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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] Mar 20, 1991

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 9996.
March 20, 1991
The Seventh Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1990-91 was held on Wednesday, March 20, 1991 at
8.00 p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Present: President D. W. Strangway (Chairman), Vice-President D. R.
Birch, Mr. S. Alsgard, Mr. D. A. Anderson, Dr. A. P. Autor, Miss M. D. Bain,
Dr. M. A. Boyd, Dr. D. M. Brunette, Rev. P. C. Burns, Dean P. T. Burns, Mr.
R. Bush, Miss A. L. Callegari, Dr. D. G. A. Carter, Professor E. A. Carty,
Dr. R. L. Chase, Dr. S. Cherry, Dr. T. S. Cook, Mr. N. A. Davidson, Dr. K.
Dawson, Dr. G. W. Eaton, Dr. A. J. Elder, Mr. E. B. Goehring, Dr. S. E.
Grace, Dr. R. D. Guy, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dean M. J. Hollenberg, Dr. M.
Isaacson, Dr. J. G. T. Kelsey, Miss W. A. King, Dr. M. M. Klawe, Mr.
O. C. W. Lau, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Mrs. L. Lohia, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Miss
S. A. Mair, Dean M. P. Marchak, Mr. R. H. McGowan, Mr. B. V. McGuinness, Dr.
J. A. McLean, Dean J. H. McNeill, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dean A. Meisen, Dr.
A. G. Mitchell, Mr. J. A. Moss, Mr. M. D. Nikkei, Dr. L. Paszner, Dr. R. J.
Patrick, Ms. B. M. Peterson, Professor R. S. Reid, Dr. P. Resnick, Dean
P. B. Robertson, Mr. M. M. Ryan, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr.
C. E. Slonecker, Dr. L. de Sobrino, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Ms. H. Swinkels, Mr. B.
Taylor, Dr. R. C. Tees, Mr. G. A. Thorn, Dr. D. A. Wehrung, Dr. R. M. Will,
Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Ms. N. E. Woo, Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
Chancellor L. R. Peterson, Mr. J. A. Banfield, Dean C. S. Binkley, Professor
P. L. Bryden, Dr. J. D. Dennison, Dean J. R. Grace, Dr. J. F. Helliwell, Ms.
A. Ironside, Dr. S. Katz, Dean B. C. McBride, Dr. H. McDonald, Mr. B. D.
Prins, Dean J. F. Richards, Mr. A. J. Scow, Dr. L. J. Stan, Dr. A. Van
Seters, Dr. J. Vanderstoep.
Senate Membership
Declaration of vacancy (University Act, section 35(6))
Mr. James McQueen - student representative of the Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences
Student senators
On behalf of Senate, the Chairman expressed thanks and appreciation for
the contributions made by those students who were attending their last
Senate  meeting.   Students  were  requested  to  continue  to  serve  on
committees until replacements are approved by Senate. 9997.
March 20, 1991
Minutes of previous meeting
Dr. Birch     ) That the minutes of the Fifth regular
Dr. Sobrino   ) meeting of Senate for the Session 1990-91,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
Ca r r i ed
Business arising from the Minutes
Capping of enrolment in Majors and Honours Programs (p.9938)
Dr. Sobrino   ) That the Faculties take the necessary
Dr. Elder     )  steps to ensure that the capping of enrolment
in specific programs does not prevent students
who have met the advancement requirements of a
Faculty from continuing their studies in some
program within the same Faculty.
Dr. Sobrino stated that the Curriculum Committee had expressed its
concern about the capping of enrolment in specific programs due to lack of
resources.  He explained that the intent of the motion was to ensure that
those students who had been accepted into a Faculty and had satisfied the
requirements for promotion would be able to continue their studies.
Because of the  increasing limitation of enrolment  in programs,  the
Committee felt that a situation could arise where students would be unable
to continue their studies.  In order to prevent this from happening, the
Committee felt that the matter ought to be brought to the attention of
Senate and the Faculties.
In speaking to the motion, Dean Marchak stated that within the Faculty
of Arts there were still many options open to students and that the
Faculty was not in a situation where students meeting the minimal
requirements would have no options. She stated, however, that due to
fiscal restraints the Faculty could not possibly provide all the personnel
with the expertise that all programs require and that this was simply a
fact of life as far as departments in the Faculty of Arts are concerned. 9998.
March 20, 1991
Business arising from the Minutes
Capping of enrolment in Majors and Honours Programs (continued)
Speaking in support of the motion, Dr. Birch commented that the issue
was not limited to the Faculty of Arts. He stated that for many years
each specialty in the engineering programs within the Faculty of Applied
Science has had a cap in terms of the numbers that could be accommodated,
and students had been moved on into their second choice or even their
third choice. He said that it was untenable to admit students, promote
them, and then say we cannot accept you in any of the majors in the
Faculty. He stated that in order to combat this problem the elements that
would have to be watched were, the allocation of resources within the
Faculty, the allocation of resources within the University, the admission
standards and numbers, and the numbers that are controlled within each
major. He felt that it would be untenable for Senate not to endorse a
principle such as the one stated in the motion.
The motion was put and carried.
Chairman's remarks and related questions
Three Year Plan
Copies of the Three Year Plan of the University had been circulated at
the meeting for information. President Strangway stated that the Academic
Plan had been submitted to the Ministry of Advanced Education, Training
and Technology in response to a request to submit plans to them with
respect to the next three years. He stated that this academic plan was
really draft #12 following draft #11 circulated to Senate last year, and
that this would continue to change each year as a result of extensive
input from departments and faculties. In this sense it was an evolving
plan. President Strangway stated that he would appreciate receiving any
comments or suggestions that members of Senate might have concerning the
documents circulated. 9999.
March 20, 1991
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations - subject,
where applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented
without formal reference to the President and the formal agreement of the
President; and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new programs be
asked to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
(i) Change in name of the Department of Theatre to the Department of
Theatre and Film, recommended by the Faculty of Arts. (pp.9882-3)
(ii) Curriculum proposals from: the Faculties of Applied Science, Arts,
Commerce and Business Administration, Dentistry, Forestry, Graduate
Studies, Medicine, School of Nursing, and the Faculty of Science,
(pp.9890-9919)
(iii)  Enrolment quotas and controls for 1991/92.  (p.9922-4)
(iv) Curriculum proposals from: the Faculties of Agricultural Sciences,
Arts, Education, Graduate Studies, Medicine, Pharmaceutical Sciences,
School of Physical Education and Recreation, and the School of
Rehabilitation Medicine.  (pp.9948-9995)
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
Recommendation to establish a University Ombuds Office
Dr. Tees, Chair of the Committee, presented the following report:
"Recommendations (Summary)
1. That a University Ombuds Office be established.
2. That the Office be jointly supported by the University and the
Alma Mater Society.
3. That an Ombuds Advisory Committee representing the Board, the
Senate and the Alma Mater Society oversee the Office.
4. That the Ombuds Office restrict its clients to students.
5. That the effectiveness of the Office be evaluated in its third
year of operation.
Rationale for Recommendations
1. That a University Ombuds Office be established.
UBC is a very large institution - thousands of students, a huge
bureaucracy with many rules and regulations and appeal procedures
which are cumbersome, difficult and perhaps paternalistic. (Appeals
are made within the same bureaucracy that made the decision in the
first place.)  Students do get frustrated and lost.  They need a 10000.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
Recommendation to establish a University Ombuds Office
Rationale for Recommendations
1. That a University Ombuds Office be established.  (continued)
place or a person to whom they can turn, in whom they have
confidence, who is seen to be independent and who has authority. For
the University such an office would be a check on operations to
ensure mistakes are caught, to identify unintended consequences of
procedures, and it can reinforce current operating practices as just.
The summary of issues provided by the AMS Ombuds Office would
indicate that there is a role for an office on this campus.
2. That the Office be jointly supported by the University and the
Alma Mater Society.
To ensure that both students and the University see the Office as
independent and working in the best interests of both it must be
jointly supported. If the Office is supported only by the
administration it is likely to exert undue influence controlling
costs, hours of work, issues to be resolved, who holds the office,
etc. On the other hand, if it is supported only by students, as is
now the case, it is in danger of not being accepted by the
professorate and of being seen as a "students' advocate" rather than
interested in students' rights.
3. That an Ombuds Advisory Committee representing the Board, the
Senate and the Alma Mater Society oversee the Office.
An Advisory Committee should be formed which would consist of one
individual named by each of the President's Office for the Board, the
Senate, and the Alma Mater Society. The Committee would have the
responsibility for the satisfactory operation of the Office:
(a) establish initial policies/terms of reference;
(b) select the Ombudsperson;
(c) advise on the operation of the Office and create policies;
(d) report on an annual basis to the respective bodies.
4. That the Ombuds Office restrict its clients to students.
Some university ombuds offices deal with faculty and staff
complaints. Both of these groups at UBC have access to support
through either faculty or staff associations/unions, and universities
have well-developed appeal procedures for both faculty and staff. As
well, to mix all groups may downgrade the function of looking after
students. 10001.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
Recommendation to establish a University Ombuds Office
Rationale for Recommendations  (continued)
5. That the effectiveness of the Office be evaluated in its third
year of operation.
We should have some procedure in place to allow the Office to be
evaluated. Although timing is not crucial, it must be long enough
that the Office has a chance to become known and respected, and yet
not so long that problems may become entrenched. The timing and
procedures for evaluation should be placed in the terms of reference."
In speaking to the report, Dr. Tees reminded members that in May
1990, Senate had approved a motion requesting that the Academic Policy
Committee examine and make recommendations concerning the advisability
of this university having a university ombudsperson. He informed Senate
that the Committee had collected information from several universities
across Canada. The questions asked included: do you have such an
office or ombudsperson; who are the clients of this office; who does
the office or officer report to, and information about terms of
reference and cost. The Committee also consulted the AMS ombudsperson
and got a sense of what kinds of tasks were involved in the office and
how much work there was to be done. After collecting this information
the Committee concluded that there was sufficient reason to establish
such an office as indicated in the report.
Dr. Tees      )  That the recommendations of the Committee
Dr. Isaacson  ) be accepted.
Dean Burns stated that while he supported the proposal in principle
he could not vote for the establishment of an Ombuds Office without
knowing its function. 10002.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
Recommendation to establish a University Ombuds Office  (continued)
Dean Meisen stated that he fully endorsed the basic notion behind the
proposal but would have felt more comfortable had the initial policies
and terms of reference been established so that Senate could have a
clear idea of what the Ombuds Office was to do and how it was to be
done. He also suggested that it would be premature to evaluate such an
office in its third year.
Dean Meisen   )  That the motion be tabled.
Dean Burns    )
Lost
After further discussion the following amendment was moved:
In amendment:
Dr. Scudder   )  That recommendations 1, 2 and 4 be
Dr. Klawe     ) approved in principle, and that an
Ombuds Advisory Committee representing
the Board, the Senate and the Alma Mater
Society be established to draw up terms
of reference which will be reported to
Senate for approval.
Carried
The motion, as amended, was put and carried.
Admissions Committee
Dr. Will, Chair of the Committee, presented a report on the following
items:
Procedures on Appeals for Admission and Readmission
The following report was presented for information:
I. For Admission
1. The Senate Admissions Committee is charged with examining and ruling
upon applications for admission which do not meet the criteria
established by the University Senate. 10003.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Procedures on Appeals for Admission and Readmission
1. For Admission  (continued)
2. Applicants for consideration must submit their appeals in writing.
It is recommended that they use the form provided by the Admissions
Office along with the advice on appeals provided by this Committee.
3. The opinion of the Faculty or School is solicited by the Registrar
who is Secretary to the Committee.
4. The appeals and opinions are circulated to the Committee if possible
with the agenda. Not all the appeals can be circulated with the
agenda since the Committee is faced with such a flood of business
from mid-July to mid-August from 200 or 300 applicants seeking places
mainly in the first or second year of Arts or Science. The
applicants deserve a decision as soon as possible as many of them are
also holding places at community colleges.
5. The appeals are considered individually and each is voted upon by the
Committee, the Chair abstaining except to break a tie. The Committee
may accept or deny the appeal or it may send the appeal back to the
applicant for amplification and/or verification. Where errors in
procedure have been found, it may refer the applicant back to the
Faculty for reconsideration after correction of the procedural error.
6. The applicant is informed as soon as possible by the Registrar.
There is no appeal from the SAC decision to the Faculty or School.
7. The Senate Admissions Committee does not normally hear re-appeals
unless substantial new evidence that a wrong decision has been made
is presented to it.
II. For Readmission
A. After the designation "Failed year. Required to Discontinue."
The regulation in the Calendar (promotion regulations, Section III) says
"A student will normally be required to discontinue study at the
University for at least one year."
Students appealing immediately against such a designation should direct
their appeals to their Faculties or Schools. In general, they should
apply to have the designation "Failed Year. Required to Discontinue"
changed to "Failed Year. Permitted to Continue" or "Credit Granted in a
Partial Program" or whatever code applies.
In cases where such an appeal is unsuccessful or no appeal has been
entered, the student will be eligible for re-admission no sooner than 12
months from the end of the failed session.
Such students must meet all criteria for admission to Faculties and
Schools in effect at the time of the re-admission. 10004.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Procedures on Appeals for Admission and Readmission
II. For Readmission  (continued)
B. After "Failed Year. Required to Withdraw."
The designation is entered on the student's transcript after a second
failed year.
A student at any level of University study who fails for a second time,
whether in repeating a year or in a later year, will be required to
withdraw from the University; after a period of at least one year an
appeal for permission to re-enrol will be considered by the Dean of the
Faculty concerned. A negative decision made by the Dean may be appealed
to the Senate Admissions Committee.
1. Students who have been "Required to Withdraw" after a second failed
year may appeal for readmission normally after the lapse of at least
a year.
2. Students should submit their appeals to the appropriate Dean of
Faculty or Head of School. Senate was assured by the Vice-President
Academic that all such successful appeals would be reported to SAC.
3. If students wish to appeal a negative decision made by a Dean of
Faculty or Head of School, the procedure the student should follow is
as above.
C. Appeals for Admission from students who have been required to
discontinue or withdraw as a consequence of disciplinary action have
occasionally been before the Senate Admissions Committee.
Clarification of the meaning of "Suspension" and the terms of any
re-entry either to the same program or a different one made at the time
of the suspension would remove much ambiguity from such cases which have
been very few in number but very difficult to resolve in a satisfactory
manner.
Guidelines for Students Appealing Decisions on Admission and Re-admission
The following report was presented for information:
For First Admission
1. Students whose applications for first admission have been denied may
appeal to the Senate Admissions Committee.
2. The appeal should be submitted in writing on the form provided in the
Undergraduate Admissions Office. 10005.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Guidelines for Students Appealing Decisions on Admission and Re-admission
For First Admission  (continued)
3. The appeal should explain why the decision made by the Admissions
Officers, whether of university or faculty, should be reversed.
Applicants may submit whatever outside information they think may be
useful to the Committee. A claim based on illness must be verified
by certificates from the attending physician and/or hospitals. A
claim based on domestic affliction or family problems should be
verified by outside witnesses.
Warning: Appeals for admission which has been denied on the
grounds of insufficient marks or an inadequate number of academic
courses are unlikely to be granted by the Committee. The applicant
will be advised to improve his or her competitive position by taking
university transfer courses at one of the community colleges.
4. The decision of the Senate Admissions Committee is final. There is
no appeal from the Committee to any Faculty or School.
For Re-admission after one or more Failed Years
1. Students applying for re-admission after being asked to discontinue
or withdraw should consult the Calendar under "General Information
Promotion Regulations".
2. Appeals should be in writing on the form provided by the
Undergraduate Admissions Office.
3. In making the appeal, the student must show that he or she is now
able to complete his or her program. Evidence the Committee has used
in the past has included transcripts from other institutions,
fulfilment of requirements for credentials not acceptable for credit
(BCIT diplomas, for instance), letters from employers, satisfactory
resolution of medical, financial or domestic problems, and the like.
In general, the appeal should include the student's assessment of the
reasons for the failure and what steps have been taken to solve the
problems.
4. Students should be aware that the Senate Admissions Committee will
solicit opinions from the Faculty or School concerned.
5. The decision of the Senate Admissions Committee is final. There is
no appeal from the Committee to any Faculty or School. Unless there
is substantial new evidence put forward, there is no second appeal. 10006.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee  (continued)
Admission requirements for the degree completion program in Dental
Hygiene - Bachelor of Dental Science (B.D.Sc.)
The  Committee  recommended  approval  of  the  following  admission
requirements for the Bachelor of Dental Science degree completion
program in Dental Hygiene.
A. Admission
The Faculty of Dentistry reserves the right to select students for
admission to the program from among those who meet the admission
requirements.
1. Candidates for admission must have completed 30 credits of
university or equivalent courses which must include:
Biology 101 or 102 or 103
Chemistry 103 or 110 or 120
English 100
Psychology 100 or 200 or 206
and must have graduated from a dental hygiene program accredited
by the Canadian Dental Association, with a minimum 65% overall
average.
2. Courses used to satisfy #1 above will not be accepted for credit
to the degree completion program.
3. Preference will be given to candidates with at least one year of
practice experience.
4. Selection for admission will be made on the basis of:
i)  academic record
ii)  interview results
iii) personal references
5. Candidates who meet minimum admission  requirements  are  not
guaranteed admission.
6. Applicants may be required to demonstrate clinical proficiency.
B. Degree Completion Requirements
1. Minimum passing grade for all courses is 60%.
2. Students will be expected to complete the program within five
years of registration.
3. The degree completion years will require a minimum of 60 credits
of required and elective courses. 10007.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Admission requirements for the degree completion program in Dental
Hygiene - Bachelor of Dental Science (B.D.Sc.)  (continued)
Dr. Will      ) That the admission requirements for the
Dean Robertson ) Bachelor of Dental Science degree completion
program in Dental Hygiene (B.D.Sc.) be approved.
Carried
Revised Calendar Statement for the M.Sc. Program in Occupational Hygiene
Dr. Will explained that the admissions criteria for the M.Sc. Program
in Occupational Hygiene, which appears on p.9988 of the January 16, 1991
Senate minutes, had been approved by the Committee subject to editorial
changes. The editorial changes had inadvertently been omitted from the
material submitted to Senate at the January meeting, and the Committee
therefore recommended that the following revised statement be approved:
"An interdisciplinary program is offered leading to the degree of
M.Sc. in Occupational Hygiene. A student may follow either of two
options: 1) 36 credits of courses and a six-credit project,
requiring a minimum of 16 months of full-time study or an equivalent
amount of time on a part-time basis; 2) 30 credits of courses and a
12-credit thesis, generally requiring 20-24 months of full-time
equivalent work. The program focuses on such areas as hazard
identification; analysis and control; toxicology; epidemiology;
industrial process analysis; ergonomics; worker safety, etc. The
program is designed to prepare students for careers in occupational
hygiene in the government, para-government, and industrial sectors.
To be admissible, students should have completed a bachelor's degree
in such areas as the physical or health sciences, or engineering.
Before commencing the program, students should have completed
university-level courses or have equivalent background in calculus,
physics, organic chemistry, biology, and statistics. Prior
preparation in the areas of human physiology and/or pathology, and
analytic chemistry, is recommended but not required. Applicants
should consult a faculty adviser regarding their academic background.
In exceptional circumstances a student may be allowed to take some
courses required for admission as corequisites in conjunction with
the program, extending the program over a full two-year period."
Dr. Will      ) That the revised Calendar statement for the
Dean Hollenberg) M.Sc. Program in Occupational Hygiene be
approved.
Carried 10008.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee  (continued)
Enrolment quota for the Bachelor of Music program
The Committee recommended approval of a quota of 250 for the four
years of the Bachelor of Music program.
Dr. Will      ) That an enrolment quota of 250 for the
Dr. Tees      )  four years of the Bachelor of Music
program be approved.
Carried
Curriculum Committee (see Appendix 'B')
Dr.  Sobrino,  Chair  of  the  Committee,  presented the  report.   The
Committee recommended approval of a proposal by the Faculty of Dentistry
to offer a Bachelor of Dental Science degree completion program in Dental
Hygiene (B.D.Sc).
Dr. Sobrino   ) That the Bachelor of Dental Science degree
Dean Robertson )  completion program in Dental Hygiene (B.D.Sc.)
be approved.
Carried
Elections Committee
Dr. Hamilton, Chair of the Committee, presented the following report:
"The Committee is empowered to "hear appeals on election irregularities"
(p.7066 Senate Minutes) and is to report its decisions to Senate for
information.
The Committee met on Wednesday, January 30, 1991, and dealt with four
appeals as follows:
1. A letter from a candidate running for election to Senate as an
at-large representative, stating that an irregularity had occurred in
that The Ubyssey misplaced his photograph and a portion of his
statement, thereby putting his candidacy at an unfair disadvantage.
The Committee agreed that this was an irregularity, since the A.M.S.
rules governing elections state that "each candidate shall be
interviewed by the Ubyssey or permitted to have a 200 word statement
published in The Ubyssey prior to the election." 10009.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Elections Committee (continued)
2. Allegations that one of the candidates for election to the Board of
Governors had put up posters after the deadline for ceasing to
campaign, as required by the A.M.S. Rules Governing Elections. The
candidate advised the Committee that he did put up posters after the
deadline but had been unaware of the regulations.
It was pointed out to the Committee that there was confusion because
the Senate regulations did not specifically state that candidates for
election to the Board and Senate are also bound by the A.M.S. Rules
Governing Elections.
The Committee concluded that there was clearly a breach of the A.M.S.
regulation that "Campaigning must cease by...5:00 p.m. on the day
prior to the election..."
3. A letter of complaint from an observer that in the election of
Senators at-large, two of the candidates had put up posters after the
deadline for campaigning to cease. The candidates admitted they had
put up posters after the deadline but assured the Committee that they
had been unaware of the regulations. They also stated that they had
not been invited to the "all candidates" meeting.
4. A letter reporting that one of the candidates in the election of
Senate representative for the Faculty of Arts had put up posters
after the deadline for campaigning to cease.
The candidate in question advised the Committee that she had put more
posters up after the deadline because hers had been removed. She had
not been aware of the regulations.
Recommendat ions
The Committee recommended that the election results stand since none of
the irregularities had materially affected the results of the elections.
The Committee further recommended that future nomination forms for Board
and Senate elections be revised to require that nominees sign a
statement indicating that they agree to abide by the A.M.S. Rules
Governing Elections, and that the Senate regulations be amended to
specify this requirement and to indicate where copies may be obtained."
Dr. Hamilton  ) That the election results stand
Mr. Lau      )
Carried
Dr. Hamilton  ) That future nomination forms for Board and Senate
Dean Burns    ) elections be revised to require that nominees sign
a statement indicating that they agree to abide by
the A.M.S. Rules Governing Elections, and that the
Senate regulations be amended to specify this
requirement and to indicate where copies may be
obtained.
Carried 10010.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate (continued)
Nominating Committee
Dr. Elder, Chair of the Committee, presented the report. The Committee
recommended that Dr. David Randall, Associate Dean (Awards) of the Faculty
of Graduate Studies, be co-opted to the membership of the Senate Committee
on Student Awards.
Dr. Elder     )  That the recommendation of the Nominating
Professor Reid ) Committee be approved.
Carried
Committee on Student Awards
Dr. Cook, Chair of the Committee, presented the report.
Dr. Cook      ) That the new awards (listed in Appendix *A')
Dr. Dawson    )  be accepted subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
Carried
Dr. Cook informed Senate that the Van-Tel Credit Union had withdrawn
the funds for the Van-Tel Credit Union Bursary approved by Senate in
December 1990.
Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute
The following memorial statement had been prepared in accordance with
the custom of Senate, in recognition by the University and Senate of the
late Gilbert John Parfitt.
IN MEMORIAM
GILBERT JOHN PARFITT (1910-1991)
Gilbert Parfitt, the first department head appointed in the Faculty of
Dentistry at this university, died on January 12, 1991. 10011.
March 20, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute  (continued)
Dr. Parfitt was born in Reading, England, in 1910, and was educated at
Guy's Hospital in London, where he earned a dental licence in 1934 and
medical degree in 1938. During World War II, he served as an Emergency
Surgeon in the Maxillofacial base at East Grinstead, a famous site for
the restoration of the faces of seriously wounded servicemen.
In 1947 he practised Preventive Dentistry at Guy's Dental Hospital, and
became a pioneer in what was then a relatively new field.
After a four year term with the World Health Organization, Dr. Parfitt
enrolled in the University of Alabama, where he earned another doctoral
degree and began teaching Oral Medicine, another area of study largely
unknown at the time.
In 1963, Gilbert Parfitt accepted an appointment at U.B.C. in the
fledgling Faculty of Dentistry and set up the Department of Oral
Medicine and Radiology. He served on the Senate from 1964 until 1969,
and retired in 1974.
No better testimony to the career of this distinguished professor and
teacher could be provided than that from one of his former students and
later colleague. "He was a Post-Victorian man, a "Brit", with a noble
vision and a brain to match. He was devoted to knowledge and the
betterment of the human's lot on this earth, with special respect to
children. He was not a scientist, but a Naturalist, observing the human
problems and seeking causes and effects, and deducing ideas for
practical use."
The author of over fifty research publications, a member of a dozen
professional societies, the recipient of fifteen academic awards, and
the dedicated teacher of many hundreds of students, Gilbert Parfitt
embodied the best of university values.
To his surviving family, the Senate of this university extends its
deepest sympathy.
Dr. Slonecker ) That the memorial statement for
Dean Robertson ) Gilbert John Parfitt be spread on
the minutes of Senate and that a
copy be sent to the relatives of
the deceased.
Carried 10012.
March 20, 1991
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal to establish a Sustainable Development Research Institute
It was stated in the material circulated that the Institute's main
objectives could be summarized as:
To create an academic environment conducive to multidisciplinary
studies of sustainable development, providing opportunities for the
necessary intellectual exchange;
to seek and coordinate funding for proposed research;
to initiate and carry out, in consultation and collaboration with the
private sector and other institutes of higher education, research
leading to new understanding, products, policies, and appropriately
experienced personnel in the area of sustainable development;
to provide advice to graduate students about relevant programs of
study in the Faculty of Graduate Studies;
to act as UBC's link with agencies, departments of government and the
private sector engaged in sustainable development research; and to
disseminate information to academics, administrators and the public.
Dr. Cherry    ) That the proposal of the Faculty of
Dean Marchak  ) Graduate Studies to establish a Sustainable
Development Research Institute be approved.
Dr. Cherry informed Senate that the establishment of the institute would
enable the University to address various interdisciplinary issues of
environmental concern to society and that the humanities, social sciences,
pure and applied sciences, and medical sciences were involved. He stated
that the government had encouraged this activity by providing funding to
stimulate research. He explained that the institute is intended to serve
as a catalyst for such research and will act as a link with the
government, industry, and other academic institutions. He noted that the
university had already received a grant of a million dollars for one of
its proposals to the government agency, and that the university
administration had provided for budget which would ensure financial support 10013.
March 20, 1991
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal  to  establish  a  Sustainable  Development  Research  Institute
(continued)
for the activities of the institute.  He stated that central to the
institute is a Think Tank which will generate and encourage research
proposals and provide intellectual focus.  He stated that he had been
advised that there is space available in various locations on campus to
house the institute in its initial stages.  In conclusion, he stated that
there would be a review of the institute after three years.
In response to a query by Dr. Patrick concerning library resources for
the proposed institute, Dr. Cherry stated that there are existing library
resources on campus in this area (for example, the library attached to the
former Institute of Animal Resource Ecology) and that he expected that
funding could be made available from the Institute's operating fund and
from the operating grants of individual faculty members.
A query was raised concerning a diagram of the Institute's
Administrative Structure which appeared in the material circulated to
Senate. Dr. Birch agreed that there should not be a steering committee in
an administrative line and that the diagram was in conflict with the
statement in the material that says the Director will report to the Dean
of Graduate Studies.
The motion was put and carried.
Report of the Task Force on Monday Holidays
The following report had been circulated for information:
"A task force, comprised of those who were nominated in response to a
memo from the Registrar to the Deans, met on Wednesday, January 23,
1991, to consider this matter. 10014.
March 20, 1991
Report of the Task Force on Monday Holidays (continued)
Responses to the Registrar's memo were received from the Faculties of
Agricultural Sciences, Arts (including responses from 9 departments
and 2 schools), Commerce, Forestry, Graduate Studies, Law, Medicine,
Pharmaceutical Sciences and the School of Nursing. Four respondents
felt that there is a problem that should be addressed by the task
force, three recognized that there is a problem but felt that it can
be (or had been) addressed at the faculty or department level and two
felt that there was not a problem.
The task force concluded that there is a significant loss of
instructional hours in some courses (or sections) in the first term
because both the Labour Day and Thanksgiving holidays fall on a
Monday. There is a serious problem in some of these courses when the
Remembrance Day holiday also falls on a Monday. This problem is
particularly acute in courses that have laboratories scheduled early
in the week and in courses that have more than one hour of lectures
scheduled on Mondays.
Various possible solutions were considered, including:
extending the first term to Monday or Tuesday of the 14th week;
starting classes on Monday of the week after Labour day and finishing
at the end of the present 14th week;
scheduling Monday activities on Tuesday following Remembrance Day if
the holiday is on a Monday.
The task force concluded that it is not practical to end the first
term later than the end of the present 13th week because of the need
for an exam period long enough to properly accommodate the increasing
number of December final exams. It appears that there is no
practical university wide solution.
The task force makes the following recommendations:
(a) Faculties, Schools and Departments should continue to address any
problems of lost instruction due to Monday holidays on an
individual basis;
(b) The Registrar's Office should issue a reminder to instructors
before the end of the preceding Winter Session when there will be
three Monday holidays in Term 1 of the next Winter Session."
Other business
Library resources for New Programs
The President reported to Senate that he and the Librarian, Dr. Patrick,
had hosted an occasion in which those people who had written or published
books in the past year were invited to participate and to show their 10015.
March 20, 1991
Other business
Library resources for New Programs (continued)
books. He stated that 168 books by UBC professors had been published in
the past year, representing 162 different authors, which he felt was a
remarkable performance. Dr. Patrick noted that it had been a very happy
and positive occasion for the Library.
Dr. Grace drew attention to the provisos contained in the notification
of approval of Senate recommendations by the Board of Governors, and
suggested that the Board ought to change their statement to include any
library requirements for new programs. She stated that the Library should
always be consulted when there are new programs in case there are special
needs for new journals etc. Dr. Birch pointed out that the provisos came
after approval by the Board of Governors and prior to implementation. He
felt that on the question of library resources Senate should have such
information at the time it is considering approval of new programs, and
fully endorsed the notion that the Senate Curriculum Committee should
bring that information forward with the program proposals at the time the
programs are being approved. Dr. Sobrino stated that the Curriculum
Committee does take this into account if the information is provided by
the Faculties. He suggested that information concerning library needs
could be obtained by including a request for information on the curriculum
change forms which are circulated with the Curriculum Guidelines each year
to all Deans, Department Heads and Directors of Schools.
Dr. Birch suggested that it would be useful to have an assessment from
the Library itself so that there would be some form of analysis, and this
would also give the Library an early warning before a program has gone all
the way through the Curriculum Committee and Senate. 10016.
March 20, 1991
Other business  (continued)
Summer Session Calendar
In response to a query by Mr. Lau concerning the delay in the
publication of the Summer Session Calendar, the Registrar stated that the
Registrar's Office was partly responsible for this publication and that he
regretted the inconvenience caused to students by this delay.
Honorary Degrees
The President informed Senate that the following had accepted
invitations to receive honorary degrees at the 1991 Ceremonies:
Sidney Altman
Tetsuo (Ted) Aoki
Baroness (Lydia) Dunn
Judith Forst
Patricia Mary Fulton
Lucille M. Johnston
Yousuf Karsh
Stephen Lewis
Gordon Frederick MacFarlane
Antonine Maillet
Cornelia Hahn Oberlander
Dorothy E. Smith
Elijah Edward Smith
Report of the Tributes Committee - in camera
Emeritus status
In the absence of Dr. Dennison, Chair of the Committee, Dr. Slonecker
reported that the committee recommended that the following be offered
emeritus status:
Dr. H. J. Burhenne     - Professor Emeritus of Radiology
Dr. N. J. Divinsky     - Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Dr. R. G. Jones        - Professor Emeritus of Social and Educational
Studies
Dr. C. R. Krishnamurti  - Professor Emeritus of Animal Science
Mr. J. Kulich - Program  Director  Emeritus  of  Continuing
Education
Dr. J. A. Laponce      - Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Dr. K. M. Leighton     - Professor Emeritus of Anaesthesiology
Mr. J. A. MacDonald     - Associate Professor Emeritus of Social Work 10017.
March 20, 1991
Report of the Tributes Committee - in camera
Emeritus status (continued)
Dr. J. H. Milsum
Dr. N. D. Nathan
Mrs. A. M. Nelson
Mr. E. Neufeld
Dr. G. B. Porter
Prof. I. Reid
Dr. B. Sylvester
Dr. P. M. Townsley
Dr. N. J. Wilimovsky
Dr. J. H. Winter
Dr. B. J. Wood
Dr. N. J. Yorkston
Dr. L. Young
Dr. J. W. Zahradnik
- Professor  Emeritus  of  Health  Care  and
Epidemiology
- Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
- Admin. Librarian I Emerita
- General Librarian Emeritus
- Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
- Assistant  Professor  Emerita  of  Slavonic
Studies
- Associate Professor Emeritus of English
- Professor Emeritus of Food Science
- Professor Emeritus of Animal Resource Ecology
- Professor Emeritus of History
- Associate Professor Emerita of Radiology
- Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry
- Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering
- Professor Emeritus of Bio-Resource Engineering
Dr. Slonecker
Dean Robertson
) That the recommendations of the Tributes
) Committee concerning emeritus status be
approved.
Carried
The meeting adjourned at 9.30 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, April 24,
1991.
Secretary
Confirmed
Chairman 10018.
March 20, 1991
APPENDIX 'A'
Awards recommended for acceptance by Senate
Archibald Prize in Economics - A $500 prize has been established by his
colleagues and former students to honour Chris Archibald on the occasion of
his retirement from the Department of Economics in 1991. The prize will be
awarded for the best piece of research undertaken by a graduate student in
the Department of Economics. The work may be embodied in a thesis, an essay
or a journal. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department.
(Available 1991/92 Winter Session.)
Stanley Coren Prize in Psychology - A $150 prize has been established by
Stanley Coren. The prize is awarded on the recommendation of the Department
of Psychology to a graduate student presenting an outstanding Master's
thesis in psychology.  (Available 1991/92 Winter Session.)
Donald M. Flather Bursary - A $250 bursary has been provided by the late
Donald M. Flather. The award is available to students in the Faculties of
Medicine or Science and is offered for a four year period commencing in
1991/92.
Donna Gibson Memorial Prize - A $300 prize has been endowed by family,
friends and colleagues of Donna Gibson who, at the time of her death, was a
Research Associate in Health Care and Epidemiology. The award is made on
the recommendation of the Department of Health Care and Epidemiology to an
M.Sc. graduating student with the most outstanding thesis. (Available
1991/92 Winter Session.)
Husky Oil Scholarship - A $1,000 scholarship is offered by Husky Oil. The
award is made to a student entering the penultimate or final year in
Engineering or Geology. The award is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Applied Science in odd numbered years and on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Science in even numbered years. (Available 1991/92 Winter
Session.)
Ladner Downs Prize in Conflicts Law - A prize of $750, a gift of Ladner
Downs, Barristers and Solicitors, will be awarded annually to the student
who achieves the highest academic standing in Law 390 (Conflict of Laws).
The award will be shared between the students ranking first in each
section. The prizes will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Law.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Louis F. Lindholm, Q.C, Memorial Prize in Maritime Law - A prize in an
amount of approximately $350 will be awarded annually to a student who
achieves high academic standing in the course Law 391 (Maritime Law). This
prize is endowed by the estate of the late Louis F. Lindholm, Q.C, a
graduate of the Faculty of Law at U.B.C. This award will be made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Law.  (Available 1991/92 Winter Session.) 10019.
March 20, 1991
APPENDIX 'A'
Awards recommended for acceptance by Senate (continued)
David Miller Memorial Bursary - A $300 bursary has been established by his
family and friends, in memory of David Miller. The award is offered to
undergraduates in Geological Sciences.  (Available 1991/92 Winter Session.)
PBK Engineering Ltd. Scholarship - A $2,000 scholarship is offered annually
to a student entering third year Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, or Mining
and Mineral Process Engineering. The award is made on the recommendation of
the Faculty of Applied Science.  (Available 1991/92 Winter Session.)
Provincial Women's Programs Bursary - Two $500 bursaries are offered by the
Province of British Columbia in recognition of women's contributions to the
economic and social life of the province. The bursaries will be awarded to
females with preference to students in part-time programs. (Available
1990/91 Winter Session.)
Dorothy and Clyde McK. Smith Bursary - A $600 bursary has been endowed by
Dorothy and Clyde Mc.K. Smith. The award will be made to a student
demonstrating financial need.  (Available 1991/92 Winter Session.) APPENDIX 'B'
10020.
March 20, 1991
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
Degree completion program in Dental Hygiene - Bachelor of Dental Science
(B.D.Sc.)
Calendar Statement
The Faculty of Dentistry offers a post-dental hygiene diploma degree
completion program that leads to a Bachelor of Dental Science degree.
Completion of the degree will require completion of a minimum of 60
credits of course work, including 34-38 credits of core material,
following graduation from an accredited dental hygiene program. The
remaining course work will allow the student to focus on community
dental health care, advanced clinical practice, or allied dental
education and research.
Third Year
Oral Microbiology and Immunology
Oral Pathology
Dental Hvgiene Care I
Statistics for Health Research
or Introduction to Statistics for Research in Education
Current Issues in Oral Health Sciences
Electives3
MICB 4251 (3)
OMSS 4351 (4)
DENT 4021 (8)
HCEP 4001 (3)
EDPS 482 (3)
DENT 4001 (6)
(3-6)
27-30
Fourth Year
Periodontology Seminars I
and/or Periodontology Seminars II
Dental Hygiene Care II
Guided Studies in Dental Hygiene
Electives to support options in:3
1. Community Dental Health Care
2. Advanced Clinical Practice
3. Allied Dental Education and Research
DENT 4611'2 (4)
DENT 4621'2 (4)
DENT 4041 (6)
DENT 406 (6)
(12-18)
32-38
1 Core Courses
Advanced Clinical Option
3 Faculties of Medicine, Education, Applied Science 10021.
March 20, 1991
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
Degree completion program in Dental Hygiene - Bachelor of Dental Science
(B.D.Sc.)  (continued)
New courses    DENT 400 (6) Current Issues in Oral Health Sciences
CDSC 401 (2) Dental Epidemiology
DENT 402 (8) Dental Hygiene Care I
DENT 404 (6) Dental Hygiene Care II
DENT 406 (6) Guided Study in Dental Hygiene
DENT 461 (4) Periodontal Seminars I
DENT 462 (4) Periodontal Seminars II
A. Admission
The Faculty of Dentistry reserves the right to select students for
admission to the program from among those who meet the admission
requirements.
1. Candidates  for  admission  must  have  completed  30  credits  of
university or equivalent courses which must include:
Biology 101 or 102 or 103
Chemistry 103 or 110 or 120
English 100
Psychology 100 or 200 or 206
and must have graduated from a dental hygiene program accredited
by the Canadian Dental Association, with a minimum 65% overall
average.
2. Courses used to satisfy #1 above will not be accepted for credit to
the degree completion program.
3. Preference will be given to candidates with at least one year of
practice experience.
4. Selection for admission will be made on the basis of:
i)  academic record
ii)  interview results
iii) personal references
5. Candidates  who  meet  minimum  admission  requirements  are  not
guaranteed admission.
6. Applicants may be required to demonstrate clinical proficiency.
B. Degree Completion Requirements
1. Minimum passing grade for all courses is 60%.
2. Students will be expected to complete the program within five years
of registration.
3. The degree completion years will require a minimum of 60 credits of
required and elective courses.

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