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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] May 19, 1982

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Array 7775.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
The Ninth regular meeting of the Senate of The University of British Columbia for
the Session 1981-82 was held on Wednesday, May 19, 1982 at 8.00 p.m. in the Board and
Senate Room.
Present: President D. T. Kenny (Chairman), Chancellor J. V. Clyne, Dr. R. A.
Adams, Dean D. R. Birch, Mr. W. H. Birmingham, Mrs. M. F. Bishop, Dr. T. H. Brown,
Rev. P. C. Burns, Dr. K. O. L. Burridge, Dr. D. J. Campbell, Dr. J. J. R. Campbell,
Dr. J. Dahlie, Dr. J. D. Dennison, Dr. D. Donaldson, Dr. A. J. Elder, Mr. D. B. Fields,
Dean C. V. Finnegan, Mr. H. J. Franklin, Mr. K. D. Freeman, Mrs. E. D. Fulton,
Dean J. A. F. Gardner, Dr. R. F. Gray, Dr. A. M. Hickling, Dr. H. E. Hirsch, Miss S. J.
Holmes, Dr. W. M. Keenlyside, Dr. R. F. Kelly, Dean W. D. Kitts, Dr. A. Kozak, Mr. J.
Kulich, Dean P. A. Larkin, Dr. L. M. Lavkulich, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Dean K. M. Lysyk,
Mr. T. Mah, Dr. J. P. Martin, Ms. C. E. McAndrew, Dr. A. J. McClean, Ms. D. N.
McDonnell, Mr. D. Mclnnes, Mr. J. F. McWilliams, Mr. W. Milosevic, Dr. W. R. Morford,
Mr. T. K. P. Ngai, Dr. J. F. Richards, Dean B. E. Riedel, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. M.
Shaw, Dr. J. G. Silver, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Miss L. M. Stenger, Dr. R. Stewart, Dr. P.
Suedfeld, Dr. N. Sutherland, Dr. P. R. Tennant, Miss C. L. V. Warren, Dean W. A.
Webber, Dean L. M. Wedepohl, Mr. V. G. Wellburn, Dean R. M. Will, Dr. D. LL.
Williams, Dr. M. D.  Willman, Dr. J. L. Wisenthal.
Observer:  Mr. J. A. Banham
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from Dean G. S.
Beagrie, Dr. G. D. Bel I ward, Dr. D. J. Connor, Mr. B. J. Coulson, Mrs. S. Dodson,
Mr. C. P. Fulker, Mr. R. C. Gill, Dr. D. Lupini, Mr. M. A. McCann, Miss R. E. Robinson,
Dr. R. H. T. Smith, Dr. R. A. Spencer.
Minutes of the previous meeting
Dr. Kozak   ) That the minutes of the Eighth regular meeting of
Dean Kitts ) Senate   for   the   Session    1981-82,   having   been
circulated, be taken as read and adopted.
Carried 7776.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Business arising from the Minutes
Proposed new Policy on Branch Libraries and Reading Rooms (P.7770)
Mr. Mclnnes, acting Librarian, drew attention to the last paragraph on page 7770
of the minutes, in which it was agreed that students would discuss with the Librarian
a suggestion that reading room collections be fully represented in the Central Library
catalogue until April I, 1983 after which only those holdings affected by journal
cancellations or by closure of reading rooms would be recorded. Mr. Mclnnes
reported that some discussions had taken place and that he was hopeful that the
Library would be able to respond to the students' concern but it would largely depend
on the willingness of the departments to provide the Library with accurate
information about the cancellation or continuation of periodical subscriptions.
Prizes, Scholarships and Bursaries
Mr. McWilliams )      That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A') be
Dr. Silver )      accepted subject to the approval of the Board of
Governors and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried
Candidates for Degrees
Lists of candidates for degrees, as approved by the various Faculties and Schools,
were made available for inspection by Senate members prior to the meeting.
Mrs. Bishop ) That the candidates for degrees and diplomas, as
Dean Finnegan ) approved by the Faculties and Schools, be granted
the degree or diploma for which they were
recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chairman of
Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried
Scholarships and Awards
The Chairman reported that Bruce Arnold Lowden was to receive the
Governor-General's Gold Medal, and that Ian Ralph Weir would receive the University
Medal for Arts and Science. Congratuations were extended to the other winners of
medals, prizes and scholarships shown in the list circulated. 7777.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs
Dr. Runeckles presented the following report:
"The Committee's last report to Senate in May 1981 reaffirmed the need for those
projects which had been included in the University's Capital Plan and for which
construction had not yet commenced at that time, viz. Psychology,
Chemistry/Physics, Agricultural Sciences/Forestry, and the Clinical Departments
(Medicine). In addition it recommended six new projects: Dentistry, Chemical
Engineering, Biochemistry, Physiology, Geophysics/Astronomy, and a Studio
Resources Building.
Two further recommendations were that consideration be given to the
construction of flexible, university resource space for short-term occupancy, and
that the university take steps to update and reclassify its space inventory. These
latter recommendations were based upon recognition of the need to develop
methods whereby the University could update its priorities in terms of the
Universities' Council of British Columbia (UCBC) and respond to changing needs
more rapidly than had been possible in the past.
The present report deals with the events of the past year as they relate to these
recommendations.  Three items in particular are drawn to Senate's attention.
1. Universities Council 5-Year Capital Plan
The UCBC Capital Planning and Development Committee's recommendations to
UCBC for the B.C. University System's capital needs for 1982-1987 included all of
the building needs approved by Senate in 1981 with the exception of the Studio
Resources Building (Faculty of Arts), together with the inclusion in 1983, 1984 and
1985 of engineering expansion proposals.
However, these recommendations included several changes from those
recommended by Senate. First the proposal for Agricultural Sciences/Forestry
was reduced in scale and referred to as Phase I. Second, the adoption of three
levels of priority (l=critical; 2-necessary but not critical; 3-necessary but
postponable) resulted in the Dentistry proposal for 1982 being given a priority "3"
rating, and part of the engineering expansion in 1984 being given priority "2". All
other projects received priority "I".
In addition, appreciable funds for public works and renovations were included in
each year, for upgrading and renovations to buildings, and for the upgrading of
electrical and other campus services.
2. Space Inventory
With the election of a new Senate in 1981, a new SABN Committee was appointed.
Only three members of the present Committee continued from the previous one.
The new committee was first convened in October 1981. At that time, the prime
concern was to urge that work on the university's space inventory be undertaken
as soon as possible. As a consequence of budget retrenchment activities, it has
only recently been possible to assign responsibility for the space inventory to the
Office of Institutional Analysis and Planning, and to provide the necessary
personnel to undertake the work entailed. 7778.
Wednesday,  May 29,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs  (continued)
"3.     New Projects
No new projects have formally been addressed to the SABN Committee during the
past year. However, as a result of liaison with the Director of Facilities Planning,
the committee has been made aware of the following:
a. A proposal to house and maintain a Pulp and Paper Centre on campus.
The Centre would be operated using funds provided by the Pulp and Paper
Research Institute of Canada (PAPRICAN). This development would
expand upon the current association between PAPRICAN and the
University which is currently limited by the serious shortage of space in
Chemical Engineering.
b. A proposal to construct an Imaging Research Centre, in association with
the Health Sciences Complex, in order to allow clinical access to
Positron Emission Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
techniques, leading to the availability of new medical diagnostic
procedures.
c A proposal for a Molecular Genetics Centre, for research and teaching,
with anticipated operating and equipment funds to come largely from
federal and provincial granting agencies.
d. The Facility Development Plan for Engineering. The plan reviews
projected enrolment figures, additional space requirement, the
relationships of proposed new buildings to existing space, and the phasing
of the developments. This plan incorporates space for Chemical
Engineering (identified by SABN Committee in 1981 as a high priority)
and for the Pulp and Paper Centre (item b, above).
The Engineering Development plan, and the Pulp and Paper Centre proposal
include space entitlement calculations based upon the UCBC approach. However,
since the SABN Committee has not been able to complete its evaluation of the
procedures whereby the UCBC formula can be meaningfully applied to individual
space requests, it has not yet reviewed these proposals in detail.
Recommendations
In the light of the foregoing, the Senate Academic Building Needs Committee
makes the following recommendations.
1. THAT THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF SPACE PRIORITIES MADE IN MAY
1981 BE REAFFIRMED.
The Committee, through lack of resources, has not been able to refine
the procedures for estimating space entitlements by the application of
the UCBC approach. Accordingly, it has no reason to believe that the
1981 priorities need to be changed.
2. THAT SENATE SPECIFICALLY REAFFIRM THE HIGH PRIORITY GIVEN IN
1981 TO THE FACULTY OF DENTISTRY, IN ORDER TO DEVELOP SPACE
FOR RESEARCH.
The Committee is concerned that by being rated in 1982 as "necessary
but postponable" by UCBC, the proposal will founder. 7779.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs
Recommendations (continued)
"3. THAT SENATE REAFFIRM THAT THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY EXPANSION
PROPOSAL BE REGARDED AS BEING OF THE GREATEST URGENCY FOR
FORWARD PLANNING AS A SPECIAL PROJECT.
In December 1980, Senate adopted the SABN Committee's
recommendation that expansion of the University Library was essential
and that a proposal be submitted to UCBC as a special project,
independent of the then 5-year capital plan. The Committee is
concerned that, a year later, the project has yet to be recognized by
UCBC and included in its capital planning.
Future Activities
The SABN Committee anticipates that work will shortly recommence on the
refinement of the UCBC formula for the assessment of space entitlements.
Coupled with the revisions to the University's space inventory, the Committee
expects to be able to conduct a campus-wide survey of space needs during the
coming year.
In addition, the Committee will address the thorny issue of quality of space, as to
its implications with regard both to specific academic space entitlements and
shortages, and to university (especially teaching) space. In this context, the
Committee will attempt to develop recommendations which will influence the
utilization of and the requests for Public Works and Renovations funds.
Finally, the Committee will review and make recommendations to Senate on the
new space requests listed above, in due course."
Dr. Burridge ) That     the    recommendations    of    the    Senate
Dr. Morford ) Academic Building Needs Committee be approved.
Dean Will pointed out that the Studio Resources Building had not been
recommended by UCBC for funding and that this was a continuation of the situation
in the past where such performing arts buildings as the Faculty of Arts did have had
been funded from Federal sources and not from Provincial sources.
The motion was put and carried.
Appeals on Academic Standing
Dr. McClean presented the following report, for information:
"Under its terms of reference the committee is required to make an annual report
to Senate. Clause 2.07 of the terms of reference states: "The report shall state
the number of appeals heard, their disposition, and the general nature of the
appeals, and shall draw the Senate's attention to any other matters of general
significance in the university which have arisen out of the committee's work." 7780.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Appeals on Academic Standing (continued)
"This report covers the period April I, 1981 to March 31, 1982. During that period
the committee heard five appeals. Four were dismissed and one was allowed. In
two of the appeals that were dismissed the student was granted permission to
write a supplemental examination, on one occasion this being done on the
initiative of the committee and in the other on the initiative of the Faculty.
The committee has no jurisdiction to deal with an appeal where the question
involved is the exercise of academic judgment. One appeal turned solely on a
decision that a student had made such poor progress in graduate studies that he
ought to be required to withdraw, a second, in part, on the exercise of judgment in
the marking of an examination paper, and a third, in part, on a faculty regulation
on the comparative weight to be accorded to work done during the term and final
examinations. In the opinion of the committee these were issues of academic
judgment, and to the extent that the appeals turned on them the appeals were
dismissed.
The committee has jurisdiction to allow an appeal where a decision has been
arrived at through improper or unfair procedures, and, as a result, a wrong
decision on the merits has or may have been arrived at. Four of the appeals raised
in whole or in part procedural issues.
In one case it was alleged that the required course of study was not made clear
and that examination questions were misleadingly phrased; in another that the
faculty's regulations on deferred examinations had not been sufficiently well
publicized; and in a third that the requirements for completing the course were
not made clear sufficiently early in the academic year. The committee found that
these allegations were nof subsfantiated on the evidence presented to it, and the
appeals therefore failed. In one of these appeals it was also alleged that after the
examination results had been announced a student was not given the opportunity
of seeing her examination paper in accordance with University regulations, and
that in considering her appeal within the Faculty the Faculty had not followed its
own appeal procedures. The committee found these allegations to be well
founded. However, coming as they did after the examination, these irregularities
had not had an affect on the decision that the student stand failed, and so did not
affect the outcome of the appeal. This case was one in which a supplemental was
granted. Nonetheless it is obvious that University regulations and a Faculty's own
procedures ought to be adhered to. This is desirable not only as a matter of
principle, but also because it generally leads to disputes being settled within a
Faculty without the need for any appeal.
In the appeal that was allowed a student had been permitted to enrol in one of two
courses needed to complete her degree after the normal time for the completion
of the degree expired. She completed that course, but was then told that she
could not enrol in the final course needed to complete her program. The student
conceded the decision of the Faculty may well have been based on incomplete
information, and that she may have failed to ensure that the Faculty was put in
possession of all the facts. The committee decided that it was unfair to the
student not to permit the final course to be taken in order to give her the
opportunity of completing her degree, and her appeal asking for permission to take
that course was allowed. 7781.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Appeals on Academic Standing (continued)
"By its terms of reference the committee is also required to draw to the attention
of Senate any issues arising from appeals which might be regarded as being of
general significance to the University. Two points may be noted with respect to
this year's appeals. First, five appeals were heard during the year. That compares
with twelve in academic year 1980-1981. Second, most of the appeals related to
matters of procedure. We therefore repeat what we said in last year's report: "It
is clear that it is for the benefit of both faculty and students that there be well
established rules relating to such questions as evaluation techniques, deadlines,
and examination procedures, and that these rules be carefully adhered to."
Curriculum Committee  (See Appendix 'B')
Faculties  of  Agricultural   Sciences,  Applied  Science,   Commerce and  Business
Administration, and Education
Dr. Richards presented the report. The committee recommended approval of
new courses, course and program changes submitted by the Faculties of
Agricultural Sciences and Applied Science, new courses and course changes
submitted by the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration and course
changes and changes in concentration and program requirements submitted by the
Faculty of Education.
Dr. Richards ) That the proposals of the Faculties of Agricultural
Dr. Kelly       ) Sciences,     Applied    Science,     Commerce     and
Business    Administration,    and    Education,    be
approved.
Carried
Faculty of Forestry - proposed Four-Year Curriculum
Dr. Richards drew attention to the various amendments to the Forestry
proposal which had been circulated with the report. He stated that the proposal
represented a reduction from the five-year program to a four-year program which
would permit admission directly from Grade 12. The total number of in—session
units had been reduced from 75 in the current program to a variable unitage of
62fe to 69 depending on which major field the student chose to follow. There
would be no substantial change in the fields of specialization, which are Forest
Research Management, Forest Harvesting, Wood Science and Industry, and Forest
Science which has been operating under Forest Biology. Two degrees were being
proposed, the B.S.F. degree for students majoring in Forest Resource Management
and Forest Harvesting, and B.Sc. (Forestry) for those in Wood Science and Industry
and Forest Science. 7782.
Wednesday, May  19,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee
Faculty of Forestry - proposed Four-Year Curriculum (continued)
The new program did not include as extensive a preparation in the first year
basic sciences as did the five-year program. The committee was aware that this
would have implications with regard to the extent and depth of science content of
subsequent courses as well as the flexibility of courses for students transferring
from a typical First-Year Science program at U.B.C. or elsewhere. The
committee noted that the Faculty had indicated that they would be incorporating
as many of the basic science concepts as necessary into forestry courses and that
had reduced the committee's concerns in this regard.
It was noted that the Senate Admissions Committee had considered the
proposed admission requirments and recommended approval subject to the
inclusion of two Grade 11 courses to be chosen from Biology 11, Chemistry 11 and
Physics 11, all three being strongly recommended.
Some members of the committee, during its deliberations, had expressed
concern with regard to the breadth of the program. It was decided that it did not
differ much from the five-year program and that it was not significantly different
from many other programs in other Faculties or Schools. A careful analysis of
other Forestry programs had been done and the proposed program was found to be
similar. It was felt that the nature of the Forestry program was quite broad and
was based on the applications of natural, physical, mathematical, social and
managerial sciences. After taking these features into account the committee
agreed to recommend approval.
Dr. Richards    )        That the proposal of the Faculty of Forestry to
Dean Gardner )        offer a new four-year curriculum be approved,
with amendments.
In reply to a query it was stated that the program would go into effect in
September 1983.
Dr. Suedfeld referred to the notice of motion submitted for discussion at the
September meeting of Senate in which it is suggested that recommendations be
drawn up as to the minimum breadth requirements for the pre-baccalaureate
programs of the University. He stated that Senate's role was to set guidelines and
that one of the areas that should receive attention was the area of breadth.
Under the circumstances he felt that the proposal of the Faculty of Forestry
should be tabled until the notice of motion had been disposed of. 7783.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee
Faculty of Forestry - proposed Four-Year Curriculum (continued)
Dr. Suedfeld      )       That the proposal of the Faculty of Forestry be
Dr. Sutherland )       tabled.
Lost
In the discussion that followed Dr. Haley, Chairman of the Faculty of
Forestry Curriculum Committee, responded to queries raised concerning the
number of electives contained in the program and also commented on the breadth
of the program.
The motion was then put and carried.
Faculties of Graduate Studies and Medicine
The committee recommended approval of a proposal by the Faculty of
Graduate Studies that the restriction of the Ph.D. in Computer Science to the
fields of Programming Languages and Artificial Intelligence be removed and that
the Department be authorized to offer the Ph.D. in a full range of fields of
computer science. The committee also recommended approval of two new
courses, Family Practice 480 and 481, proposed by the Faculty of Medicine.
Dr. Richards   ) That the proposals of the Faculties of Graduate
Dean Webber ) Studies and Medicine be approved.
Carried
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the School of Physical Education and
Recreation
The committee recommended approval of new courses and course changes
recommended by the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, with the exception of
Pharmacy 407 which was withdrawn by the Faculty. The committee also
recommended approval of Physical Education 383 which had been withheld at the
January 20, 1982 Senate meeting pending further consultation.
Dr. Richards) That     the     proposals     of     the     Faculty     of
Dr. Morford  ) Pharmaceutical    Sciences    and    the    School    of
Physical Education and Recreation be approved.
Carried 7784.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
Faculty of Science
The committee recommended approval of new courses, course, curriculum
and program changes proposed by the Faculty of Science. Dr. Richards drew
attention to a proposed change in policy that students may be required to obtain
at least 60% in a specific first-year course basic to the field of the major as a
prerequisite for entering a program. Attention was also drawn to a statement
that it may be necessary to limit enrolment in certain courses.
It was also noted that the proposed change in prerequisites for Computer
Science 414 also applies to Electrical Engineering 478 since these two courses are
cross-listed. Approval of the proposed change from Electrical Engineering was
withheld at the January 20, 1982 Senate meeting pending submission of the
proposal from Computer Science.
Dr. Richards      )
Dean Finnegan  )
Nominating Committee
That the proposals of the Faculty of Science be
approved.
Carried
Dr. Richards presented the following report concerning student representation on
Senate Committees:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. M. S. Dedels
Mr. A. Varma
Admissions
Mr. C. P. Fulker
Mr. S. T. Henderson
Agenda
Mr. M. A. McCann
Mr. R. J. Summerbell
Appeals on Academic Standing
Mr. B. J. Coulson
Mr. R. C. Gill
Mr. M. A. McCann
Budget
Mr. B. J. Coulson
Ms. D. N. McDonnell
Continuing Education
Mr. T. Mah
replacing Ms. D. N. McDonnell
replacing Mr. R. L. Mullen
replacing Mr. R. L. Mullen
replacing Mr. R. Gyurkovits
additional member
replacing Mr. I. C. Miller 7785.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee  (continued)
Curriculum
Mr. I.C Miller
Mr. W. Milosevic
Mr. T. K. P. Ngai
Extracurricular Activities
Ms. S. M. Provost
Mr. A. Varma
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Mr. R. J. Summerbell
Nominating
Mr. S. T. Henderson
Mr. M. A. McCann
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
Mr. R. C. Gill
Mr. W. Milosevic
Mr. G. M. Shepard
Student Awards
Mr. M. S. Dedels
Mr. I.C.Miller
Tributes
Ms. S. M. Provost
University Library
Mr. K. D. Freeman
Mr. C. P. Fulker
Mr. G. M. Shepard
Standards in English
Mr. T. Mah
Ms. L. M. Stenger
Elections
replacing Mr. S. T. Henderson
replacing Ms. D. N. McDonnell
- replacing Mr. R. G. Bryan
- replacing Mr. G. A. Smith
replacing Mr. D. Kirshner
- replacing Mr. R. Tan
- replacing Ms. D. Wong
replacing Mr. R. G. Bryan
replacing Mr. D. Kirshner
replacing Mr. S. T. Henderson
replacing Mrs. E. M. Thomson
replacing Mr. R. Tan
Ms. L. M. Stenger
Dr. Richards also reminded Senate that at the March 17, 1982 meeting it was
agreed that a Convocation or Lt. Governor appointee be added to the membership of
the Senate Budget Committee. The committee recommended that Dr. D. J. Connor,
a Lt. Governor appointee, be added to the membership of the Senate Budget
Committee.
Dr. Richards )
Miss Warren  )
That   the   recommendations   of   the   Nominating
Committee be approved.
Carried 7786.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Faculty of Arts
School of Home Economics - requirement that the English Composition Test be taken
prior to admission to the Third Year of the B.H.E. program
It was stated in the material circulated that the faculty in the School of Home
Economics had become increasingly concerned at the number of students in the
program who reach the third and even the fourth years of their program without
having met the English Composition requirement. It is the School's position that the
requirement represents a prerequisite to and is an essential foundation for other
courses taken by a student in the University and in the Home Economics program in
particular. Students should not be allowed to proceed beyond the second year of the
program unless they have completed the requirement. It is the School's view that one
additional year, beyond the first year, is the maximum "grace" period that should be
allowed those who fail in the first year.
Dean Will )        That the proposal of the Faculty of Arts that the
Dean Gardner  ) English    Composition   Test   be    taken    prior    to
admission   to   the   Third   Year   of   the   B.H.E.
program be approved.
Carried
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Modification of Residency Requirements in Doctoral Programs
It was stated in the material circulated that an ad hoc committee of the Faculty
of Graduate Studies had surveyed all Departments and Faculties to solicit views
regarding doctoral residency requirements.   The existing requirements are as follows:
Program of Study
Students will normally be required to spend a minimum of three winter sessions in
full-time status at the University (see "Graduate Student Status" in this section).
This period may be reduced for those possessing a Master's degree or equivalent.
Graduate Student Status
A full-time graduate student is one in pursuit of a graduate degree devoting full
time to his or her academic program. This means that the student may not
commit more than 12 hours a week of working time, including teaching assistant
or research assistant duties, to matters other than the degree program.
The full-time graduate student will be geographically available to the campus,
visit it regularly, and make regular use of the University's resources.
Under special circumstances a full-time student may be required to conduct
research at some location away from this campus. With the permission of the
Dean of Graduate Studies, up to a year of this research time may be counted as
residence. 7787.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Modification of Residency Requirements in Doctoral Programs  (continued)
More than 80% of respondents indicated that these requirements were
satisfactory. Some felt that a shorter residency requirement would be appropriate
for some candidates; some Departments in the Faculties of Applied Science and
Education proposed "modified" two year residence requirements for mature, early or
mid-career professionals.
A modified doctoral residency requirement would comprise:
1. A minimum of 12 months residence as a full-time student on campus.
2. A second year at an off campus site during which the student could be
employed while completing data collection and dissertation preparation (not
applicable to U.B.C. Faculty members, who may be admitted in exceptional
circumstances and for whom normal residence requirements apply).
For such programs it would be required that:
(a) Approval must be given by the Department, and the Executive of the Faculty
of Graduate Studies.
(b) The first year must be a minimum of 12 consecutive months of on campus
full-time graduate study.
(c) As a prerequisite, a candidate would have a Master's degree with thesis, or a
Master's degree without thesis and published work equivalent to a thesis.
(d) The comprehensive examination would be completed during the first year.
(e) The candidate would meet at least once every four months with the
supervisory committee and a report of the meeting would be filed with the
Faculty of Graduate Studies.
(f) The thesis proposal would be completed within 30 months of initial
registration and acceptance of the proposal would complete residency
requirements.
The Faculty therefore recommended that the Residency Requirements in Doctoral
Programs be modified as follows:
Program of Study
Students will normally be required to spend a minimum of three winter sessions in
full-time status at the University (see "Graduate Student Status" in this section).
This  period may be reduced for those possessing a Master's degree or equivalent.
For students with Master's degrees and relevant professional experience the residence requirement may be reduced to twelve consecutive months on campus.
(Candidates must meet special requirements, details of which can be obtained from
the Dean of Graduate Studies.
Graduate Student Status
A full-time graduate student is one in pursuit of a graduate degree devoting full
time to his or her academic program. This means that the student may not
commit more than 12 hours a week of working time, including teaching assistant
or research assistant duties, to matters other than the degree program. 7788.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Modification of Residency Requirements in Doctoral Programs
Graduate Student Status (continued)
The full-time graduate student will be geographically available to the campus,
visit it regularly, and make regular use of the University's resources.
Under special circumstances a full-time student may be required to conduct
research at some location away from this campus. With the permission of the
Dean of Graduate Studies, up to a year of this research time may be counted as
residence.
A doctoral student whose residence requirement is twelve consecutive months on
campus (see Program of Study in this section) will be considered as being full-time
until the special requirements of the program are satisfied.
Dean Larkin       )      That the modification of Residency Requirements
Dean Wedepohl  )      in   Doctoral   Programs,   recommended    by    the
Faculty of Graduate Studies, be approved.
After considerable discussion the motion was put and carried.
Centre for Advanced Technology in Microelectronics
The following proposal for a Centre for Advanced Technology in Microelectronics
had been circulated:
Recent developments in the application of microelectronics are prompting the
demand for graduate student training and research in the field of microelectronic
technology.
It is proposed that the Microelectronics laboratory of the Department of
Electrical Engineering be expanded and named as the Centre for Advanced
Technology in Microelectronics, to enable a greater emphasis on graduate training
and research, and a widened collaboration with other institutions.
Administratively, the Centre is to be established in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. There will be a Board of Management, chaired by the Dean of Graduate
Studies, and including the Dean of Applied Science, the Dean of Science, and the
Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering.
A director will have responsibility for all activities of the Centre and will report
to the Board of Management. There will be a Technical Advisory Committee,
widely representative of various sectors of microelectronics technology in the
province.
The Centre facilities will be available to and operated in conjunction with Simon
Fraser University, the University of Victoria, and the British Columbia Institute of
Technology. Projects of these institutions will be supported by appropriate
provisions of funds to offset any costs to The University of British Columbia. 7789.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Centre for Advanced Technology in Microelectronics  (continued)
Space for the Centre is to be provided by the Faculty of Applied Science. Any
equipment provided to the Centre from external sources will be the property of
The University of British Columbia.
In association with the establishment of the Centre there will be set up an
incorporated company or society undertaking contracts with industry, and
operating on a non-profit basis, using a federal government contribution to
purchase equipment, to hire technical personnel, and to buy time of university
faculty and staff, until such time as the company becomes self—supporting.
Negotiations are currently underway with the Department of Industry Trade and
Commerce and will be completed in early 1982.
Dean Larkin ) That   the  proposal   of  the  Faculty  of  Graduate
Dr. Shaw       ) Studies   to   establish   a   Centre   for   Advanced
Technology in Microelectronics be approved.
Carried
Centre for Molecular Genetics
The following proposal for a Centre for Molecular Genetics had been circulated:
The recent development of molecular genetics provides a powerful technology
that has not only opened ways of asking fundamental biological questions which
could not be addressed previously, but also is expected to have significant
industrial applications and medical applications related to the diagnosis and
therapy of human disease.
It is hard to over-estimate the importance of this rapidly-advancing area in the
Life Science disciplines, and it is in recognition of this that the University wishes
to facilitate development of research and teaching in Molecular Genetics.
Accordingly, it is proposed that a Centre for Molecular Genetics be created to
serve as a focus for innovative interdisciplinary research in this subject. This
structure will permit faculty with different backgrounds and training to work
together in an area which is too complex and challenging to be met by any single
discipline.
The University of B.C. already has a foundation of expertise in the area and it is
envisaged that bringing together colleagues with diverse backgrounds, using
molecular genetic approaches to a variety of important biological problems, will
facilitate development. The close cooperation of clinical deparfments in the
Medical Faculty with basic science departments is seen as an extremely valuable
aspect which will allow clinical advantage to be taken of the opportunities opened
up by basic investigation. It is envisaged that this Centre will provide excellent
training for a wide range of students, and would allow development of an
interdepartmental course emphasising genetic engineering techniques. Such a
course is becoming essential as part of the training for a variety of disciplines
such as Microbiology, Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics.
In summary, the Centre will provide an arena for University wide participation in
research, teaching and discussion of molecular genetic approaches to biological
problems which is not available in the University at the present time. 7790.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Centre for Molecular Genetics  (continued)
Administrative Structure
It is proposed that there will be a Board of Management (Vice-President
(Research) or designate; Director of Centre; the Deans of Science, Medicine,
Dentistry and Graduate Studies; a representative from Industry) which meets
annually, an Executive Committee which meets monthly to oversee the ongoing
activities of the Centre, and a Director. It is also proposed that there be a
Scientific Advisory Board which meets annually and which could be consulted on
matters of scientific policy.
All faculty who are members of the Centre will have a primary appointment in a
University department and will also have a cross-appointment on the faculty of
the Centre.
It is envisaged that there will be undergraduate laboratory courses taught in the
Centre. These will be organized under the aegis of the Biology Program in the
Faculty of Science.
It is envisaged that initially graduate students will be in participating departments
in the Centre, e.g. Microbiology, Biochemistry or will be graduate students in the
Genetics Program in the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Initially, the Faculty of Medicine will be providing space for the Centre.
The administration of grants and contracts for the Centre will be handled through
the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Dean Larkin ) That   the  proposal   of  the  Faculty  of  Graduate
Dr. Shaw       ) Studies   to   establish   a   Centre   for   Molecular
Genetics be approved.
Carried
Faculty of Law
Proposal to establish the Walter S. Owen Chair of Law
lt was stated in the material circulated that The Honourable Walter S. Owen,
Q.C, LL.D., made an outstanding contribution to the public, charitable, legal and
commercial affairs of Canada. His family and friends wished to recognize that
contribution by establishing and endowing a visiting professorship in the Faculty of
Law, the professorship to be known as the Walter S. Owen Chair of Law.
Distinguished lawyers will be appointed as Owen professors for a period of up to three
years. They will work in selected areas, writing and teaching, both within and
without the Faculty. It was hoped that in this way the training of lawyers would be
enriched, legal writing in Canada developed, and the name of Walter Owen
appropriately and permanently remembered. 7791.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Faculty of Law
Proposal to establish the Walter S. Owen Chair of Law (continued)
Dean Lysyk    ) That Senate approved the establishment of the
Dr. McClean ) Walter S. Owen Chair of Law.
Carried
Report from the Vancouver School of Theology
The annual report of the Vancouver School of Theology was presented for
information.
It was noted in the report that renovations to the Library were being planned to
provide additional stack space and that the location of the periodical reading room was
being changed in order to allow better control and access to the library resources.
Library holdings are approximately 70,000 volumes. It was also noted that in May 1982
the following degrees were conferred:
Master of Theology I
Master of Divinity 14
Master of Theological Studies I
Bachelor of Theology I
Other business
Notice of motion
Dr.  Suedfeld  presented  the  following  notice  of  motion  for  discussion  at  the
September 15, 1982 meeting of Senate:
WHEREAS the University has an obligation to ensure that its alumni have the
fundamentals of a liberal education gained by exposure to a broad range of
discipline and academic subjects, and
WHEREAS there is at the present time no mechanism to ensure that majors and
honours programs require an adequate degree of such breadth, and
WHEREAS at the present time several Faculties are submitting major program
changes,
THEREFORE let it be resolved that:
I. The Policy Subcommittee of the Senate Curriculum Committee be requested
to enquire into and draw up recommendations as to minimum breadth
requirements in the pre-baccalaureate programs of the University, and to
report through the Curriculum Committee to Senate concerning these
recommendations; and 7792.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Other business
Notice of motion  (continued)
2. The Senate Curriculum Committee be asked to suspend approval of new
programs or major program changes pending the acceptance of
recommendations as to minimal breadth requirements by Senate.
The meeting adjourned at 10.20 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September 15, 1982.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 7793.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX 'A'
New Awards recommended to Senate
Asian Centre Scholarship - Supported initially by the donations made through the
Asian Studies Open House Committee of 1982 and later mainly by the
contributions of faculty members in the Department of Asian Studies, this
scholarship will be awarded, on the recommendation of the Head of the
Department of Asian Studies, to a student whose academic record and
achievement show promise of a successful career in the Asian Studies field. (This
award will not be offered prior to the 1983/84 Winter Session.)
Biely Memorial Scholarship - In recognition of his contributions to the academic
and scientific communities, the family and friends of Dr. Jacob Biely have
established a scholarship in the amount of $150 to be awarded annually to a
student in Poultry Science at The University of British Columbia. The award will
be made on the recommendation of the Department of Poultry Science. (This
award will be made available in the 1983/84 Winter Session).
British Columbia Society of Periodontists Prize - An annual prize will be offered
to an outstanding dental student in third year periodontics. The prize consists of a
one year subscription to the Journal of Clinical Periodontology plus a student
award certificate. The award will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty
of Dentistry.   (This award will be made available in the 1981/82 Winter Session.)
Chemical Engineering Bursary - This fund, established by graduates, students and
friends of the Department of Chemical Engineering, provides aid to needy
undergraduates enrolled in the department. (This award will be made available in
the 1983/84 Winter Session.)
Eikos Group Prize - This prize of $250, made available by the landscape
architecture planning firm of Eikos Group Inc., is awarded to the third or fourth
year Landscape Architecture student demonstrating excellence in urban design.
(This award will be made available in the 1981/82 Winter Session.)
Colin C. Gourlay Scholarship - This annual scholarship in the amount of $250 is
made possible by gifts from friends and alumni in recognition of Professor
Gourlay's 34 years of dedication to students in the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration. The scholarship will be awarded on the recommendation
of the Faculty to the student with the highest standing in third year Commerce
who is proceeding to fourth year Commerce. (This award will be made available
in the 1982/83 Winter Session.)
Health Administrators' Association of B.C. Prize - A prize in the amount of $ 100
has been made available by the Health Administrators' Association of B.C. The
award will be made to a graduating student in the program in Health Services
Planning, who, in the opinion of the Faculty, has demonstrated scholarship and
leadership while completing the requirements of the course. (This award will be
made available in the 1981/82 Winter Session.)
Clive Justice Book Prize - A $50 book prize, made available by Mr. Clive Justice
of the firm Justice, Webb and Vincent, will be awarded annually to the Landscape
Architecture student demonstrating excellence in the written communication of
Landscape Architecture and the profession. (This award will be made available in
the 1981/82 Winter Session.) 7794.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX 'A'
New Awards recommended to Senate  (continued)
Lombard North Group Scholarship - A scholarship of $500 per year is presented to
the second year Landscape Architecture student who, in fhe opinion of the
Faculty, best applies the skills of landscape architecture to regional resource
planning endeavours. The award is made available by the Lombard North Group, a
western Canada resource planning and landscape architecture firm. (This award
will be made available in the 1982/83 Winter Session.)
Susan Matties Nadel Memorial Prize - A prize in the amount of $75 will be
awarded annually to the graduating medical student who has shown the greatest
interest and excellence in hematological neoplasia. The award will be made on
the recommendation of the Faculty. (This award will be made available in the
1981/82 Winter Session.)
Professor of Pathology - Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science Prize - A prize
in the amount of $250 will be awarded to the student in the graduating class of the
Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science Degree showing greatest overall
academic excellence. The award will be made on the recommendation of the
Faculty.  (This award will be made available in the 1981/82 Winter Session.) 7795.
Wednesday,   May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX t3'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Plant Science - Landscape Architecture
New courses LARC 199      (I)        Introductory Workshop
499      (I fe/3) Directed Studies
Changes LARC 150      -    change in number (previously LARC 100)
100      -    change  in number (previously LARC   101) and
title
340      -    change in number (previously LARC 240) title,
description, hours and prerequisite
450      -    change    in    number    (previously   LARC   410)
description, units, hours and term
Program changes:
Landscape Architecture - First Year
Landscape Architecture 100
Ife
Landscape Architecture 150
3
Landscape Architecture 199
1
English 100
3
Forestry 292
Ife
Geography 101
3
Geography 200
Ife
Plant Science 110
Ife
Soil Science 300 (or 200)
Ife
I7fe
Landscape Architecture - Second Year
Landscape Architecture 200
4fe
Landscape Architecture 220
life
Economics 100
3
Forestry 203
Ife
Geography 350
Ife
Recommended electives
4fe
I6fe
Landscape Architecture - Third Year
Landscape Architecture 300
41fe
Landscape Architecture 340
Ife
Landscape Architecture 350
Ife
Architecture 306
Ife
Plant Science 316
Ife
Recommended electives
6
I6fe 7796.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Plant Science - Landscape Architecture
Program changes:     (continued)
Landscape Architecture - Fourth Year
Landscape Architecture 400
4fe
Landscape Architecture 401
3
Landscape Architecture 450
1
Plant Science 415
Ife
Recommended electives
4fe
Arts elective
3
I7fe
Plant Science - Second Year
Agricultural Sciences 213
Ife
Agricultural Core Requirements
4fe
Chemistry 230
3
Physics 110 (115 or 120)
3
Plant Science 258
Ife
Plant Science 259
Ife
Unrestricted elective
Ife
I6fe
Agricultural Sciences
Change     AGSC 213 - change in description, units and listing
Animal Science
Program change:
Second Year
Agricultural Sciences Elec
Animal Science 258
Agricultural Sciences 213
Chemistry 230
English 100
Electives
fives
3
Ife
Ife
3
3
4fe
I6fe
Poultry Science
Program change:
Second Year
Agricultural Sciences 213
Agricultural Sciences elec
Chemistry 230
English 100
Electives
fives
Ife
3
3
3
6
I6fe 7797.
Wednesday,  May  19,1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Chemical Engineering
Program change:
CHEM 260 (2) Organic Chemistry for Engineers replaces CHEM 256
in the Second Year program in Chemical Engineering
Changes CHML 476 and 475 - change in hours
Civil Engineering
New course    CIVL 485 (I) Traffic Engineering - Traffic Analysis
Deletion CIVL 585
Geological Engineering
Program changes:
CIVL 490 -    removed from core program and recommended as a
technical elective
GEOL 446 -   removed   from   core   program   and   students   will   be
allowed to choose either GEOL 445 or 447
Mechanical Engineering
Change MECH 365 -  change in description
Metallurgical Engineering
New courses  METL 262    (I)   Metallurgical Engineering Calculations I
264    (I)   Metallurgical Engineering Calculations II
494    (I)   Composite Materials I
Change METL 488 -   change in title and description
Deletion METL 250
Program change:
MMPE 371 to be replaced by MMPE 251 and 252
Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
Changes MMPE 250 -split into two courses, now:
MMPE 251 (I) Introduction to Mining
252 (I) Introduction to Mineral Processing 7798.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B' (continued)
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
New courses        COMM    457 (Ife)     Introduction to Financial Accounting
458 (I fe)     Introduction to Managerial Accounting
Deletion COMM    459
Changes COMM    337 -    change in description and units
Urban Land  Economics Option 9 - in Third Year of program
change '4fe units of electives' to '6 units of electives'.
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Social and Educational Studies
Change in requirements for teaching Major and Concentration in Social Studies
(emphasis on Geography):
First and Second Years:
(a) 6 units of Geography, including 3 units from Geography 103, 200, and
201, and 3 units from Geography 101, 212, and 213.
(b) 3 units of first or second year history.
(c) 3 units of first or second year anthropology, Asian area studies,
classical studies, economics, history, history of fine arts, history of
music, philosophy, political science, Slavonic area studies, sociology, or
urban studies.
Third and Fourth Years:
Concentration
9    units    of    third    and    fourth    year    geography    which    shall    include
Geography 320, 350, 366.
Major
15 units of third and fourth year geography as follows:
(a) Geography 320, 350, and 366;
(b) 3 units from the technique courses;
(c) 71fe units from one of the following streams: Cultural/Historical,
Economic, Environmental, and Urban.  At least 3 of these units must be
at the 400-level.
Notes:
(1) In the total program at least 3 units of geography must have an
emphasis on Canada.
(2) Students are advised to elect an additional 3 units of senior courses in
anthropology, Asian area studies, classical studies, economics, history,
history of fine arts, history of music, philosophy, political science,
Slavonic area studies, sociology, or urban studies. 7799.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Social and Educational Studies
Notes: (continued)
(3) Students are strongly urged to complete a program that will prepare
them for the wide range of geographical topics dealt with in secondary
schools.
(4) Students combining this concentration with another social studies
concentration should know that prerequisite courses may satisfy some
junior requirements in both concentrations.
Change in requirements for teaching Major and Concentration in Social Studies
(emphasis on History):
First and Second Years:
(a) 6 units of first or second year history or medieval studies.
(b) 3 units of first or second year geography.
(c) 3 units of first or second year anthropology, Asian area studies,
classical studies, economics, geography, history of fine arts, history of
music, philosophy, political science, Slavonic area studies, sociology, or
urban studies.
Third and Fourth Years:
Concentration
9 units of third and fourth year history, of which not more than six may be
in the same field or area.
Major
15 units of third and fourth year  history chosen  in consultation with a
departmental advisor.
Notes:
(1) In the total program at least 3 units of history must have an emphasis
on Canada.
(2) Students are advised to elect an additional 3 units senior anthropology,
Asian area studies, classical studies, economics, geography, history of
fine arts, history of music, philosophy, political science, Slavonic area
studies, sociology, or urban studies.
(3) Students are strongly urged to complete a program that will prepare
them for the wide range of historical topics dealt with in secondary
schools.
(4) Students combining this concentration with another social studies
concentration should know that prerequisite courses may satisfy some
junior requirements in both concentrations. 7800.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Social and Educational Studies (continued)
Change in requirements for teaching Concentration in Social Studies (emphasis on
Social Sciences):
It is recommended that students electing this concentration accompany it by
#5 - Canadian studies concentration or #23 — social studies concenfration
(emphasis on geography), or #24 - social studies concentration (emphasis on
history).
First or Second Years:
(a) 6 units of first or second year course work in the department of the
social science concentration (anthropology, Asian studies, economics,
sociology or political science).
(b) 3 units of first or second year history.
(c) 3 units of first or second year geography.
Third and Fourth Years:
9 units of third and fourth year course work in the department of the
concentration (anthropology, sociology, economics, political science, or
Asian area studies) appropriate to the secondary school social studies
program. This course work should be chosen in consultation with a
departmental advisor.
Notes:
(1) In the total program at least 3 units, from the department of the
concentration if possible, must have an emphasis on Canada.
(2) Students are advised to select an additional 3 units of senior course
work in history or geography.
(3) Students combining this concentration with another social studies
concentration should know that pre-requisite courses may satisfy some
junior requirements of both concentrations.
Change in several program requirements to include Education 407 (3) as an option
whenever "one of Education 400, 430, 470" is required or allowed.
Curriculum and Instructional Studies
Changes EDUC 410 and 411    -    change in description, units and hours 7801.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Admission Requirements:
Admission to Forestry will normally be directly from senior secondary school.
Apart from the general university entrance requirement (see General
Information section of this Calendar) students from Grade 12, British
Columbia, are required to have completed satisfactorily Algebra 12, two of
Biology I I, Chemistry I I, Physics I I, (all three are strongly recommended) and
two of Biology 12, Chemistry 12, Physics 12.
English Composition Requirement:
All students must satisfy the English Composition Requirement of the Faculty
of Forestry normally within two academic years of admission to the Faculty of
Forestry. To do this, students must obtain credit for English 100 and must pass
the English Composition Test administered by the Faculty of Arts.
Students (including transfer students) who have obtained credit for English 100
but have not passed the Composition Test will write it during registration
week. The test will also be given during the December and April examination
periods.
Students who anticipate difficulty passing the test are advised to enrol in a
remedial English course in the Centre for Continuing Education.
Examinations and Advancement:
The University regulations concerning examination and advancement as listed
under General Information in the Calendar, apply. In addition, the Faculty of
Forestry sets the following requirements.
(1) Standing and awards will be based on the average mark of all courses
attempted in any one year. Only those students who have completed at
least 15 units of insession course work during the winter session will be
considered for awards.
(2) Students who wish to drop courses may do so after consultation with the
instructor and the Associate Dean, provided it is done within two weeks
of the start of the course.
(3) Honours standing on graduation will be granted to those students who
have completed at least 15 units of course work during each of their
final three years without failures or supplementals, and who have
obtained First Class standing during their final year and at least 75 per
cent in each of the two preceding years.
(4) The passing mark in Forestry is 50 per cent. In subjects comprising both
lecture and laboratory or problem sessions, the candidate must pass
both. If a candidate fails to obtain 50 per cent the Faculty may, at its
discretion, award a pass in that subject on the basis of a good aggregate
standing. Such a pass will be entered on the record of the candidate as
an adjudicated pass. 7802.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Examinations and Advancement (continued)
(5) If a student's general standing in the final examinations of any year is
sufficiently high, the Faculty may recommend supplemental
examinations in the subject or subjects failed. Notice will be sent to all
students to whom such examinations have been granted.
(6) If a student fails a course and is required to take it again, exemption
from the laboratory or problem session portion of such a course may be
granted.
(7) Only those students with an average grade of 60 per cent or more in
15 units during their first year will be eligible for entry to Second Year
Forestry. Students who fail to achieve this standing will be required to
withdraw from the Faculty for at least one year.
In subsequent years, students who do not pass at least 60 per cent of the
course work undertaken or who do not achieve an overall average of 50
per cent, will be required to withdraw from the Faculty for at least one
year.
(8) A candidate who does not complete studies for graduation in May
following Fourth Year, will be required to register for all incompleted
subjects, including graduating thesis or essay, in a subsequent session,
summer or winter, and will be assessed the prescribed fees for these
subjects. Students who do not complete Forestry 499, B.S.F. Thesis;
Forestry 498 B.Sc. Thesis or Forestry 497 Graduating Essay in their
Fourth Year must complete these requirements in time for graduation
in the fall of the following year. Students who do not complete their
thesis or graduating essay within the specified period of time must
formally re-register in the B.S.F. or B.Sc program in a subsequent
session and must spend at least one term in residence in order to
complete this requirement.
Degree Requirements:
The undergraduate program in each of the four majors consists of a minimum
of four years of university study.
The Forest Resource Management, Forest Harvesting and Wood Science and
Industry majors have a common First Year. The decision on which of these
majors to pursue can, therefore, be postponed until the end of the Spring Term
of the First Year of study. The Forest Science major may require a different
First Year, as described below, and students are encouraged to indicate their
preference for this program of study upon entering the Faculty. 7803.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum (continued)
Forest Resource Management Major
The study program in Forest Resource Management is designed to prepare
students for admission to the profession of forestry. It is the most general of the
four majors and involves all aspects of forest resources biology and management.
The resources considered include timber, range, wildlife, recreation, fisheries, and
water. The program deals with the unique characteristics of each resource, their
interactions, and the manipulation of forests to yield a variety of desirable
products in the context of the social and economic environment of Canadian
society.
The program consists of a minimum of 67.5 units of insession and 7.0 units of
extrasessional course work. Most of the required course work must be taken in
the order indicated. However, I 1.0 units of required work are designated as
flexible core and may be taken in any sequence during Second to Fourth Year. 6.0
units to 8.0 units are designated as approved electives. Each student during the
second year will be assigned to a faculty advisor, according to his/her general area
of interest, who will provide guidance in choosing elective courses and will closely
supervise the student's academic program during the third and final years. It is
expected that the graduating essay or B.S.F. thesis will be written within the
student's chosen interest area. Areas of interest include:
Forest Ecology
Forest Economics and Business Management
Forest Genetics and Artificial Regeneration
Forest Pest Management
Forest Soils
International Forestry
Forest Range Management
Recreation Resources and Landscape Management
Remote Sensing and Land Classification
Silviculture
Timber Management
Watershed Management (including forestry/fisheries interactions)
Wildlife Ecology and Management
Quantitative Methods
Other area of student's choice (with special permission of the
Dean of Forestry) 7804.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Resource Management Major (continued)
COURSE REQUIREMENTS - B.S.F.
(Major in Forest Resource Managment)
First Year
Subject
Units
Hours
ENGL
100
MATH
100
MATH
101
BIOL   1
101 or
or
CHEM
103
or
PHYS
110
FRST
III
FRST
130
Literature and Composition
Calculus I
Calculus II
102 Principles of Biology
General Chemistry
Mechanics, Electricity, and
Atomic Structures
Dendrology
Biometrics and Data Processing
3.0
3-0; 3-0
1.5
3-1; 0-0
1.5
0-0; 3-1
3-3; 3-3
3.0*
3-3; 3-3
3-2-1; 3
3.0
3-2; 3-2
3.0
3-2; 3-2
-2-1
*One science course (3 units) not taken at Grade 12 level. Students should be aware of
the necessary prerequisites for courses in the Faculty of Science. Of particular
importance to students in Forest Resource Management is the fact that all courses in
Biology, Botany and Zoology (except Botany 310 and Zoology 400) have Biology 101 or
102 as a prerequisite.
Second Year
Subject
Units
Hours
ECON 100 Principles of Economics
ENGL 301 Practical Writing
SOIL 200 Introduction to the Study of Soils
GEOG 214 Forest and Agricultural Climatology
FRST 202 Forest Ecology
FRST 203 Silvics of Forest Trees of Western Canada
FRST 237 Introduction to Forest Mensuration and
Photogrammetry
FRST 238 Forest Mensuration
Flexible Core Courses
FRST    263      Basic Forest Surveying
3.0
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
4.5
(1.5)*
3-0; 3-0
0-0; 3-0
3-2 or 3-2
2-2; 0-0
3-2; 0-0
0-0; 3-2
3-2; 0-0
0-0; 3-2
*To   be   taken   during  a   10  working-day
examination period of the first year.
period   immediately   following  the  spring 7805.
Wednesday,   May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Resource Management Major (continued)
Third Year
Subject
Units
Hours
FRST    305
Silviculture 1
1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST    306
Silviculture II
1.5
0-0; 3-2
FRST    308
Forest Entomology
1.0
2-2; 0-0
FRST    309
Forest Pathology
1.0
0-0; 2-2
FRST    319
Principles of Forestry Economics
1.5
3-1; 0-0
FRST    325
Timber Management
1.5
0-0; 3-2
FRST    327
Forest Fire Control and Use
1.0
2-2; 0-0
FRST    364
Timber Harvesting Systems
1.5
0-0; 3-2
FRST    375
Wood Anatomy, Properties & Identification
1.0
2-2; 0-0
Flexible Core Courses and Approved Electives
6.5*
FRST    348
Forestry Technical Essay
(1.0)**
FRST    351
Interior Field Work
(l.5)f
*Electives must be approved by Faculty Advisor.
**To be submitted by students entering third year forestry no later than November I.
All students proceeding to third year will participate in 10 working days of field study
in the Interior of British Columbia for a period immediately following the spring
examination period of their second year.
Fourth Year
Subject
Units
Hours
FRST
415
Forest Policy
1.0
0-0; 2-1
FRST
421
Case Studies in Integrated
Resource Management
2.0
0-0; 2-4
FRST
432
Forest Resource Supply &
Allocation Models
1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST
445
Seminar
0.5
1-0; 1-0
FRST
462
Industrial & Government Forest
Management and Administration
1.0
2-2; 0-0
FRST
480
Forest Products Manufacturing
and Distribution
1.5
3-0; 0-0 APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Resource Management Major
7806.
Wednesday,   May   19,   1982.
Fourth Year (continued)
Subject
Units
Hours
FRST    497      Graduating Essay or Technical Report
or  FRST    499      B.S.F. Thesis
Flexible Core Courses and Approved Electives
FRST    451       Field Work in Harvesting, Silviculture
and Mensuration
1.0*
3.0*
6.0 to 8.0**
(3.0)7
*The Graduating essay or B.S.F. Thesis will normally be an integral part of the area of
interest.
**Number of units will be determined by whether FRST 497 or FRST 499 is selected.
Electives must be approved by Faculty Advisor.
All students proceeding to fourth year will participate in 21 working days of field
study at the University Research Forest during a period immediately following the
spring examination period of their third year.
FLEXIBLE CORE COURSES
The following required courses may be taken at any time during the second, third or
fourth years. In most cases, 4.5 units will be taken during the second year and the
remaining units during the third and fourth years.
Subject
Units
Hours
SOIL      302      Forest Soils and Photo Interpretation 1.5
FRST 328 Introduction to Range Management 1.5
FRST    385      Forest Hydrology and Watershed
Management 1.0
FRST 386 Forestry-Fishery Interaction 1.0
FRST    290      Principles of Forest & Wildland
Recreation 1.5
FRST    395      Forest Wildlife Ecology and Management     1.5
Electives in Arts and/or Commerce 3.0
0-0; 3-1
2-2; 0-0
2-2; 0-0
0-0; 2-2
3-2; 0-0
0-0; 3-2 7807.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum   (continued)
Forest Harvesting Major
The Forest Harvesting major is designed to prepare the graduate for professional
forestry responsibilities, with the emphasis on the planning, design, and
administration of: forest road development, including bridges and drainage
structures; planning, costing and supervision of logging operations, including site
protection and subsequent rehabilitation and preparation; and special projects such
as camp construction, log handling and transportation facilities. Graduates should
be eligible for registration in the Association of B.C. Professional Foresters.
The program consists of a minimum of 68.5 units of in-session and 6.5 units of
extra-sessional course work. There are 7.5 units of free electives through which
the student can specialize in chosen aspects of forest harvesting. Selection of
elective courses will be done in consultation with a faculty advisor. A graduating
project must be completed involving a topic within the student's concentration.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS - B.S.F.
(Major in Forest Harvesting)
First Year
Subject
Units
Hours
ENGL
100
Literature and Composition
3.0
3-0; 3-0
MATH
100
Calculus 1
1.5
3-1; 0-0
MATH
101
Calculus II
1.5
0-0; 3-1
BIOL
102
Principles of Biology
3-3; 3-3
or CHEM
103
General Chemistry
3.0*
3-3; 3-3
or PHYS
110
Mechanics,  Electricity,  and Atomic
Structures
3-2-1; 3-2-1
FRST
III
Dendrology
3.0
3-2; 3-2
FRST
130
Biometrics and Data Processing
3.0
3-2; 3-2
*One science course (3 units) not taken at Grade 12 level. 7808.
Wednesday, May 19, 1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Harvesting Major   (continued)
Students entering the second year of the Forest Harvesting program must have an
average grade for first year of at least 65% or the consent of the Divisional
advisor.
Second Year
Subject
Units
Hours
ECON
100
Principles of Economics
3.0
3-0; 3-0
SOIL
200
Introduction to the Study of Soils
1.5
3-2 or 3-2
FRST
202
Forest Ecology*
1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST
237
Introduction to Forest Mensuration and
Photogrammetry
1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST
238
Forest Mensuration
1.5
0-0; 3-2
FRST
375
Wood Anatomy,  Properties and
Identification
1.0
2-2; 0-0
FRST
262
Principles of Timber Harvesting Systems
,  1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST
362
Timber Harvesting
1.5
0-0; 3-2
MATH
200
Calculus III
1.5
0-0; 3-1
PHYS
155
Mechanics
3.0 +
(l.5)T
2-0-4; 2-0-2
FRST
263
Basic Forest Surveying
♦Special section for students in Forest Harvesting.
To   be   taken   during   a   10 working—day   period
examination period of the first year.
immediately   following   the   spring APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Harvesting Major  (continued)
7809.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Third Year
Subject
Units
Hours
FRST
303
Silviculture for Harvesters
1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST
308
Forest Pathology
1.0
0-0; 2-2
FRST
309
Forest Entomology
1.0
2-2; 0-0
FRST
359
Cable Mechanics
1.5
0-0; 3-2
FRST
360
Forest Engineering Economics
1.5
2-2; 0-0
FRST
363
Forest Route Surveying and Design
1.5
0-0; 2-2
FRST
372
Timber Structures and Design
1.5
0-0; 2-3
FRST
385
Forest Hydrology and Watershed
Management
1.0
2-2; 0-0
MATH
221
Matrix Algebra
1.5
3-0 or 3-0
APSC
270
Mechanics of Solids
Social Science or Humanities Elective
Technical Electives
2.0
1.5
3.0
2-1; 2-1
FRST
348
Forestry Technical Essay
(1.0)*
FRST
352
Harvesting Field Trip
(l.0)f
*A   technical   essay  on  a  forest  harvesting   topic  to  be  submitted  no   later  than
November I.
All students proceeding to third year will participate in a five-day field trip prior to
the start of the fall term. APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Harvesting Major  (continued)
Fourth Year
7810.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Subject
Units
Hours
FRST    327      Forest Fire Control and Use
FRST    325      Timber Management
FRST    331       Optimization Techniques in Forestry
FRST    442      Photo Interpretation of Forest Land
FRST    462      Industrial and Government Forest
Management and Administration
FRST    463      Forest Roads and Bridges
FRST    464      Forest Transportation
FRST    459     Analysis of Harvesting Operations
FRST    497      Graduating Essay or Technical Report
FRST     445      Seminar
Technical Electives
FRST     451       Field Work in Harvesting,  Silviculture
and Mensuration
1.0
2-2; 0-0
1.5
0-0; 3-2
3.0
2-2; 2-2
1.5
2-2; 0-0
1.0
2-2; 0-0
1.5
2-2; 0-0
1.5
0-0; 2-2
1.5
0-0; 2-2
1.5
0.5
3.0
(3.0)*
*AII students proceeding to fourth year will participate in 21 working days of field
study at the University Research Forest during a period immediately following the
spring examination period of their third year.
Wood Science and Industry Major
The Wood Science and Industry major is designed to give students a strong
technical background in wood as a material and a good understanding of wood
products manufacture, marketing and utilization. Graduates will be educated for
employment in many facets of the wood products industry both technical and
managerial.
The program consists of a minimum of 69.0 units of insession and 5.5 units of
extrasessional course work. 781
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Wood Science and Industry Major  (continued)
No later than the end of the spring term of the second year, each student will be
required to select one of three Areas of Concentration. Each of these sequences
of courses is designed to broaden the student's knowledge in one of three specific
areas: Forestry, Business Management or Science and Engineering. The Forestry
sequence should permit a graduate to qualify for registration in the Association of
British Columbia Professional Foresters upon completion of certain other
academic and non-academic requirements. The Business Management sequence
which has been designed in cooperation with the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration, is designed for the student interested in the business and
financial aspects of the forest products industry. The Science and Engineering
sequence allows students interested in mill operation, research and product
development to expand their backgrounds appropriately, and it is recommended
for those students contemplating a post-graduate degree in Wood Science.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS - B.Sc. (Forestry)
(Major in Wood Science and Industry)
First Year
Subject
Units
Hours
ENG
100
Literature and Composition
3.0
3-0; 3-0
MATH
100
Calculus 1
1.5
3-1; 0-0
MATH
101
Calculus II
1.5
0-0; 3-1
BIOL
102
Principles of Biology
3-3; 3-3
or CHEM
103
General Chemistry
3.0*
3-3; 3-3
or PHYS
110
Mechanics,  Electricity,  and
Structures
Atomic
3-2-1; 3-2-1
FRST
III
Dendrology
3.0
3-2; 3-2
FRST
130
Biometrics and Data Processing
3.0
3-2; 3-2
*One science course (3 units) not taken at Grade 12 level. APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Wood Science and Industry Major  (continued)
Second Year
7812.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Subject
Units
Hours
ECON
ENGL
FRST
100
301
335
FRST    376*
FRST    480
FRST
372
CHEM
103**
or
CHEM
120
PHYS
155.
457*
COMM
or
COMM
120
Principles of Economics
Practical Writing
Quality Control Systems in Forest
Products Industries
Wood Anatomy,  Properties and
Identification
Forest Products Manufacturing and
Distribution
Wood Physics and Mechanics
General Chemistry
Principles of Chemistry
Mechanics
Introduction to Financial Accounting
Principles of Organizational Behaviour
3.0
1.5
3-0; 3-0
0-0; 3-0
1.5
0-0; 3-0
1.5
2-4; 0-0
1.5
1.5
3.0
3-0; 0-0
0-0; 2-4
3-3; 3-3
3.0
1.5
1.5
2-0-4; 2-0-2
3-0; 0-0
3-0; 0-0
♦Same as FRST 375 but with additional 2—hour lab each week.
**lf CHEM 103 has been taken in the first year another course may be substituted.
Recommended for students entering the Business Management Area of Concentration.
Third Year
Subject
Units
Hours
CHEM 230
FRST 331
FRST 377
FRST 371
FRST 373
FRST    348
FRST    353
Organic Chemistry
Optimization Techniques in Forestry
Wood Microscopic Properties and
Ultrastructure
Wood Deterioration and Protection
Timber Structures and Design
Area of Concentration
Forestry Technical Essay
Mill Site Visits
3.0
3.0
3-3;
2-2;
3-3
2-2
1.5
2.0
1.5
0-0;
2-2;
2-3;
2-4
2-2
0-0
6.5
(1.0)*
(1.5)**
*To be submitted by students entering third year Forestry no later than November I.
**AII students proceeding to third year will participate in 10 working days of on—site
study of forest products manufacturing plants during a two week period immediately
following the spring examinations of their second year. APPENDIX 'B'
7813.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Wood Science and Industry Major  (continued)
Fourth Year
Subject
Units
Hours
FRST
419
Forestry Economics
1.5
0-0; 3-0
FRST
445
Seminar
0.5
1-0;  1-0
FRST
461
Forest Products Utilization
1.5
0-0; 3-0
FRST
473
Wood Chemistry and Chemical
Utilization
2.0
0-0; 3-4
FRST
482
Wood Drying and Finishing
1.0
0-0; 2-2
FRST
484
Wood Milling and Machining
1.5
2-3; 0-0
FRST
487
Glued Wood Products
1.5
2-3; 0-0
FRST
497
Graduating Essay or Technical Report
1.0
or FRST
498
B.Sc.  Thesis
Area of Concentration
3.0
6.0-8.0*
FRST
449
Directed Studies in Forestry
(3.0)**
*Number of units will be determined by whether FRST 497 or 498 is selected.
**AII students proceeding to fourth year must submit a report based on their summer
work experience in the forest industry, no later than the second Monday in October.
This report must have a minimum of 5000 words, exclusive of bibliography and
appendices.
AREAS OF CONCENTRATION
I.   Forestry
Third and Fourth Years
12.5-14.5 units from:       SOIL 200, FRST 202, 203, 237, 238, 305, 306, 319,
325,364,415.
2.   Business Management
Third Year
Required Courses:
Fourth Year
Electives:
*with permission of instructor.
COMM 120,261,271,458.
4.5 to 6.5 units from COMM 241, 322, 331, 341,
344*, 466, 468; or other approved courses. 7814.
Wednesday, May 19, 1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Wood Science and Industry Major - Areas of Concentration   (continued)
3.   Science and Engineering
Third and Fourth Years
Electives:
12.5 to 14.5 units from BOTA 330; CHEM 156, 205,
311,  321,  330;  APSC 270,  278, CHEM ENG 470,
471; BIOL 102, 200, 201; FRST 430, 431, 470;
MATH 150, 151, 165, 200, 221; PHYS 156; or other
approved courses.
Forest Science Major
The Forest Science major is for students primarily interested in research and
teaching in this field. Emphasis is given to education in basic and interactional
phenomena that influence the establishment, growth and development of trees and
other forest resources.   These include genetics, soils, weather and climate, form
morphology and cytology), function (physiology and
(ecosystem form and function), microbiology and other
entomology,   pathology,   si Ivies,   silviculture   and   wood
(dendrology, anatomy,
biochemistry), ecology
foundation   courses   in
science.
The course consists of a minimum 62.5 units of insession and 7 units of
extrasessional course work. First and second year requirements are combined and
include 30 units of course work which must be completed before proceeding to the
third year.
No later than the end of the spring term of the second year students must select
one of the following areas of concentration: Forest Ecology, Forest Entomology,
Forest Pathology, Forest Genetics, Forest Soils, Tree Physiology and Wildlife
Ecology. Each area of concentration consists of 9 units of course work plus a
thesis (3 units).
Interested   students   are   advised   to   discuss   their
representative of the division of Forest Science.
program   of   study   with   a 7815.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B»
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Science Major  (continued)
COURSE REQUIREMENTS - B.Sc. (Forestry)
(Major in Forest Science)
First and Second Year
Subject
Units
Hours
BIOL
101**
Principles of Biology
3.0
3-3-1; 3-3-1
or BIOL
102**
Principles of Biology
3.0
3-3; 3-3
BIOL
200
Cell Biology I:      Structural Basis
1.5
3-0-2; 0-0-0
BIOL
201
Cell Biology II:     Introduction to
Biochemistry
1.5
0-0-0; 3-0-0
CHEM
110**
Principles of Chemistry
3.0
3-3-1; 3-3-1
or CHEM
120**
Principles of Chemistry
3.0
2-3-1; 2-3-1
CHEM
230
Organic Chemistry
3.0
3-3; 3-3
ENG
100
Literature and Composition
3.0
3-0; 3-0
FRST
Ml
Dendrology
3.0
3-2; 3-2
FRST
130
Biometrics and Data Processing
3.0
3-2; 3-2
FRST
202
Forest Ecology
1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST
203
Si Ivies of Forest Trees of Western
Canada
1.5
0-0; 3-2
GEOG
214
Forest and Agricultural Climatology
1.5
2-2; 0-0
MATH
100**
Calculus 1
1.5
3-1; 0-0
MATH
101**
Calculus II
1.5
0-0; 3-1
PHYS
110**
Mechanics, Electricity and Atomic
Structures
3.0
3-2-1; 3-2-1
or PHYS
115**
Wave Motion,  Mechanics and
Electricity
3.0
2-3-1; 2-3-1
or PHYS
120**
Wave Motion,  Mechanics and
Electromagnetism
3.0
2-3-1; 2-3-1
SOIL
200
Introduction to the Study of Soils
1.5
3-2 or 3-2
FRST
263
Basic Forest Surveying
(1.5)*
*To   be   taken   during  a   10  working-day  period   immediately  following   the  spring
examination period.
**These courses must be completed during the first year in order to meet the pre and
corequisite requirements for courses that must be taken during the second year. APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Science Major  (continued)
7816.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Third Year
Subject
Units
Hours
BIOL
301
Biomathematics
1.5
0-0; 3-0
or FRST
430
Advanced Biometrics
2.0
3-2; 0-0
or PLNT
322
Design of Experiments
1.5
0-0; 3-2
BIOL
334
Fundamental Genetics
1.5
3-0-2 or 3-0-2
or FRST
302
Forest Genetics
1.5
0-0; 2-2
or PLNT
413
Plant Breeding
1.5
0-0; 2-2
FRST
237
Introduction to Forest Mensuration and
Photogrammetry
1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST
305
Silviculture 1
1.5
3-2; 0-0
FRST
306
Silviculture II
1.5
0-0; 3-2
FRST
308
Forest Entomology
1.0
2-2; 0-0
FRST
309
Forest Pathology
1.0
0-0; 2-2
FRST
327
Forest Fire Control and Use
1.0
2-2; 0-0
FRST
376
Wood Anatomy, Properties and
Identification
1.5
2-4; 0-0
FRST
399
Research Methods
Area of Concentration
0.5
3.0
1-0;  1-0
FRST
348
Forestry Technical Essay
(1.0)*
(1.5)*
FRST
351
Interior Field Work
*To be submitted by students entering third year Forestry no later than November I.
All students proceeding to third year will participate in 10 working days of field study
in the Interior of British Columbia during a period immediately following the spring
examination period of their second year. APPENDIX 'B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Science Major (continued)
Fourth Year
7817.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
Subject
Units
Hours
FRST    445      Seminar
FRST    498      B.Sc.  Thesis in Forestry
Area of Concentration
Arts Electives
Free Electives
FRST     451       Field Work in Harvesting,
Silviculture and Mensuration
0.5
3.0
6.0
3.0
4.0
(3.0)*
1-0;   1-0
*AII students proceeding to fourth year will participate in 21 working days of field
study at the University Research Forest during a period immediately following the
spring examination period of their third year. A special section of this course will be
available to students in the Forest Science major.
AREAS OF CONCENTRATION
I.   Forest Ecology
Third and Fourth Years Required Courses:  FRST 312, 405; SOIL 416
Fourth Year Electives:
4.5 units from BOTA 311*, 312*, 402, 426*
FRST 386**, 395**, 428.**, 443, 485**; PLNT 431 ;
SOIL 321 ; ZOOL 421**
♦Recommended for students interested in synecology.
**Recommended for students interested in general forest ecology.
Recommended for students interested in functional ecology.
2.   Forest Entomology
Third Year Required Courses:      PLNT 331 or ZOOL 311
Fourth Year Electives:
6.0 units   from  BIOL 330,  FRST 406,  408,  431,
435, 443; PLNT 431, 432, 435; ZOOL 410*
♦Prerequisite ZOOL 311 7818.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum
Forest Science Major  (continued)
3. Forest Pathology
Third Year Electives:
Fourth Year Electives:
4. Forest Genetics
Third Year Electives:
Fourth Year Electives:
BOTA 308; PLNT 336
6.0 units    from     BOTA 409,    416;    FRST 406;
MICB 200; PLNT 437
3.0 units from BIOL 340; BOTA 311; FRST 377;
MICB 324^, 325^*
6.0 units from ANSC 4I3T; BIOL 436; BOTA 414,
437; ZOOL 402 or other approved courses.
♦Prerequisite MICB 200, BIOL 201; Corequisite BIOC 302.
♦♦Prerequisite BIOL 201; BIOC 302; BIOL 334.  (BIOL 201 and BIOC 302 can be replaced
by BIOC 300).
Prerequisite ANSC 313.
5.  Forest Soils
Third Year Required Courses:      FRST 312, 442.
Fourth Year Required Courses:    SOIL 416, 315 or 404% 413 or 414.
♦Prerequisite CHEM 205 or CHEM 208.
6. Tree Physiology
Third Year Electives:
Fourth Year Electives:
7. Wildlife Ecology
Third Year
Required Courses:
Recommended Electives:
Fourth Year
Required Courses:
Approved Electives:
3.0 units  from  BOTA 210,  330; FRST 431, 377;
PLNT 326.
6.0 units from  BOTA 402,  430, 435; FRST 41 I;
SOIL 413, 414.
FRST 395; ZOOL 203
FRST 328; ZOOL 323
FRST 495 or ZOOL 421;
ANSC 424; FRST 428;
(credit will not be awarded for both ZOOL 323
or ANSC 424)
3 units 7819.
Wednesday,  May  19,   1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum  (continued)
New courses
FRST  202    1
Jfe)
Forest Ecology
203    (
Jfe)
Si Ivies of Forest Trees of Western Canada
237    1
,lfe)
Introduction to Forest Mensuration and
Photogrammetry
238    (
Jfe)
Forest Mensuration
290    1
Ife)
Principles of Forest & Wildland Recreation
303    1
:ife)
Silviculture for Harvesters
305    1
:ife)
Silviculture I
306    1
jfe)
Silviculture II
308   1
:d
Forest Entomology
309    1
j)
Forest Pathology
327    1
A)
Forest Fire Control and Use
352
A)
Harvesting Field Trip
353    1
ife)
Mill Site Visits
359    1
;ife)
Cable Mechanics
360   1
:ife)
Forest Engineering Economics
364    1
:ife)
Timber Harvesting Systems
376    1
:ife)
Wood Anatomy, Properties and
Identification II
386    1
:d
Forestry-Fishery Interactions
399    (
Ml)
Research Methods
403    1
ife)
Ecology of Forestry
421
(2)
Case Studies in Integrated Resources
Management
432    1
464    1
jfe)
:ife)
Forest Resource Supply and Allocation Models
Forest Transportation Systems
465    1
jfe)
Mechanization of Forest Operations
497
:o
Graduating Essay or Technical Report
498
,3)
B.Sc. Thesis in Forestry
Deletions
FRST   125, 1
46
Changes
FRST 262     •
change in title and description
351    ■
change in title, description and units
263    ■
change in number, description, units and
hours
319    ■
change in hours
325    ■
change in title, description and hours
335   ■
change in hours
363   ■
change in title and description
364    ■
change in number
371    ■
change in units and hours
372    ■
change in number, description and hours
373    •
change in number
375    ■
change in number, title, units and hours
377
change in number, title, description and
hours APPENDIX B'
7820.
Wednesday, May 19, 1982.
FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Four-Year Curriculum (continued)
Changes
FRST
in title, description, units and hours
in number and description
in title and hours
in title, description, units and hours
in title and hours
in title and description
in units
in description, units, hours and
isites
in hours
in title, description and units
in title, description and units
in hours
in number, title, and description
in units and hours
in number
in description and units
Change in prerequisites:      FRST       III,  130, 331, 404, 406, 419, 427, 430, 431,
435,461,484,485,487
Change in method of designating hours:
A two digit system will be used in the future for designating course hours in the
Faculty of Forestry. The first digit will refer to the number of lecture hours each
week; the second digit will refer to the number of hours spent weekly in
laboratories, tutorials or in the field. All course listings in the calendar should be
modified to reflect this change.
385 -
change
392 -
change
395 -
change
415 -
change
425 -
change
427 -
change
445 -
change
459 -
change
prerequ
461 -
change
462 -
change
463 -
change
473 -
change
480 -
change
482 -
change
486 -
change
499 -
change
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Family Practice
New courses        FMPR 480    (Ife)     Prevention of Athletic Disabilities I:
481    (Ife)
Musculoskeletal and Sense Organs
Prevention of Athletic Disabilities II:
Internal Organs
FACULTY OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
New course
Change
PHAR 406    (I)       Topics in Pharmacy Practice
PHAR 401
change in title, description, units and
prerequisites 7821.
Wednesday, May 19, 1982.
APPENDIX 'B'
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION
New course PHED 383    (I fe)     The Olympic Games:  Ancient and Modern
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Registration and Program approval  - change in policy:
"With the approval of the Dean of the Faculty of Science, departments may
require, as a prerequisite for entering a program, that a student obtain at least
60% in a specified first—year course basic to the field of the major, unless special
permission is received from the Head of the Department."
Limitation of enrolment:
"It may be necessary to limit enrolment in certain courses in the Faculty of Science
when the demand for these courses is greater than the resources available. Where
limitations in enrolments become necessary, the criteria for implementation will
normally be determined by academic considerations as suggested by the Head of
the Department and approved by the Dean."
Biology
Change
BIOL   330   -
Chemistry
Changes
CHEM 312 and <
408    -
New course
CHEM 260   (2)
Deletion
CHEM 256
Computer Science
change in prerequisites
CHEM 312 and 401   - change in description and prerequisites
change in prerequisites
Organic Chemistry for Engineers
Add statement at beginning of Computer Science Section of the Calendar:
"N.B. Enrolment in certain of the Computer Science courses (marked with an *)
may be limited due to lack of resources. The enrolment to these courses will be
controlled by imposing more stringent admissions criteria based on academic
considerations than those listed in the course description. The student should
consult with the Computer Science Department during the spring or summer to
determine what the criteria for entrance into these courses will be." 7822.
Wednesday, May 19, 1982.
APPENDIX B'
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Computer Science   (continued)
Add "♦" to Computer Science 215 and 220.
Add "and permission of Head" to prerequisites of Computer Science 215 and
220.
New courses CPSC   114    (Ife)     Principles of Computer Programming I
116    (Ife)     Principles of Computer Programming II
Changes CPSC   118,215,220,414 -  change in prerequisites
Deletion CPSC   115
Geological Sciences
New courses        GEOL 445    (I fe)     Petroleum Geology
447    (Ife)     Coal Geology
Deletion GEOL 446
Geophysics and Astronomy
Program change:  Honours in Geophysics -  Fourth Year, change to:
GEOL 304    (3)
317    (Ife)

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