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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] May 23, 1990

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 9776.
May 23, 1990
The Ninth Reqular Meetinq of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1989-90 was held on Wednesday, May 23, 1990 at 8.00
p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Present: President D. W. Strangway, (Chairman), Vice-President D. R.
Birch, Mr. S. Alsgard, Mr. D. A. Anderson, Dr. E. G. Auld, Miss M. D. Bain,
Dr. B. Bressler, Mr. R. Bush, Miss A. L. Callegari, Dr. T. s. Cook, Mr.
N. A. Davidson, Dr. J. D. Dennison, Dr. A. J. Elder, Acting Dean D. J.
Elkins, Mr. E. B. Goehring, Dr. S. E. Grace, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. J. F.
Helliwell, Dr. M. A. Hickling, Dr. P. G. Hill, Ms. A. Ironside, Ms. T. L.
Jackson, Dr. S. Katz, Dean R. W. Kennedy, Miss W. A. King, Dr. A. Kozak,
Mr. 0. C. W. Lau, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Mr. B. V. McGuinness, Dr. J. A.
McLean, Mr. M. G. McMillan, Dean A. Meisen, Dr. A. G. Mitchell, Dr. B. M.
Morrison, Mr. J. A. Moss, Mr. M. D. Nikkei, Mr. S. R. Pearce, Mrs. G. E.
Plant, Mr. E. S. Reid, Dean J. F. Richards, Dean P. B. Robertson, Dr. D. F.
Robitaille, Dean N. Sheehan, Dr. L. de Sobrino, Dr. J. K. Stager, Dean P.
Suedfeld, Mr. B. Taylor, Dr. P. R. Tennant, Mr. G. A. Thorn, Dr. R. C.
Thompson, Dr. A. Van Seters, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Dean W. A. Webber, Dr. D.
A. Wehrung, Dr. L. S. Weiler, Dr. D. LI. Williams, Ms. N. E. Woo.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
Chancellor L. R. Peterson, Dr. J. M. Anderson, Dean P. T. Burns, Dr. G. W.
Eaton, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Mrs. L. Lohia, Miss S. A.
Mair, Dean B. C. McBride, Mr. R. H. McGowan, Dean J. H. McNeill, Dr. J. E.
Phillips, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Dr. R. C. Tees, Mr. W.
Watson.
Senate Membership
Declaration of vacancy (University Act, section 35 (6))
Mr. Dan Horvat, student representative of the Faculty of Medicine.
Minutes of previous meetinq
Dean Webber   ) That the minutes of the Eighth regular
Dean Richards  )  meeting of Senate for the Session 1989-90,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
Carried 9777.
May 23, 1990
Business arising from the Minutes
University Ombudsperson  (p.9765)
Dr. Tennant   ) That the Academic Policy Committee examine
Ms. King      ) and make recommendations concerning the
advisability of this university having a
university ombudsperson.
Dr. Tennant stated that, in his opinion, there was a need for an
ombudsperson on campus to better serve the needs of students. Dr. Tennant
stated that from his experience as a member of the Senate Committee on
Appeals on Academic Standing and from recent discussions with students, he
had formed the opinion that a good many of the appeals that reach the
committee should never have got to the committee, and that, on the other
hand, a good many valid complaints never get to the committee. Although
he felt that there was nothing wrong in principle with the present appeal
system there were basic features that did not work in the students'
interests.  For instance, at the instructor, department head, and Deans
level, those to whom an appeal is addressed are the very ones that make
the decisions. He also felt that a number of appeals that reached the
committee were plainly motivated by a student's dislike of the manner and
attitude after the Faculty decision, not by the decision itself.
Obviously, the present system does not have any ready way of weeding out
frivolous complaints or speeding on the more serious ones. He felt that
the present system was very time-consuming and impersonal. He pointed out
that although there is an AMS ombudsperson the position has no formal role
in the university at large, and inevitably both student complainants and
Faculty tend to see the student ombudsperson as a student advocate and he
felt that that was a corrosive attitude as far as the role of ombudsperson
is concerned. He stated that the overall effect was that the majority of
students with valid complaints simply give up before the process is 9778.
May 23, 1990
Business arising from the Minutes
University Ombudsperson  (continued)
complete. He felt that a University ombudsperson could alleviate the
situation, since an ombudsperson is independent, impartial and
approachable, and could provide authoritive advice to students when
needed, resultinq in much time beinq saved and greater fairness.
In conclusion, Dr. Tennant stated that he realized that this was not a
matter for Senate alone. The President and the Board of Governors would
be involved in any final decision, and equally important the AMS, as the
voice of students, would have to be involved in any final decision about
having such a position and in appointing any individual to be ombudsperson.
In response to a query as to whether the terms of reference would be
limited exclusively to student issues, Dr. Tennant stated that in his view
the office of ombudsperson would deal primarily with student issues. He
stated that he was aware that in other universities which commonly have
ombudspersons a whole range of issues are handled by that office but felt
that the question of the terms of reference should be left to the Academic
Policy Committee.
Dr. Weiler stated that, at a recent meeting, the President's Permanent
Advisory Committee on Sexual Harrassment had been very supportive of such
a venture. However, he felt that the terms of reference should be
extended to more than just student issues since there were a number of
people who could benefit from such an office on campus.
The motion was put and carried. 9779.
May 23, 1990
Chairman's remarks and related questions
President Stranqway encouraged members of Senate to take part in the
1990 graduation ceremonies on May 29, 30, 31 and June 1.
President strangway informed Senate that the overall increase in the
operating budget was 6.53%. He pointed out that although most of the
operating income comes from that source about 15% of the income comes from
student tuition. The increase in student tuition was approximately 4.9%,
which basically means an increase in the overall operating revenue of
6-1/4%. There was a continuing commitment with respect to the access funds,
and UBC is to receive approximately $2.7 million for increasing our graduate
student enrolment by 160. The university also received money for increases
in physiotherapy, and an increase in money from the Ministry of Education as
opposed to the Ministry of Advanced Education for increasing on a short term
basis the flow of teachers needed in the coming years. The equipment money
received last year was a two year grant and that continues. The public
works and renovation money was also increased.
The President stated that he would be establishing a President's Task
Force on Racism and Racial Harrassment and that Ms. Wendy King had agreed to
serve on that committee. It was hoped that the committee would start work
in September to address how the university as an institution should deal
with the issues of racism as they affect the campus and the community.
In conclusion, Dr. Strangway drew attention to the campus planning
issue. He stated that there had been a lot of debate on campus and that a
questionnaire had been distributed by the campus planning group. He
informed Senate that he had agreed to a suggestion that, at a meeting early
in the fall, the people working on the campus plan should make a
presentation to Senate in order that members can see the plans for the
framework of the campus. 9780.
May 23, 1990
Candidates for Degrees
Lists of candidates for degrees, as approved by the various Faculties
and Schools, were made available for inspection by Senate members prior to
the meeting.
Dean Webber ) That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
Mr. McMillan ) as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chairman
of Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Dr. Elder commented that in the Faculty of Arts the motion to award
degrees was not unanimous.  At the time that the names were put forward the
Faculty of Arts affirmed its rights and responsibilities as defined in the
University Act to determine, with the approval of Senate, all the degree
requirements and to recommend to Senate approval of all candidates for
degrees in the Faculty. The Faculty, after a lot of soul-searching, decided
to separate the statutory problem from the problem of any particular student
on the list and so the names have come forward.  As a matter of interest,
Dr. Elder informed Senate that three dyslexic students were graduating from
the Faculty of Arts;  one had completed all the requirements of the Faculty,
including the language requirement, one had completed a program which was
developed in conjunction with the senior faculty advisor which would give
the student some notion of a culture other than the one he was in himself,
and one had been put on the list by the actions of the Vice President
Adademic who had waived a requirement of the Faculty of Arts.
Dr. Birch stated that he had not waived a requirement of the Faculty of
Arts but that he directed that it be waived.
President Strangway noted that a Task Force was being created to look
into the issue as far as the university as a whole is concerned.
The motion was put and carried. 9781.
May 23, 1990
Scholarships and Awards
A list of scholarships, medals and prizes awarded to students in the
graduating classes was circulated for information.
Dr. Cook informed Senate that there were 27 winners, 14 of whom had
entered university directly from B.C. high schools, one from a high school
in Canada outside of B.C., and one from a high school outside of Canada. Of
the remaining 11 winners, five came to UBC via B.C. colleges, three came
from other B.C. universities and the remaining three came from Canadian
universities. Dr. Cook announced the names of three exceptional winners
honoured by UBC repeatedly over the years, the first, Jonathan Moss from
Forestry, winner of the Jean Craig Smith Scholarship, Rhodes Scholar winner,
and recipient of the Wesbrook Scholar denomination. Second, the head of the
graduating class receiving the Governor-General's Silver Medal in Science,
Bozidar Bo Ilic, who was a major entrance scholar coming directly to UBC
from Winston Churchill High School and also a Longstaff Entrance Scholar.
Finally, a young woman of exceptional characteristics, the winner of the
Governor-General's Silver Medal in Arts, Irshad Manji, who was a
Chancellor's Entrance Scholar who went on to win the Sherwood Lett
Scholarship and finally was named a Wesbrook Scholar. Ms. Manji came
directly to UBC from Richmond High School.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
School of Nursing Master's Program - revised Calendar statement on
admission
Dr. Elder, Chairman of the Committee, presented the report.  The
Committee  recommended  approval  of  the following  revised Calendar
statement on admission to the Master of Science in Nursing program
(changes underlined) : 9782.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
School of Nursing Master's Program - revised Calendar statement on
admission  (continued)
Admission Requirements
Applicants are required to meet the admission requirements of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies (see Graduate Studies section). Applicants
are required to have achieved first class standing in at least six units
of course work in nursinq and a 72% average for course work taken at the
third and fourth year level.
Applicants are normally required to be graduates of a baccalaureate
program in nursing which included instruction and clinical experience in
community health nursing and psychiatric nursing. Applicants are
required to have completed an undergraduate level statistics course or a
"refresher" course not more than three years prior to admission to the
MSN proqram. Registered nurses holding a baccalaureate degree in a
field other than nursing may be admitted to the Master's program at the
discretion of the School. Such applicants may be required to complete
up to fifteen units of course work to qualify for admission.
Applicants should be aware that all students must have current
practicing registration or be eligible to so register.
The last day for submission of applications for admission to the program
for the Winter session beginning the followinq September is April 30,
with necessary documents and official transcripts to be in the
Registrar's office by May 31.
Applicants seeking information about the Master's program in Nursing or
application forms should write to:
The Graduate Adviser
The University of British Columbia
School of Nursing
T206-2211 Wesbrook Mall
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 2B5."
Dr. Elder     ) That the proposed revisions to the
Dean Suedfeld ) Calendar statement on admission to the
Master of Science in Nursing program be
approved.
Carried 9783.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate  (continued)
Curriculum Committee (see Appendix 'B')
Dr. Thompson, Chairman of the Committee, presented the report.
Faculty of Education
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Education.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
The Committee recommended approval of M.Sc. and Ph.D. Programs in
Health Care and Epidemiology, revisions to the Master of Science program
in Nursing, and curriculum proposals, submitted by the Faculty of
Graduate Studies.
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, subject to minor editorial changes.
Dr. Thompson  )  That the proposals of the Faculties of
Dr. Sobrino   ) Education, Graduate Studies, and
Pharmaceutical Sciences, be approved.
In response to a query, it was confirmed that junior mathematics refers
to first and second year as opposed to third and fourth year which is
senior mathematics.
In response to a query concerning the number of units assigned to the
thesis in the Master of Science in Nursing Program, Dean Suedfeld stated
that although it is true that Master's theses are frequently qiven 6 units
it is not always the case. He stated that the number of units that one
gets for a thesis does not usually reflect the amount of work or the
quality of the work put into it. He also stated that although there were
people who might go on to a doctoral program in nursing, there were not 9784.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
many offered in Canada. He felt that many master's students in nursing,
as in many other professional programs, probably would not go into a
doctorate immediately, and that since UBC does not offer a doctoral
program at this point he felt that Senate should trust the wisdom of the
School of Nursing in deciding that 3 units is the proper allocation of
units to the thesis.
The motion was put and carried.
Student Awards
List of new awards
Dr. Cook, Chairman of the Committee, presented the report.
Dr. Cook      )  That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A')
Mr. Pearce    )  be accepted subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
Dr. Cook drew attention to the Chancellor's Entrance Scholarship
which had been broadened to include students transferring from other
universities. Dr. Cook also drew attention to the School of Community
and Regional Planning Scholarship amounting to $6,000, and to the A. D.
Scott Fellowship in Economics consisting of two fellowships totalling
$15,000.
The motion was put and carried.
Annual Report
Dr. Cook presented the following report, which had been circulated:
"Since its last major report to Senate in February, 1989, the Committee
has met a total of eleven times. One hundred and fifty-three new awards
with an aggregate annual value of $326,300 have been presented to Senate
for approval. The Committee has dealt with one appeal. The following
matters have been addressed by the Committee: 9785.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Annual Report (continued)
1. University Scholarship Program
This program has been in operation for eleven years and provides the
vehicle to allocate scholarship dollars which are not discipline
specific. The program seeks to ensure that continuing full-time
undergraduate students (presently defined as those taking at least
90% of a full program load) receive minimum values of scholarship.
The present levels are: $1,200 for students in the top 3% of their
year and faculty, and $900 for students in the next 3%. These values
have been in place since 198 4.
The Committee has recommended to the President's Office that the
present levels of the University Scholarship Program be increased to
reflect recent increases in tuition.
2. Unit Load Requirements for Scholarships
At the request of the faculty, the Committee reviewed unit load
requirements for scholarships for students in the Faculty of Law, and
also established the requirements for renewable Entrance Scholarships
in Engineering.
3. Scholarships for Part-time Students
In 1982 the Senate approved the Committee's recommendation that
students who are taking fewer units than the number required under
the University Scholarship Program be considered for scholarships.
In 1988/89 the Board of Governors approved $25,000 to begin to
recognize outstanding undergraduates who were carrying less than 90%
of a full program load. Thirty-nine students who were carrying
between 80% and 90% of a full load were awarded scholarships with an
aggregate value of $32,000. In 1989/90 the program was expanded to
include students who were carrying between 60% and 90% of a full
load, and a total of 92 students were awarded scholarships worth
$65,400. The value of the awards was established by pro-rating the
University Scholarship Program values.
4. Conditions of Acceptance of Student Awards
Over the past three years, the Committee has spent considerable time
discussing the conditions of acceptance of student awards. Last
November, the Committee presented a proposal to Senate to limit the
non-academic restrictions which would be accepted in connection with
student awards. The proposal was not accepted. The Committee
considered the points raised by Senate and prepared a revised draft
which was circulated for comment. Written comments from the Deans
and others were considered. The Committee's recommendation is
presented separately for the consideration of Senate." 9786.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Annual Report  (continued)
On behalf of the Committee, Dr. Cook expressed thanks and
appreciation for the contributions made by the two convocation members
of the committee, Mrs. Mary Plant and Mr. Murray McMillan.
Dr. Cook      )  That the report of the Committee be
Dr. Bressler  ) received.
Carried
Recommendation regarding conditions of acceptance of student awards
Dr. Cook presented the following report which contains a revised
statement of the terms and conditions for the acceptance of scholarship
and bursary monies to the University:
1. Background
For the past three years, the Senate Committee on Student Awards has
grappled with the terms of awards which include non-academic
restrictions. Occasionally Senate has referred award statements back
to the Committee for clarification and/or revision.
In 1980 Senate adopted the following statement which appears in UBC's
award publications and materials directed to donors, and which also
guides the staff of the Awards Office:
"The University prefers to administer awards that are made
available without restrictions deemed to be discriminatory. It
will administer awards that define, in terms acceptable to
Senate, the eligibility of students to receive the award.
Senate may decline awards containing criteria that it deems to
be contrary to the interest of the University as an academic
institution."
The Committee which operated between 198 4 and 1987 experienced
difficulties in writing and recommending restrictive awards. Since
1987 these difficulties have increased and, on several occasions,
have been brought to the attention of Senate, the administration, and
the Development Office by the Committee in its effort to develop a
stronger and more useful statement.
In November of 1989, after much consultation, the Committee placed a
new statement before Senate. For a variety of reasons, Senate was
unable to adopt the following: 9787.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Recommendation regarding conditions of acceptance of student awards
(continued)
"Awards should be free of criteria based on personal
charactertistics such as race, national or ethnic origin,
colour, religion, political belief, sex, family or marital
status, sexual orientation, age, or mental or physical
disability. This does not preclude the University from
establishing awards designed to increase the participation of
disadvantaged individuals or groups including those who are
disadvantaged on the grounds mentioned above."
2. The Present
The Committee has reviewed the comments made at Senate, the various
written and oral suggestions received subsequent to the November
Senate, and the published strategic plan of the University. We
re-affirm our commitment to the necessity for Senate to provide a
clear and practical statement to guide the Awards Office, the
Development Office, and others in their work with donors. The
revised statement is in accord with the Canadian Charter of Rights
and Freedom, the British Columbia Human Rights Act and UBC's mission
statement document entitled "Second to None".
The University has identified several categories of students for
affirmative action awards (see Second to None p.36 through 45).
These categories are: First National students; women and minority
students in graduate and certain professional programs; foreign
students; students from outside the lower mainland and from
elsewhere in Canada; UBC students on exchange from outside the lower
mainland and from elsewhere in Canada; UBC students on exchange
programs, and part-time students.
The Senate Committee on Student Awards believes it has a
responsibility through the Awards and Development Offices to
encourage donors to:
(i)  support awards for students specifically identified by the
University, and
(ii) support general award pools in  the various  faculties  and
programs of the University.
Further, the Committee believes it has a responsibility to relieve
Senate of the tedious and often inconsistent review process of
individual specialized award descriptions. 9788.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Recommendation regarding conditions of acceptance of student awards
(continued)
3. Recommendations
1. The  Committee  recommends  the  following  policy  statement  on
University awards be adopted by Senate:
That regulation 10 (page 30, 1990/91 Calendar) which reads as
follows:
"The University prefers to administer awards that are made
available without restrictions deemed to be discriminatory. It
will administer awards that define, in terms acceptable to
Senate, the eligibility of students to receive the award.
Senate may decline awards containing criteria that it deems to
be contrary to the interest of the University as an academic
institution."
be deleted and replaced by the following:
"It is the policy of the University to attract, at both graduate
and undergraduate levels, the best academically qualified
students, whatever their origin. With that objective in mind,
it is the primary policy of the University to encourage
donations, whether to individual Faculties or to the
University's general scholarship and bursary funds, that can be
used to reward excellence or to support needy students without
restrictions based on non-academic considerations. Such
donations maximize fairness, flexibility and efficiency in the
administration of available funds.
The University is committed to working for true equality of
opportunity for all academically qualified students by enabling
them to overcome non-academic barriers whatever the source.
With that goal in mind, it recognizes that, in order to ensure
equitable access to the educational system at all levels, it may
be desirable, and indeed necessary, to take affirmative action
by providing financial support for particular groups, such as
women, native students, the disabled and visible minorities, as
well as for students from outside the Lower Mainland. In order
to maximize progress towards true equality of opportunity, the
University may be prepared to accept and administer donations
designed to accomplish such objectives either by encouraqing
members of such groups at large to take advantage of a
university education or by increasing their level of
participation in particular programs." 9789.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Recommendation regarding conditions of acceptance of student awards
(continued)
II.  The  Committee  recommends  that  the  following  administrative
guidelines on students awards be accepted by Senate:
"(a) The most desirable form of funding is that which does not
stipulate conditions other than that of academic
performance and, in the case of bursaries, of financial
need. Persons negotiating on behalf of the University with
potential donors will exert their best efforts to obtain
sponsorship of this kind.
(b) Where non-academic considerations are considered by the
donor to be of overriding importance, the terms of the
award must be reviewed by the Senate Committee on Student
Awards prior to acceptance of funds by the University. The
Senate Committee shall satisfy itself that the terms of the
proposed award are consistent with the general statement of
policy.
(c) For the purpose of the general statement and these
guidelines, non-academic considerations include personal
factors such as race, national or ethnic origin, colour,
religion, political belief, sex, family or marital status,
sexual orientation, age, mental or physical disability.
(d) As the objectives of affirmative action programs are met,
it is highly desirable that any restrictive conditions
based on non-academic personal considerations be ultimately
removed, in order that the funds can be applied in a manner
consistent with the primary policy set out in the general
statement of policy and paragraph (a) of these
administrative guidelines.
(e) The University recognizes that it may not be sufficient in
order to achieve the equality of opportunity to which the
University is committed, simply to redress a current
imbalance in registration in particular faculties,
departments, schools or programs. It may well take some
time to redress generations of systematic inequality and
ensure real equality of opportunity. Proportionate
representation of the affected groups is one, but not the
only factor to be taken into account."
Dr. Cook      ) That item 10. under "Regulations Governing
Mrs. Plant    ) University Awards", in the UBC Calendar, be
replaced by the following: 9790.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Recommendation regarding conditions of acceptance of student awards
(continued)
"It is the policy of the University to attract, at both graduate and
undergraduate levels, the best academically qualified students,
whatever their origin. With that objective in mind, it is the
primary policy of the University to encourage donations, whether to
individual Faculties or to the University's general scholarship and
bursary funds, that can be used to reward excellence or to support
needy students without restrictions based on non-academic
considerations. Such donations maximize fairness, flexibility and
efficiency in the administration of available funds.
The University is committed to working for true equality of
opportunity for all academically qualified students by enabling them
to overcome non-academic barriers whatever the source. With that
goal in mind, it recognizes that, in order to ensure equitable access
to the educational system at all levels, it may be desirable, and
indeed necessary, to take affirmative action by providing financial
support for particular groups, such as women; native students, the
disabled and other visible minorities; as well as for students from
outside the Lower Mainland. In order to maximize progress towards
true equality of opportunity, the University may be prepared to
accept and administer donations designed to accomplish such
objectives either by encouraging members of such groups at large to
take advantage of a university education or by increasing their level
of participation in particular programs."
In amendment:
Dr. Elder     )  That the second sentence in the second
Dr. Birch     )  paragraph be amended to read:
With that goal in mind...levels, the
University is prepared to take affirmative
action...Lower Mainland. And that the last
sentence be amended to read:  In order to maximize
progress...the University is prepared to accept
and administer...programs.
Carried
Dr. Birch stated that with the emphasis on the best academically
qualified students and on the primacy of the academic criteria, concern
had been expressed that the university might be excluding or failing to
draw attention to the fact that there are a good many scholarships based
on academic criteria plus additional areas of merit and achievement. 9791.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Recommendation regarding conditions of acceptance of student awards
(continued)
He  stated  that many of  the major  scholarships expect community
involvement, community participation, athletic involvement and a broad
range of achievement in addition to the academic, and he felt that the
policy statement should not give the impression of ruling out the
possibility of added criteria that reflect merit and achievement.  He
wished it to be a matter of record that this statement is not taken to
be inimical to recognizing additional areas of merit and achievement.
The motion was put and carried.
Dr. Cook      ) That the guidelines be accepted and referred
Dr. Birch     ) to the next Senate Committee on Student Awards,
to the President's Office, the Development
Office and the Awards and Financial Aid
Office for their consideration.
Dr. Tennant drew attention to item (b) of the guidelines. He felt
that the statement represented a transfer of power to the Committee, and
suggested the following amendment:
In amendment:
Dr. Tennant   )  That item (b) of the proposed guidelines on
Dean Lusztig  )  student awards be amended to read:
Where non-academic considerations are
considered by the donor to be of overriding
importance, the Senate shall satisfy itself
that the terms of the proposed award are
consistent with the general statement of policy.
Carried 9792.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Student Awards
Recommendation regarding conditions of acceptance of student awards
(continued)
In amendment:
Dean Webber   ) That item (c) of the proposed guidelines on
Dr. Dennison  )  student awards be amended by adding the
following statement:
It is not intended to exclude outstanding
achievement in appropriate areas, such as
public service, leadership, or athletics.
Carried
In response to a query concerning the wording "mental or physical
disability" in item (c), it was stated that this had been taken from the
Human Rights Act.
The motion, as amended, was put and carried.
Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute
The following memorial statement had been prepared in accordance with
the custom of Senate, in recognition by the University and Senate of the
late William Winston Wood.
IN MEMORIAM
WILLIAM WINSTON WOOD (1940-1990)
Dr. William W. Wood, a Professor of Clinical Dental Sciences and an
outstanding teacher and practitioner in his profession, died on May 12,
1990.
Bill Wood was born in 1940 in Melbourne, Australia, and earned his
Bachelor of Dental Sciences Degree from the University of Melbourne in
1965, where he headed his class in his final year. After a period spent
in private practice, Dr. Wood moved to Canada and was awarded a
Doctorate in Dental Surgery Degree from the University of Toronto in
1970. He later completed a Master of Arts in Higher Education at UBC in
1978. 9793.
May 23, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute (continued)
In 1972, he accepted his initial appointment at this university as an
instructor, later to be promoted to Assistant Professor in 1973, and
Associate Professor in 1982. Dr. Wood would have received his full
professorship in July of this year.
Bill Wood played many roles in his life, each one characterized by
excellence and commitment. His skill in the practice of restorative
dentistry was widely known and highly acclaimed. But above all, he was
dedicated to the improvement of dental education and he spent endless
hours seeking ways to better the quality of student learning in his
faculty. Students were always his first concern and he provided them
with a role model par excellence. A short time before his death he
learned that he had received the Teaching Award in the Faculty of
Dentistry.  This honour was of particular significance to him.
In the field of research his record was no less impressive. He received
numerous competitive grants and earned national and international
recognition for his studies on the functional behaviour of the jaw.
Dr. Wood also served this university in many ways. In his faculty he
served on both the Executive and Admissions Committees, the latter as
Chair. As a member of Senate he was a dedicated and compassionate
participant in the Committee for Appeals on Academic Standing and the
Admissions Committee. At all times he displayed his deep respect for
the values of the university. Above all else, he believed that those in
authority should always act in an ethical and principled manner. It was
this deep sense of responsibility which guided him throughout his
personal, academic, and professional life.
Bill Wood lived a full and active life outside the university. In spite
of physical difficulties, he was a keen and competitive yachtsman, an
often unsuccessful but eternally optimistic fisherman, and an
enthusiastic outdoorsman.
Bill Wood was a warm and generous man. He was also a valued colleague,
a loving husband and father, and a loyal, genuine and always dependable
friend.
To his wife, Sue, his daughter Stephanie, and to his surviving family,
the Senate of The University of British Columbia extends its deepest
sympathy.
Dr. Dennison  ) That the memorial statement for
Dean Robertson ) William Winston Wood be spread
on the minutes of Senate and that
a copy be sent to the relatives of
the deceased.
Carried 9794.
May 23, 1990
Faculty of Forestry
Proposal to establish a Chair in Silvics and Silviculture
Dean Kennedy  )  That the proposal of the Faculty of
Dr. Kozak     ) Forestry to establish a Chair in Silvics
and Silviculture be approved.
It was stated in the material circulated that the study of life history,
characteristics, and ecology of forest trees, especially in stands, and
the science and art of cultivating the forest are two increasingly
important  subjects  in  forestry,  and  that better  forest management
decisions depend on an improved understanding of the complex ecological
structure of forests.  It was also noted that the Chair has been funded by
the B.C. Ministry of Forests for a five-year period, and is renewable at
the discretion of the Ministry.
The motion was put and carried.
Proposal to establish a Chair in Forest Products Biotechnology
Dean Kennedy  )  That the proposal of the Faculty of
Dr. Kozak     ) Forestry to establish a Chair in Silvics
and Silviculture be approved.
It  was  stated  in  the material  circulated  that  biotechnology  is
recognized as being of increasing value in the forest industry, both in
improving  the  quality  of  forest  products  and  in  controlling  the
environmental problems faced by the industry.  The establishment of this
Chair will enable the Faculty of Forestry to be in the forefront of
research and teaching in this area, both nationally and internationally.
It was also stated that the Chair has been fully endowed by gifts from
MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd., and by grants from the
Provincial  Government.   Activities  of  the  chair  holder  will  be
supplemented in its first five years by grants from NSERC, PAPRICAN,
FORINTEK, and Novo Nordisk A/S.
The motion was put and carried. 9795.
May 23, 1990
UBC Ritsumeikan Education Abroad Program
The  following  report  from  Vice-President  Birch  concerning  the
UBC/Ritsumeikan University Education Abroad Program had been circulated:
"At its April meeting Senate approved a set of recommendations from the
Senate Committee on Academic Policy establishing guidelines for
Education Abroad Programs. Those guidelines will be reproduced in the
Minutes before members of Senate at the meeting of May 23, so members of
Senate will be able to consider this document in the context of the
guidelines.
The guidelines will be a great help to us in establishing new Education
Abroad Programs and in their administration. However, a number of
Education Abroad Programs pre-exist the establishment of the guidelines
and it was the increasing interest in establishing more such programs
that led us to seek the assistance of the Senate Committee on Academic
Policy in providing a framework for further development. Our largest
existing program is that with the University of California under which
approximately 20 UC students come to UBC annually for a semester or year
abroad, and UBC students undertake a semester or an academic year's
study at one of the nine campuses of the University of California for
credit towards their UBC degrees.
In 1987/88, President Strangway and President Tanioka of Ritsumeikan
University signed a general Exchange Agreement and an Education Abroad
Exchange Agreement which provided for the reciprocal exchange of
visiting students from each institution for one academic year. The
first two students from UBC began studying at Ritsumeikan University in
May 1989 and two Ritsumeikan students began their studies at UBC in
September of that year.
In addition Ritsumeikan University has been sending 20 students each
spring since 1987 to study in the four-week "International Seminar"
organised for them by the English Language Institute at UBC. In
connection with the Seminar, Ritsumeikan has sent members of faculty and
staff to visit UBC, to work with their students and to familiarize
themselves with the University.
As the President reported to the March meeting of Senate, plans are well
advanced for the development of UBC/Ritsumeikan House, a facility to be
erected on the UBC Campus to accommodate 100 Japanese students and 100
regular UBC students (perhaps with priority given to those studying
Japanese). Students from Ritsumeikan University will be expected to
have some competence in English before their arrival and will
concentrate on the study of English in the early part of their time at
UBC. The Ritsumeikan Senate and its senior academic representatives
have proposed two courses to be jointly developed, jointly approved and
jointly taught by Ritsumeikan and UBC faculty members. Their proposals
have been referred to the Faculty of Arts for consideration and will be
before Senate for approval when they have been approved by the Faculty.
The first proposal is for a course in Pacific Rim Studies which, though
comprehensive, would incorporate both Japanese and Canadian content and
perspectives,  when approved, it would be offered for credit both at UBC 9796.
May 23, 1990
UBC Ritsumeikan Education Abroad Program (continued)
and at Ritsumeikan. The second course would incorporate the study of
Japanese culture and society and Canadian culture and society and would
include an emphasis on Canada as a multicultural society.
Ritsumeikan University is very interested in providing reciprocity
within the framework of a joint venture. UBC is unlikely to be able to
send a large number of students to study in Japan but Ritsumeikan is
prepared to make space available on its Kyoto campus for a research
institute (perhaps in Canadian Studies which is an integral component of
its recently developed program in International Relations). Ritsumeikan
would also be prepared to act as host for graduate students who require
an advanced knowledqe of Japan as part of their UBC programs.
Ritsumeikan University was established in 1869 by Prince Kinmochi
Saionji, an eminent statesman and liberal thinker who later served as
Prime Minister of Japan. At the turn of the century it was essentially
a college of law and economics. Ritsumeikan University's period of most
rapid growth followed World War II and today it offers bachelor's,
master's and doctoral programs in each of seven faculties: Law,
Economics, Business Administration, Social Sciences, Letters, and
Science and Engineering. It has recently added studies to the
baccalaureate level in a Faculty of International Relations.
Ritsumeikan University is among the ten leading private universities of
Japan.
There has been some concern that enlarging our Education Abroad Program
with Ritsumeikan University might be perceived as an exclusive
relationship and thereby limit relations with the national universities
and perhaps with other private universities as well. We already have
formal relationships with a number of leading Japanese universities
including Tsukuba, Osaka (Dentistry and Law), Hokkaido (Law), Komazawa
(Buddhist Studies), Tokyo University of Agriculture. A December visit
by the Vice President Research confirmed and reinforced UBC's strong
research linkages with the major universities, Tokyo and Kyoto. Recent
contacts with Sophia University, Waseda University and others confirm
UBC's high status in Japan and the interest of those institutions in
strengthening ties with us.
Planning for the next steps in the already approved UBC/Ritsumeikan EAP
is proceeding apace and the President of Ritsumeikan University will be
visiting our campus later this month to sign a formal agreement covering
the proposed joint venture. The administration has reviewed with care
the financial arrangements, both capital and operating, to ensure that
there is no net cost to UBC, and the Board of Governors has authorized
President Strangway to proceed with the agreement. I recommend that
Senate approve the following resolution:
That Senate endorse the extension of the Education Abroad
Program between The University of British Columbia and
Ritsumeikan University within the framework outlined
above, that the initial approval be for a period of five
years and that the Academic Vice President report
annually to Senate on the program." 9797.
May 23, 1990
UBC Ritsumeikan Education Abroad Program (continued)
Dr. Birch     ) That Senate endorse the extension
Dr. Bressler  )  of the Education Abroad Program between
The University of British Columbia and
Ritsumeikan University within the framework
outlined above, that the initial approval
be for a period of five years and that the
Academic Vice President report annually to
Senate on the program.
Carried
Continuing Education
Re-organization of the Centre for Continuing Education, Extra-Sessional
Studies and Guided Independent Study
The following report had been circulated for information:
"Introduction
Second to None (a Strategic Plan to Implement the Mission of The
University of British Columbia) stressed the significance of life-long
learning, both credit and non-credit.  It stated:
Much of the teaching and research at universities has a significant
impact on what people are doing in their jobs and professions. It
should be available to those who wish to keep current. But the
University has a more general obligation to contribute to the general
culture, social and political advancement and awareness of the
community, and offers courses in such areas as current affairs,
domestic and international economic development, the sciences, the
health sciences, and the arts.
The document also noted, however, that life-long learning activities are
carried out by many institutions in the Province. Thus, as with its
overall role in the province, UBC's role in life-long learning must be
seen in an overall provincial context.
In conformity with the principles stated in Second to None, the
University should vigorously engage in life-long learning activities
which are appropriate to its general mission and to its role in the
post-secondary education system in the Province. The purpose of the
proposals set out below is to provide a framework and environment in
which that can be done
I. Academic Objectives and Principles
(1) The University will continue to provide and to expand the
opportunity for students to take credit courses at times or in ways
other than those available during the day in the Winter Session. 9798.
May 23, 1990
Continuing Education
Re-organization of the Centre for Continuing Education, Extra-Sessional
Studies and Guided Independent Study
I. Academic Objectives and Principles (continued)
(2) Whatever the administrative arrangements for the delivery of credit
courses at times or in ways other than during the day in Winter
Session, the responsibility for all academic aspects of these
activities rests with the faculties and Senate.
(3) All non-credit education offered by the University should be at a
level that is compatible with the academic objectives of a
university of the stature of UBC, and should be responsive to those
aspects of community interest and demand which are congruent with
such academic objectives.
II Administrative Structure
(1) An Associate Vice-President for Continuing Studies shall be
appointed. The person appointed to that position shall initially
also hold the position of Director of the Centre for Continuing
Education.
(2) The Associate Vice-President for Continuing Studies shall take
responsibility for the Centre for Continuing Education,
Extra-Sessional Studies, and Guided Independent Study; and,
subject to the approval of the Academic Vice President and Provost,
if he or she deems it expedient, restructure those units so as to
more effectively carry out their academic roles.
(3) The Associate Vice-President shall seek to increase the range and
quality of the activities of the units for which he or she has
responsibility and shall seek to involve all academic units more
actively in those functions. He or she shall work to identify the
areas of conqruence between the mission of the University and the
interests of the community in order to initiate and extend programs
and activities in those areas.
(4) The Associate Vice-President with the advice of the Senate
Committee on Continuing Education shall recommend policies and
establish procedures designed to provide incentives for all
academic units to increase their participation in continuing
studies, both credit and non-credit. The policies and procedures
shall include provision for integrating planning for evening,
spring and summer courses and programs with planning for the
offering of courses and programs at the "normal times" in the
winter session.
(5) The Associate Vice-President, on request, shall make available to
all academic units including those faculties which at present
administer their own continuing studies (extra-sessional studies,
distance education and continuing education), the professional
services for which he or she is responsible. When this is done,
costs and revenues will be appropriately shared. 9799.
May 23, 1990
Continuing Education
Re-organization of the Centre for Continuing Education, Extra-Sessional
Studies and Guided Independent Study
II Administrative Structure (continued)
(6) All units engaged in continuing studies will incorporate in their
annual budgets, brought forward for approval, their plans for
development of continuing studies together with projections of
revenues and expenditures.
(7) Each academic unit offering continuing studies shall, subject to
the approval of the Vice President Academic, establish procedures
for ensuring that the academic objectives and principles set out in
Part I above are adhered to and shall continue to report annually
through the Vice President Academic to Senate on all continuing
education courses and programs offered. The Senate Committee on
Continuing Education will review the year's offerings and report to
Senate on the extent to which the University's total offerings in
continuing education are consistent with the academic objectives
and principles outlined above.
(8) Those faculties which at present administer their own continuing
studies shall continue to do so subject to review at the discretion
of the Vice President Academic and to continuing approval in the
normal planning and budgeting cycle.
(9) Those faculties which at present do not administer continuing
studies in their respective fields may be permitted to do so but
only on such terms as may be approved by the Vice President
Academic.
ill Finances
(1) The Extra-Sessional Studies, Guided Independent Study and
Continuing Education programs of faculties administering their own
program are expected to be self-sustaining and will contribute a
percentage (yet to be established) of revenues to general purpose
operating.
(2) The units reporting to the Associate Vice-President for Continuing
Studies should collectively operate on a financially
self-sustaining basis by the fiscal year 1991/92, and by the fiscal
year 1995/96 shall be contributing a percentage (yet to be
established) of their revenues to the general purpose operating
fund to be allocated to the cost of services provided centrally."
In speaking briefly to the report, Dr. Birch drew Senate's attention to
item 4. which refers to the role of the Senate Committee on Continuing
Education, and noted that the Committee will be responsible for advising
the Associate Vice President with regard to policies and establishing 9800.
May 23, 1990
Continuing Education
Re-organization of the Centre for Continuing Education, Extra-Sessional
Studies and Guided Independent Study  (continued)
procedures designed to create incentives and to include provision for
integrating the planning of those activities with credit activities and
the rest of the mission of the University. Similarly, as outlined in item
7, the Committee is expected to review the year's offerings in non-credit
activity and to report to Senate on the extent to which those offerings
are consistent with the academic principles and objectives outlined.
Report from Vancouver School of Theology
Dr. Van Seters presented the annual report to Senate from the Vancouver
School of Theology, which had been circulated for information.  Dr. Van
Seters drew Senate's attention to the new registration/accreditation policy
initiated by the B.C. Government and asked for Senate's support in the
School's request for exemption from this additional accreditation procedure.
It was stated in the report that from time to time there had been
discussions between VST and UBC about the possibility of course transfer
credit at the Masters level. Dr. Van Seters stated that he hoped that
Senate would be open to discussing some kind of graduate study credit.
In commenting on the report, Dr. Birch explained that during the past
year the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Advanced Education had
initiated a process to begin registration, and then various levels of
registration, including accreditation, for approximately 600 proprietary
institutions in the province. The Ministry had sought advice from the Joint
Planning and Articulation Committee, on which the three universities, BCIT,
the colleges and the Ministry are all represented, and they were advised
that institutions which have a well established, credible, accreditation
process in place should not be subjected to an ad hoc provincial process as
a substitute for this. Dr. Birch said that as a representative of UBC and
as a member of bodies like the Joint Planning and Articulation Committee, he 9801.
May 23, 1990
Report from Vancouver School of Theology (continued)
had no difficulty in taking the stand that a provincial accreditation
process designed to look at whether or not student support should go to
students in a bible college is not exactly appropriate for a theological
college whose graduate programs are reviewed by an international body with
well established rules.
In commenting on the issue of transfer credit, the Registrar stated that
UBC does give transfer credit at the undergraduate level for work done at
the theological colleges. A student who was transferring to UBC from Regent
College complained to the B.C. Ombudsman's Office about the fact that he was
not receiving any credit, and the ombudsman was satisfied with the
University's answer, which was that the university examines transcripts from
theological colleges as it does transcripts from any other institution and
gives credit where it is appropriate.
Dr. Birch commented that there would probably be further review
concerning this issue.
Other business
Senate membership
Dr.  Strangway expressed thanks and appreciation to those members
attending their last Senate meeting.
The meeting adjourned at 10.15 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September
12, 1990.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 9802.
May 23, 1990
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate
Amoco Canada Petroleum Company Ltd. Scholarship in Geophysics - A $1,500
scholarship is offered by Amoco Canada Petroleum Company Ltd. to a student
entering the penultimate or final year of an undergraduate program in
geophysics - or in physics, engineering physics, or applied mathematics who
has registered in one or more geophysics courses. The award is made on the
recommendation of the Department of Geophysics and Astronomy in consultation
with the other departments. Participation in university/community
activities and financial need may be considered. (Available 1990/91 Winter
Session.)
Chancellor's Entrance Scholarship (from a College or University) - The
University of British Columbia offers up to 5 awards of $3,000 each to
outstanding students entering undergraduate programs from a college or
university. The awards will be based primarily on the student's scholarly
achievement. Holders of this scholarship who maintain a first class average
in a full program of study or who stand in the top 10% of their class will
be eligible to have the award renewed for a further two years of study or
until the first undergraduate degree is obtained (whichever is the shorter
period). Candidates must complete the General Application for University of
B.C. Scholarships and for Affiliation Awards Administered by the University
of B.C., and include two letters of reference as well as a copy of their
college or university transcript and their senior secondary school
transcript. A statement no longer than 200 words detailing general
interests and activities, proposed course of study and present career plans
must be included in the application. Completed applications must be
received no later than May 15th.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
C. J. Coady Memorial Bursary - A $1,000 bursary, offered by the C. J. Coady
Foundation to recognize personal and professional qualities of Dr. Coady, is
available to a medical student.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
School of Community and Regional PLanning Scholarship - Scholarships
totalling $6,000, made available from income on the School of Community and
Regional Planning Student Development Fund, are made on the recommendation
of the School in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
(Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Bernice M. Parous Memorial Scholarship - A $600 scholarship honouring the
memory of Bernice Muriel Darcus is awarded on the recommendation of the
Department of Classics to an outstanding student majoring in Latin, Greek or
Classical Studies, or in an honours program in Classics or Classical Studies
who has demonstrated exceptional ability in the study of ancient philosophy.
(Available 1991/92 Winter Session.)
I.L.W.U. Local 506 Ralph Scruton Memorial Scholarship - A $750 scholarship
is provided by Local 506 of the International Longshoremen's and
Warehousemen's Union in memory of Ralph Scruton. It is available to members
of the union in good standing and their sons and daughters. Candidates may
attend the University of B.C., the University of Victoria, Simon Fraser
University, the B.C. Institute of Technology or any college in B.C. and must
enrol in a full program of studies. The donor reserves the right to
re-award the scholarship if the winner receives other scholarships of
substantial value.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.) 9803.
May 23, 1990
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate  (continued)
Plant Science Research Prize - This prize is awarded on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences to a graduate student for the best
research poster presentation at the annual Plant Science Poster Day. The
prize consists of either a subscription to a scientific journal of the
student's choice or cash to cover travel expenses up to $100 to allow the
student's participation in a scientific meeting. (Available 1989/90 Winter
Session.)
S. Morton Schloss Memorial Scholarship - A $400 scholarship is offered by
Dr. and Mrs. Murray Atnikov, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. Syd
Coleman and Dr. and Mrs. Lyall Levy, in memory of Dr. S. Morton Schloss. It
is made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine to a student
entering third year who best emulates Dr. Schloss* academic interest and
sportsmanship.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
A. D. Scott Fellowship in Economics - Two fellowships totalling $15,000 have
been endowed to honour Anthony Scott, a distinguished Canadian economist and
world pioneer in the economics of natural resources, environmental issues
and federalism, who retired from the University in 1988. One fellowship is
available to an incoming graduate student and a second is intended to
support thesis research by a senior graduate student in one of Professor
Scott's fields of interest. They are awarded on the recommendation of the
Department of Economics in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Shell Scholarship - Three $2,000 scholarships known as the Shell Scholarship
Series are offered by Shell Canada Limited. One is awarded to a student
entering the penultimate or final year of engineering or the first year of a
master's program in engineering, and a second to a student entering the
penultimate or final year of geology or geophysics, or the first year of a
master's program in geology or geophysics. The third award is for a student
in one of the above programs who is a member of the federally designated
group for employment equity - women, native, disabled and other visible
minorities. Preference is given to students with interest in the petroleum
industry. The awards are made on the recommendation of the Faculties of
Applied Science and Science in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies where appropriate, and are offered for a three-year period
commencing in 1990.
William and Catherine Tyers Memorial Scholarship - A $250 scholarship has
been established in memory of William F. amd Catherine M. Tyers, long-time
residents of Kaslo, by their children.  Preference is given to students from
B. C. School District #86 (Creston-Kaslo). Financial circumstances of the
candidates will be considered.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.)
Ben Wosk, CM. Scholarship - A $1,000 scholarship is endowed by Wosk's Ltd.
to commemorate the 50th anniversary of its incorporation in British Columbia
and to honour Ben Wosk, CM. It is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration to a student entering second
year of the B.Com. program. Financial circumstances of the candidate may be
considered.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.) 9804.
May 23, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Language Education
New ENED 3 43 (1.5) Teaching Folklore in the Elementary
Classroom
ENED 3 44 (1.5) Multicultural Children's Literature in
the Elementary Classroom
Change in subject field name from "Library Education (LIBE) to:
Teacher Librarianship (LIBE)
New LIBE  477  (1.5-3)d  Special  Topics  in  Teacher
Librarianship
Changes LIBE 381, 383, 384, 385, 387, 388 - change in title,
description
LIBE 382 - change in title, description, prerequisite
LIBE 386 - change in title, description, hours
Mathematics and Science Education
New program specialization
VI. THE DIPLOMA IN EDUCATION
The Faculty of Education offers ...
... towards the requirements of a Diploma in Education.
D. Fields of Specialization
+Adult Education
• • *
Guidance Studies
Home Economics Education
Industrial Education
New HMED 414 (1.5) Curriculum and Instruction in Home
Economics
HMED 465 (1.5-3)d Special Topics in Home Economics
Education
Change teaching subject requirements
Calendar entry
(7) Mathematics Concentration and Major
Concentration:
6-9 units of junior mathematics and 9 units of senior mathematics. The
program must include courses in 3 of the following 6 areas, including at
least one of the first 3: algebra, geometry, number theory, probability
and statistics, applied mathematics, and computer science.
Major
An additional 6 units of senior mathematics. 9805.
May 23, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals (continued)
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Clinical Enqineering
Change in Program
Delete       HCEP 45 4, 500
New Calendar Entry
PATH 375
APSC 550
Plus 6.5 units of approved graduate level courses in Engineering,
Physics, Computer Science, Physiology, Health Sciences and Management,
of which at least 5 units must be courses in Engineering.
An additional 1.5 units of approved 300, 400 or 500 level courses are
required in Computer Systems, Data Management, Operations Research, or
Systems Analysis.
Community and Regional Planning
Change   PLAN 525 - change in title, description, units to: (.5-1.5)d
Electrical Enqineerinq
New      ELEC 563 (1.5) Wireless Communication Systems
ELEC 582 (1)  Optical Fibers and Devices
Changes  ELEC 560 - change in title, description, units to (1.5)
ELEC 562, 592 - change in title, description
Enqlish Education
Change   ENED 500 - change in units to (1.5/3)c
Germanic Studies
New      GERM 505 (1.5)  The Acquisition of German as a Foreiqn Language
M.Sc. and Ph.D. Programs in Health Care and Epidemiology
New  HCEP 503 (1.5) Analysis of Health Care Organizations
HCEP 506 (1.5) The Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials
HCEP 522 (1.5) Measurement of Health Care
HCEP 529 (1.5) Clinical Decision Analysis
HCEP 5 47 (1.5) Research Seminar
HCEP 6 49 Ph.D. Thesis 9806.
May 23, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
M.Sc. and Ph.D. Proqrams in Health Care and Epidemiology (continued)
Calendar Statement
Ph.D. and M.Sc. Degrees. The Department offers research-oriented
graduate programs leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees, both with
thesis. These may be focussed around any of the areas of strength of
the faculty, with particular examples being clinical epidemiology,
community health, health services management and planning, health care
policy, occupational and environmental health, and preventive medicine
and health promotion. Individuals with a basic degree in the health or
related sciences will be considered eligible to apply for admission, but
the number of positions is limited to the supervision available. The
Department's graduate advisor should be contacted for further
information.
History
Change HIST 5 48 - change in units to (3)
Home Economics Education
New  HMED 514 (1.5) Curriculum and Instruction in Home Economics
HMED 5 45 (1.5) Foundations of Home Economics Education
Mathematics Education
Change
Medicine
MAED 5 47, 5 48, 5 49 - change in prerequisite
MEDI 520 (3.) Health Sciences for Biomedical Engineers
New
Nursinq
Revisions to the Master of Science in Nursinq Proqram
Revised Calendar Statement
"MASTER'S PROGRAM  (p. 210, 1989/90 Calendar)
Goals of the Master's Program
8. Demonstrate the ability to articulate ideas clearly and logically,
verbally and in writing. 9807.
May 23, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Nursing
Revisions to the Master of Science in Nursing Program (continued)
Admission Requirements
Applicants are required to meet the admission requirements of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies (see Graduate Studies section). Applicants
are required to have achieved first class standing in at least six units
of course work in nursing and a 72% average for course work taken at the
third and fourth year level.
Applicants are normally required to be graduates of a baccalaureate
program in nursing which included instruction and clinical experience in
community health nursing and psychiatric nursing. Applicants are
required to have taken a prerequisite undergraduate level statistics
course or a "refresher" course not more than three years prior to
admission to the MSN program. Registered nurses holding a baccalaureate
degree in a field other than nursing may be admitted to the Master's
program at the discretion of the School. Such applicants may be
required to complete up to fifteen units of course work to qualify for
admission.
Applicants should be aware that all students must have current
practicing registration or be eligible to do register.
The last day for submission of applications for admission to the program
for the Winter session beginning the following September is April 30,
with necessary documents and official transcripts to be in the
Registrar's office by May 31.
Applicants seeking information about the Master's program in Nursing or
application forms should write to:
The Graduate Adviser
The University of British Columbia
School of Nursing
T206-2211 Wesbrook Mall
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 2B5."
THE PROGRAM
The MSN degree requires the successful completion of a two-year program
of study. The candidate may elect to complete:
17 units of course work and a thesis for 3 units, OR
20 units of course work, at least one major essay, and a comprehensive
examination.
New  NURS 5 43 (1.5) Applying Theory to Practice 9808.
May 23, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Nursing
Revisions to the Master of Science in Nursing Program (continued)
Changes      NURS 510 - change in title, description
NURS 522 - change in prerequisite
NURS 542 - change in title, description, units, hours to:
(1.5)
NURS  5 46  - change  in  description,  units,  hours  to
(1.5/2.5)c
NURS  5 48  -  change  in  description,  units,  hours,
prerequisites to: (1.5/3)c
NURS 5 74 - change in prerequisite
NURS 588 - change in units, hours, prerequisite to: (4.5)
Deletion     NURS 59 7
Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Change in Calendar Statement
Under Master's Degrees
C. Program Options
1. Pull-time Study
delete: "Pharmacology"
Under 2. Part-time Study
insert "Pharmacology"
Physics
Change      PHYS 500 - change in title, description units to 1.5/3)c
Delete       PHYS 501
Science Education
New  SCED 506 (1.5) Research in School Health Education
SCED 507 (1.5) Seminar in School Health Education
SCED 517 (1.5) Critical Analysis of Goals in School Sciences
SCED 518 (1.5) Theory and Research in the Social Context of
School Science
SCED 520 (1.5) Science Learning in Informal Environments
SCED 544 (1.5) Issues in the Teaching and Learning of the
School Sciences
SCED 5 45 (1.5) Research in the Teaching and Learning of the
School Sciences
SCED 581 (1.5) Theory and Research in Environmental Education
Delete       SCED 511, 561
Statistics
New  STAT 5 35 (1.5) Statistical Computing 9809.
May 23, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
New PHAR 40 4 (1.5) Drug Therapy for the Pediatric Patient
PHAR 458 (1.5) Marketing Applications in Pharmacy
New Block Timetabling for Implementation in September, 1990
The fourth year program is presently divided into two sections. Students
go to classes on Mondays, Wednesday, and Fridays, and spend Tuesdays and
Thursdays at either hospital or community pharmacies located off campus.
This occurs during both terms. The suggested block timetable proposal
will have the students attend classes from Monday to Friday in the first
term and the second term will be divided into five sections allowing
off-campus rotations to be done in two week blocks rather than the present
Tuesday and Thursday format. All fourth year pharmacy courses will retain
the same number of presently available lecture hours.

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