The Chairman reported that Allen Dale Hunter was to receive the Governor-
General's Gold Medal, and that Alexander R. Jones would receive the University Medal
for Arts and Science. Congratulations were extended to the other winners of medals,
prizes and scholarships shown in the list circulated.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs
Dr. Runeckles presented the report. It was stated in the report that the Senate
Academic Building Needs Committee believed that it was inappropriate to
recommend a single, extensive listing of priorities. Such a listing, by virtue of its
extent, would have little significance for any but the first, select few, other than to
raise expectations. Instead, the committee chose to break down the major needs of
the moment, into categories which aggregate different types of need, and thereby
may suggest different financial solutions. The categories, which are not mutually
exclusive, are as follows:
A. Committed and reaffirmed projects requiring new construction, i.e. projects
which are currently approved as part of the University's Capital Building
Programme, or for which commitments have been made in relation to other
agencies.
B. Current acute space shortages requiring new construction, i.e. units in which an
academically crippling shortage of currently available space has been clearly
demonstrated. 7566.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs (continued)
C. Anticipated acute space shortages requiring new construction, i.e. units in which
there may currently be modest shortages but for which there is clear indication
that such shortages will become acute in the near future.
D. Current/anticipated shortages largely solvable by real location/renovation, i.e.
units in which shortages could largely be remedied by redistributions of existing
prime space, together with the necessary refurbishing.
E. Sub-standard building replacement, i.e. units whose needs are largely related to
the poor quality of existing buildings.
The following units were identified as those with the greatest need for academic
space within these five categories (within each category, units are listed
alphabetically by Faculty):
A. Committed and Reaffirmed Projects:
Agricultural Sciences;
Psychology (Arts);
Forestry;
Clinical Departments (Medicine);
Chemistry, Physics (Science).
B. Current Acute Shortages:
Chemical Engineering (Applied Science);
Studio resources building (Arts);
Dentistry;
Biochemistry, Physiology (Medicine/Science).
C. Anticipated Acute Shortages:
Civil, Mechanical, Electrical Engineering (Applied Science).
D. Real location/Renovation
Architecture (Applied Science) and Community & Regional Planning
(Graduate Studies);
Computer Science (Science).
E. Sub-standard building replacement:
Plant Science greenhouses (Agricultural Sciences);
Education;
Institute of Animal Resource Ecology (Graduate Studies);
Geophysics & Astronomy, Mathematics, Oceanography (Science).
Excluding Category I, the SABN Committee further recommends for immediate
forward planning: 7567.
Wednesday,  May 20,   1981.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs (continued)
That priority be given to the following:
1. Dentistry
2. Chemical Engineering
3. Biochemistry
4. Physiology
5. Geophysics & Astronomy
6. Studio Resources Building
It was further stated in the report that, at the present time, the Committee believed
that it would be inappropriate and potentially misleading to specify the actual areas
of new, additional or replacement space associated with these recommendations, but
it would shortly be in a position to do so, as the methodology and data retrieval
needed by the U.C.B.C. formula were refined over the course of the next few months.
The Committee was acutely aware that, in addition to those few academic units
identified above, there were many other units whose inadequate current space
holdings may be seriously impeding the effectiveness of teaching and research
programmes. To repeat the words of the 1977 SABN Committee's report: "this list
does not exhaust the needs for well-designed academic space at the University".
With regard to procedure, the present Committee followed a similar but abbreviated
version of that which led to the 1977 report, with the exceptions that, as far as
possible, U.C.B.C. formula data rather than Bareither-Schillinger formula data were
used as initial indicators, and interviews and site visits were conducted by subcommittees rather than the full Committee. The selection of units for placement in
the five categories was by consensus, and the final establishment of overall priorities
of the units in Categories B, C, D, and E was determined by ballot, using the
"Olympic formula", in which one highest and one lowest score were eliminated from
the totals.
In the light of its recommended priorities, the SABN Committee noted that,
its identification of Dentistry's high priority reflects a current acute
shortage of office and graduate teaching/research space in the Macdonald
Building;
its identification of Chemical Engineering's priority reflects the current
situation, and is independent of any proposals with regard to expansion of
the engineering programme at U.B.C. which would also involve other
engineering departments;
its inclusion of both Biochemistry and Physiology recognizes the continuing
space shortages in these departments, which are in part attributable to their
involvement in degree programmes in the Faculty of Science, and which are
unrelated to the current expansion of the medical school;
its inclusion of Geophysics and Astronomy is related to the serious structural
inadequacies of current space holdings with respect to the needs of the
department;
its inclusion of the Studio Resources Building recognizes the long-standing
joint needs of the Departments of Fine Arts, Music, and Theatre. 7568.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs  (continued)
The SABN Committee reaffirmed the acute space needs of those projects which had
already been approved as part of the current Capital Plan, including the commitment
to develop the Clinical Departments of the Faculty of Medicine in association with
affiliated hospitals.
The submission from the Faculty of Arts for an extension to the Museum of
Anthropology was referred back for reconsideration of the academic needs of the
Museum building.
Time did not permit the SABN Committee to develop its current recommendations in
as much detail as those presented in previous reports. Indeed, as had already been
noted, the concept of more-frequent review argued against the development of
extensive listings of priorities. However, in recognition of the need to try to make
provision for the fairly rapid changes in space shortages which would undoubtedly
occur in the future, the Committee recommended:
That the University immediately undertake an investigation of the
feasibility of constructing university resource space, of extreme flexibility
in design and function, to accommodate, on a short-term basis, academic
units which are experiencing acute shortages of space, and as a means of
accelerating the demolition of present substandard buildings.
In conclusion, it was stated that the Committee firmly believed that the U.C.B.C.
formula approach to space entitlement could be developed into a useful tool for
assisting in the review of academic space priorities. In order to aid the development
of the methodology, the Committee recommended:
"That the University place priority on maintaining an up-to-date space
inventory, and on improving the classifications of room types and of
academic activities associated with courses offered."
Dr. Runeckles  )        That priority be given to the following:
Dr. Tennant      ) ^    .. .
Dentistry
Chemical Engineering
Biochemistry
Physiology
Geophysics & Astronomy
Studio Resources Building
A question was raised about the construction of two new classrooms in the Civil
and Mechanical Engineering building which the Committee had supported and
recommended to the President's Office in 1979. Dr. Runeckles stated that this item
had not been included in the current priorities because the matter was already in
hand.
Following a brief discussion, the motion was put and carried. 7569.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs  (continued)
Dr. Runeckles ) That   the   University   immediately  undertake  an
Dean Webber   ) investigation  of   the   feasibility   of   constructing
University resource space, of extreme flexibility
in design and function, to accommodate, on a
short-term basis, academic units which are
experiencing acute shortages of space, and as a
means of accelerating the demolition of present
substandard buildings.
Carried
Dr. Runeckles   )       That the University place priority on maintaining
Dean Finnegan )       an up-to-date space inventory, and on improving
the classifications of room types and of academic
activities associated with courses offered.
Carried
The  Chairman  expressed  thanks  and  appreciation  for  the  work   done  by  the
committee.
Admissions Committee
Bachelor of Music Program - Admission Requirements
Dr. Smith reported that the Admissions Committee recommended approval
of the proposal of the Faculty of Arts that applicants to the Bachelor of Music
Program be permitted to include a Grade 12 Music course among the four courses
from the Arts and Science category of the Secondary School Curriculum listed in
the requirements for admission to the University in September 1981.
Dr. Smith  ) That applicants to the Bachelor of Music Program
Dean Will  ) are  permitted  to,   and  wherever   possible,   shall
include a Grade 12 Music course among the four
courses numbered 7-8-9-10.
Carried
Curriculum Committee (See Appendix 'B')
Faculties of Graduate Studies and Law
Dr. Richards presented the report. Approval of a course change and course
deletions, submitted by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, had been withheld at the
November 12, 1980 meeting of Senate pending further consultation between the
Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical Engineering.
Dr. Richards reported that the Department of Electrical Engineering were now
satisfied that the proposed change would not result in the duplication of an
existing Electrical Engineering course and the committee were therefore
recommending approval of the proposed changes. 7570.
Wednesday,  May 20,   1981.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee
Faculties of Graduate Studies and Law (continued)
The committee also recommended approval of a new course, submitted by
the Faculty of Law, subject to the addition of the prerequisite "permission of
instructor".
Dr. Richards ) That the proposals submitted by the Faculties of
Dean Lysyk   ) Graduate Studies and Law be approved.
Carried
School of Rehabilitation Medicine
The committee recommended approval of a proposal to offer a Bachelor of
Science degree program in Occupational Therapy and a Bachelor of Science degree
program in Physical Therapy but recommended that approval of the degree
designations and the question of awarding a second Bachelor's degree be withheld.
The committee also recommended that approval of a proposed new course
RHME 402 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry, be referred to the Subcommittee on
Statistics because the course had a significant statistical component. The
committee further recommended that the fe unit value assigned to RHME 414 and
RHME 425 be deleted. Dr. Richards explained that the courses were similar to a
number of other courses classified as professional courses which the committee
had consistently recommended receive zero credit.
As far as the degree designations were concerned Dr. Richards stated that
those recommended by the School were the B.S.O.T. and the B.S.P.T. The
committee had been under the impression that those designations were in common
use in Canada and North America. However, it appeared that a wide variety of
designations were used and it was felt that others might be more appropriate and
should therefore be considered.
Dr. Richards drew Senate's attention to a statement in the proposal that
students who wished to become dually qualified in occupational therapy and
physical therapy could do so by completing an additional 18 months of full-time
study. The committee had been under the impression that the School were
proposing that students could qualify for a second credential for professional
purposes but it appeared that the intention was that students could qualify for a
second Bachelor's degree. Under the circumstances, it was proposed that approval
of this item be withheld pending further consideration by the committee. 7571.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee
School of Rehabilitation Medicine  (continued)
Dr. Richards   ) That the proposal of the School of Rehabilitation
Dean Webber  ) Medicine to offer a Bachelor of Science degree
program in Occupational Therapy and a Bachelor
of Science degree program in Physical Therapy be
approved.
Carried
Faculties of Science and Medicine
The committee recommended approval of the proposed Faculty of Science
route into the Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science program. It was explained
in the material circulated that the Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science degree
was, at present, granted upon the successful completion of a two-year program.
Candidates for admission must have graduated from an approved Institute of
Technology, plus one year of in-hospital training in a C.M.A. approved hospital
laboratory. They must, in addition, have gained credit in Chemistry 205 and 230
(or equivalent) and English 100.
The proposed program would offer an alternate route whereby students could
enter this program. The prospective student would take two years in the Faculty
of Science and, if accepted into the B.M.L.Sc. program, would take a summer
term of courses in a hospital and then take the normal two-year program that has
already been established. Students not accepted into the B.M.L.Sc. program
could continue in the Faculty of Science to obtain their degree in one of the Life
Sciences. However, they would not be able to use the Pathology courses that they
had taken, toward their B.Sc. degree.
Dr. Richards   ) That the proposal of the Faculties of Science and
Dean Webber  ) Medicine to offer a Faculty of Science route into
the    Bachelor   of    Medical    Laboratory   Science
program be approved.
Carried
Nominating Committee
Dr. Richards, Chairman of the Nominating Committee, presented the committee's
recommendations for membership on the various committees of Senate. He reported
that the committee had tried to accommodate the preferences indicated by members
in their responses to the request that members state the committees on which they
would like to serve. 7572.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee (continued)
Dr. Richards also reported that the committee had nominated Dr. C. E. Slonecker,
Dr. P. Suedfeld and Mr. S. T. Henderson as the three members to be elected by Senate
to serve on the President's Advisory Committee for the recommendation and
selection of candidates for the position of University Librarian.
Dr. Richards   ) That   the   recommendations   of   the   Nominating
Dr. Dennison ) Committee be approved.
Senate was reminded that at the May 25, 1977 meeting of Senate it had been
agreed that a liaison member of Senate be named to the President's Bookstore
Committee. It was agreed that the Nominating Committee be requested to nominate
a member of Senate to serve on the President's Bookstore Committee.
The motion was put and carried.
Report of Ad Hoc Committee to Consider Alternatives to the Universities Council of
B.C.'s Grant Allocation Formula
Dr.   Shaw  presented   the   following  report  of  the committee,  which  had  been
established as a result of a motion passed at the October 15, 1980 meeting of Senate:
"I.       Preamble
Beginning in 1979/80, the Universities Council of B.C. embarked on a three year
experiment with a formula for dividing the provincial operating grant among the
three B.C. universities. The formula is used to calculate the number of "grant
units" to which each university is entitled, and the operating grant is divided
among the three universities in proportion to the number of "grant units" assigned
to each university. In principle, only 95% of the total operating grant is allocated
by the formula, with the distribution of the remaining 5% left to the discretion of
the Council. In practice, the Council has applied the formula to all of the
operating grant except for the provision for new and emergent programs. As a
result, in 1979/80 and 1980/81 almost 99% of the total operating grant was
allocated according to the formula.
The principles on which the formula is based were drawn up and approved by
UCBC in 1978. Revisions were made after the grant for the fiscal year 1979/80
was allocated, and it was decided that the revised formula would be employed for
the fiscal years 1980/81 and 1981/82.
The ad hoc committee was charged with considering alternatives to the UCBC
grant allocation formula and asked to focus on alternatives which will recognize
and help ensure excellence in university education within our province. This
charge reflects the Senate's concern about the academic consequences of any
inequities in funding. 7573.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Report of Ad Hoc Committee to Consider Alternatives to the Universities Council of
B.C.'s Grant Allocation Formula  (continued)
"II.      Nature of the Formula
The purpose of this section is to describe the formula in general terms.
The three provincial universities, UBC, SFU and UVic are very different
institutions. The allocation formula only recognizes three differences between
them, namely:
(1) Size (i.e. overall student enrolment)
(2) Relative costs of programs offered.
(3) The nature of the academic year.
(I)    Size
The role of enrolment in the formula is complex. In effect, three different
measures of university size are involved:
(a) The number of full-time equivalent students (FTE's)
(b) The number of cost-weighted full-time equivalent students    (WFTE's)
(This measure is discussed further below).
(c) The number of students enrolled, i.e., the "headcount".  For this purpose
a part-time student is counted as the equivalent of a full-time student.
In calculating the number of grant units the first two measures of size are
summed. This procedure severely dilutes the impact of the cost weights. The
effects of this are considered below. The third measure of size enters the
formula in a way which is supposed to make an allowance for economies of scale.
The first 4050 students are entered with full weight; the remaining students are
entered with a weight of 1/10. The choice of these figures is arbitrary. The
effect of giving ten-times the weight to the first 4050 students is to give a
relatively larger allocation of funds to the smaller universities. In 1978/79 (the
base year for the 1980/81 grant) 4050 students amounted to 52% of the
headcount at UVic, 43% at SFU and 16% at UBC.
(2) Relative costs of programs
The number of FTE students in certain programs is multiplied by a weighting
factor in an attempt to recognize relative costs of programs.
It should be noted that the weighted full-time equivalent enrolment is a
cost—weighted measure of the relative sizes of the three universities which could
be used to allocate funds among the universities. However, the effect of this
cost—weighted FTE measure is offset by two assumptions: (a) that costs among
the universities also vary according to the number of students without regard to
their program or their status as full-time or part-time enrollees, and, (b) that
there are substantial economies of scale in the universities.
(3) Nature of the academic year
An additional allowance is provided to SFU for its trimester system. 7574.
Wednesday,  May 20,   1981.
Report of Ad Hoc Committee to Consider Alternatives to the Universities Council of
B.C.'s Grant Allocation Formula (continued)
'III.     The Effects of the Formula
One way to describe the effect of the formula is to note that it provides an
allocation of funds among the three universities which is in close proportion to the
relative FTE enrolments, as shown in the following table.  (Table I)
TABLE I  *
Actual Grant for operating purposes from Government of B.C.
per FTE indexed to UBC = 1.00
Year UBC SFU UVic
1979/80 1.00 I.01 0.94
1980/81 1.00 0.99 0.95
Mean 1.00 1.00 0.945
This distribution totally ignores the differences in relative costs inherent in
different programs, many of the more costly of which are unique to UBC.
The weights used in the formula are intended to reflect the approximate relative
costs of different programs. If the funds available had been allocated among the
three universities in proportion to the relative cost weighted FTE enrolments,
UBC would have received about $12.5 million more in 1980/81 than it actually did.
UBC is a much more complex institution than either SFU or UVic. It has a larger
proportion of its students enrolled in programs which are inherently very costly.
This is illustrated in Table II which shows for each university the ratio of cost
weighted full-time equivalent enrolments (WFTE) to full-time equivalent
enrolments (FTE). The higher the ratio, the higher the costs faced by the
institution per full-time student.
* The data in Tables I, II and III exclude the special grant for the expansion of
the Medical School at UBC as well as the additional students funded by the
expansion budget.
TABLE II
Year
1978/79
1979/80
1980/81
Table III shows the relative grants per cost weighted full-time equivalent student
for the three universities for the past 3 years.
WFTE/FTE
UBC
SFU
UVic
1.977
2.006
2.018
1.619
1.649
1.640
1.639
1.648
1.650 7575.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Report of Ad Hoc Committee to Consider Alternatives to the Universities Council of
B.C.'s Grant Allocation Formula
"III.     The Effects of the Formula  (continued)
TABLE 111
Actual Grant for operating purposes from Government of B.C. per
WFTE indexed to UBC = 1.00
Year UBC SFU UVic
1978/79 1.00 1.20 1.19
1979/80 1.00 1.23 1.14
1980/81 1.00 1.22 1.16
Mean 1.00 1.217 1.163
The data show that, on the average, UBC has received 16% less than UVic and
22% less than SFU per WFTE over the last 3 years.
It is our view that this disparity in the relative grants per WFTE reflects a serious
under funding of UBC.
This inequitable allocation of funds among the three universities arises for two
fundamental reasons:
(a) The assumptions made about economies of scale.
The formula assumes that economies of scale depend simply on the number of
students enrolled in the university, without regard to the complexity of the
university. At a university like UBC, which offers a wide range of specialized
undergraduate, graduate and professional programs, requiring special facilities and
frequently with relatively small enrolments, there are few costs which depend
only on the size of the university. It is our conclusion that the assumption implicit
in this formula that large economies of scale are possible at UBC is ill-founded.
Our conclusion is consistent with the findings of an independent study
commissioned by the UCBC and submitted in 1978. The consultant estimated
UBC's shortfall in funding relative to the other two universities to be $6,044
million. He proposed a 5 year plan to correct this inequity which was abandoned
by UCBC after implementation for I year (1978/79).
(b) The assumptions made about major special costs.
The formula itself only includes one special cost factor - SFU's trimester system.
UBC operates many programs on a year-round basis and has large spring and
summer sessions which are not given recognition. Moreover, no allowance is made
for additional operating costs at UBC such as those arising from the relative age
of many of its buildings, and the operation of a comprehensive library which
serves as the ultimate provincial library resource.
IV.     New Programs
Special grants are made outside the formula for new programs. These grants,
based on a careful analysis of costs by the universities and the Council, are
designed to finance the new programs through their new and emergent phases, i.e., 7576.
Wednesday,  May 20,   1981.
Report of Ad Hoc Committee to Consider Alternatives to the Universities Council of
B.C.'s Grant Allocation Formula
IV. New Programs  (continued)
"until the first class graduates from the program. Unless the formula reasonably
reflects the relative costs of the new program when it is operating at its planned
level, termination of the special grant will create a shortfall of revenue for the
university. In the case of small programs, this is not a serious concern. However,
for a major new program, like the expansion of the medical school, it could
provoke a major financial crisis. Unless the formula is adjusted to reflect more
adequately the relative costs of medical students, termination of the medical
expansion grant could well produce the ludicrous result that approximately 35% of
the funding originally provided for the expansion of the medical school at UBC
would be allocated by the formula to the other two universities.
V. Recommendations
At this juncture we see no alternative to a formula but consider that the present
formula should be significantly revised.  In particular, we recommend:
(1) That until there is good empirical evidence for substantial economies of scale
in B.C. universities, no such provision should be incorporated in the allocation
mechanism.   In other words, the 'head count factor' should be dropped.
(2) That if a special allowance for the trimester system at SFU is continued then
a comparable allowance should be made for spring and summer sessions at
UBC and UVic.
(3) That full recognition be given to the cost weighted FTE measure in the
allocation mechanism.
(4) That these changes be phased in over a reasonable period.
As a general observation, we express some concern about an enrolment driven
allocation mechanism which creates incentives for universities to reduce
admission standards at both graduate and undergraduate levels in order to attract
revenue producing students. With a view to maintaining excellence in university
education in British Columbia, we hope that the UCBC will remain sensitive to
this issue."
In conclusion, Dr. Shaw stated that the Board of Governors had established its own
committee which would be meeting with the President's committee on May 26. He also
stated that the Universities Council had requested that the University's official position
on the allocation mechanism be forwarded to the Council by August 30, 1981.
Dr. Shaw )       That the report be received and referred to the
Dr. Keenlyside )       President for consideration and action.
Following a brief discussion, the motion was put and carried. 7577.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Report from the Vancouver School of Theology
A report from the Vancouver School of Theology was presented to Senate in
accordance with the regulation in the Affiliation Agreement of January 18, 1978 which
requires that a theological college "shall submit a resume of its academic operations to
the Senate annually".
Some of the points noted in the report were as follows:
112 students were enrolled for degree courses in the winter session.
Approximately 47% of these students were women.
84 students holding a first theological degree were enrolled in advanced
study in the Summer School courses in 1980.
349 clergy were involved in the School's continuing professional education
programs in 1980/81.
Following an accreditation team visit in October, the School was
reaccredited for a ten year period by the Association of Theological Schools
in the United States and Canada.
Library: Extensive renovations have been carried out to provide better
facilities for the services area of the Library. Further changes are
anticipated this summer to provide new reading room space. The holdings of
the Library are approximately 68,000 volumes.
Degrees conferred in May 1981 were:
Master of Theology I
Master of Divinity 17
Master of Theological Studies 3
Master of Theological Studies (Honours) I
Bachelor of Theology 4
Correspondence
Senate, at its meeting of March 18, 1981, requested the Secretary of Senate to
write to the Minister of Education concerning the English Placement Test. The
Secretary read to Senate the following reply from the Minister of Education:
"Thank you for your recent letter concerning the Senate of the University of
British Columbia's appreciation of the usefulness of the English Placement
Test and expressed desire for its continuation.
Please assure the members of the Senate on my behalf that, while we have
been finalizing plans to move coordination of this service from the Schools
level to the jurisdiction of the Post-Secondary Department within the
Ministry, there has not been a decision made to discontinue it. Rather, it is
our intention to monitor its continued usefulness and to investigate potential
viable alternatives with users of this service.
With this in mind, I am most appreciative of the information you have shared
with me on behalf of the Senate. Please advise the members of the Senate
that consultation with all post-secondary users will precede any decision to
discontinue or substantially modify this service." 7578.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
Report of the Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing  (in camera)
Dr. McClean presented the following report:
"This report covers the period April I, 1980 to March 31, 1981. During that period
twelve appeals were launched. Two were withdrawn before a hearing could take
place, and a third, although not formally withdrawn, was not pursued by the
student. Of the nine appeals heard the Committee dismissed seven and allowed
two.
The Committee, it will be noted, has no jurisdiction to allow an appeal where the
sole question raised involves the exercise of academic judgement by a Faculty.
One of the nine appeals turned on such a question, and it was therefore dismissed.
The other eight appeals raised questions which fell within the Committee's
jurisdiction. In one case it was alleged that there was bias against a student, in
another that there was a personality conflict between the student and an
instructor, and in four others that there had been insufficient information
provided to students on a variety of matters, for example there was insufficient
information provided on the method of evaluation to be used, on the deadlines for
papers and on the reasons for failure. In these six cases the Committee decided
on the evidence presented to it that the various allegations had not been
substantiated, and the appeals were therefore dismissed.
The two remaining appeals were allowed. In one the Committee decided that a
student ought to be reinstated in a graduate program. The student had been
required to withdraw because it was stated he had not shown research ability and
because he had failed a comprehensive examination. The Committee decided that
no clear decision had been made by the department on the student's research
ability, and that the failure on the comprehensive examination ought not to be
held against the student because he had been required to sit the examination on
excessively short notice. In the other appeal a student failed his year by a very
slim margin. The Committee decided that in reaching that decision it was not
clear that the Faculty involved had followed its own prescribed procedures and,
given how close the student had been to passing, allowed the appeal, and directed
that the student be permitted to proceed to the next year of study.
By its terms of reference the Committee is required to draw the attention of
Senate to any issues arising from appeals which might be regarded as being of
general significance to the University. Two points are perhaps worth noting with
respect to this year's appeals. First, altogether twelve appeals were commenced.
That compares with three appeals in the year 1979-80. This is a significant
increase, although given the size of the University there is perhaps no reason for
concern. Second, most of the appeals related to matters of procedure. It is clear
that it is for the benefit of both faculty and students that there be well-
established rules relating to such questions as evaluation techniques, deadlines and
examination procedures, and that these rules be carefully adhered to."
It  was agreed that since  names of students were  no  longer mentioned  in the
reports of the committee it would not be necessary to present future reports in camera.
The meeting adjourned at 10.30 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September 16, 1981.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 7579.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
APPENDIX 'A'
New Awards recommended to Senate
Betty Belshaw Memorial Prize - The Betty Belshaw Memorial Fund has been
established by donations from Betty Belshaw's family, friends, and colleagues to
provide an annual prize of $400 to be awarded to an outstanding student in
English 205 (Introduction to Poetry) or English 206 (Introduction to Drama). The
award will alternate annually between the two courses.
Dr. Earl B. Gillanders Memorial Scholarship - An annual scholarship in the amount
of $1,000 has been provided by Canada Tungsten Mining Corporation Limited in
memory of Dr. Earl B. Gillanders, B.A. (Geology) 1925, M.A., 1926, who went on
to a distinguished national and international career in the mining industry. The
award will be made to a student entering the final year in Geology, and planning
to go into the mining industry upon graduating or alternatively, to continue
post-graduate studies in the field of Geology. The award will be made on the
recommendation of the department and will be based on scholastic achievement,
with preference given to candidates demonstrating financial need.
Edwina Heller Scholarship in Music - This scholarship in the amount of $500 has
been provided by Edwina Heller, supportive friend of the Department of Music and
former faculty member in piano. It will be awarded annually to a gifted pianist in
the third or fourth year of study in the Bachelor of Music program. While
achievement and promise in piano performance and related areas of study will be
the primary criteria of selection, the financial circumstances of the student will
also be taken into account.
Walter E. Heller Financial Corp. Scholarship - A scholarship in the amount of $300
has been offered by the Walter E. Heller Financial Corp. The award will be made
on the recommendation of the Faculty to the student obtaining the top mark in
Business Finance and entering the final year in the M.B.A. program. 7580.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Computer Science
Course change CPSC 537 - change in description
Deletions CPSC 507 and 527
FACULTY OF LAW
New course LAW 397 (l/lfe)d  Economic Analysis of Law
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy and Bachelor of Science in Physical
Therapy
Calendar statement
PROGRAMS OFFERED:
1. Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy
2. Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy
Occupational therapy and physical therapy are health professions concerned with
the rehabilitation of the sick and injured and the prevention of dysfunction.
Therapists serve as members of the rehabilitation team associated with
physicians, nurses, social workers, teachers, speech pathologists and psychologists.
They work in hospitals, rehabilitation centres, psychiatric institutions, industrial
facilities, governmental and voluntary health agencies, schools, homes for the
aged, and in patients' homes.
Occupational therapists provide service to individuals whose abilities to cope with
tasks of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging
process, poverty and cultural differences, physical injury or illness, or
psychological and social disability. Reference to occupation in the title is in the
context of man's goal-directed use of time, energy, interest and attention.
Occupational therapists use selected activity to evaluate and to treat dysfunction.
The activities may include manual and creative arts, industrial and vocational
skills, recreational activities, remedial games, communication skills, play for
children, and training of patients in the use of adaptive equipment and assistive
devices for the tasks of daily living.
The services of physical therapists are primarily directed toward the prevention or
alleviation of movement dysfunction. The more common movement dysfunctions
may be manifested in impairment, actual or potential, related to clients'
neuromuscular, musculo-skeletal, respiratory or cardiovascular systems. Physical
therapists evaluate functional impairment of their clients which may have
resulted from developmental deficits, the aging process, disease, injury or
psychological stress. Treatment programs are planned and implemented to
alleviate pain, improve physical fitness and promote optimal movement function.
Treatment methods may include therapeutic exercise, physical agents such as heat
or electricity and the instruction of clients and their families in the use of
appropriate activities or assistive devices to achieve the tasks of daily living. 7581.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
APPENDIX 'B'
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy and Bachelor of Science in Physical
Therapy  (continued)
GENERAL INFORMATION
Admission
Application for admission to the Second Year of the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine will be considered for an applicant who has completed a full year of
university or college study with an overall achievement of at least 70% including
the following subjects, or the equivalent: English 100, Biology 101 or 102,
Chemistry 103 or I 10 or 120, Mathematics 130 (or 100 and 101), Psychology 100
and either Grade XI or XII Physics.
Admission is limited and based on academic standing, maturity, personal
suitability and any available references concerning performance as a volunteer
worker or employee. Priority will be given to residents of British Columbia. The
University reserves the right to reject applicants for admission on the basis of
their overall academic records even if they technically meet entrance
requirements and to limit enrolment if its facilities and resources are inadequate.
Unless distance from the University makes it impractical, a personal interview is
required prior to acceptance.
Graduates of the School will be given priority for readmission to obtain dual
qualifications in occupational and physical therapy.
Physical Fitness Requirements
Each applicant must present a certificate of physical fitness from a physician in
accordance with the regulations of the University Health Service.
Application and Registration
All inguiries relating to admission and personal interviews should be addressed to:
The Director, The School of Rehabilitation Medicine, The University of British
Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., V6T IW5. See the General Information section for
details. Note: The School opens the day after Labour Day. The deadline for
application is February 28.
Costs Other Than Sessional Fee
There are additional expenses for uniforms, travel, clinical practice, and books.
The School will provide applicants with information regarding these additional
costs. Students should be prepared to have clinical practice outside the Vancouver
area and therefore should include living and travel costs for this experience in
estimating total expenses. Students are encouraged to try to have access to a car
for transportation in order to minimize time and effort expended in essential
travel to the various areas used for clinical experiences.
Two white laboratory coats. Instruction regarding purchase of uniforms will be
given by the School.
Laboratory fee $30.00 per year. 7582.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
APPENDIX 'B'
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy and Bachelor of Science in Physical
Therapy  (continued)
Attendance
This section is unchanged.
Examinations and Advancement
This section is unchanged.
Clinical Experience
Clinical Practice: Field work in professionally accredited facilities will be
supervised by University appointed personnel in hospitals, health clinics,
community care agencies and rehabilitation centres.
A student must satisfactorily complete field work before being promoted to Third
Year or Fourth Year. A student failing to satisfactorily complete field work must
repeat the failed section with satisfactory results in order to be eligible for
graduation.
On completion of all didactic and clinical field work, the graduate will be eligible
for membership with either the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists
or the Canadian Physiotherapy Association.
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy - Proposed Program
Second Year
Anatomy 390. Basic Human Anatomy 3
Pathology 375. Introduction to Human Pathology I
Zoology 303. Vertebrate Physiology or an approved equivalent 3
Psychology 301. Developmental Psychology or an approved course
in human growth and development 3
Sociology 200. Introduction to Sociology or an approved equivalent 3
RHME 200. Functional Anatomy I
RHME 201. Kinesiology Ife
RHME 202. Clinical Skills fe
RHME 204. Tests and Measures I fe
RHME 205. Devices/Equipment I fe
RHME 207. Occupational Therapy Theory and Practice 3
RHME 209. Clinical Fieldwork, Occupational Therapy 0
Total   22 units
By the end of the second year, all students will be required to show evidence of:
1. a valid first aid (St. John's Ambulance) certificate or equivalent competence
2. a valid certificate for basic life support, e.g. Canadian Heart Foundation
certificate or equivalent competence in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation at the
basic level
3. completion of the recommended medical terminology programmed text. 7583.
Wednesday,  May 20,   1981.
APPENDIX 'B'
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy and Bachelor of Science in Physical
erapy
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy - Proposed Program  (continued)
Third Year
Psychology Elective.  Selection to be approved by Division of
Occupational Therapy 3
Anatomy and Physiology 425.  Elements of neuroanatomy and
neurophysiology or an approved equivalent
RHME 301.
RHME 302.
RHME 303.
RHME 306.
RHME 307.
RHME 311.
RHME 323.
RHME 335.
Fourth Year
RHME 401.
RHME 402.
RHME 406.
RHME 407.
RHME 408.
RHME 416.
RHME 417.
RHME 424.
RHME 425.
RHME 426.
RHME 428.
RHME 435.
Medicine and Surgery I, II, III, IV
Psychosocial Aspects of Disability
Occupational Therapy, Clinical Conditions
in Psychiatry
Occupational Therapy, Orthotic and Remedial
Equipment
Occupational Therapy, Psychosocial Dysfunction
Leadership and Communication
Occupational Therapy, Neurodevelopmental
Techniques
Clinical Fieldwork, Occupational Therapy
3fe
3
Ife
Ife
3
Total   21 units
Medicine and Surgery V fe
Introduction to Scientific Inquiry
Occupational Therapy, Lifestyling
Occupational Therapy, Advanced Problem-Solving
for Physical Dysfunction
Management and Administration
Occupational Therapy, Function in Home
and Community
Health Care Systems
Occupational Therapy, Program Design
Occupational Therapy, Social and Professional Issues
Occupational Therapy, Independent Study
Occupational Therapy, Advanced Problem-Solving
for Mental Health Ife
Clinical Fieldwork, Occupational Therapy 3fe
Ife
I
Ife
I
Ife
2
I
fe
life
fe
fe
Total   15.5 units
Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy - Proposed Program
Second Year
Anatomy 390.
Pathology 375.
Zoology 303.
Psychology 301
Sociology 200.
Basic Human Anatomy 3
Introduction to Human Pathology I
Vertebrate Physiology or an approved equivalent 3
Developmental Psychology or an approved course
in human growth and development 3
Introduction to Sociology or an approved equivalent 3 7584.
Wednesday,  May 20,   1981.
APPENDIX 'B'
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy and Bachelor of Science in Physical
Therapy
Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy - Proposed Program
Second Year  (continued)
RHME 200.
RHME 201.
RHME 202.
RHME 204.
RHME 205.
RHME 208.
RHME 210.
Functional Anatomy
Kinesiology
Clinical Skills
Tests and Measures
Devices/Equipment
Introduction to Physical Therapy
Clinical Fieldwork, Physical Therapy
Ife
fe
Ife
Ife
3
0
Total   22 units
By the end of the second year, all students will be required to show evidence of:
1. a valid first aid (St. John's Ambulance) certificate or equivalent competence
2. a valid certificate for basic life support, e.g. Canadian Heart Foundation
certificate or equivalent competence in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation at the
basic level
3. completion of the recommended medical terminology programmed text.
Third Year
Elective. Selection to be approved by Division of
Physical Therapy
Anatomy and Physiology 425.  Elements of neuroanatomy and
neurophysiology or an approved equivalent
RHME 301.
RHME 302.
RHME 304.
RHME 305.
RHME 308.
RHME 31 I.
RHME 313.
RHME 314.
RHME 330.
Fourth Year
RHME 401.
RHME 402.
RHME 404.
RHME 408.
RHME 41 I.
RHME 412.
Medicine and Surgery I, II, III, IV
Psychosocial Aspects of Disability
Physical Therapy Assessment and Management
Procedures
Physical Therapy, Electro and Hydrotherapy
Physical Therapy, Musculo-Skeletal Disorders
Leadership and Communication
Physical Therapy, Respiratory Disorders
Physical Therapy, Neurological Disorders
Clinical Fieldwork, Physical Therapy
Ife
3fe
3
Ife
fe
Ife
Ife
I
Ife
4fe
Total   21 units
Medicine and Surgery V fe
Introduction to Scientific Inquiry
Medicine and Survery VI
Management and Administration
Physical Therapy, Obstetrics and Paediatrics
Physical Therapy, Cardiac and Peripheral-Vascular
Disorders Ife
Ife
Ife 7585.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
APPENDIX 'B'
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy and Bachelor of Science in Physical
Therapy
Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy - Proposed Program
Fourth Year  (continued)
RHME 413.
RHME 414.
RHME 415.
RHME 417.
RHME 430.
Physical Therapy, Comprehensive Patient
Management
Physical Therapy, Social and Professional Issues
Physical Therapy, Independent Study
Health Care Systems
Clinical Fieldwork, Physical Therapy
3
fe
2
fe
3fe
Total   15.5 units
New courses
Course changes
RHME 202 (fe)
RHME 208 (3)
RHME 302 (Ife)
RHME 308 (Ife)
RHME 31 I (I)
RHME 313 (I)
RHME 314 (Ife)
RHME 323 (Ife)
RHME 41 I (Ife)
RHME 412 (fe)
RHME 413 (3)
RHME 414(0)
RHME 415 (2)
RHME 416 (Ife)
RHME 417 (fe)
RHME 424 (I)
RHME 425 (0)
RHME 426 (Ife)
RHME 428 (Ife)
Clinical Skills
Introduction to Physical Therapy
Psychosocial Aspects of Disability
Physical Therapy, Musculo-Skeletal Disorders
Leadership and Communication
Physical Therapy, Respiratory Disorders
Physical Therapy, Neurological Disorders
Occupational Therapy, Neurodevelopmental
Techniques
Physical Therapy, Obstetrics and Paediatrics
Physical Therapy, Cardiac and
Peripheral-Vascular Disorders
Physical Therapy, Comprehensive Patient
Management
Physical Therapy, Social and Professional Issues
Physical Therapy, Independent Study
Occupational Therapy, Function in Home
and Community
Health Care Systems
Occupational Therapy, Program Design
Occupational Therapy, Social and Professional
Issues
Occupational Therapy, Independent Study
Occupational Therapy, Advanced Problem
RHME 200, 201, 204, 207, 209, 301, 303, 304, 306, 307, 401,
404, 406, 407, 408 - change in title, description, units
and hours
RHME 310 - change in number (now 330) title, description,
units and hours
RHME 409 - change in number (now 435) title, description,
units and hours
RHME 410 - change in number (now 430) title, description,
units and hours 7586.
Wednesday,   May 20,   1981.
APPENDIX 'B'
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy and Bachelor of Science in Physical
Therapy
Course changes (continued)
RHME 210 - change in title, description and units (now (0))
RHME 205, 305 - change in title, description and hours
RHME 309 - change in number (now 335) title, description
and hours
Deletions RHME 203, 206, 300, 400, 403, 405
FACULTIES OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE
Faculty   of   Science   route   into   the   Bachelor   of   Medical   Laboratory   Science
Program
First Year
Mathematics 100 and 101
Chemistry I 10 or 120
Physics 110, 115 or 120
English 100
Biology 101 or 102
(J55
* Science credit will not be granted for the courses in Pathology.
Summer Term in Hospital  (June - August)
Pathology 201 and 202 (2)
Pathology 204 (I)
Pathology 210 (I)
Pathology 230 (I)
TST
Third and Fourth Years of the Program were approved by Senate October 12, 1977.
New courses PATH 201 (I) Introductory Clinical Chemistry
PATH 202 (I) Applied Practical Clinical Chemistry
PATH 203 (I) Introductory Haematology and Blood Banking
PATH 204 (I) Applied Haematology and Blood Banking
Second Year
(3)
Chemistry 205 (or 220)
(3)
(3)
Chemistry 230 (or 203)
(3)
(3)
Microbiology 200
(3)
(3)
Biology 200 and 201
(3)
(3)
Pathology 203, 205 and 206 *
(2)
Arts elective
(3)
PATH 205 (fe)    E ementary Theory and Practice of Microscopy
PATH 206 (fe)    Basic Histopathological Technique
PATH 210(1)     Hospital Organization and Practical Training
PATH 230 (I)     Applied Medical Microbiology

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.senmin.1-0115728/manifest

Comment

Related Items