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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] May 17, 1989

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 9529.
May 17, 1989
The Ninth Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1988-89 was held on Wednesday, May 17, 1989 at 8.00
p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Present:  President D. W. Strangway,  (Chairman), Chancellor L. R.
Peterson, Mr. S. Alsgard, Dr. J. M. Anderson, Dr. E. G. Auld, Dr. B.
Bressler, Professor P. L. Bryden, Rev. P. C. Burns, Mr. R. Bush, Dr. D. G. A.
Carter, Dr. T. S. Cook, Mr. N. A. Davidson, Dr. J. D. Dennison,  Dr. G. W.
Eaton, Dr. A. Eisen, Dr. A. J. Elder, Ms. W. L. Fox, Mr. E. B. Goehring, Dr.
S. E. Grace, Mr. A. K. Haji, Dr. M. A. Hickling, Dr. P. G. Hill, Dr. A.
Kozak, Dr. S. C Lindstrom, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Mr. D. Mclnnes, Dr. J. A.
McLean, Dean A. Meisen, Dr. A. G. Mitchell, Dr. B. M. Morrison, Mr. S. R.
Pearce, Mr. R. L. Peters, Mr. D. M. Pettingale, Mrs. G. E. Plant, Mr. G. A.
Porter, Mr. E. S. Reid, Dean J. F. Richards, Dean P. B. Robertson, Dr. D. F.
Robitaille, Dr. M. Shaw, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr. L. de Sobrino, Dr. J. K.
Stager, Dr. L. J. Stan, Dean P. Suedfeld, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Dr. R. C Tees,
Dr. P. R. Tennant, Mr. G. A. Thorn, Ms. J. Thorn, Dr. R. C Thompson, Dr. A.
Van Seters, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Mr. C Q. Vanwermeskerken, Dean W. A.
Webber, Dr. D. A. Wehrung, Ms. N. E. Woo, Dr. W. W. Wood.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
Vice-President D. R. Birch, Mr. D. A. Anderson, Dean P. T. Burns, Ms. L. M.
Copeland, Acting Dean D. Dolphin, Dr. J. A. S. Evans, Mr. J. A. S.
Fogarassy, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Miss J. Harrington, Mr. D.
Horvat, Ms. A. Ironside, Dr. S. Katz, Mr. T. P. Kaweski, Dean R. W. Kennedy,
Miss W. A. King, Mr. M. J. Libby, Mrs. B. M. Loeb, Dr. B. C. McBride, Mr.
M. G. McMillan, Dean J. H. McNeill, Dr. J. E. Phillips, Mr. M. M. Ryan, Dr.
G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. L. S. Weiler, Dean R. M. Will, Dr. W. C Wright, Jr.
Minutes of previous meeting
Dr. Eisen     )  That the minutes of the Eighth regular
Dr. Carter    )  meeting of Senate for the Session 1988-89,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
Carried
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education (p.9525)
Dean Meisen spoke to the following proposal, which had been circulated:
The Schools of Nursing at The University of British Columbia (UBC) and
the Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) propose to collaborate in offering 9530.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education (continued)
a nursing program that will permit students who would normally have
enrolled in the VGH program in September 1989 and thereafter to enroll
instead as UBC students and obtain the baccalaureate degree in nursing
from UBC
Rationale for Joint Program
Nursing practice is becoming increasingly more complex and it is
imperative that nurses have a broad knowledge base upon which to draw
in making clinical judgments. Vancouver General Hospital has
identified the need for more nurses prepared at the baccalaureate level
and for more opportunities to work with the UBC School of Nursing in
developing a supportive climate for nursing practice and research. The
Canadian Nurses Association and the Registered Nurses' Association of
British Columbia have both gone on record in support of the
baccalaureate degree in nursing as the minimum educational requirement
for entry to practice from the year 2000 onward. The above are the
primary reasons for the proposal to offer a joint baccalaureate
program.  The advantages of the joint program are:
- A large number of nurses holding the baccalaureate degree can be
prepared in British Columbia without increases in funding for either
program.
- UBC gains access to a new range of excellent clinical resources for
educating nurses in its bacclaureate program.
- The UBC School of Nursing obtains access to faculty with excellent
clinical backgrounds, many of whom are experienced teachers.
- Opportunities arise for more efficient and creative use of faculty
time and talents than in separate programs.
- The human, financial, and physical resources of both Schools can be
allocated more efficiently and effectively while providing nursing
graduates who are better prepared for current and future nursing
practice demands.
- The long-established relationship between UBC and VGH and their
commitments to advanced nursing education are reinforced.
In summary, the proposed jointly-offered program will be beneficial for
consumers of nursing and health care in British Columbia, both Schools
of Nursing, and the nursing profession. There are no
readily-identifiable drawbacks.
In order to implement the proposal, certain principles have been
established in discussions with Dr. Inge Schamborzki (Vice-President
Nursing at VGH and the person having overall responsibility for the VGH
School of Nursing) and Mrs. Gail Bishop (Director of the VGH School of
Nursing).  These principles are: 9531.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education  (continued)
Students
Students will meet the UBC requirements for entrance into, progression
through, and graduation from the UBC Bachelor of Science in Nursing
(BSN) program. As a result of the collaboration between the UBC and
VGH Schools of Nursing, it is proposed that up to 80 additional
students will be admitted to the first year of the UBC BSN program
starting in September 1989. The present first year quota of the UBC
BSN program is 80 students.
Admission
Admissions will be handled by the UBC Registrar's Office with
assistance from the Registrar of the VGH School of Nursing and a VGH
clerical staff member.
This arrangement has been discussed with the UBC Registrar and
Assistant Registrar responsible for nursing. A joint UBC - VGH
Committee has met to resolve the logistical aspects of the admission
process.
Curriculum
The curriculum, which will be followed by all students, is the
presently approved UBC School of Nursing curriculum. Any future
curriculum revisions will be recommended by the UBC School of Nursing
through the School Council to the UBC Senate in accordance with current
procedures. Input from both UBC and VGH faculty will be provided, as
at present, through the UBC Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and the
UBC Faculty Caucus. Provisions will be made for on-going curriculum
monitoring through a joint committee of UBC and VGH faculty members and
students.
Library
Journals and book holdings in the VGH School of Nursing Library and the
VGH Biomedical Library have been assessed in relation to requirements
of the UBC program. Funds presently allocated to the VGH School of
Nursing Library will be used to increase holdings as required and it is
understood that all nursing students will have access to the Woodward
Library.
Faculty and Support Staff
The VGH School of Nursing presently has a complement of 39.4 FTE
faculty members plus a Librarian and Registrar. The support staff
numbers 7. Both faculty and support staff will continue to be
appointed and paid by VGH with direct input in the selection process
from the UBC School of Nursing Director and from UBC faculty as
appropriate. The qualifications of the present VGH faculty are being
reviewed. It has been established that, following a period of
orientation, the VGH faculty will be well suited for teaching in the
UBC BSN program. 9532.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education  (continued)
VGH faculty members will hold Adjunct Professor or Clinical Associate
appointments, both of which titles are currently in use in the UBC
School of Nursing. It is understood that new faculty members, who will
be retained by the VGH School of Nursing, will meet, at the time of
their appointment, the UBC criteria for Adjunct Professors or Clinical
Associates. The appointments will be made upon the recommendation of
the UBC School of Nursing's Appointment, Re-appointment, Promotion and
Tenure Committee and they will be reviewed on a yearly basis.
Instruction will be monitored by utilizing student and peer evaluation
procedures currently in force in the UBC School of Nursing.
The faculty members of the VGH School of Nursing will continue to be
housed in VGH facilities, presently located on 10th Avenue.
Administrative Structure
The Director of the UBC School of Nursing will have overall
responsibility for the UBC BSN program taught jointly by UBC and VGH
faculty members. The Director of the VGH program will also hold an
appointment as Assistant/Associate Director of the UBC program and VGH
faculty will be responsible through her to the UBC Director. Appendix
A contains a summary of her responsibilities.
Resources
The admission of 80 additional First Year BSN students from September
1989 onwards will increase the teaching loads of the UBC School of
Nursing and UBC faculties which provide service courses for the program
(i.e. Science, Medicine, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Arts). The latter
faculties have been contacted and their requirements for additional
staff, equipment and operating expenses are summarized in Appendix B.
The UBC School of Nursing requires three additional faculty members to
teach senior level courses in the BSN program.
It may be noted that the UBC requirements are modest since most of the
teaching duties arising from the admission of the extra students will,
in effect, be covered by the existing resources of the VGH School of
Nursing. The latter currently offers a two year diploma program with a
total enrollment of approximately 320 students. By discontinuing the
diploma program, replacing it with the four-year UBC BSN program and
admitting 80 additional students into First Year of the UBC BSN
program, it is clear that the VGH School can, in effect, contribute
most resources for sustaining the enrollment increase in the UBC BSN
program.
Furthermore, it has been possible to show that the additional resources
required by UBC can be defrayed from the tuition fees paid by the
additional students enrolled in the UBC BSN program. 9533.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education (continued)
Budgetary Arrangements
The UBC and VGH Schools of Nursing will maintain their respective
budgets as separate entities.
Should the UBC - VGH agreement (see below) be modified or terminated,
the internal UBC resource allocation will be reviewed and, if
appropriate, changed. It will be the responsibility of the individual
Departments and Schools to make the necessary adjustments.
Legal Agreement
Once approval is granted for the joint program, a legal agreement will
be prepared for signature by UBC and VGH to guarantee on-going support
for the VGH component of the program. The agreement will indicate
that, should there be a change in the support for the VGH component of
the program, the presently proposed number of 80 First Year students
will be re-examined and modified as appropriate. Furthermore, the
participation of both schools in the UBC BSN program will be reviewed
on a five year basis and the agreement may be discontinued upon the
advice of either party provided the educational obligations to students
enrolled in the program at that time are fully met.
Recommendation
It is recommended that the UBC and VGH Schools of Nursing be authorized
to offer jointly, from 1989/90 onwards, the UBC BSN program under the
conditions outlined in this report.
Appendix A
Summary of Responsibilities of the Assistant/Associate Director of the
UBC/VGH Joint Bacclaureate Program
The Assistant/Associate Director will be responsible to the Director of
the UBC School of Nursing with respect to the UBC - VGH joint
baccalaureate program. She will oversee the implementation and
execution of the joint program at the VGH Site. Specifically, she will:
1) Select faculty for the VGH Site in consultation with UBC Director
and faculty.
2) Arrange for the orientation and evaluation of faculty at the VGH
Site in conformity with UBC procedures.
3) Implement UBC policies and procedures regarding the UBC BSN program.
4) Participate in appropriate UBC School of Nursing committees.
5) Coordinate and collaborate in the development, implementation, and
evaluation of student learning experiences in classroom, laboratory,
and clinical settings at the VGH Site 9534.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education
Appendix A (continued)
6) Collaborate with health professionals within VGH, the community, and
other institutions to facilitate implementation of the joint
baccalaureate program.
Appendix B
Resource Aspects Pertaining to the Joint UBC/VGH BSN Program
1.  Resource Requirements
Faculty of Science
♦Biology 153:
4 teaching assistants
Benefits
1 full-time technician
Benefits
Supplies and expenses
New laboratory equipment
♦Microbiology 153:
2 teaching assistants
Benefits
Supplies and expenses
♦Statistics 203:
Faculty (partial)
Benefits
Computer funds
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
♦Pharmacy 2 40:
Faculty (partial)
Benefits
Faculty of Arts
♦Family and Nutritional Sciences 209:
Teaching Assistants
Benefits
Supplies and Expenses 9535.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education
Appendix B  (continued)
♦English 100:
1 Faculty position
Benefits
♦Elective Courses:
Faculty (partial)
Benefits
UBC School of Nursing
1 Faculty position
Benefits
1 Faculty position
Benefits
1 Faculty position
Benefits
Supplies and expenses
Indirect UBC Costs
2. Revenues from Tuition Fees
The revenues arising from the UBC portion of the tuition fees are
sufficient to defray all net direct and indirect costs accruing from
the above resource requirements. (VGH is assuming responsibility for
some instructional tasks currently undertaken by the UBC School, and
the School is taking responsibility for some tasks currently undertaken
by VGH.)"
Dean Meisen   )  That the UBC and VGH Schools of Nursing be
Dean Webber   )  authorized to offer jointly, from 1989/90
onwards, the UBC BSN program under the
conditions outlined in this report.
In response to a query, Dean Meisen explained that students currently
enrolled in the diploma program at the VGH School of Nursing will have an
opportunity to complete that program before it is phased out.  He also
explained that the proposal had not been referred to the Senate Admissions
Committee since there were no proposed changes in admission criteria. 9536.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education  (continued)
In response to a query concerning the proposed increase in enrolment,
Dean Meisen explained that enrolment in the UBC B.S.N, program would be
increased from 80 to 160 in the first year. Dean Meisen also confirmed
that since the VGH diploma program in nursing was being phased out this
collaboration would not produce more nurses.
A query was raised concerning Appendix *B' of the report. Dean Meisen
stated that most of the coursework instruction will be given at UBC, space
permitting, but that there are lecture rooms and other facilities
available at VGH. Dean Meisen also explained that the Deans of the
various Faculties responsible for providing service courses had been asked
to indicate any additional resources that would be required to handle the
increase in enrolment in those courses.
Attention was drawn to the fact that Psychology courses required by the
nursing program had been omitted from the list of resource requirements
for the Faculty of Arts, and that resources for increased enrolment were
not specified. Dean Meisen agreed to discuss this omission with the
Vice-President Academic.
In response to a query concerning a statement that UBC was prepared to
increase its undergraduate enrolment by approximately 200, President
Strangway stated that this had been proposed by the provincial
government. However, he did not think that the proposed increase in
enrolment in the B.S.N, program was to be part of the 200. 9537.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education (continued)
In response to a query, Dean Meisen confirmed that there would be no
difficulty in recruiting the additional 80 qualified students for entry
into the B.S.N, program, and that the tuition revenue would therefore be
available to offset the cost of additional services.
In answer to concerns expressed about the lack of specific provision in
Appendix 'B' to address additional demands on campus libraries, Dean
Meisen stated that this matter had been discussed by the Budget Committee
and that budgetary information concerning the resources of the VGH School
of Nursing had been passed to the University Librarian. Dean Meisen also
noted that under the item headed "Library" in the proposal, the sentence
which reads: "...and it is understood that all nursing students will have
access to the Woodward Library." should read "...access to the UBC
Library system."
In response to a query concerning long-term funding, Dean Meisen stated
that the University had a legal agreement governing the collaboration
between the two institutions, and that if either institution felt that the
arrangements were not satisfactory, for financial or other reasons, either
party could disengage itself from the agreement.
With the agreement of Senate, Dr. Inge Schamborzki, Vice-President
Nursing at the VGH, commented on the proposal. Dr. Schamborzki explained
that the funding for the School of Nursing at VGH was included within the
global allotment to the hospital, and that she had received assurances
through the Hospital Board and the Ministry of Health of their commitment
to this project.  Dr. Schamborzki noted that the VGH Alumni had recently 9538.
May 17, 1989
Business arising from the Minutes
UBC/VGH Collaboration in Nursing Education (continued)
celebrated  its  90th  anniversary,  which  she  felt  demonstrated  the
commitment of the hospital and the Ministry vis-a-vis funding.  The
Ministry had also recently supported some research endeavours at VGH and
it was hoped that this research would assist in finding ways to reduce the
costs associated with hospital admissions, patient care, and the length of
stay.
Following further discussion the motion to approve the proposal was put
and carried.
Chairman's remarks and related questions
Senate membership
President Strangway paid tribute to the University Librarian, Mr. D.
Mclnnes for his eight years of service on Senate, to Dr. Michael Shaw,
University Professor and former Vice-President Academic, for his eighteen
years of service on Senate, and to Dr. R. M. Will, Dean of Arts, and
member of Senate for fifteen years.
In the absence of Dean Will, the Chairman invited Senate to join him in
a round of applause in appreciation of Dean Will's outstanding service and
commitment to the University.
With the agreement of the Chairman, Dr Shaw read to Senate the following
verse on the occasion of his forthcoming retirement from the University:
SIC TRANSIT GLORIA - PERHAPS!
0 quam cito transit Gloria Mundi!
There's a rule applies to all and sundry:
No matter that your fit and trim,
Your belly filled with fire, vigour, vim,
Your intellect intact, your thoughts profound,
No matter that your mind is clear and sound,
No matter that your mem'ry has no match, 9539.
May 17, 1989
Chairman's remarks and related questions
Senate membership (continued)
SIC TRANSIT GLORIA - PERHAPS!
Your name is on the list for quick dispatch,
A winged Phoenix too soon flames to ash
Because it's said the U is short of cash.
Unless you are an unpaid governor
Or an eminent aged Chancellor
When your age is sixty five precisely
You must retire - best do so nicely!
Your friends will dine you - some cry in their soup -
Praise you - all with ceremonial poop!
Not that your age has knock'd you for a loop,
They cry so softly, softly in their soup
Because, you see, each wonders for himself
What he will do when he is on the shelf.
For others that seems many years away
And here is what they'd really like to say:
Your years are long, your shoulders sag;  your brain is addled
also.
You cannot stay, you're in the way;  your views are even
more so.
You long ago had passed your prime, and if, mayhap
there was a time
Some of us thought you could amuse us by spouting
caustic rhyme,
Of late, old man, your so-called verse has gone
from bad to worse;
That is why, no matter how you fight or kick or
yell or curse,
The rule applies - since you are sixty five we shall
retire you,
Go quietly, go quietly old man, or we shall fire you.
I shall.  I wish all Senators well.  Before I take my leave
Hear, Senators, one reason that I do not deeply grieve,
One reason that my copious tears are purest crocodile,
Profusely shed to hide from all assembled here my broadest smile -
The Supreme Court may raise me - a winged Phoenix from my ash
Then, gentlemen, we can talk about a settlement - in cash.
Members of Senate applauded Dr. Shaw's poetic endeavours.
Tuition fee date
President Strangway asked the Registrar to report to Senate on the
action taken as a result of a motion passed by Senate recommending to the
Board of Governors that the first term tuition fee date should be changed
to the first day after Labour Day, and that the telereg deposit be 95 40.
May 17, 1989
Chairman's remarks and related questions
Tuition fee date (continued)
increased from $100 to $200. Dr. Spencer reported that the first term
tuition fee date has been changed and will be September 5, 1989. However,
in considering the recommendation from Senate with respect to the deposit,
the Board of Governors approved the recommendation but suggested that
implementation should follow a review by the Registrar's Office, Financial
Services and Information Systems Management. The Registrar's Office and
Financial Services considered that there were some areas of concern and
advised against raising the deposit. Those areas of concern included the
following: There are several hundred students who pay total fees of less
than $200, and it would therefore have been necessary to generate refunds
for those students. Also, if the deposit were to be raised part-time
students enrolling in three or six units would have to pay as much as 60%
of their fees up to three months before their courses start. It was felt
that experience last summer suggested that the $100 deposit was achieving
the intended goal of ensuring that the majority of those who took
advantage of early registration were in fact seriously intending to enrol
at UBC, and finally it was felt that an increase in the deposit might
discourage a significant number of students from taking advantage of early
registration, and that some might delay registering until the last date of
the registration period, or in fact consider going elsewhere. Therefore
the advice from the Registrar's Office and from Financial Services was not
to increase the telereg deposit, and that advice has been accepted.
Resignation of the Dean of Arts
On behalf of the Faculty of Arts, Dr. Elder read to Senate the following
letter, addressed to President Strangway, which had been circulated at the
meeting: 95 41.
May 17, 1989
Chairman's remarks and related questions
Resignation of the Dean of Arts (continued)
" The resignation of Dean Will has caused widespread concern about the
future of the Arts Faculty. The earlier statement by the Dean to the
Faculty that he was not prepared to accept further cuts in budgeted
positions suggests that his resignation was precipitated by demands from
your office for such cuts.
We believe that the quality of all universities that aspire to national
and international recognition is built upon the foundation of excellent
arts and science faculties.
We are convinced that our Arts Faculty has suffered a disproportionate
share of the cuts in faculty positions, undermining the academic
foundations of the university. Larger classes, truncated programs, and
increasing demands on the time of continuing faculty weaken our capacity
to provide high quality teaching and supervision.
We call upon you to make a commitment to strengthen our Faculty, to
rebuild weakened departments and programs, and to recommend the
appointment of a dean whose qualities will attract immediate support from
this faculty and who will provide the academic leadership to rebuild our
strength and reputation."
Dr. Elder stated that members of the Faculty of Arts were very concerned
about the future of the Faculty.  Problems associated with programs and
lack of faculty had been brought to the attention of Senate on numerous
occasions and, apparently, had now led to the resignation of the Dean and
the Associate Deans.  On behalf of the Faculty, Dr. Elder called upon
Senate and the President to act to rebuild the Faculty.
President Strangway responded that the decision of the Dean was his own
personal decision, and was clearly related to issues of budget cuts.
President Strangway noted, however, that budget cuts had been applied to
all Faculties and that it was simply a matter of judgement as to whether
they were disproportionate or not. President Strangway said that he had
no difficulty with the issue of a commitment to strengthening the
Faculty. He stated that the fund-raising campaigns and the establishment
of endowed chairs were all part of the plan to re-build the strength of
the University as a whole, of which the Faculty of Arts is a significant
part. 95 42.
May 17, 1989
Chairman's remarks and related questions
Resignation of the Dean of Arts (continued)
Dr. Sobrino commented that many members of the University who are not
members of the Faculty of Arts shared his concern at the perception that
the University is moving away from its basic core of Arts and Science,
particularly Arts, and as a member of Senate elected by the Faculty
at-large he felt it was his duty to express support of the letter read to
Senate.
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations:
(i)  establishment of The Nathan T.  Nemetz Chair in Legal History,
recommended by the Faculty of Law.  (pp.9501-2)
(ii) enrolment quotas and controls for 1989/90  (p.9491)
Candidates for Degrees
Lists of candidates for degrees, as approved by the various Faculties
and Schools, were made available for inspection by Senate members prior to
the meeting.
Dr. Shaw ) That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Dr. Bressler ) as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chairman
of Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried
Scholarships and Awards
A list of scholarships, medals and prizes awarded to students in the
graduating classes was circulated for information. 95 43.
May 17, 1989
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
The Mission Statement
Dr. Tees, Chairman of the Committee, reported that the suggestions
received for changes to the draft Mission Statement had been
incorporated in the final version which was now before Senate. This
reads as follows:
THE MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of The University of British Columbia is to be a world
renowned institution of higher education and research.
From their beginnings, universities have accepted the responsibility for
preserving and advancing formal knowledge. The University of British
Columbia has shared this responsibility since its founding, seventy-five
years ago. Now, with the development of a knowledge-intensive society,
the crucial function of the University to preserve and extend our stock
of knowledge grows ever more challenging.
In this context, The University of British Columbia will provide
instruction, research and public service that contributes to the
economic, social, and cultural progress of the people of British
Columbia and Canada, is broadly representative of the fields of
knowledge and professional specialties, is known and respected
internationally, and is sensitive to the issues of our common global
society.
The University of British Columbia dedicates itself to meeting this
challenge and so serving the people of British Columbia.
In pursuit of this mission, the University adopts the following
statement of objectives. The University will
1. maintain an environment that encourages creative activity, freedom of
expression and a sense of purpose, in the recognition that people are
the essential resource of the University;
2. provide an education that will enrich the lives of its graduates,
enable them to play responsible roles in society, and ensure that
degree programs foster the ability to think critically, creatively
and independently, to exercise judgement, and to communicate clearly;
3. participate in the continuing development of a system of
post-secondary education in the province that responds to the diverse
educational needs of an increasingly complex society, and collaborate
with other educational institutions in the province to ensure
complementarity of offerings, equity of access and cooperation in
joint undertakings; 9544.
May 17, 1989
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
The Mission Statement  (continued)
4. maintain its position as one of North America's major research
universities, and carry out research which is at the forefront of
human knowledge and which can be freely and openly disseminated in a
wide range of fields including the arts, social sciences, humanities,
sciences and applied sciences and be a prime resource for the
province and the nation;
5. foster the transfer and application of knowledge for the benefit of
society by undertaking joint research programs with industry,
government, and community organizations, licensing university
intellectual property, and encouraging active participation in the
intellectual, business and professional life of the community;
6. respond to the demand for increased enrolment in graduate programs;
7. enrich the educational experience by enrolling students from many
countries;
8. provide continuing education in a wide range of subject areas which
draw on the University's strengths, and
9. strengthen its commitment to international development activities and
expand linkages with institutions in other parts of the world,
emphasizing the Pacific Rim.
In support of these objectives, the University will strive to
1. maintain an environment which respects the academic freedom of
students and faculty while reinforcing excellence in teaching and
research;
2. continue to recruit outstanding faculty;
3. respond to the academic and personal needs of students;
4. provide an efficient and effective administration and support staff;
5. provide excellent library service, equipment and facilities for the
pursuit of knowledge;
6. foster the loyalty and support of the alumni and the community.
Dr. Tees      )  That Senate adopt this as the Mission Statement
Dr. Morrison  )  for UBC 95 45.
May 17, 1989
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
The Mission Statement  (continued)
In amendment:
Dr. Sobrino   )  That paragraph 5. be amended to read:
Dr. Lindstrom  )  "foster the transfer and application of knowledge
for the benefit of society by encouraging active
participation in the intellectual, business and
professional life of the community and, when
appropriate, by undertaking joint research programs
with industry, government, and community
organizations, and by licensing university
intellectual property."
Carried
The motion, as amended, was put and carried.
Curriculum Committee  (see Appendix 'B')
Dr. Thompson, Chairman of the Committee, presented the report.
Faculty of Applied Science
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Applied Science, with the exception of BIOE 303 and 403 which
were being withheld pending further discussion by the Faculty.
Faculty of Arts
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Arts, subject to the following:
International Relations - Under Third and Fourth Years Note: after
...non-English language requirement ... add the words "referred to
above".
Dr.  Thompson  noted  that  the  section  involving  admission  and
applications under International Relations had not been considered by
the Curriculum Committee since this was not within the Committee's terms
of reference. 95 46.
May 17, 1989
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
Faculty of Education
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Education, subject to the following:
Education 495 and 496, change the unit designations of "d" to "c".
Educational Psychology 432 should read "423".
Faculty of Graduate Studies
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Graduate Studies, with the exception of HCEP 5 45 which is
being withheld pending consultation with the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration.  The Committee also recommended approval of a
new Calendar statement for the Biology Graduate Program, and recommended
approval of the statement concerning Guided Independent Study Courses in
Graduate Degree Programs, subject to the last sentence being changed to
read:  "Approval of...is required;  students are advised to obtain
approval prior to registering."
Faculty of Medicine
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Medicine.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.
Faculty of Science
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Science. 95 47.
May 17, 1989
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee  (continued)
Dr. Thompson  ) That the proposals of the Faculties of
Mr. Pearce    )  Applied Science, Arts, Education,
Graduate Studies, Medicine, Pharmaceutical
Sciences, and Science be approved.
Dean Suedfeld drew attention to the Committee's proposed change to the
statement concerning Guided Independent Study Courses.  He explained that
prior approval is required in order to avoid situations whereby a student
taking a guided independent study course, which is later deemed to be
unacceptable for graduate credit, has wasted his or her time, effort and
money in taking a course for which no credit is going to be granted.  The
Graduate Council had therefore insisted that approval has to be sought in
advance, not afterwards.
In amendment:
Dean Suedfeld ) That the Committee's proposed change
Dean Lusztig  )  to the statement on Guided Independent
Study Courses in Graduate Degree Programs
be withdrawn.
Carried
The motion, as amended, was put and carried.
Library Committee
Dean Suedfeld, Chairman of the Committee, reported on the activities of
the Senate Library Committee during the 1988-89 academic year. He stated
that the Committee had focussed its attention on the report of the Library
Review Committee, and through successive stages had developed a response
to the report. The Committee felt that while the report raised some very
good points, some of it was reflective of the backgrounds of the members
of the review committee, which had dealt with libraries that were very
different to UBC both in size and complexity.  Therefore some of the 95 48.
May 17, 1989
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee  (continued)
recommendations made as a result of that unfamiliarity with the scope of
the UBC Library should not be taken as strategies for the future
development of the Library without more consideration and discussion.
Also, some of the procedures that had been proposed, which were apparently
directed towards cutting costs, would probably do so at an excessive loss
in benefits offered by the Library. In conclusion, Dean Suedfeld stated
that the response of the Committee had been sent to the review board
through the President's Office.
Nominating Committee
Dr. Tennant, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following report:
"The Nominating Committee nominates the following persons to fill student
vacancies on Senate Committees:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. T. P. Kaweski
Mr. G. A. Porter
Academic Policy
Mr. J. A. S. Fogarassy
Mr. D. M. Pettingale
Admissions
replacing Mr. A. K. Haji
replacing Mrs. B. M. Loeb
- continuing member
- replacing Mr. S. Vukusic
Ms. H. E. Cowan
Mr. C. Q. Vanwermeskerken
Agenda
Mrs. B. M. Loeb
Mr. R. L. Peters
Appeals on Academic Standing
Miss W. A. King
Mr. R. L. Peters
Mr. D. M. Pettingale
- continuing member
- replacing Mr. J. A. S. Fogarassy
- replacing Miss H. Shou
- continuing member
- replacing Mr. G. Taylor
- continuing member
- continuing member Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee  (continued)
95 49.
May 17, 1989
Budget
Mr. E. B. Goehring
Mr. M. J. Libby
Continuing Education
Miss J. Harrington
Curriculum
Ms. H. E. Cowan
Miss J. Harrington
Mrs. B. M. Loeb
Committee on Elections
Ms. J. Thorn
Extracurricular Activities
Mr. A. K. Haji
Mr. G. A. Porter
continuing member
replacing Mr. S. M. Wilson
replacing Mr. R. G. Bush
- continuing member
- replacing Mr. G. Taylor
- continuing member
- replacing Mr. J. P. Andrews
- continuing member
- replacing Ms. K. P. Curtis
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Mr. E. B. Goehring - replacing Mr. S. Vukusic
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
The following membership was approved at the April Senate meeting:
Mr. D. Horvat
Mr. T. P. Kaweski
Mr. M. J. Libby
Student Awards
Mr. G. A. Porter
Ms. J. Thorn
Tributes
Ms. W. L. Fox
Mr. C Q. Vanwermeskerken
University Library
Ms. W. L. Fox
Miss J. Harrington
Mr. T. P. Kaweski
- replacing Mr. J. P. Andrews
- replacing Mr. R. G. Bush
- replacing Mr. R. A. Speers
- replacing Mr. E. W. N. Lam
- replacing Mr. S. M. Wilson
- replacing Miss K. P. Curtis
- replacing Mr. S. F. Haffey
- replacing Mr. E. B. Goehring
- replacing Mr. S. F. Haffey
- replacing Mr. E. W. N. Lam 9550.
May 17, 1989
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee (continued)
Dr. Tennant   )  That the recommendations of the
Mr. Pettingale ) Nominating Committee be approved.
Student Awards
Carried
In presenting the report, Dr. Cook, Chairman of the Committee, paid
tribute to the outstanding contribution made by Mr. Ernie Lam, one of the
student representatives on the Committee during the past academic year.
Dr. Cook informed Senate that the first Wesbrook Scholars had been
presented with a plaque and a scroll at a reception given in their honour
by the President's Office.
Dr. Cook noted that of the twenty-seven Heads of Graduating Classes two
had entered the University as Chancellor's Scholars and one as the Bert
Henry Scholar, and that three of the twenty-seven are also Wesbrook
Scholars.
Dr. Cook      )  That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A')
Mrs. Plant    )  be accepted subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
In response to a query, Dr. Cook stated that the Committee would be
reviewing the criteria used for awarding scholarships to part-time
students.
Dean Suedfeld pointed out that there were a large number of part-time
graduate students at UBC in need of financial support, and suggested that
if the funds available are not for graduate students the title of the
scholarship  should  indicate  that,  and,  if  that  were  the  case, 9551.
May 17, 1989
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards  (continued)
consideration should be given to establishing similar scholarships for
graduate part-time students.
President Strangway agreed that this matter should be looked into.
The motion was put and carried.
Triennial elections of representatives to the Board of Governors and the
Senate
The following report and recommendations concerning the forthcoming
elections had been circulated:
"The University Act, Section 42, states that "... senate shall make and
publish all rules necessary and not inconsistent with this Act in respect of
nominations, elections and voting ..."
BOARD OF GOVERNORS:
(i)    The Registrar shall conduct the elections.
(ii)   Each candidate shall be nominated in writing, the nomination to be
signed by SEVEN persons entitled to vote in the election of the Board
of Governors and by the nominee indicating willingness to run for
election, and the nominations shall be sent to the Registrar.
(iii) Each nominee shall be requested to supply a brief curriculum vitae and
be permitted to include a further statement of up to 150 words which
will be circulated with the ballot papers.
(iv)   The elections shall be conducted by mail ballot to campus addresses.
(v)    The election schedule shall be as follows:-
Faculty :  (Two to be elected)
- call for nominations, Friday, September 8, 1989
- close of nominations, 4.00 p.m., Friday, September 29, 1989
- Election date, Tuesday, October 31, 1989
Non-Faculty full-time Employees:  (One to be elected)
- call for nominations, Wednesday, October 25, 1989
- close of nominations, 4.00 p.m., Wednesday, November 15, 1989 9552.
May 17, 1989
Triennial elections of representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
BOARD OF GOVERNORS:
Non-Faculty full-time Employees:  (One to be elected)  (continued)
- Election date, Wednesday, December 20, 1989
(vi) The election of Faculty members to the Board of Governors will be
conducted by preferential voting. Voters will be required to rank
ALL candidates in order of preference. No tie rankings will be
permitted. Ballots will be machine counted in the Computing
Centre. The candidates elected will be the two with the lowest
totals. Ballots will be considered invalid unless all candidates are
ranked.
SENATE:
Election of Chancellor and (eleven) Convocation Members of Senate:
(i)    The Registrar shall conduct the elections.
(ii) All nominations of candidates for the office of chancellor shall be
signed by seven persons entitled to vote in the election.
(iii) All nominations for membership in the senate shall be signed by three
persons entitled to vote in the election.
(iv) All nominations for election of candidates for the office of
chancellor and for membership in senate shall require the signature of
the nominee indicating willingness to run for election.
(v) "The registrar shall forthwith send a written notice of nomination to
each person nominated as a candidate for the office of chancellor and
to each person nominated as a candidate for membership in the senate,
with a request that the candidate forward to the registrar information
respecting his degrees, the dates thereof, his occupation, offices
held by him at a university or in any other organization, his other
professional or business interests, and his publications."
(University Act, Section 14 (3)).
The registrar shall circulate only the information specified in the
University Act.
(vi) The election of convocation members be scheduled and regulated as
follows:
(a) this election include the election of a chancellor;
(b) that the notice of the election and call for nominations be made
in the fall Chronicle to be published October 6, 1989;
(c) that the close of nominations for chancellor and for convocation
membership in the senate be 4.00 p.m. on Friday, November 17, 1989;
(d) that the election date be Monday, March 5, 1990. 9553.
May 17, 1989
Triennial elections of representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
SENATE:
Election of Chancellor and (eleven) Convocation Members of Senate:  (continued)
(vii) In the event that after the close of nominations but before the
election date it is found that a nominee for the office of chancellor
could not serve if elected, the registrar be authorized, if so
instructed by the chairman of senate, to delay the election and issue
another call for nominations.
(viii) The voting papers be designed to permit machine tabulation of the
election results.
(ix) The results of the election, in accordance with Section 16 of the
University Act, will be reported to the senate at its next regular
meeting, namely March 21, 1990.
(x)    Replacement procedures for Convocation representatives to Senate
replacements will be appointed on the basis of the recommendation of
the remaining Convocation representatives to Senate.
(Approved by Senate, April 21, 1976)
Election of Faculty members at-Large (Ten to be elected)
(i)    The Registrar shall conduct the election
(ii) Each candidate shall be nominated in writing, the nominations to be
signed by THREE 'faculty members'
(iii)  The election schedule shall be as follows:
- call for nominations, Friday, January 5, 1990
- close of nominations, 4.00 p.m., Friday, January 26, 1990
- Election date, Thursday, March 1, 1990
(iv) Replacement procedures - "a vacancy in this category shall be filled
by a candidate in the ... election of members at-Large. Where no
candidate is willing or able to serve as a replacement, a special
election to fill that vacancy will be held."
"The Registrar shall invite the candidate who received the highest
number of votes in the ...general election ... to fill the vacancy.
If that candidate declines ... the candidate with the next highest
number of votes shall be invited to fill the vacancy, and so on, until
a willing candidate is found."
"An individual who has vacated a position as a representative of the
faculty members at-Large is not thereby disqualified from filling a
vacancy in accordance with the above procedures."
(Approved by Senate, May 25, 1977) 955 4.
May 17, 1989
Triennial elections of representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
SENATE (Continued)
Elections of Faculty Members from Individual Faculties (Two from each Faculty)
Individual Faculties will make their own decisions on the procedures and
timing of the election of their two representatives to serve on Senate on the
understanding that all elections be completed by February 28, 1990. Such
elections may be held at Faculty meetings subject to the terms of the
University Act (i.e. those participating in the elections must be 'faculty
members' as defined in the "General Provisions" section of this submission.)
With the election date of Tuesday, October 31, 1989, for the election of
Faculty representatives to the Board of Governors, and the election date of
Thursday, March 1, 1990, for the election of Facuty members at-Large to
Senate, the following schedule is suggested for individual faculties. This
schedule would enable any eligible faculty members who wished to do so to run
as a candidate in all of the elections involving faculty members at-Large.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
call for nominations:
close of nominations:
Election date:
Monday, October 16, 1989
Monday, November 6, 1989
Wednesday, December 6, 1989
Other faculties requiring an election by mailed ballot:
call for nominations: Tuesday, November 21, 1989
close of nominations:
Election date:
Tuesday, December 12, 1989
Monday, January 22, 1990
(Replacement procedures - Nomination and election shall be conducted in
accordance with established Faculty procedure. Where such established
procedures do not exist then nominations shall be called for either before or
on the floor of a meeting of the Faculty concerned and voting shall be either
by show of hands or by balloting at the meeting. It was agreed that the
Registrar's office would not be involved.)
(Approved by Senate, April 21, 1976)
Faculties who want to have runners-up used as replacements in the event of a
vacancy during the three-year term will be asked to advise the Registrar so
that this may be stated clearly in the call for nominations.
Faculties will be asked to advise the Registrar of their decisions. 9555.
May 17, 1989
Triennial elections of representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
SENATE (Continued)
Election of representative of the full-time Professional Librarians
(i)    The Registrar shall conduct the election.
(ii) Each candidate shall be nominated in writing, the nominations to be
signed by THREE professional librarians employed by the University who
have been employed in that capacity for a period of four months or
longer, and by the nominee indicating willingness to run for election.
(iii)  The election schedule shall be as follows:-
- call for nominations, Monday, January 8, 1990
- close of nominations, 4.00 p.m., Monday, January 22, 1990
- Election date, Wednesday, February 21, 1990
GENERAL       PROVISIONS
Eligibility
'Faculty members' eligible to participate in elections of representatives to
serve on the Board of Governors and the Senate shall be only those persons
who, at the time the nominations are called, hold full-time Board appointments
(which they have held for four months or longer) at the ranks of lecturer,
instructor, assistant professor, associate professor or professor.
Any faculty member who has been granted leave extending for more than six
months from the time at which Senate mebership would commence (September 1,
1990), or who is on disability leave at the close of nominations shall not be
eligible to stand for election to Senate.
Approved by Senate, November 18, 1981)
Nominations
In some elections the Registrar publishes the names of the nominators in the
information provided to electors. Where more signatures than are required
are submitted in support of a particular candidate, the Registrar will publish
only the minimum number of names required. Only one nomination will be
accepted for each candidate in any one election.
Results
Where appropriate, results will be machine counted.
Terms of office (three-years)
Unless otherwise determined by the Board of Governors, the Chancellor shall
take office on June 25, 1990 and the installation ceremony will take place on
Friday, June 1, 1990. 9556.
May 17, 1989
Triennial elections of representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate
Terms of office (three-years)  (continued)
All other members of the Board of Governors will take office on February 1,
1990.
All other members of Senate will take office on September 1, 1990.
Leaves of absence
The position of an elected faculty member shall be declared vacant by the
Secretary of Senate when he has received notice that the member has resigned,
or that the member is going on leave for a period of more than six months, or
that the member has been granted disability leave.
(Approved by Senate, November 18, 1981)
Any elected member of Senate may be granted leave of absence for up to five
consecutive ordinary meetings of Senate. Any absence without leave for more
than five consecutive ordinary meetings of Senate shall result in a
declaration of vacancy by the Secretary of Senate.
(Approved by Senate November 18, 1981)
Dr. Shaw     ) That the recommendations of the Registrar
Mr. Alsgard    )  concerning elections be approved.
Dr. Sobrino drew Senate's attention to item (vi) under Board of
Governors, and questioned the statement on ranking.  He felt sure that the
intent was that candidates would be ranked with consecutive, positive
integers but suggested that this be clearly explained on the ballot.  Dr.
Tennant observed that the system was rather bizarre and suggested that this
be looked at by the Committee on Elections for report back to Senate.
The motion was put and carried
Report from St. Mark's College
The annual report to Senate from St. Mark's College had been circulated
for information. Father Burns pointed out that the major spirit of the
report was to acknowledge the increase in student participation in courses
during the past year, despite severe budget restraints. He stated that this
increase is due considerably to the spirit of cooperation that exists
between the sister colleges, Vancouver School of Theology and Regent
College, as well as to several individuals and units at UBC. 9557.
May 17, 1989
Report from Regent College
The annual report to Senate from Regent College had been circulated for
information.
Report from Vancouver School of Theology
The annual report to Senate from the Vancouver School of Theology had
been circulated for information.
Other business
Clerk to Senate
Dr. Tennant noted that this evening marked the completion of Fran
Medley's second decade as Clerk to Senate, and moved the following motion
in recognition of her service to the Senate.
Dr. Tennant   ) We acknowledge with appreciation and
Dean Richards ) gratitude the two decades of exemplary
service that Fran Medley has provided
to this Senate, to its committees, and
to its members. We look forward to
many more years of her wisdom, good humour,
and steady hand.
Carried
Congregation
It was noted that in recent years not many members of Senate had
attended the graduation ceremonies.  Members were encouraged to take part
in this year's ceremonies.
Faculty of Arts - International Relations
Dr. Elder drew Senate's attention to the proposals from International
Relations concerning admission and applications, which had not been
considered by the Curriculum Committee.  She stated that the Admissions 9558.
May 17, 1989
Other business
Faculty of Arts - International Relations  (continued)
Committee had not dealt with this matter as they were not sure that
internal admission requirements (from second year into third year, and so
on) came under their jurisdiction. However, since these proposals
required Senate approval, Dr. Elder moved the followng motion:
Dr. Elder
Dr. Stager
) That the proposed changes to the
) Calendar entry for admission to the
Major program in International Relations,
and the the proposed deadline date of May 31
for applications for admission to the program
be approved.
Carried
The meeting adjourned at 9.45 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September
13, 1989.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 9559.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate
Apotex Inc. Prize in Pharmaceutical Sciences - This $350 prize honours a
graduating student in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences who has
demonstrated high overall academic achievement. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. (Available
1988/89 Winter Session.)
Ahmad Bhimani Memorial Scholarship - A $500 scholarhip has been established
in memory of Ahmad Bhimani by his family, friends and classmates. It is
awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Applied Science to a student
entering fourth year who demonstrates a strong personal commitment to, and
enthusiasm for, academic activities, community endeavors, and sports.
(Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
Canadian Particleboard Association Scholarship - This $1,000 scholarship
supports a student in wood science and industry with an interest in the
properties, manufacturing or marketing of reconstituted wood products. The
award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry in
consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies with preference given to
Canadian citizens or permanent residents. (Available 1989/90 Winter
Session.)
Coastal Silviculture Committee Bursary - This $250 bursary assists an
undergraduate student majoring in Forest Science in the Faculty of Forestry,
with preference given to a student taking courses in silviculture.
(Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
Dr. Jack Diamond Scholarship - An $800 scholarship has been endowed by
Charles and Isabelle Diamond and Gordon and Leslie Diamond in honour of
their father's 80th birthday. Jack Diamond is a well-known businessman,
philanthropist and sportsman. The award is made to a student in the liberal
arts on the recommendation of the Faculty of Arts. (Available 1990/91
Winter Session.)
Terry J. Gower Memorial Scholarship - A $1,000 scholarship has been
established by his family and friends in memory of Terry Gower, who sought
in his professional career as a B.C. architect to give form and expression
appropriate to the regional landscape. The award is made on the
recommendation of the School of Architecture to a student entering third
year with high standing in design reflecting an interest in regional
expression in architecture.  (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
Rob Gray Memorial Award - A $300 award has been established by family and
friends as a memorial to Rob Gray, B.A. '88, who died tragically in 1988
while in his last year of the Multicultural and Minority Education Diploma
program. The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Education to a student in the Multicultural and Minority Education Diploma
program who combines strong academic standing with participation in
university and community affairs, and personal qualities of sensitivity,
empathy, and humour, qualities for which Rob Gray will be remembered.
(Available 1989/90 Winter Session.) 9560.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate  (continued)
Rudi Haering Medal in Physics - Friends, colleagues and former students of
Dr. Rudi Haering have established a medal in recognition of his many years
of service as a professor in the Department of Physics. The medal is
awarded on the recommendation of the Department of Physics in consultation
with the UBC Physics Society, to the most outstanding graduating student in
a majors or honours program in Physics.  (Available 1988/89 Winter Session.)
Raymond G. Herbert Award in Law - This $500 award honours the best all-round
graduating student in the Faculty of Law. Established by his many friends,
the award honours Ray Herbert, Q.C, D.F.C, CD., who rendered
distinguished service to his country both in war and peace, to his
university and its Faculty of Law, and to the legal profession in B.C.
Candidates must have ranked in the top quartile in the two preceding winter
sessions. Academic achievement, athletic involvement, moral force of
character, and ability to serve, work with, and lead others are considered.
The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available
1988/89 Winter Session.)
Nettie Mae Huskins Memorial Bursaries - Bursaries totalling $18,000 have
been made available by the late William Eric Huskins for students in Nursing
(approximately $4,000) and Engineering (approximately $14,000). The
academic record of the candidates may be a consideration. (Available
1989/90 Winter Session.)
Janet Ketcham Bursary - Bursaries totalling $1,000 are offered by Janet
Ketcham to assist First Nations students. Preference is given to students
who have demonstrated an interest in serving their native community.
(Available 1989/90 Winter Session).
James Ruggles Macdonell Scholarship Fund - As a memorial to James Ruggles
Macdonnell, an honours graduate in Philosophy in the Class of 1966 who died
accidentally in his graduating year, his family and friends have established
a scholarship of $850 to be awarded to a promising honours student entering
his or her final undergraduate year in philosophy. If there is no suitable
candidate in the Honours Program, the award may be made to a student in the
Major Program. Financial need will be considered.
(Members of Senate should note that this represents a change of terms in an
existing award. The award is endowed and the donor's whereabouts is
unknown. The Senate has the right to change the terms governing an award,
so that they may meet new conditions, may more fully carry out the
intentions of the donor, or maintain the usefulness of the benefaction.)
Russell & DuMoulin Prize in Topics in Industrial and Intellectual Property -
A $500 prize, the gift of Russell & DuMoulin, Barristers and Solicitors,
honours a student who achieves high academic standing in Law 439 (Topics in
Industrial and Intellectual Property - Law and Technology). The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 1988/89 Winter
Session.) 9561.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate  (continued)
Vinod K. Sood Memorial Fellowship - A $6,500 fellowship has been endowed by
family, colleagues, friends and the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration, in memory of Vinod K. Sood. At the time of his death in
1988, Mr. Sood was Chairman and CEO of Finning Limited, and a member of the
Advisory Council of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration.
Preference is given to a Commerce graduate student in organizational
behavior, and is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.  (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
University of B.C. Scholarship (for Part-time Study) - A number of
scholarships are provided from the operating budget of the university, for
students in less than a full program of studies in Winter Session.
(Available 1988/89 Winter Session.)
University Publishers Scholarship in Dentistry - A $200 scholarship assists
a dentistry student to purchase textbooks. The award, based on academic
standing and participation in the activities of the Dental Undergraduate
Society, is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Dentistry in
consultation with the Dental Undergraduate Society. The financial
circumstances of the candidate may be a consideration. (Available 1989/90
Winter Session.)
J.C. Wilt Psychotherapy Prize - A $250 prize is given to a psychiatry
resident for the best oral submission in the course Psychiatry 523
(Psychotherapy III). The content of the presentation and its form are left
to the presenter, but its purpose must be to demonstrate an understanding of
the principles and practice of psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The award is
made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. (Available 1988/89
Winter Session.)
Jake Zilber Scholarship - A $400 scholarship has been endowed by the Smith
Foundation to honour Jacob Zilber on his retirement from the Department of
Creative Writing in 1989. The scholarship acknowledges his central role in
the development of scriptwriters and the art of scriptwriting at UBC and in
British Columbia, and symbolizes the affection and respect of his students
and friends. The award is made on the recommendation of the Department to a
student who has shown exceptional promise as a writer for screen and
television and has completed at least one year of study in a B.F.A. or
M.F.A. program in Creative Writing.  (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.) 9562.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Electrical Engineering
Changes ELEC 362 - to be retained for the 1989/90 session
(previously deleted)
ELEC 472 - change in number (formerly 468)
ELEC 498 - change in description, add prerequisites
Change in program
Computer Engineering Option, Third Year
CPSC 310 - split into two courses:
CPSC 310 (1.5) Software Engineering
CPSC 319 (1.5) Software Engineering Project
FACULTY OF ARTS
Change to Arts Program Statement
Under COURSES IN OTHER FACULTIES OR DEGREE PROGRAMS in the last
paragraph beginning "No other ..." before the last sentence of the
paragraph after "concentration", add:
"Qualified fourth-year students may be allowed to register in up to 3
units of courses in the Faculty of Arts at the 500 level toward
completion of Major or Honours degree programs."
Change to Faculty of Arts Language Requirement
Under "Language Requirement" and before "Students who have not
satisfied..." (in the next to last sentence of this first paragraph) add:
"Students entering the Faculty of Arts literate and competent (i.e. who
can speak and write and who are acquainted with literature) in a
language other than English, may be permitted to satisfy the language
requirement through examination where faculty expertise to test such
competence and literacy is available. No unit of credit will be awarded
for satisfaction of the language requirement through such examinations."
Anthropology
Changes  ANTH 221 - change in title
ANTH 330, 331, 351 - change in units, hours
Classical Studies
New      LATN 300 (3)   Introduction to Latin for Senior Students
Changes  CLST 335 - change in number, description (formerly 440)
LATN 305 - change in prerequisite 9563.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
Economics
New ECON 303 (1.5)
ECON 313 (1.5)
ECON 317 (1.5)
ECON 367 (1.5)
ECON 421 (1.5)
ECON 451 (1.5)
Intermediate Microeconomics II
Marxist Economics
Poverty and Inequality
Economic Analysis of Law
Topics in Mathematical Economics
Economics of Public Expenditures
Deletions ECON 207, 25 4, 395, 45 4, 475
Changes  ECON 306, 406 - change in title, description, prerequisites
ECON 307 - change in title, description, units, prerequisites
ECON 201, 206, 407 - change in title, description
ECON 312, 487 - change in description, units, hours
ECON 3 41 - change in description
ECON 350, 420, 450 - change in title, description, units, hours
ECON 440 - change in prerequisites (September, 1989)
ECON 406, 407, 417, 420, 451, 460, 461, 465, 490 - change in
prerequisites (September, 1991)
Add to List B
Economics 303, 313, 317, 343, 344, 367, 387
Change in Program
Under Major Requirements, add:
Economics 303
Economics 325 and 326
Fine Arts
Change   FINA 393 - change in description
History
Change   HIST 451 - change in number, title, description (formerly 489)
International Relations
Before Admission to the Major Program add:
The Program described below is the one to be followed by students
entering the International Relations Major program in September, 1991
and thereafter.  Students already enrolled in the program as of October
1990 may complete under  the old program.  See the International
Relations adviser or the 1990-91 Calendar for the requirements of that
program. 9564.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX *B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
International Relations  (continued)
Change Admission entry to read:
Admission to the Major Program
Admission to the Major program in International Relations is not
automatic. To be admitted students must submit a formal application.
Because there are approximately fifty places in each year, some students
who satisfy the minimum prerequisites may not be admitted.
Students applying for admission should have completed at least 24 units,
including English 100, Economics 100, History 125 or 120, and Political
Science 260. Selection for admission is based on the overall standing
(average) in all units of credit earned to date toward the B.A. degree.
Application
A written application for admission to the Major program should be
received by May 31st prior to registering for the third year to ensure
that the student will be considered for admission. Application forms
are available from the International Relations Admissions Secretary,
Department of History, The University of British Columbia, #1297 - 1873
East Mall, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1W5.
The application form must be accompanied by a copy of the student's
permanent record from UBC and official transcripts of the student's
record from all other post-secondary educational institutions that he or
she has attended.
Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts
Note:  All courses listed below are 3 units unless otherwise indicated.
Major
First and Second Years
Students must take the following courses:
Economics 100
History 125 or 120
Political Science 260
It is possible to complete one of the preceding requirements in the
third  year  with  the  permission  of  the  International  Relations
co-ordinator.
6 units of one language other than English, in addition to the Faculty
of Arts language requirement.  The language may be the one used to
satisfy the Faculty of Arts requirement carried to a higher level, or it
may  be  an  additional  language  that  the  student  begins.   (This
requirement may be completed in the third or fourth year.)
Students who plan to concentrate in the International Economy and
Development group in the third and fourth years should remember that
many Economics courses numbered at the 400 level require Economics 201
and/or 202. 9565.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
International Relations  (continued)
Third and Fourth Years
Note: Any student who, upon entering the third year, has not completed
the non-English language requirement referred to above, should
make elimination of that deficiency a priority in course
selection.
A minimum of 16.5 units including the following three courses which,
preferably, should be taken in the third year:
Economics 355 (1.5)
History 432
One of:  Political Science 360, 361, 362 (1.5) or 364
(A course needed to satisfy any of the above requirements cannot also be
counted to meet the requirements below.)
Students in fourth year must take one seminar from the following:
Asian Studies 438 (1.5)
Economics 45 7 (1.5)
History 402 (1.5) or 403 (1.5)
Political Science 464 (1.5) or 403 (1.5)
Or a seminar designated by the International Relations co-ordinator from
the offerings of these departments: Anthropology, Geography, Psychology,
Slavonic Studies and Sociology.
9 units from the following groups, at least 6 of which must be from list
A or at least 6 of which must be from list B, plus 3 more from lists A,
B or C  No more than 24 of the final 30 units can be taken in a single
department;  and, in accord with Faculty of Arts regulations, no more
than 6 units of the last 30 units can be numbered below 300.
A. International Diplomacy, Security, and Peace Studies
History 309 Far Eastern Diplomatic History, 1800-1950
History 310 British Imperial History
History 425 War and Society
History 430 Development of Canadian External Policy Since
Confederation
History 436 The Foreign Policy of the United States from
the Revolutionary Period to the Present
History 441 (1.5)        Anti-Semitism and Nation-Building
History 448 (1.5) Diplomacy and Conflict in the Middle East,
19 48 to the Present
Political Sc. 360        Strategic Studies
Political Sc. 361        International Violence and Its Control
Political Sc. 362 (1.5)   Foreign Policies of the Superpowers
Political Sc. 363 (1.5/3)  Canadian Foreign Policy
Political Sc. 364        International Organization
Political Sc. 460 (1.5/3)  Foreign Policy Analysis
Political Sc. 461 (1.5)   Peace and Conflict Studies
Political Sc. 462 (1.5)   International Relations Theory
Political Sc. 465 (1.5)   Public International Law 9566.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
International Relations  (continued)
B. international Economy and Development
Anthropology 330
Asian Studies
420
Economics
3 41
(1.5)
Economics
342
(1.5)
Economics
3 43
(1.5)
Economics
344
(1.5)
Economics
387
(1.5)
Economics
440
Economics 487
Geography 468 (1.5)
History 423
Political Sc.
Political Sc
Political Sc.
Sociology 301
C. Area Studies
364
366 (1.5)
463 (1.5)
(1.5/3)
Africa
History 314 (1.5)
History 317 (1.5)
Political Sc. 327 (1.5/3)
Asia
Anthropology 315 (1.5/3)
Asian Studies 405
Asian Studies 420
Geography 380 (1.5)
Geography 385 (1.5)
Geography 481 (1.5)
Geography 483 (1.5)
Geography 48 4 (1.5)
History 380
History 385
History 422
History 434
History 480
Political Sc. 321
Political Sc. 322
Political Sc. 323
Political Sc. 324
Political Sc 365 (1.5/3)
Peasants and the Third World
Contemporary South Asia
Economic Development of Asia
The Economy of China Since 19 49
The Economic Development of Modern Japan
The Contemporary Japanese Economy
The Soviet Economy
Economic Development and International
Poverty
Comparative Economic Systems
Geography of International Economic Systems:
Canada and the Pacific Basin
Economic and Business History of Modern Japan
international Organization
International Political Economy
International Interdependence
Sociology of Development and Underdevelopment
History of West Africa
History of Southern Africa
African Government and Politics
Japanese Culture and Society
Communist Movements in Eastern Asia
Contemporary South Asia
Introduction to the Geography of Monsoon Asia
Geography of China
Geography of Japan
Geography of South Asia
Geography of Southeast Asia
Modern Chinese History since 1840
History of India since 1800
Modern Japanese History since 1800
History of Southeast Asia since 1800
Economic and Social History of Modern China
to 1949
Chinese Government and Politics
Japanese Government and Politics
South Asian Government and Politics
Southeast Asian Government and Politics
Asian International Relations 9567.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
International Relations (continued)
Canada and the Americas
Geography 395 (1.5)
History 338
History 350
History 437
History 450 (1.5/3)
History 451
Political Sc. 320
Introduction to the Geography of Latin
America
The United States in the 20th Century
Latin American History
The American Impact on Canada
Selected Topics in Latin American History
Selected Topics in the History of Brazil
American Government and Politics
Soviet Union and Eastern Europe
Economics 387 (1.
Geography 394 (1.
Geography 493 (1.
Geography 49 4 (1
,5)
.5)
.5)
.5)
The Soviet Economy
Geography of the Soviet Union
Geography of Eastern Europe
Geography of the Soviet Union: Regional
Analysis
History of East Central Europe in the 19th
and 20th Centuries
Russia before 1917
Communist Movements in Eastern Europe since
1900
History of the Soviet Union
(1.5)   Soviet and East European Government and
Politics
3 40     The Peoples of the Soviet Union
447 (1.5) Seminar in Slavonic Area Studies I (with
permission of program co-ordinators of
Slavonic Area Studies and International
Relations)
448 (1.5) Seminar in Slavonic Area Studies II (with
permission of program co-ordinators of
Slavonic Area Studies and International
Relations)
Sociology
New      SOCI 414 (1.5/3)d Feminist Theory
Changes  SOCI 462 - change in description, units, hours
SOCI 415 - change in number, title, description, prerequisite
and add cross-listing  (formerly 463)
SOCI 366, 461 - change in description, prerequisite
SOCI 240, 481 - change in description
History 324
History 405
History 435
History 438
Political Sc. 325
Slavonic Studies
Slavonic Studies
Slavonic Studies
Deletions SOCI 472, 474 9568.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
Theatre
Changes  THTR 233, 333 - change in title, description
THTR 330 - change in description
THTR 434 - change in prerequisite
School of Library, Archival and Information Studies
Under Requirements for the Degree
A. - change fourth sentence to read: "In addition to the four courses of
the 'core', LIBR 623 is a required course, and ...
Changes  LIBR 626 - change in title, description
School of Music
Change in Program
After Minimum Achievements in Piano and before Major in Piano add:
English Composition Test Requirement
All B.Mus. students must pass English 100 and the English Composition
Test by the time they have completed the number of units corresponding
to three full years in their Major. Prospective fourth-year students
who have not met these requirements will not be permitted to register
for additional units.
Changes to Course Lists
Under Major in Music History and Literature in the course lists change
(182), (282), (382) and (482) to read:
First Year
(172 or 182) i^Music Performance     2
Second Year
(272 or 282) 9Music Performance      2
Third Year
(372 or 382) 9Music Performance       2
Fourth Year
(472 or 482) 9Music Performance       2
Footnote 9 should read:
9 If Music 182, 282, 382, or 482 are chosen, the student is expected to
meet jury requirements.
Under Major in Composition in the course lists change (182), 282),
(382) and (482) to read:
First Year
(172 or 182) 2'6Music Performance     2
Second Year
(272 or 282) 2'6Music Performance     2
Third Year
(372 or 382) 2,6Music Performance     2
Fourth Year
(472 or 482) 2'6Music Performance     2 9569.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
School of Music
Change in Program (continued)
Footnote 6 should read:
If Music 182, 282, 38:
meet jury requirements.
6 If Music 182, 282, 382, or 482 are chosen, the student is expected to
Under Major in Music Theory in the course lists change (182), 282),
(382) and (482) to read:
First Year
(172  or  182)   i^Music Performance 2
Second Year
(272 or  282)   ^Music Performance 2
Third Year
(372  or   382)   ^Music  Performance 2
Fourth Year
(472 or   482)   ^Music Performance 2
7
Footnote  should read:
7 If Music 182, 282, 382, or 482 are chosen, the student is expected to
meet jury requirements.
New     MUSC 319 (1.5/3)d Introduction of Electroacoustic Music
MUSC 320 (1.5) Computer Music
MUSC 3 45 (1.5) Aesthetics and Practice of Film Music
MUSC 417 (3) Musical Scoring for Film
Changes  MUSC 165, 107, 207, 307, 407 - change in hours
MUSC 306 - split into two courses
MUSC 311 (2) Choral Conducting
MUSC 312 (2) Instrumental Conducting
MUSC 309 - change in prerequisites
Change to List B
Under Course Selection: Second Year
List B
add Music 3 45 (1.5) 9570.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals (continued)
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
New      Education 495 (2-9)c Teaching Practicum (Elementary)
Education 496 (2-9)c Teaching Practicum (Secondary)
Deletions Education 198, 298, 325, 398, 498
Early Childhood Education 303
Educational Psychology and Special Education
Deletions Education Psychology 302, 310, 311, 332
New     Special Education 401 (1.5) Microcomputer Technology
in Special Education and
Rehabilitation
Changes  Special Education 390 - change in units to: (1.5/3)d
Special Education 415 - change in title
Change program description to read:
3. The special education program
This program parallels the basic elementary teaching program in
preparing candidates to teach in regular classrooms. In addition it
provides the specialized preparation necessary to educate mildly
handicapped students (mildly intellectually impaired, behaviourally
disordered, and learning disabled) either within regular classrooms or
in special education settings.
The same admission requirements and procedures apply as for other
applicants to the elementary teaching program, except that applicants to
the Special Education program must have completed Special Education 312
Introduction to the study of exceptional children (or equivalent) prior
to admission to the program. If this course has not been included
during the applicant's prior university studies, admission may be
conditional upon completing the course before commencing Year 1 studies
(e..g. during summer session),
The sequence of courses is similar to that for the basic elementary
teaching program except as noted below. In addition, attention is paid
to school placements throughout the program to ensure an orderly
progression of experience in working with both regular and exceptional
students. 95 71.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Educational Psychology and Special Education
Change program description to read:
3. The special education program  (continued)
Year 1, term 1
Instead of Education 316 candidates take both of:
Education 317 1.5 units
(Communication with Exceptional Students)
Special Education 429 1.5 units
(Education of the Mildly Intellectually Impaired)
Year 1, term 2
Candidates take only 1 of Arts Eduction 320, Education 320 (Physical
Education), and Music Education 320; instead of the two not selected,
they take both of:
Special Education 316 1.5 units
(Specific Learning Disabilities)
Special Education 436 1.5 units
(Behaviour Disorders in Children)
Year 2, term 1
For candidates in the special education program, the extended practicum
includes assignments to both a classroom and a learning assistance
centre.
Year 2, term 2
Instead of Educational Psychology 423, candidates take:
Educational Psychology 421 1.5 units
(Assessment of Learning Difficulties)
As their "Academic, Curriculum, and Professional Electives",
special education candidates take:
Special Education 437 1.5 units
(Teaching Maladjusted Children)
Elective from Special Education or a related field 1.5 units
Total program requirements: 38.0 units
Mathematics and Science Education
Changes  Science Education 409 - change in prerequisite
Deletions Mathematics Education 369
Science Education 321
Change teaching subject requirements:
(5) Home Economics Concentration and Major
Concentration
6-9 units of introductory courses in home economics and/or family
studies; 9 senior units from the areas of family studies and either
foods and nutrition or textiles and clothing, or a combination of the
latter two areas.
Major
An additional 6 senior units in the above 9572.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION (continued)
Social and Educational Studies
Deletions Educational Studies 400, 407, 470
Social Studies Education 322
Visual and Performing Arts in Education
Deletions Art Education 323
Music Education 22 4
Changes  Music Education 335 - change in title
Music Education 435 - change  in  title,  units,  description,
prerequisite, hours
New     Music Education 437 (3) Orff Level II
Music Education 438 (3) Orff Level III
Music Education 345 (3) Education Through Music I
Music Education 445 (3) Education Through Music II
Music Education 446 (3) Education Through Music III
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Anthropology and Sociology
Changes  ANTH 502 - change in units to (l-9)d
ANTH 511, 525 - change in title
Asian Studies
Change   ASIA 511 - change in number, units, description (formerly 430)
Biology
Revised Calendar Statement:
"Biology Graduate Program - Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees
Chairman, Advisory Committee:  Dr. Alan G. Lewis (Oceanography)
The field of Biology is not treated by a single department. Rather,
opportunities for graduate work in most areas of Biology exist in the
specialized Life Science departments. The interdisciplinary graduate
program in Biology is designed specifically for those students whose
thesis research is primarily biological but requires major input from
more than one department. Therefore, to qualify for the Program, the
student must propose a plan for graduate thesis research that will have
a major interdisciplinary component.
As background, an undergraduate degree in the Life Sciences is
preferable but not essential. 9573.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Biology
Revised Calendar Statement:
"Biology Graduate Program - Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees (continued)
At least one member of the candidate's supervisory committee must be
from an appropriate department different from that in which the
candidate is enrolled.
Students wishing to pursue an interdisciplinary graduate program in
Biology should consult with the department or departments most
appropriate to their field of specialization, and with the chairman of
the Advisory Committee for the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in
Biology."
Commerce
Change   COMM 625 - change in title, description
Community and Regional Planning
Change   PLAN 5 40, 550 - change in units to (1.5-6)d
PLAN 548 - change in units to (.5-6)d
Educational Psychology and Special Education
New     SPED 501 (1.5-3)d Advanced Seminar in Microcomputer
Applications in Special Education
and Rehabilitation
Experimental Medicine
The Ph.D. and M.Sc. programs in Experimental Medicine will now include
the area of Infectious Diseases. The Calendar entry will read:
"Experimental Medicine - Ph.D. amd M.Sc. degrees
... Divisions of Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases, ...".
Geophysics and Astronomy
Changes  GEOP 511, 517, 527 - change in title and description
GEOP 523 - change in title
Germanic Studies
Delete   GERM 50 4 9574.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES  (continued)
Health Care and Epidemiology
New     HCEP 514 (1.5)  Occupational Health Policy and Standards
HCEP 519 (1.5) Health Information Systems
HCEP 525 (1.5)  Cancer Epidemiology
Changes  HCEP 507 - change in prerequisites
Medicine
New      MEDI 580 (1.5-3)c Experimental Medicine: Infectious Diseases
Psychiatry
Delete   PSYT 560
Psychology
Changes - PSYC 521, 544  - change in units to (1.5/3)d
Religious Studies
Change - RELG 511 - change in number, units, description to (1.5-6)d
(formerly 430)
Social and Educational Studies
Change   EDST 507 - change in units to (1.5-6)d
Delete   EDST 520
Guided Independent Study courses in Graduate Degree Programs
Change in Calendar Statement (p. 130, col. 1, 1988-89 Calendar)
Item D.3 to read:
"Some courses offered through Guided Independent Study (i.e.
correspondence), through the Knowledge Network by satellite, or
through the Inter-Institutional Service may be used as credit
toward a graduate degree program. The maximum credit obtainable
through these means is 3.0 units. Prior approval of the Department
and the Dean of Graduate Studies is required."
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Interdepartmental
Delete   INDE 402 95 75.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF MEDICINE  (continued)
Psychiatry
Change   PSYT 750 - change in number (formerly 650)
FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Change   PHAR 454 - change in units, hours to: (1) unit, 2 hours/week,
one term
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Computer Science
New      CPSC 319 (1.5)  Software Engineering Project
Changes  CPSC 310 -    change   in   title,   units,   description,
prerequisite, hours to (1.5)
Geophysics and Astronomy
Changes  ASTR 310 - change in description, prerequisite      *.;.
GEOP 310 - change in description, prerequisite      £>
GEOP 428 - change in title, description
Oceanography
Changes  OCGY 405 - change in title, credit restriction
OCGY 406 - change in prerequisite
OCGY 413 - change in units, hours to (1.5)
Deletion OCGY 401
Changes in Programs
Combined Oceanography and Biology Honours
Second Year
- Delete CHEM 203 as an alternative course
Third and Fourth Years
- Renumber present footnote 3 to , and add footnote 3 (at
reference to OCGY 408): "3Strongly recommended that this be
taken in Third Year."
- Delete OCGY 309 as an acceptable biological oceanography course.
- Add "OCGY 407 (1.5) (Introduction to Marine Chemistry and
Geochemistry)" as a required course, and reduce the Science
electives from 10.5 to 9 units to accommodate this addition. 95 76.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Oceanography
Changes in Programs (continued)
Combined Oceanography and Chemistry Honours
- Move "OCGY 408" from Fourth Year to Third Year, and move 1.5
units of Science elective 2'4 from Third Year to Fourth Year.
- Delete OCGY 401 in Fourth Year and replace it with OCGY 4143.
- Delete "in Third Year" from note 2
- Change note 3 to read: "3Physics 312 or Mathematics 316 is
prerequisite to Oceanography 414."
Combined Oceanography and Geology Honours
Second Year
- Replace "Two of Mathematics 200, 221, Computer Science 111 or
114" with: "Mathematics 200, 221 (3)". Alter note 1 to read:
" iRecommended Biology 101 or 102 or 103 or Geophysics 221 or
Computer Science 111 or 114."
Third Year
-Replace "Geology elective2 (1.5)" with: "Oceanography 408
(1.5)" and add Science elective2 (1.5)" to give a total of
(16.5) units.
Fourth Year
- Replace "Oceanography 401 or 405 (1.5)" with "Oceanography 4142
or 405 (1.5)"
- Replace "Geology elective2 (1.5)" with "Geology elective3
(3)."
- Replace "Science elective3 (3)" with "Science elective 4
(1.5)."
-Replace "OCGY 407, 408, 416 (4.5)" with "OCGY 407, 416 (3)", to
give a total of (16.5) units.
- Renumber notes "2,3« to "notes 3*4", respectively, and add
new note2: "2 Oceanography 414 requires Mathematics 316 as a
prerequisite."
Combined Oceanography and Geophysics Honours
Second Year
- Replace "Mathematics 200, 220 (3)" with "Mathematics 200, 201
(3)", and add "Science elective2 (1.5)". This increases the
total units to 18.
Third Year
- Replace "Mathematics 201 (1.5)" with "Oceanography 408 (1.5)"
Fourth Year
-Replace "Oceanography 401 or 414, 408 (3)" with "Oceanography 414
(1.5)".  This decreases the total units to 16.5. 9577.
May 17, 1989
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Changes in Programs  (continued)
Combined Oceanography and Physics Honours
- Move "Mathematics 201" from Third Year to Second Year. This
increases Second Year units to 18 and decreases Third Year units
to 16.5.
Third Year
- Replace "OCGY 401 or 414 (1.5)" with "OCGY 408 (1.5)".
Fourth Year
- Replace   "OCGY   408   (1.5)"   with  "OCGY   414  (1.5)".

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