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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] Apr 24, 1991

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Array 10022.
April 24, 1991
The Eighth Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1990-91 was held on Wednesday, April 24, 1991 at
8.00 p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Present: President D. W. Strangway (Chairman), Vice-President D. R.
Birch, Mr. S. Alsgard, Mr. J. A. Banfield, Dr. D. M. Brunette, Rev. P. C.
Burns, Dr. D. G. A. Carter, Dr. R. L. Chase, Dr. S. Cherry, Dr. T. S. Cook,
Mr. N. A. Davidson, Dr. K. Dawson, Dr. J. D. Dennison, Ms. L. B. W.
Drummond, Dr. G. W. Eaton, Dr. A. J. Elder, Mr. C. Fung, Mr. E. B. Goehring,
Dean J. R. Grace, Dr. S. E. Grace, Dr. R. D. Guy, Mr. M. L. Hanik, Dr. J. F.
Helliwell, Ms. A. Ironside, Mr. J. Jacob, Dr. S. Katz, Dr. J. G. T. Kelsey,
Dr. M. M. Klawe, Miss J. Lahey, Mr. 0. C W. Lau, Mr. D. K. Leung, Mr. S-H.
Lu, Mr. S. W. T. Mak, Dean M. P. Marchak, Dean B. C. McBride, Dr. J. A.
McLean, Mr. W. B. McNulty, Dean A. Meisen, Ms. E. Onno, Dr. R. J. Patrick,
Ms. B. M. Peterson, Miss C. L. Rankel, Dr. P. Resnick, Dean J. F. Richards,
Dean P. B. Robertson, Mr. A. J. Scow, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr. L. de Sobrino,
Dr. R. C. Tees, Mr. G. A. Thorn, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Mr. L. Waldman, Miss R.
Walia, Dr. D. A. Wehrung, Dr. R. M. Will, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Ms. N. E. Woo.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
Chancellor L. R. Peterson, Mr. D. A. Anderson, Dr. A. P. Autor, Miss K.
Bentsen, Dean C. S. Binkley, Dr. M. A. Boyd, Professor P. L. Bryden, Dean
P. T. Burns, Mr. R. Bush, Professor E. A. Carty, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dean
M. J. Hollenberg, Dr. M. Isaacson, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Dean P. A. Lusztig,
Dr. H. McDonald, Dean J. H. McNeill, Dr. A. G. Mitchell, Dr. L. Paszner,
Mrs. S. K. Prpic, Professor R. S. Reid, Mr. M. M. Ryan, Dr. G. G. E.
Scudder, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Dr. L. J. Stan, Miss S. Sterling, Mr. M.
Sugimoto, Dr. A. Van Seters, Dr. W. C Wright, Jr.
Senate Membership
(i)  Declaration of vacancies  (University Act, section 35(6))
Miss S. A. Mair - student representative of the Faculty of Education
Ms. H. Swinkels - student representative of the Faculty of Medicine
(ii) Introduction of student senators
The Chairman introduced and welcomed to Senate the following
student senators, elected to serve on Senate for one year from April
1, 1991 to March 31, 1992 (1 representative elected by each Faculty +
5 members at-large): 10023.
April 24, 1991
^^k                Senate Membership
(ii) Introduction of student senators
(continued)
Agricultural Sciences
Miss R. Walia        Third Year
Agricultural Sciences
Applied Science
Mr. S. W. T. Mak      Third Year
Applied Science
Arts
Miss K. Bentsen       Third Year
Commerce and Business Administrati
Arts
Lon
Mr. M. L. Hanik      Third Year Commerce and Business Administration
Dentistry
Ms. E. Onno Third Year Dentistry
Education
Miss S. Sterling      Third Year Education
Forestry
Mrs. S. K. Prpic      Third Year Forestry
Graduate Studies
Mr. E. B. Goehring    Ph.D. Candidate in Geography
Law
Mr.   L. Waldman Combined M.B.A./LL.B.   program
Medicine
Mr. S. H. Lu Second Year Medicine
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Mr. J. Jacob Third Year Pharmaceutical Sciences
Science
Mr. C. Fung Third Year Science
Members-at-large:
Ms. L. B. W. Drummond M.A. Candidate in Geography
Ms. J. Lahey Third Year Nursing
Mr. 0. C. W. Lau Second Year Science
Mr. D. K. Leung Second Year Applied Science
Miss C. L. Rankel Fourth Year Science
Minutes of previous meeting
Dr. Sobrino   ) That the minutes of the Seventh regular
Dr. Tees      ) meeting of Senate for the Session 1990-91,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted. 10024.
April 24, 1991
Minutes of previous meeting (continued)
It was pointed out that the references to Dean Grace on page 10012 of
the minutes should read Dr. Cherry.
The motion was put and carried.
Chairman's remarks and related questions
On behalf of Senate, President Strangway extended congratulations to Dr.
Katz on his appointment as Executive Director of Science World.
President Strangway drew Senate's attention to a recent announcement
that the University had received a major donation for the creation of an
institute for advanced studies. He stated that as soon as the funding was
available, advisory committees would be established and there would be ample
opportunity for discussion of the precise workings of the institute.
Senate Nominating Committee
In accordance with established procedures, the following vacancies on
the Nominating Committee were declared:
Mr. J. A. Moss - student representative
Mr. B. D. Prins - student representative
Members were  informed that a call  for nominations to fill these
vacancies would be mailed to all members of Senate, and that nominations
would remain open until the May 22, 1991 Senate meeting.  If more than two
nominations are received an election will be held at the May meeting.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Dr. Wehrung, Chair of the Committee, presented the following report,
which had been circulated: 10025.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
- This report summarizes the work of the Committee during the period
from March 1990 through March 1991. The Conmittee met 16 times
during this period and discussed a wide variety of issues
pertaining to the budget of the University and the impact of those
issues on the academic operation.
The Committee had access to large amounts of information for its
deliberations including:
UBC Mission Statement and Academic Plan
FY 1989/90 Operating Budget
FY 1990/91 Budget Plans and Priorities document
1991/92 submissions to Provincial Government regarding
Operating Grant Request and "Access for All" Request
1991/92 Budget Planning Cycle
Instructions to Deans and Academic and Administrative Service
Units regarding Their 1991/92 Operating Budget Requests
Historical Time Series Data for UBC and Selected Canadian
Universities on:
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
General Purpose Operating Income
Tuition Fees for UBC
Provincial Funding of British Columbia Universities
Faculty and Non-Faculty Salaries
Student/Faculty Ratios
Historical Time Series Data for UBC by Faculty/Department
on:
Objects of Expense
Faculty and Student Demographics
Faculty Retirement Schedules
Academic and Staff budgeted Positions
Class Sizes
FTE Students and Enrolment
Sponsored Research
Listed below are summaries of some of the major topics on which the
Committee advised the President during the past year:
a.  Coaperisons Among Faculty Units and Between Faculty aad Non-
Faculty units
The Committee discussed comparisons across Faculty units on
the ratio of operating budget per weighted fulltime-equivalent
student from the perspectives of appropriate levels of this
ratio for each Faculty, existing and desired trends in
graduate student enrolments for individual Faculties, and
proposed plans for any new budget increase that might be
received within a Faculty. Faculty units were discussed one-
at-a-time in groups having similar academic perspectives and
budgetary requirements. Continuing efforts are underway to
compare UBC Faculties and departments with other similar units
in Canadian universities on this indicator. 10026.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
At the request of Senate, the Committee discussed trends over
the past 5 years in the salary expenditures and budgeted FTE
positions for support staff in existing and new central
administrative units as compared with academic and support
staff in the Faculty units taken as a whole. Information on
this subject was reported at the Senate meeting of 21 March
1990.
b.   "Access for All" Funding
The President's Office discussed with the Committee its
strategy regarding funding from the Provincial government's
"Access for All" program to increase access to post-secondary
education in British Columbia. The Committee did not have an
opportunity to make input prior to the President's submission
to the Provincial government. The strategy of the President's
Office included a sharing of resources among relevant
Faculties, graduate student financial support, and
infrastructure costs. In relation to current strengths and
capacities, special attention was given to forecasted
increases in graduate student enrolment in each Faculty,
comparisons with the actual changes in graduate student
enrolments for each Faculty, and proposed allocations of
"Access for All" monies to Faculties. The Committee expressed
concerns regarding how graduate students are counted within
UBC because financial projections depend upon the accuracy of
these counts. This issue has been discussed with the other
provincial universities and a methodology has now been agreed
upon among these universities.
c. Report on Continuing Education
The Committee advised the President on the financial aspects
of a draft report that would reorganize several existing units
on continuing education into a single unit.
d. FY 1990/91 Operating Budget
Various aspects of the proposed operating budget for FY
1990/91 were discussed in very general terms over a period of
several months, including a number of priorities and
principles that should guide budgetary considerations. More
intensive discussions of the budget were held at a series of
meetings in June 1990 during which specific changes from the
FY 1989/90 budget year were discussed, including the
distribution of "Access for All" funds for FY 1990/91 and FY
1991/92. These discussions culminated in a meeting of the
Committee on 25 June 1990 at which the Committee endorsed the
President's strategy for addressing the General Purpose
Operating funds budgetary requirements. 10027.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
Two specific observations were made by the Committee:
1. For a variety of reasons the FY 1990/91 actual budget
allocations were not entirely consistent with the
priorities as identified by the President's Office during
the Committee's deliberations over the preceding year.
2. The two-year allocation time frame (FY 1990/91 and FY
1991/92) did not match up with the one-year budget
requests submitted by the Deans.
The Committee further advised the President that in the future
budget requests and allocations should reflect the same time
horizons.
e. 1991/92 operating Budget Planning Cycle
The President discussed with the Committee its proposed
budget-planning cycle for FY 1991/92 and where the Committee's
input could be most useful in this process. The Committee
advised the President's Office in general terms at the
meetings prior to this submission and will review this
submission subsequently with a view toward next year's
submission.
f. Joint Submission of the Tri-University Presidents' Council
The Committee discussed the President's submission to the
Ministry of Advanced Education, Training, and Technology
(joint with the Presidents of Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria) regarding Provincial funding for FY
1991/92, and advised him of their views.
g. FY 1989/90 Financial Statements
The Vice President Finance discussed with the Committee the FY
1989/90 UBC Financial Statements. Specific attention focused
on items that had experienced significant increases or
decreases from the FY 1988/89 Financial Statements. Also
discussed were internal cost recoveries (from ancillary
services and research overhead) and external cost recoveries.
h.  Mandatory Retirement
The President's Office discussed with the Committee its policy
regarding the mandatory retirement of faculty and solicited
the Committee's views. The fundamental question at the centre
of this issue was resolved by the decision of the Supreme
Court of Canada.
i.  Funding of Endowed Chairs
The President's Office discussed with the Committee its
strategy for funding endowed Chairs. Special attention
focused on the fact that $ 1 million endowment gifts do not
fully fund Chairs. The Committee passed the following motion:
"It is recommended that as soon as feasible the donation
deemed sufficient to establish a Chair should be changed from
$1 million to an amount sufficient to endow a senior faculty
position on a continuing basis." 10028.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
j.  Tuition Fee Strategy
The President discussed with the Committee his strategy for
tuition fees over a 3-year time horizon. This strategy linked
the Vancouver consumer price index, the operating costs that
continue to be above the consumer price index, student
financial aid, and a fund for the improvement of teaching.
The Committee made several suggestions, and, after significant
discussion, it endorsed the President's tuition fee strategy.
k.  Financial Planning for Infra-structure Costs and Retrenchment
Decisions
The President's Office discussed with the Committee its
strategy for funding the University's infra-structure costs
and solicited its views. It also discussed with the Committee
its strategy for dealing with the recent retrenchment
decisions that have resulted from faculty salary increases in
excess of the amounts available. This strategy involved
making common percentage decreases in the operating budgets of
Faculty units and no decreases in non-Faculty units.
After much discussion, Che Committee passed the following
motions;
1. "A percentage of operating budget increases from "Access
funds" and other sources should be allocated to
administrative, library, and other support services to
reflect the additional infra-structure costs incurred."
2. To the extent that subsequent budget revisions were
required, "the priorities and principles recommended by
the Committee to the President should be used to make
changes (both increases and decreases) in the total
budgets allocated to Faculty and non-Faculty units."
1.  Formula Funding Strategy Within a Planned Capacity Model
The President discussed with the Committee his strategy to
establish a formula for funding provincial universities based
on a dollar value per weighted full-time equivalent student
that is linked to a planned capacity model for each of the
universities. This strategy seeks to prevent potential
governmental pressures to take more students at marginal cost
rates, and instead to require incremental students to be
funded at average cost rates. After advising the President of
its views, the Committee endorsed the President's strategy
which remains a topic of ongoing discussion.
The Committee notes that it was consulted regarding a wide variety
of budgetary issues, and on each occasion its advice was sought.
The committee in collaboration with the President's Office is
continuing to work to ensure that consultation and advice take
place in a timely manner throughout the year. Significant progress
has been made on this issue during the past year." 10029.
April  24,   1991
Reports of Committees of  Senate
Budget  Committee     (continued)
Dr. Elder drew attention to the second paragraph under the heading
•Comparisons among Faculty Units and between Faculty and Non-Faculty
Units", and asked whether the trends reported at the March 21, 1990 Senate
meeting were continuing. Dr. Wehrung responded that there had been no
essential change in the total share of the operating budget of the
Faculties. The percentage spent on the Faculties at-large in the
pre-retrenchment period, 1982-83, represented 67.8% of the total budget.
By 1985-86 it was down to 66.8%, and although it had gone down
subsequently it was now back at 66.8% for the 1989-90 period. As far as
administrative units are concerned, Dr. Wehrung stated that there had been
an increase in expenditures. In 1982-3 expenditures represented 3.9% of
the budget,   4.4%  in  1985-86,  and  6.5%  in .1989-90.
Library Committee
Dr. Resnick, Chair of the Committee, presented the following report,
which  had been circulated:
"The Senate Library Committee met a total of six times this year, twice In
the autumn, four times in the winter term. One Item dominated our agenda ln
the winter term, the Appraisal by Architect John Graham of the Functional.   ■
Environmental and Building Systems of the Main Library Building, and lt is to
this that much of the present report and the motion we have put before you
speaks. Let me first, however, provide a brief summary of some of the other
activities of the committee.
We took it as one of our initial responsibilities to welcome the new
University Librarian, Dr. Ruth Patrick, to the campus and to provide her with
as much feed-back as possible on such topics as the collections budget, the
Library Automation Planning project, the strategic planning process, and her
first Annual Report to Senate last autumn.
In addition, we asked the President's Office for a contribution of $500 to
the UN Association Book Project, which helps distribute surplus books in the
sciences and applied sciences to the third world. That contribution has now
been made.
We supported the upgrading of the status of our Government
Publications Division from a European Reference Centre to a European
Documentation Centre, something which would allow us to receive a good
number of European Community documents free of charge. 10030.
April  24,  1991
Reports of Committees of  Senate
Library Committee     (continued)
We supported a proposal that the library receive $59,000 or 8% of the
proposed $750,000 increase in the university budget to be generated through
tuition increases in order to help cover both new journal subscriptions and a
staff person to help ln training students.
We supported the first increase in almost a decade in library fines for late
books -from $1 to $2 a day - and in the cost of library cards to external
borrowers.
The committee also welcomed with pleasure such initiatives undertaken
by the University Librarian as the organization of the first annual library
symposium in March co-sponsored by the Provost, and the staging that same
month, in conjunction with the President, of an Authors' Reception for all UBC
faculty who had published a monograph or book in the previous 15 month
period.
Much of the committee's time since January, however, has been taken
up with a discussion of the Architect's Report on the status of the Main Library
building. This Report was commissioned by the University Administration in
1989-90 to report on the state of the Main Library in the expectation of
allocating $4 million for its upgrading under the 5 year university plan. The
Report, submitted in June. 1990. was not made widely available. Its
conclusions on the state of the library building were sufficiently stark, however,
that the Administration suspended plans for putting any further funding into
the Main Library, reallocating the $4 million instead toward the costs ofa new
library building under Phase One of the University Capital Plan.
Our committee, once it had been apprised of the existence of the
architect's report, felt it imperative that it be given access to the full report. We
are pleased to inform you that a copy was. in fact, made available to us by Tim
Miner. Director for Campus Planning and Development and that we have also
received permission to pass on some of the information contained in it to
Senate. We would as a committee, however, recommend that the full Report be
made public to the university community, something which members ofthe
library staff and students in the School of Library. Archival and Information
Studies have specifically requested.
The Architect's Report is a long one, providing architectural sketches,
written descriptions, ana photographic evidence of the problems with the Main
Building. Let me briefly summarize some of its main findings.
The building, in particular the central section, has clear heritage value.
However, the building as a whole has insufficient space for collections, and this
is especially true for divisions like Government Publications. Fine Arts.
Hui"anities and Social Sciences. Special Collections and Science. Important
portions of the overall collection are in storage.
Work stations for librarians and student assistants are overcrowded.
The qualities of the building with respect to Air Change, Temperature.
Convenience, Cleanliness. Humidity. Natural Light. Artificial Light. Noise,
Odour, Structural Features, and Personal Safety are not satisfactory.
Changes to the air. electrical, plumbing or telecommunications systems
to bring them up to current standards would be extremely difficult and costly.
The most serious problem of all relates to questions of safety in the
event of fire, and risks In the event of earthquake or similar disaster.
Where fire is concerned, the Report finds that the Building fails to
comply with the Building Code in a number of safety respects. Roof
assembly is combustible, most floors don't have a fire resistance rating,
shafts and doors are deficient for fire retardation purposes, existing
capacity is less than occupant load on levels 4, 5, 8.
As regards seismic risk, the Report notes that the original 1923
section has no formal resistance to lateral forces. The North and South
extensions, built in 1946 and 1959, have some reinforced walls. The stack
areas dating from 1964 have no resistance, nor does the book shelving.
The probability of major damage to the Main Building in the event of an
earthquake is at least four times that of a well-designed modern building. 10031.
April  24,   1991
Reports of Committees of  Senate
Library Committee     (continued)
Our committee has treated the conclusions contained in this report as a
matter of the gravest concern. At peak hours, there are large numbers of people
in the library, including staff, faculty, students, and members of the general
public. The main library, moreover, is open for long hours. The risks of
accident therefore, are greater than in most campus buildings.
Through four long meetings, including one with the Vice President for
Student and Academic Services. Dr. Srivastava, we have wrestled with the
legal, human, and academic consequences of the report. I can state that the
committee and its members, representing all the Senate constituencies from
deans and faculty to students and convocation senators, feel that as a matter
of the highest priority the President and the Board of Governors must begin to
plan for the replacement of the Main Library.
It is urgent that the new library building planned under Phase 1 but not
yet finalized be completed as quickly as possible. It is imperative, in our
opinion, that the university administration and Board of Governors also begin
Elanning immediately for the complete replacement of the Main Library
uilding some time ln the 1990s.
The Committee has already asked Vice-President Birch to bring its
concerns to the attention of the Committee of Deans as well as to the
President's Advisory Committee on Space. We have also asked the Chair of the
Senate Academic Building Committee to bring our concerns to the attention of
bis committee.
Our intention, where the funding of expansion beyond Phase I is
concerned, is not to have the library engage in some kind of competitive battle
with faculties concerned about their own building and space needs. Rather, we
seek to impress upon the President and the Board of Governors the need to
undertake a special fund-raising effort in the coming years to meet the
exceptional needs faced by the library in light of the Architect's Report
The Senate Library Committee is not seeking to be alarmist But we are
convinced, after careful deliberation, that the second largest university library
In Canada, one that has been termed a provincial and national treasure, faces
an unprecedented crisis. We are deeply concerned about the physical safety of
library staff and users of the Main Library. We are also greatly concerned about
the safety of the Main Library collection itself, which has been estimated to
have a value in excess of $250 million - and much of which could not be
replaced. It is urgent that the President and the Board of Governors treat the
status of the Main Library building as a matter of the highest priority, and that
the Senate as a whole lend its support to the work of the Senate Library
Committee, not only by receiving this report but by also passing the motion
which accompanies lt "
In speaking to the report, Dr. Resnick drew particular attention to the
architect's report on the status and the safety of the Main Library
building. He stated that in relation to safety the building fell well
below acceptable standards in the event of fire and earthquakes,
particularly since a very large number of faculty, students, staff and
members   of   the   public   use   the   building.     He   estimated   that   at   peak   hours 10032.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee (continued)
there could be as many as 1500 or more people in the Library. He stated
that upgrading the building in terms of safety, lighting, heating, and
telecommunications, would still leave the problem of shortage of storage
space, and the Committee therefore urged the Administration and the Board
of Governors to start planning immediately for the complete replacement of
the Main Library building in the 1990s.
Dr. Patrick, the University Librarian, confirmed that a copy of the
architect's report was available in the Librarian's office for those who
wished to see it.
Dr. Resnick   ) That the report be accepted.
Dr. Grace     )
Carried
Senate agreed to a request that Mr. Al Seroka, President of the UBC
Librarians' Association, be allowed to speak. Mr. Seroka stated that the
Association thought that the report of the Committee understated the
situation in the Main Library. The Association considered this to be a
very serious matter in terms of safety and wished to stress that the
danger of fire and the danger of earthquake damage, both to people and to
the collections, was very serious and should not be avoided or overlooked.
Mr. Seroka stated that although a sprinkler system had been installed some
years ago the collection would be ruined by the breaking of these water
pipes in the event of seismic damage; therefore a patchwork solution to
the basic problem should not be undertaken. 10033.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee  (continued)
Mr. Marcus Bartley, representing the students in the School of Library,
Archival and Information Studies, was also invited to speak. Mr. Bartley
noted that the School is located on the eighth floor of the north wing of
the Main Library building complex, and that the students were therefore
well acquainted with the building and its operations and facilities. He
stated that it took no more than a casual inspection to realize that the
building is overloaded, overcrowded and outmoded. More important to the
the students, however, was the issue of the safety of the occupants of the
building. He said that the architect's report is a deeply disturbing
litany of fire hazards, seismic hazards, and non-compliance with the
national and provincial building codes. The students in the School felt
that faculty, staff, and other students who frequent the building were
being exposed to an unreasonable risk of harm. In the event of fire, the
lack of sufficient egress routes and areas of refuge could lead to a real
tragedy. Similarly, in the event of an earthquake the building could
suffer serious structural damage, and its occupants, particularly in the
very unstable bookstacks, could suffer serious injury. The students were
greatly disturbed at the University's apparent indifference to this
manifestly dangerous situation. Mr. Bartley said that other building
projects had been undertaken while the issue of the Library had simply
gone unaddressed. He said that the students in the School thought that
the safety issue alone required that the Library be accorded the highest
priority on the University's agenda. Surely, he said, the physical safety
of the staff, faculty and students cannot be subordinated to other 10034.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee  (continued)
interests. He said that as one of the chief policy making bodies of the
University, it lay with the Senate to recommend appropriate action on this
matter. In conclusion, Mr. Bartley urged the Senate to ensure that all
possible measures be taken to minimize physical risk while the new library
facility is being constructed.
Motion re the Main Library
Dr. Resnick   ) Whereas the Architect's Report of June 1990
Dr. Katz      )  highlights very serious problems concerning the
safety and utility of the Main Library Building;
be it resolved that Senate recommend to the
President and Board of Governors the immediate
tethering of the book stacks in the Main Library
Building and other short-term safety measures;
be it further resolved that Senate recommend to the
President and Board of Governors the completion of
the planned Phase I of the new library building as
a matter of the highest priority;
and that the Board of Governors begin immediate
preparation for the replacement of the existing
Main Library Building some time in the 1990s;
and that a special effort be undertaken by the
President and Board of Governors to raise funds for
complete replacement of the Main Library Building.
In speaking to the motion, Dr. Resnick stressed the importance of the
Library to the province as well as to the University.  He stated that UBC
has the largest research collection in western Canada and that this was
extremely important in terms of the larger national picture.  Dr. Resnick
referred to the data set out in the architect's report which suggests
great danger to both life and the collections and stated that it would be
very foolish to ignore this warning.  He explained that the intent of the
motion was to ask that the Library be given a very high priority in the 10035.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee (continued)
planning done by the President's Office and the Board of Governors. He
reminded Senate that under section 36 (n) of the University Act, Senate
had the power to make recommendations to the Board considered advisable
for promoting the interests of the University or for carrying out the
objects and the provisions of the Act. The Committee felt that a formal
motion from the Senate to the Board of Governors would emphasize the
gravity of the matter and would perhaps ensure that the Administration and
the Board of Governors seriously consider the development of a new library
building in the 1990s. Dr. Resnick concluded his remarks by strongly
urging Senate to support the motion.
Dr. Dennison spoke in support of the motion but stated that he would be
concerned if the proposal was that the central part of the Library would
disappear since the Library was the closest thing the University had to a
heritage building. Dr. Resnick responded that it was hoped that the
central part of the building could be preserved in some way.
Dr. Klawe supported the basic premise of the motion but suggested that
if a study were to be done of other buildings on campus they too probably
would not meet the building code. Dr. Klawe expressed concern that the
Library might be given top priority without first finding out if other
buildings posed even greater hazards in the event of earthquakes or fire.
Vice President Birch stated that studies had been done on a number of
buildings on campus and the findings confirmed that the Library was not
unique in this regard. However, he felt that the goals proposed by the
Library Committee were desirable goals and deserved the support of Senate.
Ms. Peterson, Senate representative of the Professional Librarians,
stated that it had been estimated that perhaps 40% of the buildings on
campus fall well below the building code. Ms. Peterson suggested that if
priorities were to be set, human life should be the first consideration.
Ms. Peterson informed Senate that in the last year the Main Library had
been open 3,446 hours and that in peak periods there are as many as 1,400
to 2,000 people in the building.  In terms of collections, Ms. Peterson 10036.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Library Committee  (continued)
noted that there were 1,600,000 volumes in the building, and that probably
most of them could not be replaced. She also pointed out that many users
of the Library were unfamiliar with the building and that this would be a
real problem in the event of fire.
Dr. Patrick spoke in support of the motion, stating that as University
Librarian she was one of the first people to feel concern over the issues
raised about the safety of the library school students, the staff, the
users, and the value of the collections which are an irreplaceable
treasure for the Province of B.C. and for the Dominion of Canada.
The motion was put and carried.
Nominating Committee
Dr. Elder, Chair of the Committee, presented the following report which
had been circulated:
1.  Ombuds Advisory Committee
At its meeting of March 20, 1991, Senate approved the establishment
of an Ombuds Advisory Committee, representing the Board, the Senate
and the Alma Mater Society, to draw up terms of reference which will
be submitted to Senate for approval.
The Nominating Committee nominates Dr. S. Cherry as the Senate
representative on the Ombuds Advisory Committee.
2. Student Vacancies on Senate Committees
The Nominating Committee nominates the following students to fill
vacancies on Senate Committees:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. J. Jacob        - replacing Mr. B. V. McGuinness
Mr. L. Waldman       - replacing Mr. B. D. Prins 10037.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee
2. Student Vacancies on Senate Committees (continued)
Academic Policy
Ms. L. B. W. Drummond - replacing Mr. 0. C. W. Lau
Mr. M. L. Hanik      - replacing Miss S. A. Mair
Admissions
Miss K. Bentsen      - replacing Miss S. A. Mair
Ms. E. Onno - replacing Mr. J. A. Moss
Agenda
Mr. C. Fung - replacing Mr. R. H. McGowan
Ms. J. Lahey        - replacing Mr. J. R. G. McQueen
Appeals on Academic Standing
Miss K. Bentsen     - replacing MissW. A. King
Mr. E. B. Goehring   - replacing Mrs. L. Lohia
Mr. D. K. Leung      - replacing Mr. B. Taylor
Budget
Mr. E. B. Goehring - continuing member
Miss C. L. Rankel - replacing Miss M. D. Bain
Continuing Education
Mr. J. Jacob - replacing Mr. B. V. McGuinness
Curriculum
Mr. D. K. Leung - replacing Miss A. L. Callegari
Ms. E. Onno - replacing Miss S. A. Mair
Mrs. S. K. Prpic - to fill vacancy
Elections
Mr. S. W. T. Mak - replacing Miss S. A. Mair
Extracurricular Activities
Ms. E. Onno - replacing Mr. M. D. Nikkei
Miss S. Sterling - replacing Mr. B. D. Prins 10038.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee
2. Student Vacancies on Senate Committees (continued)
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Mr. E. B. Goehring   - continuing member
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
Mr. M. L. Hanik
Mr. J. Jacob
Mr. S. Lu
Student Awards
- replacing Miss M. D. Bain
- replacing Miss S. A. Mair
- replacing Mr. J. A. Moss
Mr. C. Fung
Mr. J. Jacob
- replacing Miss P. F. Silver
- to fill vacancy
Tributes
Mr. E. B. Goehring
Ms. J. Lahey
University Library
- replacing Mr. R. H. McGowan
- replacing Mr. J. R. G. McQueen
Ms. L. B. W. Drummond - replacing Miss A. L. Callegari
Miss C. L. Rankel    - replacing Mrs. L. Lohia
Miss S. Sterling     - replacing Mr. M. D. Nikkei
Ad hoc Committee on Teaching Evaluation (1990)
Mr. M. L. Hanik
Mr. 0. C. W. Lau
Mr. S. W. T. Mak
- replacing Miss W. A. King
- continuing member
- replacing Mr. B. D. Prins
Ad hoc Committee on Student Participation in Appointment and Tenure
Committees
Mr. C. Fung - replacing Miss W. A. King
Mr. 0. C. W. Lau     - continuing member
Dr. Elder     ) That the recommendations of the
Dr. Tees      )  Nominating Committee be approved.
Carried 10039.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate (continued)
Committee on Student Awards
In presenting the report, Dr. Cook, Chair of the Committee, drew
attention to the Donald M. Flather Bursary which had been approved at the
previous meeting. Dr. Cook informed Senate that this award was being
resubmitted in an amended form to include the statement that the award
would be available to students in the Faculties of Medicine or Science who
have graduated from a high school in School District 89. The Committee
had been unaware that this restriction existed in the terms of the will
when recommending it to Senate in March. Despite this restriction,
however, the Committee felt that the award should be accepted in view of
the fact that the University's Mission Statement places particular
emphasis on the recruitment of students outside the Lower Mainland.
Dr. Cook      ) That the new awards (listed in the Appendix)
Dean Marchak  ) be accepted subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
Dr. Katz drew attention to two awards for small amounts and stated that
although obviously the University was grateful to have them, he wondered
at what point did it become economically unfeasible to accept some
awards. He also asked if the Committee had discussed the possibility of
suggesting minimum amounts. Dr. Cook replied that the Committee had
discussed this matter with the Development Office and the President's
Office without reaching a solution.
The motion was put and carried. 10040.
April 24, 1991
Reports of Committees of Senate (continued)
Tributes Committee
Hood for the Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program
Dr. Dennison, Chair of the Committee, reported that the Committee
recommended approval of the proposal of the Faculty of Dentistry that
the hood for the Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program be lilac
and red with twisted cord on white.
Dr. Dennison  ) That the hood for the Dental Hygiene Degree
Dean Robertson ) Completion Program be lilac and red with
twisted cord on white.
Carried
Proposals of the Faculties
Faculty of Applied Science
Change in Honours Standing
The following proposed change in the Calendar statement on honours
standing had been circulated:
On graduation a student will be granted Honours standing if he/she
obtains an average of not less than 80% in the winter session of the
final year and either a minimum of 75% in each of the preceding two
winter sessions or, if the minimum of 75% is not achieved in one or
more of the preceding two Winter Sessions, an overall average in the
three years of 80% or higher. To be eligible a student must have had
full-time status for all four years, with no failed courses.
It was explained in the material circulated that the intent of the
change was to make it fairer for students who enter engineering directly
from Grade 12 to qualify for Honours standing.
Dean Meisen   ) That the proposed change in the
Dr. Klawe     ) Calendar statement on honours standing
be approved.
In response to a query, Dean Meisen confirmed that the statement
applied only to engineering students and not to students in the Schools
of Architecture and Nursing.
The motion was put and carried. 10041.
April 24, 1991
Proposals of the Faculties (continued)
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal to establish a Fisheries Centre
It was stated in the material circulated that the UBC Fisheries
Centre will provide the academic focus, through its personnel and
facilities, for fundamental studies in the scientific and social aspects
of living aquatic resources in marine and freshwater environments.
Core personnel of the Centre will maintain a critical mass of
researchers devoted to the study of living aquatic resources and to
issues related to Fisheries. Research activities will range widely,
starting at the basic level of aquatic biology, through the
environmental connections of fisheries limnology and oceanography, and
central fisheries problems such as recruitment and survival, to
questions of management, aquaculture and social dimensions of
fisheries. Members of the Centre will adopt a broadly based research
effort, while keeping strong links with discipline oriented departments
through cross-appointments and other associations.
In addition to its core personnel, the Centre will encourage the
participation of faculty with expertise in other areas of science and
applied science as well as from areas representing social, commercial,
industrial, international and regulatory concerns of fisheries. This
second tier of faculty, which might also attract government and industry
personnel with adjunct status, would be based on informal associations
with the Centre, but would nevertheless contribute fundamentally to its
activities through participation in its research programs and graduate
thesis supervision.  Collaborative work in the Centre between Core 10042.
April 24, 1991
Proposals of the Faculties
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal to establish a Fisheries Centre  (continued)
faculty and associated social scientists would include such topics as
the impact of changing market processes, taxation structures,
anti-pollution legislation, or native rights on the social biological
dimensions of fisheries problems.
There is already considerable expertise on campus in many of the
areas to be covered. What is now lacking is leadership and a clear
focus, as well as complementary expertise in a few areas. New
appointments and replacement of retirements would readily complement
existing strengths and create a leading research unit.
The Centre will act as a catalyst for research and graduate studies
on campus, stimulating the expertise available within its core as well
as within many of the departments of the university, by:
- taking the lead in the development of broad research initiatives
- offering graduate courses and thesis supervision within a wide
variety of scientific and social science research topics;
- serving as an intellectual focus for research and communication in
fisheries and aquatic sciences by offering courses, seminar series
colloquia and workshops to the university community, as well as to
industry and government;
- managing the Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences Reading Room, into which
Ecology and Oceanography Reading Room collections have now been fused;
- acting as an institutional link with provincial and federal research
and management agencies in the areas of freshwater and ocean
fisheries as well as with industry.
In speaking to the proposal, Dean Grace stated that the major
rationale behind having such a centre was to provide some visibility and
some coordination of the research going on in the many departments
across the campus.  He informed Senate that the B.C. Ministry of 10043.
April 24, 1991
Proposals of the Faculties
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal to establish a Fisheries Centre  (continued)
Fisheries had promised $150,000 on approval of the proposal. As far as
staff was concerned, Dean Grace stated that there would be a Director of
the Centre, a steering committee, an advisory committee, and support
staff provided for by the reallocation of resources primarily from the
old Institute of Resource Ecology.
Dean Grace    ) That the proposal to establish a
Dr. Klawe     ) Fisheries Centre be approved.
In response to a query by Mr.  Banfield concerning budgetary
implications, Dean Grace stated that Senate does not debate budgetary
aspects.  However, he did explain that there would be a reallocation of
resources of operating budget to cover this item and that there was
still some residue from the old institute of Animal Resource Ecology,
most of which would go into the new Centre.  He also confirmed that the
$150,000 from the government would be a once only item.
Dr. Will said that he understood that in May 1985 Senate had
retrenched the whole budget of the Institute of Animal Resource
Ecology. In response, Dean Grace stated that the name of the Institute
had been retrenched but that some residue of the budget had carried on
through the years and was therefore available for the new Centre.
The motion was put and carried.
Proposal to establish a Centre for Research in Women's Studies and
Gender Relations
It was stated in the material circulated that the Centre will advance
interdisciplinary research and knowledge in Women's Studies and Gender
Relations. The specific goals are: 10044.
April 24, 1991
Proposals of the Faculties
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposal to establish a Centre for Research in Women's Studies and
Gender Relations (continued)
1. Research - to initiate and conduct interdisciplinary research in
Women's Studies and Gender Relations; to facilitate the activities
of UBC researchers in related areas; to disseminate the resulting
knowledge; and to develop and promote links to the international
scholarly community.
2. Graduate Education - to develop a strong interdisciplinary program of
graduate studies that will build upon current thematic strengths and
complement the development of feminist research within various
disciplines.
3. Community Liaison - to facilitate links between the university and
the local, national, and international communities.
Dean Grace stated that this was an important area for scholars and a
number of different Faculties, such as Arts, Law, Applied Science,
Education, Medicine, Graduate Studies, and Commerce. He stated that
although scholars in this area had done a great deal of work it was not
well coordinated at the moment as the scholars tend to work in
isolation. It was hoped that the creation of the Centre would be
instrumental in bringing top women faculty members and students to the
campus. He stated that the structure of the Centre was quite
straightforward: a director, administrative assistant, secretary,
faculty members and graduate students who have an interest in this area,
a steering committee, and a committee to advise the director.
Dean Grace    ) That the proposal to establish a
Dean Sheehan  ) Centre for Research in Women's Studies
and Gender Relations be approved.
Carried 10045.
April 24, 1991
Proposals of the Faculties
Faculty of Graduate Studies (continued)
Proposed Revision of Calendar Regulations for Master's and Doctoral
Programs
The following proposed revision of the Calendar regulations for
Master's Programs had been circulated:
Master's Programs
"G. Low Scholarship
A minimum of 60% (P) must be achieved in all course work taken for
credit. A course in which a grade of less than 60% (P) was obtained may
be repeated for a higher standing, or an alternate course may be taken,
if an exemption is recommended by the Department and approved by the
Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. If no such recommendation is
made, or the recommendation is not approved, the student may be required
to withdraw. A student who obtains more than one grade below 60% (P)
will normally be required to withdraw.
In a course that is repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript.
The higher mark will be used to determine promotion in a program and in
any decision to admit or withdraw a student from a program. Averages
calculated for other purposes will include both marks.
Dean Grace    ) That the proposed change to the Calendar
Dr. Cherry    ) Regulations for Master's Programs be approved.
Ca r r i ed
The following proposed revision of the Calendar regulations for
Doctoral Programs had been circulated:
Doctoral Programs
"F. Low Scholarship
A minimum of 68% (B-) must be achieved in all course work taken for
credit. A course in which a grade of less than 68% (B-) was obtained
may be repeated for a higher standing, or an alternate course may be
taken, if an exemption is recommended by the Department and approved by
the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. If no such recommendation
is made, or the recommendation is not approved, the student may be
required to withdraw. A student who obtains more than one grade below
68% (B-) will normally be required to withdraw.
In a course that is repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript.
The higher mark will be used to determine promotion in a program and in
any decision to admit or withdraw a student from a program. Averages
calculated for other purposes will include both marks. 10046.
April 24, 1991
Proposals of the Faculties
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Proposed Revision of Calendar Regulations for Master's and Doctoral
Programs (continued)
Dean Grace    ) That the proposed change to the Calendar
Dr. Cherry    ) Regulations for Doctoral Programs be approved.
In response to a query, Dean Grace stated that while there is no
general requirement for courses, many departments and schools do require
courses as an integral part of the Ph.D.  Clearly the thesis is the most
important requirement but if a course is specified there should be some
level at which those courses have to be satisfied.
The motion was put and carried
Other business
Endowed Scholarships and Fellowships
The following list of endowed fellowships and scholarships had been
circulated for information:
Roman M. Babicki Graduate Fellowships in Medical Research
Bank of Montreal Graduate Fellowships
Hugh M. Brock Scholarships
Canadian Pacific Forest Products National Entrance Scholarships
Central Guaranty Trust National Entrance Scholarship
C. K. Choi Scholarships and Fellowships
Ronald Lorraine Cliff Bursary Fund
Crown Life Insurance National Entrance Scholarships
Dofasco Inc. First National Fellowships
Hong Kong-Canada Business Association Graduate Fellowships
Leonard S. Klinck Fellowships
Northern Telecom Graduate Fellowship
Northwood Pulp and Timber Ltd. Scholarships
Rayrock Yellowknife Resources Inc. National Entrance Scholarships
Rio Algom National Entrance Scholarships
Rogers Communications National Entrance Scholarships
Scott Paper Graduate Fellowship
The Simons Foundation Doctoral Fellowships
The Simons Foundation Bursary
Henry S. Skinner Scholarship
Westcoast Energy First Nations Fellowships and Scholarships 10047.
April 24, 1991
Other business
University Presidents' Council New Program Approval
The following policies and procedures for new program approval, amended
by the University Presidents' Council, had been circulated:
"PREAMBLE
1.1 This policy and procedure statement addresses the establishment of
new or substantially revised degree programs at the three public
universities. A 'new" program is one that leads to a new credential.
1.2 The two major aims of this policy are to exchange information and to
assure the Ministry that new program proposals are carefully reviewed
and are part of an overall educational plan for the universities and
the post-secondary system.
1.3 The University Act determines the responsibilities of the Senate and
the Board of the university in the establishment of new programs.
The establishment of a new degree program requires the approval of
the Minister.
INFORMATION EXCHANGE
2.1 Each university ensures that its new programs meet high academic
standards. Each employs internal and external processes to ensure
that its standards are met.
2.2 New programs are generally initiated and reviewed in Departments
prior to consideration by the Faculty.
2.3 There are many benefits to an early circulation of information on new
degree program proposals among the universities. It is the
responsibility of each Department to consult with the appropriate
Department or Departments at the other universities on new program
proposals.
2.4 There are many benefits of having a similar format for new program
proposals.
2.5 While each university has its own internal program approval processes
prior to referral to Senate, the program proposal that goes to the
Senate Planning/Program Committee will be shared with the Academic
Vice Presidents at the other universities and the Open Learning
University.
2.6 The new program proposals as approved by the Senate will be submitted
to the Council for circulation to the other universities and the
Ministry. 10048.
April 24, 1991
Other business
University Presidents' Council New Program Approval  (continued)
PLANNING AND FUNDING ISSUES
3.1 The government's long range planning requirements seek information on
new program intentions.
3.2 As the universities will be required to submit revised plans
annually, the new degree program information provided in these
submissions will meet the government's planning requirements.
3.3 Major new programs will require funding beyond that provided in the
regular government grants. Each university shall provide through the
Council detailed and timely information on proposals that seek these
additional funds.
3.4 Government shall notify Council of any new degree programs it desires
to ensure that the Council can consider them and provide a
recommendat ion."
Dr. Birch     ) That Senate ratify the policy from
Dr. Will      )  the University Presidents' Council for
new program approval.
In response to a query by Dr. Sobrino regarding item 2.5, Dr. Birch
explained that  it had been  agreed that  the  university will  share
information at that point, the intention being that if there is any
helpful feedback from other institutions, the committee might want to
consider it.  It was not the intention to impede the powers of senators or
Senate committees.
Dean Meisen drew attention to item 2.3, and suggested that the
department that initiates suggestions for a new proposal should consult
departments at other universities. Dr. Birch responded that he believed
the university could profit tremendously by consultation with peers in the
discipline but felt that such consultation should go through the Dean of
the Faculty concerned and perhaps the Academic Vice President in order to
ensure that the advice received serves the needs of the institution as
well as the needs of the discipline. 10049.
April 24, 1991
Other business
University Presidents' Council New Program Approval  (continued)
In response to a query by Ms. Peterson, Dr. Birch stated that the
assumption was that new and emergent program funding is provided for
library collections for the number of years of the program plus one
perhaps. He said that it was not the view that you buy all library
resources once and never have that charge again, but rather that this is
for the life of the introduction of the program.
Dr. Sobrino requested that the minutes reflect that approval of the
policies does not imply that the university has to change any of the
procedures now used for approval of programs.
The motion was put and carried.
Senate Membership
President Strangway expressed thanks and appreciation to Dr. Helliwell
who was attending his last Senate meeting.
The meeting adjourned at 9.15 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, May 22,
1991.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 10050.
April 24, 1991
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate
Abbott Laboratories Limited Prize in Cardiology - A $300 prize is offered by
the Pharmaceutical Products Division of Abbott Laboratories Limited. The
prize is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine, in
consultation with the Postgraduate Education Committee in Cardiology to a
resident in Cardiology, exhibiting proficiency in the treatment of patients
with hypertension.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Abbott Laboratories Limited Prize in Neurology - A $300 prize is offered by
the Pharmaceutical Products Division of Abbott Laboratories Limited. The
prize is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine, in
consultation with the Postgraduate Education Committee in Neurology to a
resident in Neurology, exhibiting proficiency in EEG and epilepsy.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Carolyn Atwell Memorial Prize - A prize in the amount of approximately $100
has been established by friends to honour the memory of Carolyn Atwell, a
UBC student in Honours Political Science who died in 1990. The prize is
awarded on the recommendation of the Department of Political Science to a
student submitting the best essay on some aspect of third world development
in a political science course or a course designated by the International
Relations Program Coordinating Committee as part of the major requirement
for the B.A. in International Relations.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd. Prize - A $500 prize and plaque have been
made available by Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd. The award is made on
the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine to a graduating M.D. student
who has demonstrated clinical proficiency and an interest in Respirology or
Cardiology.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Council of Forest Industries Prize in Landscape Architecture - A $275 prize
is offered by the Council of Forest Industries. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences to the student in the
Landscape Architecture Program presenting the most appropriate and
imaginative structure in wood.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Donald M. Flather Bursary - A $250 bursary has been provided by the late
Donald M. Flather. The award is available to students in the Faculties of
Medicine or Science who have graduated from a high school in School District
89 (Salmon Arm, Sicamous and Enderby, B.C.). The award is offered for a
four year period commencing in 1991/92. (Re-submitted with amendment to
include School District.)
Gerald Goldstein Bursary - A $100 bursary has been offered by family and
friends to honour Gerald Goldstein on the occasion of his 50th birthday in
1990. The award will be made to a student in the Faculty of Law. The award
is offered for a ten year period commencing in 1991/92.
David F. Hardwick Prize - A $500 prize has been established to honour
Professor David F~. Hardwick, who served as Head of the Department of
Pathology from 1976 to 1990. The prize is awarded on the recommendation of
the Department of Pathology to the second year Medical student who obtains
the highest standing in Human Pathology (Pathology 425). (Available 1990/91
Winter Session.) 10051.
April 24, 1991
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
David E. Highnam Memorial Prize - A $300 prize has been endowed in memory of
David E. Highnam by his family, friends and colleagues. The prize is
awarded on the recommendation of the Department of French to a graduating
student with the highest overall standing in third and fourth year courses
in the French major or honours program (Literature option). (Available
1991/92 Winter Session.)
Ishiyaku EuroAmerica Inc. Prize - A prize consisting of medical books to a
value of US$75 is offered by Ishiyaku EuroAmerica Inc. The prize is awarded
on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine to a student in second,
third or fourth year, demonstrating proficiency in the clinical
disciplines.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Korean Rotary Club of Vancouver Scholarship - A $1000 scholarship is offered
by the Korean Rotary Club of Vancouver. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Department of Asian Studies to a student taking
courses in Korean Language or History.  (Available 1991/92 Winter Session.)
William R. Mead Memorial Scholarship - A scholarship in the amount of $1000
is awarded to the second year law student who achieves the highest combined
academic average in the courses Administrative Law (Law 302) and Labour Law
(Law 353). This scholarship is given in memory of William R. Mead by
members of his law firm, Campney & Murphy, and by family and friends. It
honours an individual who, until his retirement, was a leading practitioner
in Canada in the fields of labour and administrative law. The award is made
on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 1990/91 Winter
Session.)
Singleton Urguhart MacDonald Prize in Torts - A $500 prize is awarded
annually by the law firm of Singleton Urquhart MacDonald, Barristers &
Solicitors, to a student who achieves high academic standing in Torts (Law
207). The award is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
B. J. Twaites Prize - A $300 prize has been established to honour Mr. B. J.
(Bev) Twaites, who retired as Manager of the Department of Pathology in 1991
after serving the University for 35 years. The prize will be awarded by the
Faculty of Medicine to the student in the graduating class for the B.L.M.Sc.
degree who obtains the highest standing in Laboratory Administration
(Pathology 408).  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)

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