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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] Apr 18, 1990

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 9736.
April 18, 1990
The Eighth Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1989-90 was held on Wednesday, April 18, 1990 at
8.00 p.m. in Room 102, George F. Curtis Building.
Present: President D. W. Strangway, (Chairman), Mr. S. Alsgard, Dr.
J. M. Anderson, Miss M. D. Bain, Professor P. L. Bryden, Mr. R. Bush, Miss
A. L. Callegari, Dr. D. G. A. Carter, Dr. T. s. Cook, Ms. L. M. Copeland,
Mr. N. A. Davidson, Dr. A. J. Elder, Acting Dean D. J. Elkins, Mr. E. B.
Goehring, Dr. R. J. Gray, Dr. S. W. Hamilton, Dr. A. G. Hannam, Dr. P. G.
Hill, Ms. A. Ironside, Ms. T. L. Jackson, Dr. S. Katz, Miss W. A. King, Dr.
A. Kozak, Mr. 0. C. W. Lau, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Mrs. L. Lohia, Mr. R. H.
McGowan, Mr. B. V. McGuinness, Dr. J. A. McLean, Mr. M. G. McMillan, Dean
J. H. McNeill, Miss S. A. Mair, Dean A. Meisen, Dr. B. M. Morrison, Mr.
J. A. Moss, Mr. M. D. Nikkei, Mr. S. R. Pearce, Dr. J. E. Phillips, Mrs.
G. E. Plant, Mr. B. D. Prins, Mr. E. S. Reid, Mr. M. M. Ryan, Dean N.
Sheehan, Dr. J. K. Stager, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Mr. B. Taylor, Dr. R. C. Tees,
Dr. P. R. Tennant, Dr. R. C. Thompson, Mr. W. Watson, Dean W. A. Webber, Dr.
D. A. Wehrung, Dr. D. Ll. Williams, Ms. N. E. Woo.
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from
Chancellor L. R. Peterson, Vice-President D. R. Birch, Mr. D. A. Anderson,
Dr. E. G. Auld, Dr. B. Bressler, Rev. P. C. Burns, Dean P. T. Burns, Dr.
J. D. Dennison, Dr. G. W. Eaton, Dr. A. Eisen, Dr. S. E. Grace, Dr. J. F.
Helliwell, Dr. M. A. Hickling, Dean R. W. Kennedy, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Dean
B. C. McBride, Mr. J. R. G. McQueen, Dr. A. G. Mitchell, Dean J. F.
Richards, Dean P. B. Robertson, Dr. D. F. Robitaille, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder,
Ms. P. F. Silver, Dr. L. de Sobrino, Dr. L. J. Stan, Dean P. Suedfeld, Mr.
G. A. Thorn, Dr. A. Van Seters, Dr. J. Vanderstoep, Dr. L. s. Weiler, Dr.
W. W. Wood, Dr. W. C. Wright, Jr.
Engineering Undergraduate Society Newsletter
Senate heard presentations from Jennie Jack, President of the Law
Students Association, and Evie Wehrhahn, Vice-President of the Engineering
Undergraduate Society, concerning the Engineering Undergraduate Society
Newsletter. 9737.
April 18, 1990
Engineering Undergraduate Society Newsletter  (continued)
Ms. Jack noted that many people were offended by the newsletter, not
just aboriginal people. Ms. Jack informed Senate that after the Engineers
newsletter was published, several groups across campus had met to talk about
racism, sexism and homophobia in general on the campus. She stated that
these groups would like to see changes made within the course curriculum at
the University as a whole, not just in the Faculty of Applied Science. The
various concerned groups had been unanimous in that they did not want to see
the expulsion of those students responsible for the newsletter. They felt
it was more important that such people be educated, including students and
faculty from areas other than engineering.
Ms. Jack went on to say that the decision of the Student Court in this
matter was that there would be a $15,000 fine levied on the Engineering
Undergraduate Society and that the money would be used for a conference in
the fall, dealing with racism, sexism and homophobia, and for a potlatch in
the spring.
Ms. Jack stated that in discussions with various groups on campus it had
been suggested that, since English 100 was required of all students, and
since it was believed that this course was in the process of being revamped,
issues of tolerance, discrimination, feminism, aboriginal rights and racism
should be included as topics for essays to be written for the course and in
the books to be studied within this course. Another suggestion was that
since each Faculty has a course that students have to take in order to
graduate, some of those courses could be changed to deal with issues of
tolerance. Ms. Jack stated that the Faculty of Applied Science were already
considering changes to Applied Science 120, which is a mandatory course for
all first year students.  It was proposed that this one term course be 9738.
April 18, 1990
Engineering Undergraduate Society Newsletter  (continued)
expanded to two terms, and would deal with issues of racism, sexism, and
homphobia by looking at racist films, and by inviting guest speakers and
lecturers to speak on these topics. It had also been suggested that
students already at the University could benefit from a course dealing with
these issues, so the Faculty of Applied Science were also considering
expanding Applied Science 450, a mandatory course dealing with engineering
ethics which must be taken in order to graduate, to include issues of
racism, sexism, and homophobia. The Faculty of Law had also indicated that
they were planning changes, and had been most receptive to suggestions made
by the concerned groups that material on aboriginal rights and aboriginal
title be considered for inclusion in some Law courses.
Ms. Jack suggested that a co-ordinator be hired at the administrative
level to assist other Faculties who wish to put this kind of content into
their courses. One of the main reasons for suggesting a co-ordinator was to
ensure that there would be no overlap whereby perhaps three different
Faculties would be teaching the same course. Ms. Jack also suggested that
workshops for professors be held dealing with issues of tolerance, racism,
sexism and homophobia, so that they know how to address these issues when
they occur in their classrooms. Ms. Jack noted that other universities
across Canada offered First Nations programs at the B.A. level but that none
were offered in B.C., and suggested that the University should consider
developing such a program.
In conclusion, Ms. Jack stated that the whole issue of the Engineers
Newsletter had given some bad press to the University and it was hoped that
this could be turned around so that something positive could come out of the
hurt and pain caused by the newsletter.  She felt that this could be 9739.
April 18, 1990
Engineering Undergraduate Society Newsletter  (continued)
achieved by educating people through the implementation of the courses
suggested, by the hiring of a co-ordinator, the organizing of workshops, and
the establishment of a First Nations Program.
Ms. Wehrhahn drew attention to English 100, and stated that since it was
her understanding that the course was being reviewed and that its mandate
was to cover social issues such as discrimination, it seemed appropriate to
try to work those issues into that curriculum. She also noted that the
E.U.S. was very supportive of the ideas brought forward to Senate by Ms.
Jack.
The President informed Senate that the student senators had a number of
motions that they wished to introduce. He said that he would be prepared to
accept the motions with the understanding that those items requiring
administrative action would be referred to the Administration and those
concerning curriculum would be referred to the Senate Curriculum Committee.
Ms. King      ) Whereas a lack of understanding of
Ms. Jackson   )  discriminatory issues on this campus
is demonstrated in the actions and
attitudes of both students and faculty
within the UBC community, and whereas
this lack is based on ignorance and
intolerance of such issues, be it resolved
that: a)  English 100 course content and
reading lists be altered as an immediate
remedial measure, and, b) that each Faculty
develop and/or enrich core courses to
include issues of discrimination.
The President confirmed that the motion was to be considered with the
understanding that it would be referred to the Curriculum Committee.
Dr. Hannam asked whether approval of the motion would mean that Senate
was endorsing the inclusion of obligatory courses in every Faculty at the
University. 9740.
April 18, 1990
Engineering Undergraduate Society Newsletter  (continued)
The President responded that it was his understanding that the
Curriculum Committee would discuss the issue of whether English 100 should
be adapted to include issues of discrimination or whether each Faculty
should be asked to develop its own course.
Dr. Thompson, Chairman of the Senate Curriculum Committee, pointed out
that it was beyond the terms of reference of the Curriculum Committee to
make changes to courses, although it could certainly discuss the issue and
approach individual Faculties but any changes would have to be initiated by
the Faculties.
During the discussion that followed, the opinion was expressed that as
the motions had not been circulated notice of motion would have been more
appropriate. Some members questionned the necessity of targetting English
100 for the purpose.
The President suggested that Senate might prefer to vote on the
principle involved if it did not feel it could vote on motions that had not
been circulated. The mover and seconder of the motion on the floor agreed
to accept the following substitute motion:
"That Senate believes that all students at the University should be
exposed to course material on discriminatory issues."
After further discussion Miss King withdrew the motion, stating that
some of the issues would be best dealt with through the President's Task
Force.  The President agreed to a request that student senators be
represented on the task force.
The President invited the Dean of Applied Science to comment on the
proposed changes to Applied Science 120 and 450. 9741.
April 18, 1990
Engineering Undergraduate Society Newsletter  (continued)
Dean Meisen explained that Applied Science 120, as well as being an
introductory course to engineering, covered some of the more general aspects
related to professional ethics and to professional conduct. The Faculty had
agreed that more time could be devoted to this particular set of topics and
in order to accomplish this it was intended that the course be offered in
two terms instead of one. Dean Meisen explained that the introductory
section of this non-credit course would be enlarged to deal with questions
of professional ethics, ethics in general, and problems of discrimination as
they arise in the workplace and in society and various other organizations.
In reorganizing the course, the Faculty hoped to take advantage of material
contained in case studies produced to deal with some of the issues mentioned
as well as using guest lecturers. Various members of the Department of
Anthropology had also indicated their willingness to assist in this matter.
With regard to Applied Science 450, which is a required course for all
engineering students. Dean Meisen stated that the Faculty intended to
include in that course lectures and materials that deal with problems as
they arise in the workplace and in society in general as they relate to
issues on tolerance. He stated that attention would also be given to
problems faced by First Nations people and that cases that had arisen over
the years would be used as examples to study, analyze, and to draw
conclusions from.
In conclusion, Dean Meisen expressed the opinion that some attention
might be given to other courses offered generally at the University which
could deal with these issues, not necessarily from an engineering
perspective but from a general perspective. He stated that he could
certainly imagine the inclusion of some material in a course such as English
100, but not necessarily English 100.  He felt that it was very appropriate 9742.
April 18, 1990
Enqineerinq Undergraduate Society Newsletter  (continued)
for Senate to consider this question and to find ways in which these
problems and issues can be addressed, since Senate, in his opinion, is
charged with ensuring that students receive a full and complete education
and not just an education that represents the needs of a particular
discipline or profession.
President Strangway thanked Ms. Jack and Ms. Wehrhahn for their
presentations stating that they had shown an incredible amount of
sensitivity and tolerance. Senate joined the President in a round of
applause.
Senate membership
Student representatives
The Chairman introduced and welcomed to Senate the following student
senators, elected to serve on Senate for one year from April 1, 1990 to
March 31, 1991 (1 representative elected by each Faculty + 5 members
at-large):
Agricultural Sciences
Mr. J. R. G. McQueen     Fourth Year Agricultural Sciences
Applied Science
Mr. B. D. Prins Third Year Applied Science
Arts
Mr. J. A. Moss Third Year Arts
Commerce and Business Administration
Miss M. D. Bain Third Year Commerce and Business Administration
Dentistry
Mr. B. V. McGuinness     Third Year Dentistry
Education
Miss S. A. Mair First Year Education
Forestry
Ms. P. F. Silver        Third Year Forestry 9743.
April 18, 1990
Senate membership
Student representatives  (continued)
Graduate Studies
Mr. E. B. Goehring
Law
Ms. T. L. Jackson
Medicine
Mr. D. Horvat
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Miss A. L. Callegari
Science
Mr. 0. C. W. Lau
Members-at-large:
Miss W. A. King
Mrs. L. Lohia
Mr. R. H. McGowan
Mr. M. D. Nikkei
Mr. B. Taylor
Minutes of previous meeting
M.A. Candidate in Geography
First Year Law
Second Year Medicine
Third Year Pharmaceutical Sciences
First Year Science
Third Year Arts
Third Year Science
Third Year Arts
Fourth Year Engineering
Third Year Arts
Mr. Pearce    )  That the minutes of the Seventh regular
Dr. Tees      )  meeting of Senate for the Session 1989-90,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
Carried
Business arising from the Minutes
Eligibility to serve on Senate (p.9729)
Dr. Tennant
Dr. Stager
) That faculty members who inform the
) Secretary of Senate of their intent to
remain on campus and to be active in Senate
business during their leave shall be exempt
from the rule prohibiting membership during
faculty leave.
Car r i ed
Senate Nominating Committee Membership (p.9704)
Election  of  two  student representatives  to serve on  the Senate
Nominating Committee
Two student vacancies on the Nominating Committee had been declared
at the previous meeting. 9744.
April 18, 1990
Business arising from the Minutes
Senate Nominating Committee Membership (p.9704)
Election  of  two  student  representatives  to  serve  on  the  Senate
Nominating Committee (continued)
Miss King     )  That Mr. J. A. Moss and Mr. B. D. Prins
Ms. Jackson   ) be nominated to fill the vacancies.
Carried
Dr. Tennant   ) That nominations close.
Dr. Stager    )
Carried
There being no further nominations, Mr. Moss and Mr. Prins were
declared elected.
Chairman's remarks and related questions
President Strangway reported that draft proposals had been circulated
concerning women's issues on campus, and that he looked forward to receiving
comments on those proposals before they are implemented.
President Strangway informed Senate that a report on Continuing
Education would be coming forward to Senate, partly in response to the
Report of the President's Task Force on Continuing Education. He noted that
the principle recommendation centred around the creation of a position of
Associate Vice President who would assume the responsibility for not only
Continuing Education but also Guided Independent Studies and Extrasessional
Studies, and he felt that this would be a useful administrative grouping.
President Strangway stated that the President's Report on Creative and
Performing Arts had now been published and that copies were in the process
of being mailed out. He stated that there had been a good response from
those who had already received the report. He informed Senate that the next
President's Report would be on the Health Sciences. 9745.
April 18, 1990
Chairman's remarks and related questions  (continued)
President Strangway drew Senate's attention to the fact that external
funding had been received for a program in Occupational Hygiene. He stated
that the program was being put together by the faculties of Medicine,
Applied Science, Science and Graduate Studies, and that there will be a
consultative committee working with them. It was hoped that students would
be able to register in this Master's program as early as 1991.
In conclusion, the President referred to the Report of the Academic
Building Needs Committee and stated that he would be reporting back to
Senate in due course with regard to space and other issues raised in the
report.
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations - subject,
where applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented
without formal reference to the President and the formal agreement of the
President; and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new programs be asked
to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
(i) Proposal of the Faculties of Arts and Graduate Studies that the
Master of Library Science program and the Master of Archival Studies
program be reclassified as graduate programs, effective September 1,
1990.  (pp.9717-20)
(ii) Proposal of the Faculty of Graduate Studies to establish an Institute
of Health Promotion Research,  (pp.9724-5)
(iii) Proposal of the Faculty of Graduate Studies to establish a Media and
Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre (MAGIC).  (pp.9726-8)
(iv) Proposal of the Faculty of Graduate Studies to establish The Hong
Kong Bank of Canada Chair in Asian Research.  (p.9720)
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs Committee
Dr. Stager, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following report
which had been circulated: 9746.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs Committee (continued)
"In the past, the SABN Committee took most of the responsibility for
coordinating academic space and building needs, conducted its own
research and brought recommendations and priorities to Senate. It did
not take into account space or buildings for non-academic functions, and
since they too needed attention, the central administration was obliged
to intersect with academic priorities in developing its Capital Plans to
present to Government. Further initiatives arising from the successful
University Fund Raising Campaign for campus buildings, underlined the
need for systematic campus planning. To that end, the administration
has rearranged functions of the old Physical Plant to separate Campus
Planning and Development from Plant Operations. CP&D is responsible for
the data base for campus space and buildings, planning for change in
both the near and long term, developing current initiatives down to the
detail of engineering requirements and standards.
Until recently, Senate in its own right has not been drawn into a formal
consultative role. Some documents were tabled for information, and some
others, including planning questionnaires, were circulated generally on
campus.  No business was referred specifically to the SABN Committee.
In November 1989, the President reactivated his Advisory Committee on
Space Allocation (the old one met twice in 1987) and gave it new terms
of reference. Its new membership includes all the members of the SABN
Committee with an equal number of other participants. This has
permitted members of the Senate Committee to become directly involved
with advising the administration, but should not inhibit the Committee
from reporting or recommending responses or initiatives to Senate.
This new relationship seems to the members of the Senate Committee a
more practical arrangement. It is now possible through Campus Planning
and Development to request information for Senate that will help meet
Senate concerns and responsibilities. With that in mind, the SABN
Committee sees the following issues:
A. There is, despite unprecedented imminent building, a need to develop
and maintain a current inventory of requests for additional space for
academic units and functions. It should be accompanied by the planning
standards for entitlement and space quality appropriate to the academic
purpose.
Recommend:
That the President bring a report to Senate that addresses A above.
B. There is no known policy that applies to determining building sites
on the Campus. The Committee submits that there are a number of siting
considerations that have direct and indirect consequences for the
effectiveness of our academic purposes, for example, shared functions,
academic neighbourhoods, access to libraries, inter-lecture travel time,
etc. It is expected that a policy should take account of the overall
University setting and its physical attractiveness.  A policy should 9747.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs Committee  (continued)
"also involve respect for the history and heritage of the University as
it is represented in dedicated campus spaces and features. The policy
could also articulate the process of receiving advice and making
decisions.
Recommend:
That the President prepare a policy for the siting of the new
buildings and that it be tabled in Senate. It is important that such
a policy be prepared quickly so that it may assist current planning.
C. Over time building renovations and other changes have had an impact
upon the classroom space. Also the size and location of lecture rooms,
seminar rooms and teaching laboratories may not have kept pace with the
evolution of enrolment and teaching needs. A special review of teaching
space is called for, and consultation with academic units should be part
of the process.
Recommend:
That the President bring to Senate a report on classroom inventories,
current needs and future plans.
"D. There is much talk on Campus about the condition of classroom space
and indeed some academic buildings.
Recommend:
That a report on the quality of teaching space and the strategies for
maintenance be made available to Senate..
E. The Graduate Expansion initiative clearly has space implications.
Two thousand new graduate students will be admitted in the next 5-10
years. They will have different space needs than undergraduates since
many will be TAs, have office needs and research space needs, and we
know of no coordinated effort to meet the prospect.
Recommend:
That the Vice President, Academic and Provost, take the necessary
steps to respond to E above and inform Senate as soon as possible."
Dr. Stager    ) That the recommendations of the Committee
Dr. Tees      ) be approved.
Dr. Stager spoke briefly to the report.  In discussion of the report,
Dr. Williams referred to item D. concerning the condition of classroom
space, and stated that he would like to emphasize that academic buildings 97 48.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Building Needs Committee (continued)
require upgrading not only with regard to classroom space but also with
regard to the rest of the space. He noted that very little had been done
on the campus with regard to the quality of space in the past, and stated
that he was pleased to see that this issue was now being addressed.
The motion was put and carried.
Academic Policy Committee
Changes in the University Promotion Regulations
Dr. Tees, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following report
which had been circulated:
"The Committee recommends approval of the following changes in the
University Promotion Regulations:
1. The following "Advancement Regulations" should replace the existing
"Promotion Regulations" on page 22 of the 1989/90 Calendar. (Changes
are underlined.)
ADVANCEMENT REGULATIONS
Advancement practices vary among Faculties and are described in the
Faculty section of this calendar.
General regulations applicable to all Faculties are:
(i) except in special cases, no student may repeat a course, other
than English 100 or Mathematics 100, more than once;
(ii) a student in any session will be assigned Fail standing for the
session where a study program of more than 6 units has been taken
with satisfactory standing in less than 60% of it or where a study
program of 6 or fewer units has been taken with satisfactory
standing in less than 50% ot it;
(iii) a student in a year of study which may normally be taken in the
first or second year following Secondary School Graduation who is
assigned Fail standing at the end of winter session will be
required to discontinue study in that Faculty for at least one
year;
(iv) courses which are not available for credit toward the student's
degree or diploma program will not be included when a student is
considered for advancement; 9749.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
Changes in the University Promotion Regulations (continued)
(v) students who are assigned Fail standing in one Faculty may
transfer to another Faculty if they meet the advancement and
admission requirements of the second Faculty;
(vi)  students who have been required to discontinue study at the
University under 3. above, will be readmitted to a proqram if they
meet the admission requirements in effect for applicants to that
proqram at the time they apply for readmission;
(vii) a student at any level of University study who fails for a second
time, whether in repeating a year or in a later year, will be
required to withdraw from the University; after a period of at
least one year an appeal for permission to re-enrol will be
considered by the Dean of the Faculty concerned. A negative
decision made by the Dean may be appealed to the Senate Admissions
Committee.
2. Without prejudice to the rights of Faculties to adopt more stringent
advancement regulations, the Committee recommends that editorial
changes be made to Faculty regulations where necessary to make them
consistent with the general regulations."
Dr. Tees      )  That the University Promotion Regulations,
Dr. Morrison  )  on page 22 of the Calendar, be replaced by
the proposed University Advancement Regulations.
Dr. Tees explained that during the late spring and summer, a
subcommittee of the Academic Policy Committee reviewed the promotion
regulations across all the Faculties in an effort to clarify and
simplify the regulations on page 22 of the Calendar. in November, a
draft proposal was sent to the Deans for response, and the proposal
before Senate was the result. If approved, the proposed advancement
regulations would replace the material listed under promotion
regulations on page 22 of the current Calendar.
Dr. Elder drew Senate's attention to the phrase under item (vii)
which reads: "A negative decision made by the Dean may be appealed to
the Senate Admissions Committee.", and noted that this proposed change 9750.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
Changes in the University Promotion Regulations (continued)
in policy was in conflict with the description of the procedures of the
Senate Admissions Committee.
Dr. Tees explained that it had been discovered that the regulation as
described in item (vii) had been the policy up to 1971 and that, without
approval from Senate, a change had been introduced editorially by a
writer of the Calendar. The Deans had supported this reversal and the
Committee therefore felt it was reasonable to return to the original
regulation.
Dr. Elder responded that since the wording had been in the Calendar
for about twenty years, and since the Senate Admissions Committee had
been acting on this regulation in good faith, it seemed improper to
reverse it without any discussion. She felt that the Senate Admissions
Committee should look at decisions of the Deans of the Faculties, and
proposed that the wording as it now appears in the Calendar, and on page
3 of the report on the Senate Admissions Committee's procedures, should
be retained.
In amendment:
Dr. Elder     ) That under item (vii), the sentence "A negative
Dr. Cook      ) decision by the Dean may be appealed to the Senate
Admissions Committee." be replaced by the current
Calendar reading: "Such an appeal will be granted
only after the appeal has been reviewed by the Dean
of the Faculty concerned and approved by the Senate
Admissions Committee."
In speaking against the amendment, Dr. Hamilton stated that when a
student is accepted to the University and a Faculty, there is no review
of that acceptance by the Senate Admissions Committee.  On the other 9751.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
Chanqes in the University Promotion Regulations (continued)
hand, if a student is rejected they have a right to make a formal
appeal. He stated that if confidence has been placed in the Faculty
initially to accept these students into a program, it seemed only
reasonable that equal confidence should be placed in the Faculty through
their Dean's office to accept a student who has been asked to step aside
for a year and appeals to come back in.
The amendment was lost.
The motion was put and carried.
Education Abroad Proqrams:  Guidelines
Dr. Tees presented the following report, which had been circulated:
"The Committee recommends approval of the following guidelines:
(1) Senate should play an active role in advancing reciprocal
Education Abroad Programs with foreign academic institutions and
should review each program before a formal agreement is
concluded. An appropriate Senate Committee should examine the
calendar of the foreign institution and other relevant
documentation and report to Senate so that Senate can make an
informed decision on whether or not to approve an agreement with a
foreign host institution for a specified period of time (i.e. 5
years).
(2) When Senate has approved an Education Abroad Program (EAP)
agreement, the Registrar's Office will be responsible for
assigning total UBC credit and for courses completed at foreign
host institutions. Faculties, Schools and Departments will be
responsible for determining which UBC degree requirements have
been satisfied by the courses taken. A small committee,
consisting of one representative from each participating Faculty,
an Education Abroad administrator, and (if possible) a student who
has had EAP experience, will meet twice a year to review the
students selected for the Education Abroad Programs, the material
for guides, and ongoing policy regarding such programs. This
committee will be chaired by the Registrar. 9752.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Academic Policy Committee
Education Abroad Programs:  Guidelines (continued)
"(3) The Registrar's Office will work with the Faculties, Schools and
Departments to develop and maintain academic advising guides for
each approved Education Abroad Program which can be used to
supplement the Calendars and other material from the foreign
institution. These guides should be available to Faculty Advisors
and to students and should be used to provide guidance as to which
courses at the foreign institution best satisfy specific UBC
degree requirements. Any courses found to be unsuitable for
credit should be listed in these guides.
(4) Each course taken at a foreign institution by a UBC student on a
Senate approved Education Abroad Program will be shown on the
student's UBC transcript with the grade awarded by the
institution. Total equivalent UBC credit and an equivalent
average UBC grade will be shown for each UBC session during which
the student was at the host institution.
(5) Credit earned at foreign institutions by UBC students on Senate
approved Education Abroad Programs may be used together with
credit earned at UBC to satisfy the requirement for attendance at
UBC (see UBC Calendar, Attendance).
(6) That once Senate has approved an Education Abroad Program
agreement, then UBC will admit recommended students from the peer
partner institution as Education Abroad Program students on the
understanding that work completed at UBC is for credit at the
foreign institution, not for credit towards a degree at UBC and
hence the primary responsibility for the admission of the foreign
student into the Education Abroad Program at UBC rests with the
peer partner institution on the basis of a set of principles
mutually agreed upon by the two institutions. The host
institution will be committed as a general principle to placing
foreign Education Abroad Program students."
Dr. Tees      )  That the guidelines for Education Abroad
Dr. Morrison  ) Programs be approved.
In response to a query, it was explained that the students in this
program would be UBC students working towards UBC degrees, so as a
general principle it was hoped that these students would not be
discriminated against with respect to awards.
The motion was put and carried. 9753.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate (continued)
Admissions Committee
Faculty of Arts - Access UBC, Transfer Students from the College
Proqrams and Faculty of Science Policy on Transfer from Cariboo and
Okanagan Colleges
Dr. Elder, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following reports
which had been circulated:
Arts
"The Admissions Committee recommends that transfers be permitted from
the degree completion programs at Cariboo and Okanagan Colleges which
will allow students to enrol in a richer array of courses than will
be available at the colleges and to enrol in programs not available
at the colleges, particularly our major programs. However, we also
recommend that there be limits on such transfers:
1. The maximum number of units that could be transferred would be 45.
2. The maximum number of units that can be transferred of 100 and
200 level courses would be 33 units.
3. The maximum number of units offered in 300 and 400 level courses
that would be transferrable would be 15.
4. Of the 300 and 400 level courses applicable to any particular
Major program, at least 7.5 units of such courses must be
completed at UBC. All UBC departmental requirements regarding
Major programs must also be met.
These proposals are predicated on the assumption that the students
enrolled in degree completion programs of colleges are not UBC
students, but they are enrolled in UBC courses. Thus they have a
peculiar status different from our own students and are different
from outsiders who are limited to transferring 30 units of first and
second year work."
Science
Dr. Elder presented the following report, which had been circulated:
"It is recommended that students be permitted to transfer from the
degree completion programs at Cariboo and Okanagan Colleges to UBC.
However, the following limitations on such transfers are recommended:
1. The maximum number of units that may be transferred is 45.
2. The maximum number of units of 100 and 200 level courses that may
be transferred is 33.
3. The maximum number of units of 300 and 400 level courses that may
be transferred is 15.
4. Of the 300 and 400 level courses applicable to any particular
Major or Honours program, at least 7.5 units of such courses must
be completed at UBC. All UBC departmental requirements regarding
Major and Honours programs must also be met. 9754.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Faculty of Arts - Access UBC, Transfer Students from the College
Proqrams and Faculty of Science Policy on Transfer from Cariboo and
Okanagan Colleges (continued)
Dr. Elder     ) That the proposals of the Faculty of Arts
Dr. Tees      ) concerning transfer students from the College
Programs, and the Faculty of Science proposed
Policy on Transfer from Cariboo and Okanagan
Colleges be approved.
Carried
Procedures on Appeals for Admission and Readmission
At the January 17, 1990 meeting of Senate, Dr. Elder had agreed to
prepare a report on the Committee's procedures on appeals for admission
and readmission.  The report, which had been circulated for information,
reads as follows:
"I. Senate Appeals for Admission
The Senate Admissions Committee is charged with examining and ruling
upon applications for admissions that are not clearly resolvable under
the regulations governing admission.
1) Students whose applications for admission have been rejected may
appeal to the Senate Admissions Committee.
2) Students should submit their appeals to the Admissions Office. In
their submissions the students should include reasons why they think
the appeal should be granted.
(i) In judging the appeals the Senate Admissions Committee considers
past performance and letters of recommendation. An avowal of
renewed effort is not usually sufficient by itself for an appeal
to be accepted.
(ii) Students who are rejected because of insufficient academic
courses or insufficient marks should be aware that alternate
routes exist for them to acquire the necessary credentials in
Community Colleges and the Senate Admissions Committee is likely
to recommend that they take one of those routes.
3) The appeals are circulated to the Committee with the Agenda.
4) Recommendations are solicited either immediately from ex officio
members of the Committee (Arts, Science and Applied Science) or by
mail from Faculties unrepresented on the Committee.
5) The appeals are considered one by one and each is voted upon by the
Committee, the Chair abstaining except to break a tie.
6) The student is then informed of the result as soon as possible bv the
Registrar. J
7) Students may not normally reappeal a negative decision unless
substantial new information is provided. 9755.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Procedures on Appeals for  Admission and Readmission    (continued)
II. Senate Appeals for Readmission
Appeals from students falling within the category "Failed year, required
to discontinue" and "Failed year, required to withdraw":
1. Failed year, required to discontinue:
A student in any session who is assigned Fail standing will normally
be required to discontinue study at the University for at least one
year."  (Calendar, "Promotion Regulations", Sec. (iii)).
(i) Students may apply directly to their Faculty to have "Failed
Year: Required to Discontinue" changed to "Failed Year:
Permitted to Continue".
(ii) Students who have been required to discontinue may apply for
readmission after one year, using the "Application for
Readmission" form which should be submitted to the Admissions
Office. Students who have Fail standing at the end of the
Winter Session may be admissible for the Winter Session after
the one next following.
(iii) Those applications are referred by Admissions to the Faculties
in question and, provided the student meets the current
criteria for admission, the application is accepted.
(iv) Students in this category who have been out of the University
for one year and who have been rejected by the Faculty in
question may appeal to the Senate Admissions Committee.
(v)  The procedure on that appeal will follow that described above.
2. Failed Year, required to withdraw:
"A student at any level of University study who fails for a second
time, whether in repeating a year or in a later year, will be
required to withdraw from the University; after a period of at least
one year an appeal for permission to re-enrol will be considered by
the Dean of the Faculty concerned. A negative decision made by the
Dean may be appealed to the Senate Admissions Committee."
(i) Students who have been required to withdraw may appeal that
decision, normally after at least one year has elapsed.
(ii)  Students should submit their appeals to the Admissions Office. 9756.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Procedures on Appeals for Admission and Readmission
II. Senate Appeals for Readmission (continued)
(iii) Supporting documentation including transcripts of past record,
letters of recommendation, courses taken elsewhere, will all be
considered. The student is reminded that the appeal should
include some reference to the reasons for the failure and the
steps that have been taken that the conditions that led to the
failure have been corrected.
(iv) The application will then be sent to the Faculty in question
for the recommendation by the Faculty.
(v) A negative decision made by the Dean may be appealed to the
Senate Admissions Committee.
(vi) The student is then informed of the result as soon as possible
by the Registrar."
Dean Webber stated that the Agenda Committee felt that it would be
useful if Faculties were to review these procedures and report back to
Senate with any comments they might have.
Dean Webber   ) That the Procedures on Appeals for
Dean McNeill  ) Admission and Readmission be referred
to the Faculties for comment, and that
responses be forwarded to the Registrar
by October 1, 1990.
Carried
Committee on Continuing Education
Response to "Task Force on Continuing Education
In the absence of Dean Kennedy, Chairman of the Committee, Dean
Sheehan presented the following report:
"1. The Task Force report was welcomed in that it has heightened the
awareness of the University community to the importance of
Continuing Education as a public service. The following remarks
first define Continuing Education (C.E.), then separate C.E. in
discipline-directed, professional faculties from that for
extended general learning. It recognizes deficiencies in the
latter (only), and comments on aspects of leadership, cost
recovery and faculty involvement. 9757.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Continuing Education
Response to "Task Force on Continuing Education (continued)
"2. The Senate Committee defines C.E. as the delivery of adult,
non-degree credit courses. Although extra-sessional courses and
distance education were included within the terms of reference of
the Task Force, these subjects are outside this restricted
definition of C.E. Thus the consultants' recommendation that
extra-sessional studies and guided independent studies be
incorporated into a centralized Continuing studies department was
not supported. (Having said that, it was noted in passing that
fiscal and academic planning for extra-sessional courses could be
integrated within individual faculties to provide a rational
12-month program of course offerings, with the Registrar's Office
producing the registration guide and schedule of courses.)
3. The Task Force recognized two distinct forms of Continuing
Education: C.E. for the professions, and C.E. for extended
general learning. The Senate Committee believes that C.E. in the
professional faculties has been successful in servicing their
specific professional clients. It was agreed that this activity
should remain decentralized to the professional faculties. There
was no evidence that a centralized administration would make
course delivery of professional C.E. superior to the current
arrangements. Furthermore, the professional faculties were
emphatic that they retain fiscal responsibilities for course
delivery, and they oppose transfer of their revenues to cover
other areas of C.E.
4. Most of the delivery of C.E. for extended, general learning
involves the Faculties of Arts and Science, but professional
faculties also have a responsibility for diffusion of some of
their expertise to non-specialist audiences. The need was
acknowledged for leadership in coordinating general learning
courses by defining priorities and securing cooperation of the
academic departments for course delivery.
5. A number of Senate Committee members rejected the recommendation
that leadership in C.E. must be provided by a Dean or
Vice-President. Many felt that the present structure of the
Centre for Continuing Education permitted the activity noted in
(4) above. Others felt that a more senior position than a Centre
Director was required t carry a strong advocacy role for C.E.
activities, including enhanced funding. In any event, it was
noted that the profile of C.E. at UBC should be raised to permit
better public perception and access, and to deliver quality
courses in response to public needs.
6. The Senate Committee recognized that various faculties use
different accounting procedures to finance their C.E. activities.
Even in professional faculties, there are many instances when a
given C.E. offering does not recover all direct costs.  Likewise, 9758.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Continuing Education
Response to "Task Force on Continuing Education  (continued)
"6. C.E. in the extended general learning area should not be expected
to achieve complete cost recovery. If C.E. is important to the
University's mission, it should be expected to receive some
support from general purpose operating funds, just as sessional
credit offerings are supported. The matter of financial
self-sufficiency should be referred to the Senate Committees on
Budget and Academic Policy.
7. It was general agreed that insufficient incentives presently
exist, particularly for non-tenured and more junior faculty, to
engage in C.E., as it compromises the time available for research
and regular session teaching, the two factors upon which tenure
and promotion most strongly depend.
8. Even if incentives were in place, most faculty already have heavy
teaching loads. Concern was expressed that some faculties are
unable to offer certain credit courses (e.g. service courses in
sciences for non-scientists, courses after 4.30 p.m., and summer
courses for teachers to upgrade content). Without additional
resources, it is difficult to see how many departments could
offer non-credit courses to the general public. Even if
additional resources were available, new credit offerings might
have priority.
9. It was acknowledged that other B.C. universities and colleges
engage in C.E. This reduces both UBC's opportunities and
obligations to offer a wide variety of courses.
10. In summary, present policies work well for professional C.E. and
should not be altered. A higher profile needs to be given to
C.E. for general learning, to permit the University to better
respond to public needs within its fiscal and academic
constraints."
Commenting on behalf of the Alumni representatives and the Lt.
Governor appointees who serve on the Senate Committee on Continuing
Education, Mr. Pearce stated that the Committee had not been unanimous
in its review of the report and that there had been a substantial amount
of controversy.  He noted that there was an enthusiastic, dynamic and
energetic entity within the community, which was meeting the needs of
society.  He stressed that at no time had exception been taken to the
magnificent  work  being  carried out  by  the various  faculties and 9759.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Continuing Education
Response to "Task Force on Continuing Education (continued)
professional development, be it in the area of Medicine, Dentistry,
Commerce, Education, etc. However, he was very concerned about the
broader picture of the University and the higher perception of the
profile of UBC. He stated that funding was a direct and perhaps even an
indirect product of the public perception of UBC, and that if the
population of the province did not perceive that UBC was serving the
province as a whole, one could not expect the politicians of the
province to support requests for additional funding. Mr. Pearce stated
that he believed that the report of the Vice President Academic and
Provost, dated March 20, 1990, which was circulated to members of the
Committee on Continuing Education, was probably the most all
encompassing aspect and addressed the issues as they were seen. He
stated that at the meeting there had been no dissention with the
principles articulated in Dr. Birch's document. He believed that the
University must seriously consider the matter of continuing education in
the broad spectrum.
Mr. Pearce felt that a top level appointment in continuing education
was needed so that there would be someone at UBC who could be approached
by the community. He stated that he also believed that UBC needs to
reassess its stated philosophy that continuing education has to be
self-sustaining. He did not believe this to be a realistic perspective
given what he believed to be the mandate of the University. In
conclusion, Mr. Pearce stated that as a senator of UBC he was not
satisfied with the argument that it was unnecesary for UBC to offer
continuing education courses because they were being offered at other
universities and other institutions. 9760.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Committee on Continuing Education
Response to "Task Force on Continuing Education (continued)
Dr. Katz stated that as a member of the Committee, and a faculty
member, he wished to say that the Lt. Governor appointees and the
Convocation members had made valuable contributions to the Committee's
discussions of the report and that he supported the comments made by Mr.
Pearce.
Dr. Katz noted that there were many other programs that were not
being addressed at this moment which might involve professional
faculties, particularly programs of an interdisciplinary nature which
have to start from a central focus and from people who have the impetus
to develop continuing education. He stated that many of the Committee
members had difficulty with the idea of financial restraint, and hoped
that this matter could be addressed by the President's Office.
Curriculum Committee (see Appendix 'B')
Dr. Thompson, Chairman of the Committee, presented the report.
Faculty of Applied Science
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Applied Science, subject to the following:
ELEC 314 - add to the description: ELEC 314 may not replace CPSC 210
as a prerequisite for Computer Science courses. Students who intend
to register for additional computer science courses must take
Computer Science 210.
It is also recommended that this statement appear in the section of
the Calendar which describes the third year of the regular Electrical
Engineering program.
Faculty of Arts
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Arts. 9761.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
Faculty of Graduate Studies
The Committee recommended approval of the Fire Protection Engineering
Program, proposed by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, subject to the
following:
Change the second paragraph of the Calendar description to read:
"Program: Required courses are a minimum of 15 units of graduate
Fire Protection Engineering courses (including FPEN 598) plus a
minimum of 3 units of elective courses. Depending on the field of
the baccalaureate degree, additional courses may be required. These
and elective courses must be approved by the Program Director. A
comprehensive examination is required upon the completion of all
course work."
The Committee recommended approval of the Biomedical Engineering
Program (M.Eng.) proposed by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, subject to
the approval of MEDI 520.  Dr. Thompson noted that MEDI 520 had
subsequently been approved by the Faculty of Graduate Studies and would
probably be presented to Senate for approval at the May meeting.
The Committee had recommended approval of M.Sc. and Ph.D. Programs in
the Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, proposed by the Faculty
of Graduate Studies, subject to satisfactory consultations between the
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology and the Department of
Statistics concerning HCEP 506. Dr. Thompson informed Senate that since
consultations were still in progress, approval of the programs was being
withheld.
The Committee recommended approval of the Master of Science Program
(M.Sc.) in Atmospheric Science, proposed by the Faculty of Graduate
Studies. 9762.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee (continued)
Faculty of Law
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Law.
Faculty of Medicine
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Medicine.
Faculty of Science
The Committee recommended approval of curriculum proposals from the
Faculty of Science.
Dr. Thompson  ) That the proposals of the Faculties of
Mr. Pearce    ) Applied Science, Arts, Graduate Studies,
Law, Medicine, and Science, be approved.
Carried
Nominating Committee
Dr. Tennant, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following
report:
"The Nominating Committee nominates the following persons to fill student
vacancies on Senate Committees:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. B. V. McGuinness        - replacing Mr. T. P. Kaweski
Mr. B. D. Prins - replacing Mr. G. A. Porter
Academic Policy
Ms. T. L. Jackson - replacing Mr. D. M. Pettingale
Mr. 0. C. W. Lau - to fill vacancy
Admissions
Miss W. A. King - replacing Ms. H. E. Cowan
Miss S. A. Mair - replacing Mr. c. Q. Vanwermeskerken 9763.
April 18, 1990
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee (continued)
Agenda
Mr. R. H. McGowan
Mr. J. R. G. McQueen
Appeals on Academic Standing
Miss W. A. King
Mrs. L. Lohia
Mr. B. Taylor
Budget
Miss M. D. Bain
Mr. E. B. Goehring
Continuing Education
Mr. B. V. McGuinness
Curriculum
Miss A. L. Callegari
Ms. T. L. Jackson
Miss S. A. Mair
Committee on Elections
Mr. 0. C. W. Lau
Extracurricular  Activities
Mr. M. D. Nikkei
Mr. B. D. Prins
replacing Miss W. A. King
replacing Mr. R. L. Peters
- continuing member
- replacing Mr. R. L. Peters
- replacing Mr. D. M. Pettingale
- replacing Mr. M. J. Libby
- continuing member
replacing Miss J. Harrington
- replacing Ms. H. E. Cowan
- replacing Miss J. Harrington
- replacing Mr. C. Q. Vanwermeskerken
- replacing Ms. J. Thorn
- replacing Mr. A. K. Haji
- replacing Mr. G. A. Porter
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Mr. E. B. Goehring - continuing member
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
Miss M. D. Bain
Miss S. A. Mair
Mr. J. A. Moss
Student Awards
Ms. T. L. Jackson
Ms. P. F. Silver
- replacing Mr. T. P. Kaweski
- replacing Mr. D. Horvat
- replacing Mr. M. J. Libby
- replacing Mr. G. A. Porter
- replacing Ms. J. Thorn Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee  (continued)
Tributes
Mr. R. H. McGowan
Mr. J. R. G. McQueen
University Library
Miss A. L. Callegari
Mrs. L. Lohia
Mr. M. D. Nikkei
9764.
April 18, 1990
- replacing Mr. C. Q. Vanwermeskerken
- replacing Ms. W. L. Fox
- replacing Ms. W. L. Fox
- replacing Miss J. Harrington
- replacing Mr. T. P. Kaweski
Dr. Tennant
Miss King
Student Awards
)  That the recommendations of the
)  Nominating Committee be approved.
Carried
Dr. Cook, Chairman of the Committee, presented the report.
Dr. Cook
Mr. McMillan
)  That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A')
) be accepted subject to the approval of the
Board of Governors and that letters of
thanks be sent to the donors.
Dr. Cook drew attention to the C. K. Choi Prize in Buddhist Studies
which had been withheld at the previous meeting pending clarification. It
had subsequently been confirmed that the Faculty of Graduate Studies would
be involved in decisions concerninq this award and the committee were
therefore recommending approval.
Dr. Cook informed Senate that the Rogers Communications Inc. Scholarship
which had been withheld at the previous meeting, was again being withdrawn
pending clarification of the category of students to whom this scholarship
would be awarded.
The motion was put and carried. 9765.
April 18, 1990
Report of the University Librarian 1988-89
Mr. Watson, the Acting University Librarian, spoke briefly to the
report, which had been circulated for information. He drew attention to the
overwhelming popularity of the on-line public access catalogue and stated
that he had received favourable comments about the system.  He stated that
there had been repeated requests for more terminals.  At the present time
there were 21 and he hoped that this could be brought up to 100.  He noted
that the amount of photo copying in 1988/89 had increased by 50% over the
previous year and that this trend was continuing in 1989/90.  There had been
some decline in circulation which had decreased by 42,000 transactions, and
in the Woodward Library a lot of journals had been made non-circulating.
However, there had been no decline in the amount of material being used in
the libraries, which has to be sorted and reshelved.  There had been an
increase  in  document  delivery  among  the  campus  and  hospital  branch
libraries, and an increase in inter library loan transactions.  Remote
computer searching had decreased, chiefly as a result of end-user searching
on CD-ROM.  In conclusion, Mr. Watson noted that the library processing
activity had remained level despite a decrease in staff, largely because of
improvements in automation and organization of work.
Other business
University Ombudsperson
Dr. Tennant gave notice of the following motion:
"That the Academic Policy Committee examine and make recommendations
concerning the advisability of this university having a university
ombudsperson."
The meeting adjourned at 10.00 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, May 23,
1990.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 9766.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate
C. K. Choi Prize in Buddhist Studies - A $500 prize has been endowed by the
Choi family for an outstanding graduate or undergraduate student with high
standing in Buddhist studies. It is made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Arts in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate Studies where
appropriate.  (Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
Ciba-Geigy Prize in Pharmaceutical Sciences - A $300 prize, a gift of
Ciba-Geigy Canada Ltd., is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences to the graduating student who has obtained high
standing in senior pharmacology and drug therapy courses. (Available
1989/90 Winter Session.)
Elizabeth M. Crichton-Carver Memorial Scholarship - A $200 scholarship has
been established by the late John A. Carver in memory of his mother,
Elizabeth M. Crichton-Carver, for a student in the Faculty of Arts.
Preference is given to disabled students. Financial circumstances of the
candidate may be considered.  (Available 1991/92 Winter Session.)
McCarthy Tetrault Prize in Asian Legal Studies - The firm of McCarthy
Tetrault offers a $750 prize to a student who demonstrates excellence in a
course or seminar in Asian legal studies. The prize was initiated in 1990
to commemorate he opening of the firm's office in Hong Kong and is awarded
on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law. (Available 1989/90 Winter
Session.)
McCarthy Tetrault Prize in Contracts - The firm of McCarthy Tetrault offers
a $750 prize to a student who achieves high standing in Law 209
(Contracts). It is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law.
(Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
McCarthy Tetrault Prize in Property - The firm of McCarthy Tetrault offers a
$750 prize to a student who achieves high standing in Law 211 (Real
Property). It is awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law.
(Available 1989/90 Winter Session.)
Chester F. Millar Scholarship - Scholarships totalling $5,000, established
by Glamis Gold Ltd., honour Chester F. Millar (B.Ap.Sc.'50) in recognition
of his contributions to mine development. They are awarded on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Applied Science to students entering the
penultimate or final year of Geological Engineering, Metals and Materials
Engineering or Mining and Mineral Process Engineering. Canadidates must be
Canadian citizens or permanent residents. (Available 1990/91 Winter
Session.)
Simons Foundation Bursary - A $1,000 bursary has been endowed by The Simons
Foundation in memory of the fourteen women engineering students who were
murdered at the University of Montreal in 1989. The award is available to a
woman engineering student.  (Available 1990/91 Winter Session.) 9767.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Simons Foundation Doctoral Scholarship - Two $3,000 scholarships have been
endowed by The Simons Foundation to encourage women entering doctoral
programs. One award is available in the humanities or social sciences and
the second in science or applied science. The recipients will be
outstanding women scholars with potential for significant contribution to
society through achievement in their chosen field. The awards are made on
the recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. (Available 1990/91
Winter Session.) 9768.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Bio-Resource Engineering
New BIOE 490 (1.5)  Advanced  Biological  Waste  Systems
Design and Management
Electrical Enqineering
New ELEC 314 (1.5)  System Software Enqineerinq
ELEC 457 (1.5)  RF Electronics
Changes ELEC 315, 320 - change in term
ELEC 456, 46 4, 469, 470, 476, 477, 483 - change in
prerequisite
ELEC 493, 495 - change in prerequisite, hours
Changes in Programs
Third Year Regular Program
CPSC 210 becomes an alternative to the new course ELEC 314 (1.5)
System Software Engineering
Third Year Computer Engineering Option
ELEC 320 - move to First term
ELEC 315 - move to Second term
CPSC 310 - First term
CPSC 319 - Both terms
Fourth Year Computer Engineering Option
Add CPSC 415 as an alternative to CPSC 416
Change "Free Elective" to "Approved Elective"
Add CPSC 416 to the list of Electives
Enqineerinq Physics
Changes in Programs
Second Year
Core
CPSC 118 - move from Second Year to Third Year
APSC 278 - move from Third Year to Second Year
MECH 280 - move from first term to second term
PHYS 156 - move from second term to first term
PHYS 270 - move from first term to second term
Third Year
Option A
CPSC 210 - move from first term to second term 9769.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Engineering Physics (continued)
Fourth Year
Option 5 "CPSC"
CPSC 310 - delete from Fourth Year (effective 1990/91)
- move to Fifth Year (as CPSC 310/319) (effective 1991/92)
CPSC 318 - add to Fourth Year
CPSC 220 - move to first term
CPSC 315 - move to second term
Fifth Year
Option 2 "MECH"
MECH 466 - move from second term to first term
FACULTY OF ARTS
Anthropology
Changes ANTH 220, 401 - change in title
ANTH 221, 301 - change in title, prerequisite
Classical Studies
New Program
Honours in Classical Studies
First and Second Years:
6 units of Classical Studies and/or Latin and/or Greek with at least
second-class standing, and the permission of the Department of Classics.
Recommended:  Classical Studies 210, or 310, or 330, or 331.
Students are encouraged to take courses in the ancient languages.
New CLST 449 (3) Honours Essay
French
New FREN 422 (1.5-3)d Women  Writers  of  France  and
French Canada
(Geography)
Atmospheric Science Program
Changes ATSC 300, 301, 441, 442, GEOG 300, 301 - change in
prerequisite
ATSC  302,  411,  OCGY  411,  GEOG 302  - change  in
description, prerequisite 9770.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
History
Changes HIST 315 - change in title, description
HIST 329 - change in title
Change in Program Statement
Under Honours - change to read:
Honours
• # *
Third Year:
History 321 and 333
History 322 or 6 units of courses in History or related areas, chosen in
consultation with the Honours Adviser.
3 units outside the Department
...
Religious Studies
New RELG 475 (1.5/3)d Topics in Religion
Change in Program Statement
Under Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts - change to read:
Major
First and Second Years
Religious Studies 100 or 202 or 20 4
» » •
Honours
Admission
Religious Studies 100 or 202 or 204
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Fire Protection Engineering Proqram
Calendar statement: A program in Fire Protection Engineering leading to
an M.Eng. degree is offered to qualified engineering graduates seeking
to acquire graduate-level education for the practice of engineering in
fire protection. The program is designed for students with a
baccalaureate (or equivalent) degree from an accredited or
well-recognized engineering program.
Program: Required courses are a minimum of 15 units of qraduate Fire
Protection Engineering courses (including FPEN 598) plus a minimum of 3_
units of elective courses. Depending on the field of the baccalaureate
degree, additional courses may be required. These and elective courses
must be approved by the Program Director. A comprehensive examination
is required upon the completion of all course work. FPEN
501
(1.5)
FPEN
502
(1.5)
FPEN
503
(3)
FPEN
504
(1.5)
FPEN
505
(1.5)
FPEN
506
(1.5)
FPEN
507
(1.5)
FPEN
598
(3)
9771.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Fire Protection Enqineerinq Proqram (continued)
New FPEN 501 (1.5)  Combustion I
Combustion II
Suppression Systems
Fire and Life Safety Analysis
Fire Detection and Control Systems,
Instrumentation
Fire Protection Management
Fire Protection Case Studies
Fire Protection Engineering
Project/Report
The course selection is made by students upon consultation and approval
of the Program Director. Additional courses may be prescribed by the
Program Director depending for individual students on the nature of
their baccalaureate degree.
Upon completion of all course work, students must pass a comprehensive
examination to satisfy all requirements for the M.Eng. degree in Fire
Protection Engineering.
Full-time students can complete the formal course work for the M.Eng.
degree in two terms (lst term: September to December; 2nd term:
January to April) provided they are not assigned special preparatory
courses. The project/technical report (FPEN 598) is undertaken during
the following Spring and Summer Sessions, thereby requiring a minimum of
12 months for the completion of the degree.
Biomedical Engineering - M.Eng. Deqree
Calendar statement:
"Biomedical Engineering - M.Eng. Degree
Professor and Coordinator:  t.b.a.
The Master of Engineering degree is open to qualified graduates in
Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and
Engineering Physics. The program consists of fifteen units of credit.
All students will be required to complete both of the three-unit
courses, "Health Science for Biomedical Engineers" and "Principles of
Design of Biomedical Devices". Other courses will be selected from an
approved list or as directed by the Coordinator. Up to three units of
undergraduate courses (300 or above) are permitted. In addition to the
15 units, at least one major essay and a comprehensive examination, in
the form of a final written and/or oral examination, are required. 9772.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Biomedical Enqineerinq - M.Eng. Deqree
Calendar statement (continued)
The projects and associated engineering reports which are part of the
course, "Principles of Design of Biomedical Devices", will be
established in consultation with hospitals and specialized companies.
The students will work on these projects partly in the hospitals and
companies under the supervision of the faculty. The degree requirements
may be completed in one academic year although this is not mandatory.
Part-time enrollment is permitted.
The program educates students in the design and development of
innovative medical devices and related technology to meet important
needs of the health care system. These devices are broadly defined as
tools or machines designed for specific diagnostic or therapeutic
functions and include transducers, instruments, electrical and
mechanical hardware and software, and biomaterials.
Students may carry out research in biomedical engineering leading to the
M.A.Sc. degree and Ph.D. degree by registering for these degrees in the
Department of Electrical Engineering, the Department of Chemical
Engineering or the Department of Mechanical Engineering.
New course       APSC 530 (3) Principles of Design of Biomedical Devices
Atmospheric Science - M.Sc. Degree
Calendar statement
"Atmospheric Science - M.Sc. Degree
A program leading to a M.Sc. degree is offered under the joint
sponsorship of the Departments of Geography and Oceanography. Students
must satisfy the admission requirements of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies and normally have a Bachelor's degree in atmospheric science,
chemistry, physics, mathematics, physical geography or applied science.
The M.Sc. program consists of 6 units of thesis and 9 units of course
work, or 15 units of course work and an essay. It may be obtained
through full or part-time study.
Atmospheric science deals with understanding the processes of the
atmosphere and the resulting weather and climate. Many important
environmental issues are related to the atmosphere. The Atmospheric
Science Program offers training in the basic processes of the atmosphere
and the application of scientific knowledge to problems such as
atmospheric models for weather and climate prediction, air pollution
studies and other environmental areas. 9773.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Atmospheric Science - M.Sc. Degree
Calendar statement (continued)
The faculty engage in fundamental research in atmospheric science, both
independently and in cooperation with federal and provincial
laboratories and other research groups around the world. The emphasis
of the research is on studies of processes and developing physical
understanding of the atmosphere. The research commonly involves field
or laboratory measurement and observation; data analysis and
interpretation; and numerical model construction, modification and
validation. The group is extremely well equipped for research on most
characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer. In addition to
conventional meteorological instruments, there are systems for sensing
all component fluxes of the radiation and energy budgets, eddy
correlaton systems for turbulent heat fluxes and other facilities for
probing boundary layer structure. Equipment for digital recording and
analysis of data and images is available. Other facilities include a
NOAA satellite receiving station and image processing laboratory in the
Oceanography Department and weather workstations in the Geography
Department connected to the Pacific Weather Centre's satellite and
synoptic data systems.
Students wishing to undertake a Ph/D. degree program in the Atmospheric
Sciences may do so through the Departments of Geography or Oceanography
and should consult the department most appropriate to the proposed field
of specialization.
Further information can be obtained by contacting the Chairman of the
Atmospheric Science Program."
New course    ATMS 599 (6) Master's Thesis
FACULTY OF LAW
New courses     LAW 201 (2/2.5)d Perspectives on Law
LAW 203 (2/2.5)d Legal Institutions of Canadian Government
Change LAW 213 (0)  Legal Writing and Moot Court
change in description
Deletions      LAW 201 (1.5)   Introduction to Legal Process
LAW 203 (2.5/3)d Canadian Constitutional Law I
Proposed Calendar entry:   (Courses  of  Instruction  section,  p.  167,
1989/90 Calendar)
Under FIRST YEAR, add the following paragraph: 9774.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF LAW  (continued)
"All of the first-year courses are compulsory. Instruction will
include introductory sessions covering fundamental background
material. These sessions take the place of regular classes for
three to six full days at the start of the year and up to two full
days later on in the year."
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Pathology
Change   PATH 417 - change in prerequisite to read:
"Co-requisite or prerequisite: MICB 403".
Pharmacology and Therapeutics
New     PCTH 302 (1.5) Introductory Pharmacology Laboratory
PCTH 499 (1.5/3)c Honours Thesis
Change in Calendar Entry
(p. 232, col. 2)
33. PCTH 300, 305 (390)
34. PCTH 300, 302
(p. 245, col. 1)
Honours - Fourth Year
Add:  PCTH 449 (1.5/3)
Change units for Science Electives to: (4.5/3)
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Atmospheric Science
Changes  ATSC 300, 301, 441, 442 - change in prerequisite
ATSC 302, 411 - change in description, prerequisite
Chanqe in Program
Major
Second Year
Atmospheric Science/Geography 200, 3001
Add footnote: (Existing footnotes 1 and 2 become 2 and 3)
1        For students transferring to ATSC and/or UBC to start at Third
Year, one or both of these courses may be waived on permission
of Chairman.
Change in Calendar Statement (1989-90, p. 234, col. 1, para. 1) to read: 9775.
April 18, 1990
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Atmospheric Science  (continued)
"A program of undergraduate studies, a diploma program in meteorology
and a Masters degree in Atmospheric Science are offered cooperatively by
the Departments of Geography and Oceanography. Students should direct
enquiries to the Chairman, Atmospheric Science Program, University of
British Columbia. For information on the M.Sc. program, see the Faculty
of Graduate Studies section of the Calendar. Students wishing to
undertake a Ph.D. degree program in the Atmospheric Sciences should
consult the department most appropriate to the proposed field of
specialization."
Bioloqy
Chanqe   BIOL 437 - change in description, hours, prerequisite
Geoqraphy
Changes  GEOG *300, *301 - change in prerequisite
GEOG *302 - change in description, prerequisite
GEOG *306 - change in title, description
Mathematics
New      MATH 308 (1.5) Euclidean Geometry
MATH 309 (1.5) Topics in Geometry
Deletion MATH 310
Change in Program
Major in the Mathematical Sciences
Third and Fourth Years
Delete Footnote 3 from:
Electives^
Oceanography
Change   OCGY 411 - change in description, prerequisite

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