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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] May 18, 1988

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 9280.
May 18, 1988
The Ninth Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1987-88 was held on Wednesday, May 18, 1988 at 8.00
p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Present: President D. W. Strangway (Chairman), Vice-President D. R.
Birch, Mr. D. A. Anderson, Dr. J. M. Anderson, Mr. J. P. Andrews, Dr. C E.
Armerding, Mr. D. W. Barron, Dean G. S. Beagrie, Professor J. Blom (Acting
Dean), Dr. B. Bressler, Rev. P. c Burns, Dr. D.G.A. Carter, Mr. A. K.
Colbeck, Dr. T. S. Cook, Ms. L. M. Copeland, Miss K. P. Curtis, Dr. J. D.
Dennison, Dr. A. J. Elder, Dr. J. A. S. Evans, Mr. J. A. S. Fogarassy, Dr.
M. A. Goldberg, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Dr. M. A. Hickling,
Dr. S. Katz, Dr. A. Kozak, Mr. J. Kulich, Mr. E. W. N. Lam, Dr. S. C.
Lindstrom, Mrs. B. M. Loeb, Dr. B. C. McBride, Mr. D. Mclnnes, Mr. M. G.
McMillan, Dean A. Meisen, Dr. A. G. Mitchell, Professor D. Pavlich, Mr.
D. M. Pettingale, Mrs. G. E. Plant, Mr. E. S. Reid, Dean J. F. Richards, Dr.
D. F. Robitaille, Mr. M. M. Ryan, Dr. M. Shaw, Dean N. Sheehan, Miss H.
Shou, Dr. L. de Sobrino, Mr. R. A. Speers, Dr. R. A. Spencer, Dr. L. J.
Stan, Dean P. Suedfeld, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Dr. P. R. Tennant, Mr. G. A. Thorn,
Dr. R. C. Thompson, Dr. A. Van Seters, Mr. S. Vukusic, Dean W. A. Webber,
Dr. L. S. Weiler, Dean R. M. Will, Mr. J. A. Williamson, Dr. J. L.
Wisenthal, Ms. N. E. Woo, Dr. W. W. Wood.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
Chancellor L. R. Peterson, Dr. E. G. Auld, Dr. G. W. Eaton, Dr. S. E. Grace,
Mr. S. F. Haffey, Dean R. W. Kennedy, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Dr. J. A. McLean,
Dean J. H. McNeill, Dean R. C Miller, Jr., Dr. B. M. Morrison, Mr. S. R.
Pearce, Dr. J. E. Phillips, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. J. K. Stager, Mr. G.
Taylor, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Mr. S. M. Wilson.
Senate membership
(i)   Declaration of vacancy (University Act, section 35 (6))
Dr. J. L. Wisenthal, faculty member at-large (as of July 1, 1988)
(ii)  Replacement
Dr. Richard Tees replaces Dr. Wisenthal
Minutes of previous meeting
Dean Meisen   ) That the minutes of the Eighth regular
Dr. Weiler    ) meeting of Senate for the Session 1987-88,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
Carried 9281.
May 18, 1988
Chairman's remarks and related questions
President Strangway paid tribute to Dean G. S. Beagrie and to Dr. C E.
Armerding who were attending their last Senate meeting. Dr. Beagrie had
been a member of Senate for ten years as Dean of the Faculty of Dentistry,
and Dr. Armerding had been a member for nine years as Principal of Regent
College.
President Strangway informed Senate that, in addition to the debate that
took place on the Mission Statement at the previous meeting, he had received
many written responses. As a result, the Mission Statement had been revised
and this would now be circulated to a broader cross section of the
university community for comment and response.
President Strangway stated that the operating grant for UBC from the
provincial government had not yet been settled.
Dr. Elder referred to the funding to be provided by the provincial
government over the next six years to match donations received by the three
universities. She noted that the government had released some matching
grant money for UBC, and complimented the President whom, she stated, was
mainly responsible for this achievement.
Dr. Strangway stated that the University's three-year fundraising
campaign was now underway and that $20 million had already been raised.
Candidates for Degrees
Lists of candidates for degrees, as approved by the various Faculties
and Schools, were made available for inspection by Senate members prior to
the meeting. 9282.
May 18, 1988
Candidates for Degrees (continued)
Dr. Goldberg  )
Mr. Williamson )
That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chairman
of Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried
Scholarships and Awards
A list of scholarships, medals and prizes awarded to students in the
graduating classes was circulated for information.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Advanced Credit for Advanced Placement and international Baccalaureate,
and Concurrent Enrolment Policy
Dr. Elder, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following report,
which had been circulated:
"In November 1987, the two following proposals from the President's Task
Force on Liaison, Recruiting and Admissions were referred to the Senate
Admissions Committee by Senate for "consultation with the faculties."
1. That Senate approve the granting of credit for an appropriate level
of achievement in Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate
courses taken prior to high school graduation and that responsibility
for the assessment of the appropriateness of a course and the level
achievement required for credit be determined by the department
concerned.
2. That limited numbers of gifted students who are enrolled in grade
eleven or twelve in a B.C. secondary school be admitted to the
University to pursue "Concurrent studies" as unclassified students.
Such students will be given the opportunity to complete a course or
courses prior to secondary school graduation. Credit earned may
later be applied towards an appropriate degree at The University of
British Columbia.
The Senate Admissions Committee, following the instruction of Senate,
wrote each Faculty to inquire whether and in what circumstances it would
support the Task Force proposals to assign university credit for courses
taken by secondary school students in the International Baccalaureate or
Advanced Placement programs or taken directly at the University. The
replies the Committee received are enclosed (not included in these
minutes) and the Committee would like to draw particular attention to
the replies of the Faculties of Arts and Science, the faculties most 9283.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Advanced Credit for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate,
and Concurrent Enrolment Policy (continued)
"concerned. The Faculty of Arts, in particular, took the time to do a
careful consultation and evaluation of both programs and, while speaking
very highly of both the International Baccalaureate and the Advanced
Placement programs, did counsel caution. Since the Faculty of Science
had done a similar review a year or so before, there was no particular
need for it to re-examine the question. The Faculties of Applied
Science and Forestry support the recommendations of the Faculty of
Science.
The Senate Admissions Committee would have liked to have had more
evidence that was independent of the advocates of the IB/AP programs.
For instance, it would be useful to know how the performances of these
students compare, subject by subject, with that of others taking the
Grade XII examinations. Comparisons of the GPA's of these students with
others from the same schools might also be useful. The Committee would
also have liked to know how the students from IB/AP programs already at
this University were performing. Unfortunately, the only evidence of
that sort available to the Committee were the records of 119 students
from the first term of the Winter Session 1987/88 and even those records
were incomplete. What results there were showed that students entering
with IB/AP credits of some sort had a good deal of success on the
Christmas examinations in mathematics and chemistry but a rather
alarming rate of failure on the English Composition Test taken at the
same time. Of course, the evidence is fragmentary, but the Senate
Admissions Committee believes there is enough to warrant support for the
Faculty of Arts's position that, while Advanced Placement will continue
to be assigned where appropriate, Advanced Credit will not be granted
for any IB/AP courses in the Faculty of Arts. When more evidence of
performance in Arts courses at this University becomes available, the
Faculty of Arts will keep the matter under review.
The Senate Admissions Committee is also prepared to support the view of
the Faculty of Science that Advanced Credit be assigned according to the
enclosed table (table follows this report). If that recommendation is
approved by Senate, then the table should be circulated to the secondary
schools by the Office of School and College Liaison. In accepting this
recommendation, Senate must realize that the Advanced Credit will appear
on the student's transcript whether the student decides to accept the
credit or not.
On the matter of Concurrent Studies, it seems to the Committee that
although it may be possible to follow the recommendations of the
President's Task Force (statement on Concurrent Enrolment Policy follows
this report) to control such enrolments here, it seems unrealistic to
suppose the same kind of control can be exercised over community
colleges and universities throughout the province. In accepting the
recommendation of the Senate Admissions Committee, Senate should be
aware that, whatever controls are placed on Concurrent Studies in our
own institution, we will also have to accept courses taken at other
institutions. The Committee, therefore, recommends setting a limit of
six units for this kind of credit. 9284.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Advanced Credit for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate,
and Concurrent Enrolment Policy (continued)
"Changes to be made in Calendar entries
p. 15, col. b bot. of page.
Omit:       "Advanced credit is not given ... (to end).
Substitute: "Advanced Credit and/or Advanced Placement may be given
where appropriate. These provisions apply particularly to
Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate (Higher
Level). Advanced Placement may be assigned in appropriate
subjects with high academic achievement on Advanced Level
(G.C.E.) and Principal Level (H.S.C). Interested students
should apply to the Office of the Registrar (Admissions)
for more information.
p. 16, col. a bot.
Add:       "International Baccalaureate and Advanced Placement".
The University of British Columbia is pleased to recognize
enriched secondary school programs of this type.  Some
courses may be eligible for Advanced Credit or Advanced
Placement.
p. 18 note 2
Applicants  presenting  appropriate  subjects  with high  academic
achievement on the Advanced Level (G.C.E.), Principal Level (H.S.C),
Higher Level (I.B.), or Advanced Placement may, where appropriate, be
considered for Advanced Placement or Advanced Credit.
p. 71, Faculty of Arts
Admission: For admission requirements, see section on Admission in the
General Information section of the Calendar. Note: The
Faculty of Arts, while assigning Advanced Placement in some
cases, does not assign Advanced Credit for courses in the
IB or AP programs.
p. 226, Faculty of Science
Add:       New paragraph after statistics 12
For information about Advanced Placement or Advanced Credit
for courses taken in the International Baccalaureate or
Advanced Placements programs, consult the Office of the
Registrar (Admissions)." 9285.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Advanced Credit for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate,
and Concurrent Enrolment Policy (continued)
THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE
(Table)
Advanced placement and credit towards the B.Sc. degree will be granted
for some subjects completed in the International Baccalaureate (IB) and
Advanced Placement (AP) programs as follows:
Minimum grade receiving credit
or exemption                  Courses
IB Higher Level     AP         Exemption     Credit
1 Biology   j      6      !    *      ! BI0L 10l» 102»! BI0L lst    !
103      year 3 units
1 Chemistry  j       6       j    4       j CHEM 103, 110,j CHEM lst    [
'     120, 150  year 3 units
Computer                       4        A11 lst year  cpsc H* & 116
Science                              CPSC courses  3 units
6                                 CPSC lst year
!                                          unassigned
i              I            I            i*'^ un*ts
[Mathematics J Higher Level  J Calculus AB | MATH 100, 111' MATH 100    J
6           4            120» 14°
J          ]  Further       j Calculus BC ] MATH 100, 101, j MATH 100, 101j
Mathematics        4        111, 120, 121,
6                   U0' lAl
1 Physics   |      6      | Physics B   j PHYS 110, 115,' PHYS 110    '
1                              4            12°
J          J               ' Physics C   ' PHYS 110, 115,' PHYS 115    '
4             12Q
First year students eligible for exemption and credit should consult with
Departmental.advisors before taking advanced placement in second year courses 9286.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Advanced Credit for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate,
and Concurrent Enrolment Policy (continued)
CONCURRENT ENROLMENT POLICY
Students who are enrolled in grade eleven or twelve in a B.C. secondary
school may be admitted to the University to pursue "Concurrent Studies" as
unclassified students. Normally no more than 6 units of such credit may
later be applied towards an appropriate degree at The University of
British Columbia.
The following conditions will apply at The University of British Columbia:
The applicant must have a superior academic record.
The applicant must be enrolled in a B.C. secondary school at the grade
eleven or twelve level, in a program that meets regular U.B.C. entry
requirements.
The applicant must have the written recommendation of the secondary
school Principal.
The applicant must have the written consent of the parent or legal
guardian if under the legal age of majority on the opening day of
classes.
The applicant must have the support of the Dean of the Faculty for the
courses in which he/she plans to enroll.
Admission will generally be limited to one academic session, however,
this may be renewable with the continued support of the school Principal
and the faculty Dean.
Students in Concurrent Studies will be treated as regular students in most
respects except that they may not register in a full range of courses and
their eligibility to register is valid for one academic session only
(unless renewed as per above). Standard transcripts will be issued and
fees and deadlines will be as for regular students.
Students who have enrolled in Concurrent Studies at other recognized
post-secondary institutions prior to secondary school graduation may also
be eligible for transfer credit.
Dr. Elder     ) The Senate Admissions Committee recommends approval
Mr. Williamson )  of:
1. The Faculty of Science recommendations on the
granting of advanced credit for the International
Baccalaureate and Advanced Placement according
to the table. 9287.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Advanced Credit for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate,
and Concurrent Enrolment Policy
Motion (continued)
2. A policy that allows students enrolled in grade
eleven or twelve in a B.C. secondary school be
considered for admission to the University to
pursue "Concurrent Studies" as unclassified
students. Enrolment would normally be limited to 6
units. The policy also applies to students who
have enrolled in concurrent studies at other
recognized post-secondary institutions.
3. A motion that the Senate Admissions Committee
undertake to review the performance of students
having been admitted with IB/AP credentials and
those enrolled in Concurrent Studies.
Mr. Fogarassy informed Senate that the student senators unanimously
supported the motion. He stated that they believed that the granting of
advanced credit for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate,
together with the Concurrent Enrolment Policy, will benefit the University
by attracting the best students.
The motion was put and carried.
Agenda Committee
Summary of Senate Proceedings
Dean Webber, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following
report, which had been circulated:
"Background
At its meeting of December 13,  1967,  Senate passed the following
recommendations of the Committee on the Role and Organization of Senate:
1. that a public gallery at Senate meetings should not be established;
2. that the University publish an informative agenda of senate prior to
meetings of Senate; and 9288.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Agenda Committee
Summary of Senate Proceedings
"Background (continued)
3. the University publish as soon as practicable after each Senate
meeting a summary of its proceedings including the arguments made for
and against the adoption of policies, this publication be circulated
to the Board, Senate, Faculty, the Ubyssey and interested daily
newspapers.
It is clear that the reason for the publication of a summary of Senate
proceedings was because the Committee on the Role and Organization of
Senate had recommended that Senate not be opened to the public.
On September 11, 1968, Senate opened its meetings to the public and
there was no longer the same need for the summary of Senate
proceedings. However, in the interests of providing information on a
widespread basis for the whole university community, Information
Services (now Community Relations) continued to record the proceedings
of Senate in full until November 12, 1975.
At about that time, the order of priorities within Information Services
had changed and, due to lack of funding and interest, Mr. Banham, of
Information Services, only recorded and printed in U.B.C. Reports items
which he thought would be of interest to the University community.
The Senate Agenda Committee recently received a request to revive the
publication of the summary of Senate proceedings on the grounds that
members of Faculty are affected by decisions of Senate but receive no
information as to dates of meetings or the location of Senate minutes.
The Senate Agenda Committee considered this request and discussed the
matter with Community Relations. Community Relations do not feel it
appropriate to publish the Senate minutes but are willing to publish
information relating to Senate, and to publish articles of interest
arising from Senate meetings.
Recommendat ion
The Agenda Committee therefore recommends that recommendation 3, of
December 13, 1967 be replaced by the following:
That U.B.C Reports be asked to publish annually, in September,
information relating to Senate. This would include issues likely to
come before Senate, dates, times and location of Senate meetings, the
major committees of Senate including the names of their Chairmen,
information about how to obtain tickets to attend Senate meetings, and
information about the location of Senate minutes. U.B.C. Reports would
also be asked to continue to provide regular coverage of Senate meetings
and publish articles of interest arising from Senate and to call
attention to issues likely to come before Senate." 9289.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Agenda Committee
Summary of Senate Proceedings (continued)
Dean Webber ) That U.B.C. Reports be asked to publish annually,
Dr. Tennant ) in September, information relating to Senate. This
would include issues likely to come before Senate,
dates, times and location of Senate meetings, the
major committees of Senate including the names of
their Chairmen, information about how to obtain
tickets to attend Senate meetings, and information
about the location of Senate minutes. U.B.C.
Reports would also be asked to continue to provide
regular coverage of Senate meetings and publish
articles of interest arising from Senate and to
call attention to issues likely to come before
Senate.
Dean Will informed Senate that the Faculty of Arts had decided to
produce a newsletter in an effort to keep members of the Faculty
informed about Senate matters.
Dr. Sobrino stated that there should be a forum whereby Senate
representatives of the faculty at-large could inform faculty about
Senate proceedings, and suggested that perhaps a meeting of the joint
faculties could be called, at least annually, for this purpose.
President Strangway said that he would take this suggestion under
advisement, and agreed that other issues could be discussed at such a
meeting.
The motion was put and carried.
Appeals on Academic standing
Dr. Hickling, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following report,
which had been circulated:
"1. Under s.2.07 of its Terms of Reference, the Committee is required
to make annual reports to Senate stating "the number of appeals
heard, their disposition, and the general nature of the appeals".
The Committee is also required to "draw Senate's attention to any
other matters of general significance in the University which have
arisen out of the Committee's work". 9290.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Appeals on Academic Standing  (continued)
"2. Under the Policies and Procedures for Senate Appeals on Academic
Standing, the jurisdiction of the Committee is narrowly defined.
It has no jurisdiction at all where the sole question raised in an
appeal turns on the exercise of academic judgement. It can allow
an appeal only where the decision appealed was arrived at "through
improper or unfair procedures, and that as a result a wrong
decision on the merits has or may have been arrived at". In all
other cases the appeal must be dismissed. Thus, the Committee's
jurisdiction is confined to situations where the basic issue is one
of procedure. It has no authority to assess the reasonableness,
the fairness, or the propriety of substantive policies of a
Department, Faculty or other administrative unit.
3. in the current academic year, the Committee has so far heard and
disposed of five appeals. Hearings in three other appeals have
been postponed due to illness of counsel, the absence of the
appellant or unavailability of crucial witnesses.
4. Four of the cases heard involved the appeal of a single decision.
Of this group, the appeal was allowed in two cases and denied in
the others. In the fifth case the appellant challenged two
separate decisions of different academic or administrative units.
In this case the appellant succeeded in one instance, but lost in
the other.
5. Three of the decisions involved misunderstandings arising from the
failure (actual or alleged) to provide complete or adequate
information to students about the policies or procedures adopted by
the department or Faculty involved. As a result, the Committee
made recommendations concerning changes in the university Calendar
or in Faculty prospectuses in order to avoid misunderstandings in
the future.
In one case, for example, it was suggested that a Faculty should
clarify a provision with regard to marks awarded in courses that
are repeated. Should the student receive, in such a case, the
highest, the lowest, or the average? It may be that other
Faculties, too, would wish to consider adequacy of the description
of their own policies in situations where students are allowed to
repeat courses.
The second case involved the propriety of evaluating members of the
same class on different bases. The appeal was denied, but the
Committee recommended that the Faculty provide clear guidelines as
to the rules and procedures governing alternative methods of
evaluation.
It was suggested in the third case that the Faculty concerned
clarify its rules relating to supplementals. 9291.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Appeals on Academic Standing  (continued)
"6. The Committee notes that problems arose in two cases because
individual instructors appear to have given advice to students that
was inconsistent with the established policies of the Department,
Faculty or unit concerned. This may have contributed to the
student's failure to follow the prescribed procedures. Faculties
and Departments may wish to consider what steps might be taken to
ensure that instructors are made aware of the proper rules and
procedures.
7. Whilst the jurisdiction of the Committee is confined to remedying
procedural errors, it is within its mandate to draw to the
attention of Senate unsettled questions of policy of general
importance to the University. Section 2.02(2) of the Policies and
Procedures declares that:
"If an issue on an appeal raises, in the opinion of the
Committee, an unsettled question of policy or procedure
of general importance to the University, the Committee
may refer that question to the Senate for a ruling".
8. One of the cases heard by the Committee involved an allegation that
the appellant had been unreasonably and unfairly denied medical
leave. The Faculty in question does not grant medical leave, in
the sense in which that term is ordinarily understood. It does
permit students who fall sick to withdraw and apply for readmission
when they have recovered. However, there is no guarantee, in such
a case, that their reapplications will succeed. The policy rests
upon long established practice. It does not appear to have been
formally considered and adopted by the Faculty Council. Nor has
the policy been approved by Senate or incorporated into the
University Calendar.
The legitimacy of that policy is a matter of substance rather than
procedure and hence falls outside the remedial authority delegated
to this Committee by Senate. However, in the absence of a
satisfactory explanation, it is the view of at least some of the
Senate Committee that the policy is in itself unfair and
unreasonable. Though the Committee has no authority to disallow
the policy, even if the majority were so inclined, the Committee
feels that the provision of adequate procedures for dealing with
students who fall sick is a matter of general concern which Senate
might wish to consider."
In speaking briefly to the report, Dr. Hickling drew Senate's attention
to item 8, which he stated involved not only a matter of procedure but a
matter of substantive policy. Dr. Hickling took the view that the Senate
committee has no jurisdiction on matters of substantive policy, but the 9292.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Appeals on Academic Standing  (continued)
matter of medical leave appeared to be one of general importance, and he
therefore had intended to present the following motion for Senate's
consideration:
That Senate appoint an ad hoc Committee to investigate and report
with recommendations on the policies, practices and procedures of
Faculties and other administrative units in dealing with students who
fall sick with particular reference to medical leave, deferred and
supplemental examinations.
However, Dr. Hickling stated that he had been informed that the matter
had been brought before the Committee of Deans. Consequently, he was
prepared to defer moving the above motion if the Committee of Deans
intended to bring before the Senate any results and recommendations it
were to make.
In response, Dean Suedfeld assured Dr. Hickling that the committee had
already prepared a first draft of a report on this matter, and hoped to be
in a position to present its recommendations to Senate in September.
Budget Committee
Dr. Robitaille, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following
report, which had been circulated for information:
"The Budget Committee has two major responsibilities. The first is to
advise the President on the preparation of the University budget, and
the second is to make recommendations to the President and to report to
Senate concerning academic planning and priorities as they relate to the
preparation of the University budget.
The Budget Committee was newly constituted in September, 1987 following
the Senate elections which were held last spring. This report covers
the period from September 1, 1987 to April 30, 1988, and hence includes
mention of some of the work of the former Committee as well as the
present one. 9293.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
"I. Budget Planning 1988-89
At its last meeting in September 1987, the former Budget Committee
discussed the documents which had been submitted to the Ministry of
Advanced Education and Job Training concerning the 1988-89 budget for
the University. The discussion concerned the tri-university submission
for operating funds, the Funds for Excellence, and a five-year capital
plan.
II. Operating Grant 1988-89
As of the date of this report, the University has still not received
final confirmation of the details of the operating grant for the current
fiscal year: 1988-89. As soon as that information is available, the
Committee will meet to discuss the budgets prepared by each of the
Vice-Presidents for their respective areas of responsibility. The
President and the Vice-President (Academic) have kept the Committee
informed on the status of discussions with Ministry officials concerning
this year's grant.
III. Budget Planning 1989-90
The Committee has indicated to the President that, as has been the case
in the past, the Committee wishes to be involved from the outset in the
development of guidelines for the preparation of the University's
budgetary submission for the 1989-90 fiscal year. To that end, the
Committee has requested that it be provided with trend data and other
analyses of the budget from previous years in order to be better able to
provide the kind of advice required. Those data are currently being
assembled by the Office of Budget Planning and Systems Management.
In the preparation of the 1989-90 budget request to the provincial
government, the University will be focusing on three goals:
- the provision of an adequate level of base funding, preferably with a
multi-year horizon;
the availability of capital funding on a consistent basis;
- the provision of matching funds to support fund-raising activities.
IV. Academic Planning and Priorities
1. Mission Statement. The Budget Committee met with the President to
discuss the draft version of the Mission Statement and Strategic
Planning document. This was the same draft which was later discussed
with Senate at its April meeting.
2. Joint Planning and Articulation Committee (JPAC). The Vice-President
(Academic) is a member of this committee which has been set up by the
Ministry of Advanced Education and Job Training to prepare a ten-year
plan for the post-secondary education system in the province.  The 9294.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
IV. Academic Planning and Priorities
2. Joint Planning and Articulation Committee (JPAC) (continued)
Budget Committee has discussed documents prepared for JPAC by
Ministry staff, and suggested a number of major revisions that should
be made.
V. Other
The Committee has been briefed on the progress of planning for the
major fund-raising campaign which the University will be launching in
the near future."
Curriculum Committee (see Appendix 'B')
Dr. Thompson, Chairman of the Committee, presented the report on
curriculum proposals submitted by the Faculties of Applied Science, Arts,
Commerce and Business Administration,  Dentistry,  Education, Graduate
Studies, Medicine, Science, and the School of Rehabilitation Medicine.
Faculty of Applied Science
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals, with the
exception of proposed revisions to the Third and Fourth Year Electrical
Engineering program which had been withdrawn by the Faculty of Applied
Science.
Faculty of Arts
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals. Dr.
Thompson pointed out that a proposal to change enrolment restrictions in
Family and Nutritional Sciences was being considered by the Senate
Admissions Committee, and therefore no recommendation was being made by
the curriculum committee on this item.
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals. it was
noted that the unit value of Commerce 388 should read (1.5-3)d.
Faculty of Dentistry
The committee recommended approval of a proposal to change the
description of CDSC 434, subject to the proposed change being amended to
read:
"Dental public health programs in Canada and current issues facing the
dental profession." 9295.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
Faculty of Education
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals, and also
recommended that the following statement be inserted in the Calendar for
the information of candidates in the Hearing Impairment Program:
"Sign language courses are available from a number of sources including
B.C. Regional Colleges. Further information may be obtained from the
Faculty of Education."
Faculty of Graduate Studies
The committee recommended approval of a Ph.D. program in Management
Information Systems.
The committee also recommended approval of curriculum proposals, subject
to the following:
Planning 514 - delete "of E.I.A." from description
Planning 540 - delete "Students may enroll in more than one section"
from description
Planning 548 - delete description, which states that "Students may
enroll in more than one section".
Planning 549 - change the proposed description to read:
■Research and preparation of a thesis on a topic in public policy or
professional practice."
Faculty of Medicine
The committee recommended approval of a new course.
School of Rehabilitation Medicine
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals.
Faculty of Science
The committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals, with the
exception of Chemistry 125 which had been withdrawn by the Faculty of
Science.
Dr. Thompson  ) That the proposals of the Faculties of
Dr. Goldberg  ) Applied Science, Arts, Commerce and Business
Administration, Dentistry, Education,
Graduate Studies, Medicine, Science, and the
School of Rehabilitation Medicine be approved,
subject to the provisos noted.
Carried 9296.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate (continued)
Nominating Committee
Dr. Tennant, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following report,
which had been circulated:
"1. Academic Policy Committee
At its April meeting, Senate approved a motion by the Nominating
Committee recommending that the Academic Policy Committee consist
of: Chancellor, President, Academic Vice-President, and Registrar,
all ex-officio, and thirteen additional members of Senate, including
at least two students and at least three other non-faculty members.
The Nominating Committee recommends the following membership:
Dr. E. G. Auld
Ms. L. M. Copeland
Mr. J. A. S. Fogarassy
Dr. S. W. Hamilton
Mr. J. Kulich
Dr. B. C. McBride
Dr. B. M. Morrison
Mr. E. S. Reid
Dean J. F. Richards
Dean N. sheehan
Dr. R. Tees
Mr. G. A. Thorn
Mr. S. Vukusic
Chancellor )
President ) ex-officio
Academic Vice-President )
Registrar )
The Academic Policy Committee's first item of business will be the
election of its Chairman and the preparation of proposed terms of
reference for approval by senate.
2. Student vacancies on Senate Committees
The Nominating Committee nominates the following persons to fill
student vacancies on Senate Committees:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. A. K. Haji - replacing Mr. A. J. Pearson
Mrs. B. M. Loeb - replacing Mr. D. M. Pettingale 9297.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee
"2. Student vacancies on Senate Committees (continued)
Admissions
Ms. H. E. Cowan
Mr. J. A. S. Fogarassy
Agenda
Mr. A. K. Colbeck
Miss H. Shou
Appeals on Academic Standing
Mr. A. K. Colbeck
Mr. D. M. Pettingale
Mr. G. Taylor
Budget
Mr. J. A. Williamson
Mr. S. M. Wilson
Continuing Education
Mr. R. G. Bush
Curriculum
Ms. H. E. Cowan
Mrs. B. M. Loeb
Mr. G. Taylor
Committee on Elections
Mr. J. P. Andrews
Extracurricular Activities
Ms. K. P. Curtis
Mr. A. K. Haji
- replacing Ms. B. Steffensen
- continuing member
- continuing member
- replacing Ms. B. Steffensen
replacing Mr. J. A. Williamson
continuing member
continuing member
replacing Mr. G. Loeb
replacing Mr. R. A. Yaworsky
continuing member
continuing member
replacing Mr. K. H. Stewart
replacing Mr. S. Vukusic
replacing Mr. A. J. Pearson
- replacing Mr. A. K. Colbeck
- replacing Mr. M. Fahy
Liaison with Post-Secondary institutions
Mr. S. Vukusic
Student Appeals on Academic
- replacing Mr. R. A. Speers
Discipline
Mr. J. P. Andrews
Mr. R. G. Bush
Mr. R. A. Speers
- replacing Mr. J. Ringwald
- continuing member
- continuing member 9298.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee
"2. Student vacancies on Senate Committees (continued)
Student Awards
Mr. E. W. N. Lam - replacing Mr. A. J. Pearson
Mr. S. M. Wilson - replacing Mr. S. Vukusic
Tributes
Miss K. P. Curtis - replacing Mr. M. Fahy
Mr. S. F. Haffey - replacing Mr. R. A. Yaworsky
University Library
Mr. S. F. Haffey - replacing Mr. B. Dumka
Mr. E. W. N. Lam - replacing Mr. J. Ringwald
Mr. J. A. Williamson        - continuing member
Ad hoc Committee on at-large election of Student Senators
Mr. S. F. Haffey - replacing Mr. M. Fahy
3. University Library Committee
The Nominating Committee recommends that Dr. J. A. S. Evans
replace Dr. J. L. Wisenthal on the Library Committee."
Dr. Tennant   ) That the recommendations of the committee
Dean Beagrie  )  be approved.
The following additional nominations for membership on the Academic
Policy Committee were made and accepted:
Mr. M. G. McMillan
Mr. D. M. Pettingale
Dr. R. A. Spencer
Dr. Tennant   )  That the size of the Academic Policy
Dr. Goldberg  ) Committee be increased by three.
Lost
It was agreed that,  in accordance with established procedures, an
election be held to determine the membership of the Academic Policy
Committee. 9299.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee (continued)
Dr. Tennant   ) That the committee's recommendations
Dr. Goldberg  )  to fill student vacancies on Senate
Committees, and the recommendation
that Dr. Evans replace Dr. wisenthal
on the Library Committee, be approved.
Carried
Committee on Student Awards
Dr. Cook      ) That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A')
Mr. McMillan  ) be accepted subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
Dr. Cook, Chairman of the Committee, drew Senate's attention to the
Ferguson scholarship which had been withdrawn at the previous meeting, at
the request of the donor, because of a change in wording. The change had
subsequently been made and the award was now before Senate for approval.
Dr. Cook also drew Senate's attention to the Governor-General's Gold
Medal. Dr. Cook explained that, in the past, the Governor-General's Gold
Medal had been awarded to the head of the graduating classes in Arts and
Science for undergraduate studies at the University. She stated that a
change had been made, and the Gold Medal will now be awarded to the head
of the graduating classes in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, Master's
Programs. The head of the graduating classes in Arts and science for
undergraduate studies will now be awarded a Silver Medal.
Other awards mentioned by Dr. Cook were the Asa Johal Graduate
Fellowships in Forestry, consisting of two $10,000 fellowships, and the Cy
and Emerald Keyes Awards in Mining and Mineral Process Engineering which
replaces the Cy and Emerald Keyes Bursaries in Mining and Mineral Process
Engineering. 9300.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Student Awards (continued)
In response to a question, President Strangway confirmed that the change
in policy regarding the Governor-General's Gold Medal had been made by the
Governor-General's office in Ottawa.
Senate was informed that the President had written a letter to the
Governor-General expressing concern about the change in policy.
Dr. Wisenthal pointed out that there was no reference to academic
ability in the description of the Diachem Industries Scholarships.
In amendment:
Dr. Wisenthal ) That the words "academic achievement" be added
Dr. Sobrino   )  to the description of the Diachem Industries
Scholarships, after the words "Applicants must
demonstrate..."
Some members expressed concern that the award appeared to be an athletic
scholarship, even though the recipient must meet certain minimum academic
standards, and felt that the committee should review this particular
scholarship and report back to Senate.
Dr. Birch     )  That this matter be referred to the
Dr. Shaw      )  Committee on Student Awards and that
they bring it back with a framing of the
issues for discussion of the question of
scholarships related in any way to athletics.
Carried
Dean Suedfeld drew senate's attention to the Harry Franklin Memorial
Scholarship and the Bob Ackles Scholarship, which he stated were of the
same nature as the Diachem Industries Scholarships.  Dr. Cook responded
that they were of the same nature and that they should all be referred
back to the committee. 9301.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Student Awards (continued)
In amendment:
Dean Suedfeld ) That the Harry Franklin Memorial Scholarship,
Dean Will     ) and the Bob Ackles Scholarship be referred
back to the committee.
Dr. Sobrino asked for clarification as to the difference between an
award and a scholarship.  He said that they appeared to be regarded
differently as far as academic achievement is concerned.  Dr. Cook
responded that awards may be awarded to a student on a basis other than
meeting 75% academic standing and/or top 10% in their class.
Dean Webber felt that both the awards and the scholarships connected
with athletics should be referred back to the committee rather than try to
sort out the distinction between awards and scholarships for the purposes
of looking at the criteria.
Amendment to the amendment:
Dean Webber   ) That the Harry Franklin Memorial Award,
Dean Will     )  the Harry Franklin Memorial Scholarship,
the Bob Ackles Award, and the Bob Ackles
Scholarship be referred back to the committee.
Carried
After further discussion the motion to accept the list of awards, as
amended, was put and carried.
For the information of Senate, Dr. Cook pointed out that in the list of
Heads of Graduating Classes, two of the heads of the graduating classes
were among the first groups that had received the major entrance awards on
admission to the University. The winner of the Governor-General's Silver
Medal, Russil Wvong, had received the Bert Henry Memorial Scholarship, and 9302.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Student Awards (continued)
the winner of the University of B.C. Medal for Arts and Science, Susan
Margaret Bree, had received the Chancellor's Entrance Scholarship. Dr.
Cook stated that it was interesting that students who had received awards
on admission to the University were winners of "exit" awards.
A further point that Dr. Cook brought to Senate's attention was that the
majority of the Heads of the Graduating Classes did not enter UBC in their
first year. Many of them had gone to one of the B.C. colleges or to other
•universities in this province, or other universities outside B.C., and
came to UBC in second or third year. Dr. Cook felt that it would be
interesting to see, in future years, how many UBC students became heads of
graduating classes compared to students who had attended other
institutions before coming to UBC.
in conclusion, Dr. Cook expressed thanks and appreciation for the
valuable work done by the two student members of the Committee, Mr. A. J.
Pearson and Mr. S. Vukusic.
Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute
The following memorial statement had been prepared in accordance with
the custom of Senate, in recognition by the University and Senate of the
late Phyllis Gregory Ross.
IN MEMORIAM
PHYLLIS GREGORY ROSS (1903 - 1988)
With the death of Phyllis Gregory Ross, The University of British
Columbia has lost one of its most talented, loyal and widely acclaimed
alumni. 9303.
May 18, 1988
Reports of Committees of Senate
Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute (continued)
Born in Rossland, B.C., the daughter of a miner who moved to this
province, Phyllis Ross earned her baccalaureate degree at The University
of British Columbia with first class honours in Economics and Political
Science. She continued her studies at the graduate level at Bryn Mawr,
the London School of Economics, and the University of Marburg.
Widowed in her late twenties, and with two young children to support and
educate, Mrs. Ross moved to Ottawa where, for eleven years, she held
major positions of responsibility with the Canadian Tariff Board, the
Dominion Trade and Industry Commission, and the Wartime Prices and Trade
Board.
Phyllis Ross was widely applauded as an outstanding administrator and a
major force in the direction of Canada's wartime economy. Her services
were recognized by her appointment to Commander of the Order of the
British Empire and by her inclusion among the group of University of
British Columbia graduates who received the degree of LL.D. in 1945 for
their contribution to the nation during the war.
Phyllis Ross served as a member of Senate between 1951-1954 and from
1960-1966. She was appointed to the Board of Governors in 1957 and, in
1961, became the first woman in the Commonwealth to be elected to the
position of Chancellor. Phyllis Ross devoted the same high degree of
energy, grace, and commitment to her university responsibilities which
had characterized her entire life.
In 1945 she married Frank MacKenzie Ross, who was later to serve as
Lieutenant Governor of the province from 1955 to 1960. As Chatelaine of
Government House her devotion to duty made her a familiar figure to many
thousands of British Columbians.
Mrs. Ross' list of awards and honours is extraordinary. They reflect
her active interest in many cultural, philanthropic and medical
associations, and include her appointment as Dame of St. John of
Jerusalem and as Dame of the Sovereign and Military Order of Malta.
Phyllis Gregory Ross was a truly remarkable woman and an outstanding
Canadian.  She loved this University and never tired in her efforts to
further  its cause.  Her life was one of dedication to duty,  and
unselfish devotion to the service of her family, her province, and her
country.
To her surviving relatives the Senate of The University of British
Columbia extends its deepest sympathy.
Dr. Dennison  ) That the memorial statement for
Mr. McMillan  ) Phyllis Gregory Ross be spread on the minutes
of Senate and that a copy be sent to
the relatives of the deceased.
Carried 9304.
May 18, 1988
Proposals from the Faculty of Graduate Studies
Community and Regional Planning
A proposal to change the nomenclature of the degrees from M.A. or M.Sc.
to M.A. (Planning) or M.Sc. (Planning) had been circulated.
It was stated in the material circulated that the change satisfies the
longstanding concern of the Canadian Institute of Planners and the
Planning Accreditation Board of the American Planning Association that the
designation "planning" appear in the degree title. This is a clear
requirement for accredited schools. To date, the School has escaped this
requirement by indicating that the clear designation was in process. With
a recent accreditation visit and pending report, this requirement must be
satisfied or accreditation will not be forthcoming. The designation also
increases the identity of the School, confers in a clear manner
professional status (graduates become members of the Canadian Institute of
Planners), and brings SCARP into line with similar programs in both Canada
and the U.S.
Dean Suedfeld )  That the nomenclature of the degrees
Dean Will     )  in Community and Regional Planning
be changed from M.A. or M.Sc. to
M.A. (Planning) or M.Sc (Planning).
Carried
Supplementals - proposed change in Calendar Statement
The following proposed Calendar statement concerning supplementals had
been circulated (addition to the present entry underlined):
"Supplemental examinations are not granted to students registered in a
graduate program. A course in which a grade of less than 65% was
obtained may be repeated for a higher standing if recommended by the
department and approved by the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
In courses that are repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript
and will be taken into account when determining promotion in a program,
and when deciding to admit a student or withdraw a student from a
program. Students do not have the privilege of selecting the more
favourable mark in their record." 9305.
May 18, 1988
Proposals from the Faculty of Graduate Studies
Supplementals - proposed change in Calendar statement (continued)
Dean Suedfeld explained that the proposed changes were in response to a
request by the Senate Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing that the
Faculty clarify its regulations. He stated that the proposed change in
the calendar statement clarifies and makes explicit the practice that has
always been followed and accepted implicitly. He said that although
students are permitted to retake a course in an attempt to raise their
mark, in cases where their standing or continued progress in their program
requires that, there is no implication that one of the marks will be
expunged from the record, nor will it necessarily mean that the lower mark
will be expunged from the record. In fact, the practice has been that
both marks are retained, although for purposes of continuation or progress
in the program, the higher mark is deemed to have satisfied the
requirements if the original mark did not.
Dean Suedfeld  )  That the proposed change in the Faculty
Dr. Hickling  )  of Graduate Studies Calendar statement
on Supplementals be approved.
Dr. Sobrino expressed concern with the part of the statement that says
both marks will be taken into account when determining promotion in a
program. Dr. Sobrino felt that the knowledge the student had gained was
more important in determining promotion in a program than whether or not
the student had repeated the course.
Dean suedfeld explained that there are two kinds of requirements that
students must satisfy to remain in, and progress through a program. One
is satisfying particular program requirements; that is passing or
receiving a higher mark in particular courses. Retaking a course will
enable a student to meet that requirement if he or she failed a course the 9306.
May 18, 1988
Proposals from the Faculty of Graduate studies
Supplementals - proposed change in Calendar Statement (continued)
first time, or did not receive an adequate mark in that course. The other
requirement is achieving a certain average. Dean Suedfeld stated that the
Faculty of Graduate Studies does not feel that if a student has failed a
course or received a poor mark in it once, and then takes another year and
increases that mark, that the first mark should be expunged.
Dr. Spencer, stated that it was his understanding that where an average
is at issue, the average should include all courses that have been taken,
but where there is a requirement that a minimum might be obtained in a
specific course or that a specific course be passed, then one can look at
the more recent or higher mark. However, he felt that the wording in the
proposed statement did not make that clear because the last sentence
states that students do not have the privilege of selecting the more
favourable mark in their record, whereas in fact in one of the two
situations they do have that privilege. Dr. Spencer suggested that some
rewording was necessary and that an alternative might be to place the
wording under the provisions rather than in a general statement.
Dr. Tennant suggested that the matter being discussed did not relate to
supplementals and that it was confusing to have it under the heading
"Supplementals".
Dr. Sobrino stated that he agreed with the intent of the proposal but
felt that it should be referred back for rewording.
Dr. Sobrino   ) That the proposal be referred back to
Dr. Elder     )  the Faculty of Graduate Studies for
clarification of the intent.
Carried yasy£>
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7 9311.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate
John K. Campbell Scholarship - A $1,800 scholarship, gift of John K.
Campbell, is awarded to a student in the Faculty of Law who has achieved
high academic standing in mining, metallurgy, geology or geological
engineering, or other related natural resource disciplines. students must
apply in writing to the Office of the Associate Dean, Faculty of Law, by May
lst. Applicants must provide a statement detailing their financial
circumstances as financial need will be a consideration. The award is made
on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 1988/89 Winter
Session)
Bryan R. Clarke Prize - A book prize has been established to honour Bryan R.
Clarke. It is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Education to
the graduating student who has the best practicum record with hearing
impaired children.  (Available 1988/89 Winter Session)
Emergency Physicians Prize - A prize consisting of Rosen's textbook
"Emergency Medicine" volumes I and II is offered by the emergency physicians
at Shaughnessy Hospital to the best UBC fourth year medical student in the
Shaughnessy Emergency Elective Rotation. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine in consultation with the
Shaughnessy emergency physicians.  (Available 1987/88 winter Session)
Ferguson Scholarship - A scholarship of approximately $350 has been endowed
by Dr. Rodney Poisson, M.A.'39, and Mrs. Poisson, M.A.'39, to honour the
memory of her parents the Reverend T. J. s. Ferguson and Dr. Amy Ferguson,
of Nelson. The award is made to a graduate of a secondary school in School
District No. 7 with first preference to a student from L. V. Rogers
Secondary School (Nelson). It is open to students beginning or continuing
studies at UBC The financial circumstances of the candidate will be an
important factor.  (Available 1989/90 Winter Session)
Governor-General's Gold Medal - A gold medal, presented by the
Governor-General of Canada, is awarded to the graduate student whose record,
in the opinion of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, is the best in the
graduating class for the Master's degree.  (Available 1987/88 Winter Session)
Guild, Yule, Lane, Sullivan, Mackenzie and Holmes Prize in Contract Law - A
$750 prize,giftofthelaw firm of Guild,Yule,Lane, Sullivan, Mackenzie
and Holmes, is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law to a
first-year student who achieves high standing in Law 209 (Contracts).
(Available 1987/88 Winter Session)
Guild, Yule, Lane, Sullivan, Mackenzie and Holmes Scholarship - A $750
scholarship, gift of the law firm of Guild, Yule, Lane, Sullivan, Mackenzie
and Holmes, is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law to an
outstanding student completing the second year of Law. (Available 1988/89
Winter Session)
Howard/Yano Prize - A $250 prize is offered by Howard/Yano, Architects, to
the student who has completed at least five terms of the B.Arch. program and
obtained the highest standing in non-studio courses dealing with the process
and practice issues in architecture. The award is made on the
recommendation of the School of Architecture.  (Available 1987/88 Winter
Session) 9312.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Ishiyaku EuroAmerica, Inc./Piccin Medical Book Prize - Ishiyaku EuroAmerica,
Inc. offers a prize consisting of a certificate of merit and a $75 voucher
for the purchase of medical books it publishes. The prize is awarded on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine to an undergraduate student who
has achieved high academic standing.  (Available 1987/88 Winter Session)
Asa Johal Graduate Fellowships in Forestry - Two $10,000 fellowships are
awarded to graduate students in the Faculty of Forestry based on their
scholarship and research potential. The awards are made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry and approved by the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. The funds for these awards come from operation of the UBC
Forest Nursery, which was made possible in part by a major contribution from
Asa Johal, President of Terminal Forest Products Ltd. (Available 1988/89
Winter Session)
Cy and Emerald Keyes Awards in Mining and Mineral Process Engineering -
Awards totalling approximately $16,000 have been made available by the late
Cy and Emerald Keyes for students in Mining and Mineral Process
Engineering. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Department to
students demonstrating sound academic progress and promise in the discipline.
The awards are available only to Canadian citizens and permanent residents.
(This new award replaces the Cy and Emerald Keyes Bursaries in Mining and
Mineral Process Engineering.)  (Available 1988/89 Winter Session)
Ruth Pinkus Memorial Scholarship - A $300 scholarship is awarded to a
student completing first or second year law who has demonstrated not only
high academic achievement but also a commitment to and involvement in the
field of civil rights. This scholarship is donated by family and friends in
memory of Ruth Pinkus, who as a student in the Faculty of Law and as a
lawyer was deeply concerned with the rights and freedoms of society.
Application forms are available in February at the Office of the Associate
Dean and must be submitted to that office by May lst. The scholarship is
awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 1988/89
Winter Session)
Plant Science  Seminar Prizes - A prize of  $25 is awarded on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences to recognize the best
student seminar presentation in each term of the course Plant Science 423.
(Available 1987/88 winter session)
Joan Porret Memorial Bursary - A $100 bursary has been established in memory
of Joan Porret by her family and friends for a mature woman undergraduate
student entering the Faculty of Education. (Available 1988/89 winter
Session)
Zonta Club of Vancouver Bursary - A $200 bursary has been established by the
Zonta Club of Vancouver for a woman enrolled full-time in an undergraduate
or professional program. The award is made to a Canadian citizen or
permanent resident who graduated from a B.C. high school. (Available
1988/89 winter Session) 9313.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Curriculum changes effective September, 1988
New      APSC 211 (0) Year-Round Co-operative Work Placement II-A
APSC 212 (0) Year-Round Co-operative Work Placement II-B
APSC 311 (0) Year-Round Co-operative Work Placement III-A
APSC 312 (0) Year-Round Co-operative Work Placement III-B
APSC 411 (0) Year-Round Co-operative Work Placement IV-A
Engineering Physics
Change in Programs
Second Year
ELEC 252 dropped
ELEC 251, 253 - change in hours
CPSC 118 moved from 2nd term to lst term
Third Year
ELEC 254, 266 - change in hours
Physics
Change    PHYS 175 - change in units to (1.5), hours
FACULTY OF ARTS
Undergraduate
Courses in Other Faculties or Degree Programs
The following courses in other faculties or degree programs are accepted
for credit toward the Bachelor of Arts degree:
1. All courses designated FMSC in the Family Science program of the
School of Family and Nutritional Sciences.
2. History of Medicine 400 and 401 (prerequisites: Biology 101 or 102).
3. All courses in the history, theory and composition of Music; a
maximum of 3 units from the ensemble courses in musical performance
(Music 150-165). No other musical performance courses will be
allowed.
4. All courses in the Faculty of Science, subject to the limitation
described below regarding credit for special introductory courses.
A maximum of 6 units from the following list of special introductory
courses offered by faculties other than the Faculty of Arts or by
schools within the University may count toward the last 30 units (Major)
or 36 units (Honours) of a student's program for the Bachelor of Arts
degree: 9314.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Undergraduate
Courses in Other Faculties or Degree Programs (continued)
Biology 343: Plants and Man
Biology 344: Human Heredity and Evolution
Biology 345: Ecology and Man
Biology 346: Microbes and Man
Biology 446: Principles and History of Biology
Commerce 457: Introduction to Financial Accounting
•
(same as present list)
Soil Science 300: Soil in Man's Environment
(Zoology deleted)
In certain Major or Honours programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts
degree, students may take up to 6 units in courses offered by other
faculties or schools if the department in which they are registered
agrees to accept such courses as part of the Major or Honours
requirement (i.e., as part of the 15 or more units of work required in
one subject or field of concentration). Whenever such permission is
granted, the department must notify the Senior Faculty Adviser in
writing before the permission takes effect.
With the above exceptions, no course in other faculties or degree
programs may be taken in a Bachelor of Arts program.
Asian Studies
Changes   ASIA 365 - split into two courses:
ASIA 365 (1.5) Chinese Religions Until the Han Dynasty
ASIA 366 (1.5) Taoism, Buddhism, and Popular Religion
in China
JAPN 401 - change in prerequisite
Changes in Program Description
Under:    Course Selection: First Year List A
Add the following courses in alphabetical order:
Indonesian 102
Korean 102
Punjabi 102
Under:    Course Selection: second Year List B 9315.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Asian Studies  (cont inued)
Add the following courses in alphabetical order:
Indonesian 200
Korean 200
Punjabi 200
Under:    A. Program in East Asia
add:
Under:
change:
to read:
Classics
Change
3-6 units from:
Religious Studies 367 (1.5)
Religious Studies 431 (1.5)
Major in Japanese
Third and Fourth Years:
"9-12 units in courses in Japanese numbered 300 and above."
9-12 units in Japanese language courses numbered 300 and
above, including at least one 400 level course.
CLST 315 - change in description
Change in Program Description
Under:    Honours in Classics:
Change Prerequisites: to:
Prerequisites or co-requisites: Greek 200, Greek 301, Latin 200, Latin
301, Classical studies 331. Latin 205 may be taken in place of Latin
200 and Latin 301.
Hispanic and Italian studies
Changes ITAL 302 - change in number (was 300)
ITAL 300 - change in number (was 302)
ITAL 400 - change in description
Library, Archival and Information Studies
Change    LIBR 600 - change in units to (1.5)
Music
New       MUSC 430 (1.5/3)d Major Composers
Deletions MUSC 343, 450, 451, 456, 457 9316.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
Theatre
Changes   THTR 233, 333 - change in title
THTR 433 - change in title, units, description, hours
Change in Program Requirements
Under Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts
Film and Television Major
Third and Fourth Years
Delete "and either 334 or 434"
Under Requirements for the Diploma in Film/Television Studies
Second Year - Delete "Theatre 334"
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
New
Changes
COMM 388
COMM 460
COMM 461
COMM 464
COMM 493
COMM 494
COMM 498
(1.5-3)d Seminar in Arts Administration
(1.5) Public and Nonprofit Marketing Management
(1.5) sales Management
(1.5) selected Topics in Marketing
(1.5) Business/Public Policy Project
(1.5) Corporate and Industry Analysis
(1.5) international Business Management
COMM 311 (3) - split into two courses:
COMM 311 (1.5) Decision Analysis I
COMM 312 (1.5) Decision Analysis II
Deletion
COMM 454
Changes
COMM 454 -
COMM 3 27 -
COMM 471 -
(was 371)
COMM 371 -
COMM 4 28 -
(was 325)
COMM 453 -
COMM 420 -
COMM 328 -
COMM 4 27 -
COMM 465,
COMM 492 -
COMM 363,
change in number, description (was 358)
change in number, description (was 425)
change in number, description, and prerequisite
change in number, description (was 471)
change in number, description, and prerequisite
change in units (to: 1.5/3)d
change in number, title description (was 321)
change in number, title, prerequisite (was 423)
change in number, prerequisite (was 324)
466 - change in title, description
change in title, description
467, 468 - change in title 9317.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION  (continued)
Industrial Relations Option 6
Changes in Program
Third Year Commerce 327, 328, 392, 393, 394, 391, 396, 397
electives 1.5; Non-Commerce 3.0 units.
Fourth Year Commerce 421, 427, 428, 491, 492, electives
7.5; Non-Commerce 3.0 units
Marketing Option 7
Changes in Program
Third Year Commerce 362, 363, 365, 392, 393, 394 391, 396, 397
Non-Commerce 3.0 units
Commerce 363 is prerequisite to all fourth year courses
Fourth Year Commerce 468, 491, 492
1.5 units from Commerce 460, 461, 462, 463, 464, 465,
466, 467, 469
electives 9 units
Non-Commerce 3.0 units
Commerce 362 may be taken corequisite with any 400 level
course.
Accounting Option I
Third Year (Five-Year Program)
Commerce 337, 353, 354, 392, 393, 394, 454, electives
Third Year (Four-Year Program)
Commerce 353, 354, 391, 392, 393, 394, 396, 397
Non-Commerce 3.0 units
Fourth Year  (Four-Year Program)
Commerce 453 (1.5), 454, 491, 492, 1.5 units from Commerce 355, 451,
452,455,  459,  electives;  7.5  units  of  electives  and  3.0  units
Non-Commerce.
Fourth Year (Four-Year Program)
The fourth year of the Commerce Program will consist of 491 and 1.5
units of 339, 492, 493, 494 or 498.
Third and Fourth Year (Five-Year Program)
Students are required to complete Commerce 392, 393, 394, 491and 1.5
units of 339, 492, 493, 494 or  498. 9318.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
Change     CDSC 434 - change in description
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
Change    Education 432 - change in units, hours (to 1.5/3)d
Centre for Studies in Curriculum and Instruction
Change program description
Diploma in Education
Under Fields of Specialization,
add, Primary Education
Mathematics and Science Education
Change    Business Education 401, 402 - change in hours
Visual and Performing Arts in Education
Change    Art Education 425 - change in title, description, units,
hours, prerequisite
Educational Psychology and Special Education
Change Calendar entry for the Special Education Programs to:
3. The special education programs
These programs parallel the basic elementary teaching program in
preparing candidates to teach in regular classrooms. In addition
they provide the specialized preparation necessary to educate
handicapped students either within regular classrooms or in special
education programs.
The following special education program options are available:
a. Mild impairments
This variant on the basic elementary teaching program prepares
teachers to educate mildly handicapped children (mildly
intellectually impaired, behaviourally disordered, and learning
disabled). 9319.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
3. The special education programs  (continued)
b. Moderate to severe impairments
Each of these programs prepares teachers to work with students
with the specified handicap, either in regular classrooms or in
other educational programs.
(1) The Hearing Impairment program prepares teachers to work
with students who have partial or no hearing.
(2) The Visual Impairment program prepares teachers to work with
students who have partial or no sight.
(3) The Mental Handicap program prepares teachers to work with
educable and trainable mentally handicapped students.
The same admission requirements and procedures apply as for other
applicants to the elementary teaching program, except that applicants
must have completed Special Education 312, Introduction to the study
of exceptional children (or equivalent), prior to admission to the
program. If this course has not been included during the applicant's
prior university studies, admission may be conditional upon
completing the course before initial registration (e.g., during
summer session).
The sequence of courses is similar to that for the basic elementary
teaching program; details are noted below. Where warranted, special
sections of courses are scheduled. In addition, attention is paid to
school placements throughout the program to ensure an orderly
progression of experience in working with appropriate groups of
exceptional students.
Year 1, term 1
For candidates in all special education programs, the courses taken
in this term are the same as in the basic elementary teaching program
except that instead of Education 316 - Communication Skills in
Teaching (1.5 units), candidates take:
Educational Psychology 421 1.5 units
(Assessment of Learning Difficulties) 9320.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
3. The special education programs (continued)
Year 1, term 2
All candidates in special education programs complete the following
6.5 units of courses:
Education 321
(Orientation School Experience: Elementary)
Education 328
(Practice in Teaching: Elementary)
Education 420
(School Organization in its Social Context)
Educational Psychology elective
One of:
Educational Psychology 322
(Education during the Early Childhood Years)
Educational Psychology 323
(Education during the Middle Childhood Years)
Educational Studies elective
One of:
Educational Studies 425
(Educational Anthropology)
Educational Studies 426
(History of Education)
Educational Studies 427
(Philosophy of Education)
Educational Studies 428
(The Social Foundations of Education)
Educational Studies 429
(Educational Sociology)
Curriculum and Instruction Courses
Both of:
English Education 320
Reading Education 320
And one of:
Art Education 320
Education 320 (Physical Education)
Music Education 320
Candidates in the Mild Impairment program also complete:
Special Education 316
(Special Learning Disabilities)
Special Education 436
(Behaviour Disorders in Children)
0.0 units
0.0 units
1.0 units
1.0 units
1.0 units
1.5 units
1.5 units
1.5 units
1.5 units
1.5 units
1.0 unit
1.0 unit
1.0 unit
1.0 unit
1.0 unit
1.5 units
1.5 units 9321.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
3. The special education programs (continued)
Candidates in the Moderate and Severe Impairment program also
complete:
Curriculum and Instruction courses
Mathematics Education 320 1.0 unit
Science Education 320 1.0 unit
Social Studies Education 320 1.0 unit
Summer Session
Candidates in the Hearing Impairment program must complete:
Special Education 441 1.5 units
(Audiology I)
Special Education 443 1.5 units
(Teaching Communication Skills to the Hearing Impaired)
They must also acquire sign language proficiency prior to the
beginning of the Year 2 practicum.
Sign language courses are available from a number of sources
including B.C. Regional Colleges. Further information may be
obtained from the Faculty of Education.
Year 2
During this year the programs differ substantially, depending on the
specialization.
a.    The Mild Impairment program
Year 2, term 1
Education 317 1.5 units
(Communication with Exceptional Students)
Curriculum and Instruction courses:
Mathematics Education 320 1.0 unit
Science Education 320 1.0 unit
Social Studies Education 320 1.0 unit
Special Education 429 1.5 units
(Education of the Mildly Intellectually Impaired)
Special Education 431 1.5 units
(Programming for Children with Specific Learning Disabilities)
Special Education 437 1.5 units
(Teaching Maladjusted Children)
Electives
Selected from courses in Special Education or related fields. 9322.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
3. The special education programs (continued)
Year 2, term 2
Education 418 9.0 units
(Extended Practicum: Elementary)
This will include assignment to a class including students with
special educational needs and placement in a learning assistance
centre in addition to substantial experience in regular classrooms.
Total program requirements 38.0 units
b.    The Moderate and Severe impairment programs
Year 2, term 1 and 2
Education 418 9.0 units
(Extended Practicum: Elementary)
In these programs the practica will extend over the academic year as
follows:
- in regular classrooms: 5 weeks at the beginning of Term 1.
- in programs, classrooms, and other settings for students with the
appropriate specific impairment: 3 weeks immediately following the
regular 5 weeks; 3 weeks at the beginning of Term 2; and 4 weeks
at the end of Term 2.
Courses scheduled on campus in the intervening weeks differ for each
specific impairment.
(1)   The Hearing Impairment program
Special Education 319 1.5 units
(Remedial Speech for Students with Hearing Impairments)
Special Education 422 1.5 units
(Phonetics and Voice Science)
Special Education 442 1.5 units
(Audiology II)
Special Education 444 1.5 units
(Teaching Academic Subjects to the Deaf)
Special Education 445 1.5 units
(Teaching Speech to the Deaf)
Special Education 446 1.5 units
(History of Education of the Deaf)
Special Education 447  ^ 1.5 units
(Psychology of Deafness)
Total program requirements 41.0 units 9323.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
3. The special education programs (continued)
(2) The Visual Impairment program
Ophthalmology 390 0.5 unit
(An Introduction to Diseases of the Visual System)
Special Education 320 1.5 units
(Teaching Concepts to Visually Handicapped Children)
Special Education 344 1.5 units
(Programming in Special Education: Developing Perspectives)
Special Education 415 1.5 units
(Optacon Reading for Teachers of the Visually Impaired)
Special Education 421 3.0 units
(Provisions in the Education of the Visually Handicapped)
Special Education 448 1.5 units
(The Education of Children with Multiple Handicaps)
Special Education 455 1.5 units
(Introduction to Orientation and Mobility for the Blind)
Total program requirements 38.5 units
(3) The Mental Handicap program
Special Education 344 1.5 units
(Programming in Special Education: Developing Perspectives)
Special Education 346 1.5 units
(Academic Curricula in Special Education: Developing Perspectives)
Special Education 403 1.5 units
(Mental Retardation)
Special Education 420 1.5 units
(Education of the Moderately Intellectually Impaired)
Special Education 429 1.5 units
(Education of the Mildly intellectually Impaired)
Electives 3.0 units
Selected from courses in Special Education or related fields.
Total program requirements 38.0 units
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Asian Studies
New      Asian Studies 581 (3) Research and Source Materials in Korean
Studies 9324.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (continued)
Commerce and Business Administration
New      Commerce 526 (1.5)   Corporate Reorganizations
Commerce 635 (1.5)   Advanced Topics in Management
Information Systems
Commerce 636 (1.5)   Workshop  in  Management  Information
Systems
New Ph.D. Program in Management Information Systems:
Prerequisites and requirements for admission: to be accepted to the
program a candidate should meet the admission requirements as specified
by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Furthermore, each student is
expected to possess an understanding of the functional areas of
business, computer technology, and quantitative methods roughly
equivalent to the first year of the M.Sc. program in MIS. A student
lacking sufficient preparation in one or more of these areas must make
up the deficiency before the Preliminary Examination requirement will be
considered to have been completed. The minimum requirements are listed
below in terms of UBC course offerings. Equivalents from other
institutions are equally acceptable.
Business Foundations 9 units
Microeconomics (Econ 301) plus courses to be selected from the areas
of accounting (Comm 351 and 352), organizational behaviour (Comm
323), marketing (Comm 361) and finance (Comm 373).
Technical Foundations 4 - 5.5 units
Information Systems for Management (Comm 336)
Principles of Computer Programming (Comp. Sci. 114 and 116; or 118)
Principles of Computing Science (Comp. Sc. 210)
Quantitative Methods 4 units
Decision Analysis (Comm 311)
Quantitative Methods - Analysis (Comm 313)
The proposed Ph.D. program in MIS consists of three major components:
1. Preliminary Core (12 units)
2. Comprehensive Core       (12 units)
a) MIS Knowledge
b) Research Skills
c) Minor Area
d) Research Workshop
e) Summer Research Project
3. Thesis 9325.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Commerce and Business Administration
New Ph.D. Program in Management information Systems:  (continued)
Regulations concerning the comprehensive core and exams: A cumulative
average of no less than 72% is required for a student to have the right
to take the comprehensive exam. The regulations of the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration with respect to comprehensive
examinations will be followed.
Community and Regional Planning
New      Planning 511 (1.5)   Quantitative Reasoning and Statistics
for Planning
Planning 527 (1.5)   Housing Seminar
Planning 528 (1.5/3)c Urban Design
Planning 534 (1.5)   Planning for Water Resources Management
Planning 536 (1.5)   Citizens in Environmental Planning and
Management
Planning 545 (1.5/3)d Planning Studies Abroad
Changes  Planning 425, 501, 503, 504, 505, 506, 510, 512, 513, 520,
523, 526 - change in title, description
502, 514, 515, 522, 524, 530, 549 - change in
iption
532, 540 - change in title, units, description
535 - change in description, prerequisite
change in number, title, description (was 534)
change in number, title, description (was 536)
change in title, description, prerequisite
change in units, description
Delete   Planning 511, 516, 537, 541
Theatre
Changes  Theatre 505, 506 - change in title and description
Theatre 550 - change in title, description and corequisite
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Pathology
New       PATH 438 (l-3)c Medical Laboratory Science - Directed Studies
Planning
425,
521,
Planning
500,
descr
Planning
531,
Planning
533,
Planning
507 -
Planning
529 -
Planning
525 -
Planning
548 - 9326.
May 18, 1988
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Occupational Therapy
Change in program
Second Year
Change Sociology 200 to: Sociology 200 or 210 or 220
Physical Therapy
Change in program
Second Year
Change Sociology 200 to: Sociology 200 or 210 or 220
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Mathematics
New      MATH 135 (1.5) Introduction to Mathematics
Physics
Changes   *PHYS 170 - change in description, hours
♦PHYS 175 - change in units, hours (to 1.5)
Statistics
Add to Calendar Entry
under statistics (STAT)
(Faculty of Science)
Note: Introductory courses in probability and statistics are
offered by many different departments at UBC. A list of
these courses and details concerning restrictions on the
number of units of credit students may obtain for such
courses are provided under the heading Probability and
Statistics in the Courses of Instruction section of this
Calendar.
Changes   STAT 203 - change in description, prerequisite and hours
STAT 241 - add course credit restriction
Add to list of Probability and Statistics Courses:
Under Probability and under Probability and Statistics, add:  STAT 241
(1.5)

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