Open Collections

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1979-11-14

Item Metadata

Download

Media
senmin-1.0115409.pdf
Metadata
JSON: senmin-1.0115409.json
JSON-LD: senmin-1.0115409-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): senmin-1.0115409-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: senmin-1.0115409-rdf.json
Turtle: senmin-1.0115409-turtle.txt
N-Triples: senmin-1.0115409-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: senmin-1.0115409-source.json
Full Text
senmin-1.0115409-fulltext.txt
Citation
senmin-1.0115409.ris

Full Text

 7251.
Wednesday, November  14,   1979.
The Third regular meeting of the Senate of The University of British Columbia for
the Session 1979-80 was held on Wednesday, November 14, 1979 at 8.00 p.m. in the
Board and Senate Room.
Present: President D. T. Kenny (Chairman), Chancellor J. V. Clyne, Mr. N. Akiha,
Dean G. S. Beagrie, Acting Dean T. R. Bentley, Mr. W. H. Birmingham, Mrs. M. F.
Bishop, Dr. E. V. Bohn, Dr. C. B. Bourne, Dr. T. H. Brown, Rev. P. C. Burns, Dr. J. G.
Cragg, Dr. J. Dahlie, Mrs. L. Daniells, Dr. J. D. Dennison, Dr. A. J. Elder, Dean C. V.
Finnegan, Mr. R. C. Formosa, Mr. H. J. Franklin, Mr. P. J. V. Fryer, Mrs. E. D. Fulton,
Ms. A. Gardner, Dr. P. Gilmore, Ms. P. Gouldstone, Dr. H. J. Greenwood, Dr. A. G.
Hannam, Dr. T. D. Heaver, Miss V. Johl, Dr. F. R. C. Johnstone, Dr. L. D. Jones,
Mr. W. R. Julien, Mr. E. G. Kehler, Mr. J. Kulich, Dean P. A. Larkin, Dr. J. R.
Ledsome, Mr. F. Lee, Dr. D. Lupini, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Dean K. M. Lysyk, Dr. D. J.
MacDougall, Dr. A. J. McClean, Mr. W. A. McKerlich, Dr. J. H. McNeill, Mr. J. F.
McWilliams, Mr. C. Niwinski, Dr. R. A. Nodwell, Dr. J. F. Richards, Dean B. E. Riedel,
Dr. V. C. Runeckles, Dr. S. O. Russell, Mr. R. H. Santo, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. M.
Shaw, Mr. B. K. Short, Dr. R.H. T. Smith, Dr. G. J. Spitler, Dr. J. K. Stager, Dr. O.
Sziklai, Mr. G. A. Thorn, Mr. D. F. Thompson, Miss C. L. V. Warren, Mr. D. L. Watts,
Dean W. A. Webber, Dean L. M.Wedepohl, Dean R. M. Will, Dr. M. D. Willman, Dr. J. L.
Wisenthal, Mr. B. M. S. Wright.
Observer:  Mr. J. A. Banham
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from Mr. W. G.
Burch, Dean J. A. F. Gardner, Dr. W. M. Keenlyside, Dean W. D. Kitts, Ms. C. E.
McAndrew, Dr. C. A. McDowell, Mr. M. M. Ryan, Dr. R. F. Scagel, Dr. J. G. Silver,
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs, Mr. L. Valg, Mrs. J. C. Wallace.
Minutes of the previous meeting
Dean Larkin     ) That    the   minutes    of   the   Second   regular
Dean Riedel     ) meeting of Senate  for  the Session   1979-80,
having been circulated, be taken as read and
adopted.
Carried
Senate membership
The   Chairman   welcomed   Mr.   H.   J.   Franklin   who   had   been   named   as   a
Lieutenant-Governor appointee to Senate. 7252.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations - subject, where
applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented without formal
reference to the President and the formal agreement of the President; and that the
Deans and Heads concerned with new programs be asked to indicate the space
requirements, if any, of such new programs.
(i) Change in name of the Department of Mineral Engineering to the Department
of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering recommended by the Faculty of
Applied Science.  (P.7244)
(ii) New course recommended by the Faculty of Arts.  (P.7236-7 & P.7249)
(iii) New   course   recommended   by   the   Faculty   of   Commerce   and   Business
Administration.  (P.7236-7 & P.7249)
(iv) Change in name of the Department of Oral Surgery to the Department of Oral
and   Maxillo-facial    Surgery   recommended   by   the   Faculty   of   Dentistry.
(P.7244-5)
(v) Change in name of the Department of Public and Community Dental Health to
the Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry recommended by the
Faculty of Dentistry.  (P.7245)
(vi) New course recommended by the Faculty of Education.  (P.7236-7 & P.7249)
(vii) New courses and course changes recommended by the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.  (P.7236-7 & P.7249-51)
(viii)        Course  change  recommended  by  the  Faculty  of  Pharmaceutical  Sciences.
(P.7236-7 &P.7251)
Prizes, Scholarships and Bursaries
Mr. Short ) That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A') be
Dean Beagrie     ) accepted subject to the approval of the Board
of Governors and that letters of thanks be sent
to the donors.
Carried
Candidates for Degrees
The Secretary of Senate explained that in the past lists of candidates for degrees
had been circulated to each member of Senate but due to budgetary constraints only a
few lists had been made available for inspection by Senate members at the meeting.
Senate agreed that this procedure be followed in the future.
Dean Webber       ) That the candidates for degrees as approved by
Dean Finnegan    ) the Faculties be granted the degrees for which
they were recommended, subject to any
necessary adjustments in the lists to be made
by the Registrar in consultation with the
Deans concerned and the chairman of Senate.
Carried 7253.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee   (see Appendix 'B')
Dr. Wisenthal presented the report. The committee recommended approval of
new courses in Paediatrics which had been withheld at the previous meeting. It was
noted that one of the new courses, Paediatrics 545 (2) Advanced Clinical Practice in
Audiology and Speech Pathology, had been withdrawn at the request of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies.
Dr. Wisenthal     ) That new courses in Paediatrics submitted by
Dr. Richards      ) the Faculty of Graduate Studies be approved.
Carried
Admissions Committee
Dr. Smith presented the following interim report:
"The  Senate at  its meeting of April   18,   1979 accepted a  report of the ad  hoc
Committee on Standards in English which recommended:
"that Senate ask the Admissions Committee to select an examination in
English Composition to be available for use in admitting students
entering the University in September 1980"
The Admissions Committee proceeded on the assumption that there were three
possible examinations; the English Placement Test (E.P.T.), the American College
Test (A.C.T.), and the College Entrance Examination Board Achievement Test. The
Committee understands that the universities of British Columbia are specifically
precluded from using the E.P.T. as an admissions test. The American College Test
comprises a three hour battery of tests which would be inappropriate for the purpose.
After a thorough investigation of the College Entrance Examination Board English
Composition Test with Essay, the Admissions Committee concluded that it would be
inadvisable to institute a test of this nature as an integral part of the admission
requirements of secondary school graduates seeking admission to the University. The
Committee doubts that it would contribute conclusively to the solution of the
problem of identifying students with poor writing ability. It is only a part of a set of
tests and may not be entirely useful in isolation. Moreover, it may incorporate
cultural bias. Serious questions have been raised about its validity. Finally, the
institution of this test would impose on applicants for admission to UBC an additional
$13.50 expense.
Several School Districts and individual schools, with the encouragement of the
Ministry of Education, Science and Technology have made admirable progress in
emphasizing the importance of English Composition throughout the school system in
the last several years. During this winter the Ministry is to conduct an investigation
of the feasibility of providing an evaluation of writing ability distinct from the grade
of English 12. In view of these efforts of the Ministry to upgrade competence in
writing ability throughout the schools and the likelihood of an improvement in the
identification of this ability on school transcripts of record, the Committee believes
that the University should suspend for the time being the search for an independent
test of the literacy of applicants. The Committee urges that a formal request for the
partitioning of the English 12 grade into literature appreciation and writing
components be made. 7254.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee   (continued)
"For the current Winter Session the Department of English has made use of results of
the English Placement Test to allocate students to appropriate sections of English 100
and to advise those applicants with poor E.P.T. results of the availability of remedial
studies through the Centre for Continuing Education. Some 200 students have made
use of the remedial courses this term and more are expected to enrol in them
following the Christmas examinations. The Committee proposes that, as soon as
practicable after the sessional examinations next April, the Department of English
and the Centre for Continuing Education report to the Admissions Committee on the
performance of all English 100 students. Following receipt of this information the
statistics will be analysed to determine whether there is a relationship between
English 12 courses (and possibly marks in other Grade II or 12 academic subjects),
E.P.T. scores, completion of a CCE upgrading course and English 100 marks upon
which the admissions policy might be based."
Attention was drawn to the sentence urging that a formal request be made for the
partitioning of the English 12 grade into literature appreciation and writing
components. It was pointed out that the Ministry of Education had deliberately
moved away from this approach and that if such a request were to be made some
reasoned argument ought to be presented.
Dr. Lupini suggested that the Admissions Committee meet with a group of high
school English department heads and district representatives in order to understand
more fully the objectives of the Grade 12 English program and to obtain more
accurate information on the written English aspect of the program. He stated that
the current approach to teaching English in high schools was an integrated one which
included many areas in addition to literature and writing.
Dr. Wisenthal stated that he did not agree that the University should suspend for
the time being its search for an independent test of the writing ability of applicants.
He stated that from the report it was not clear that the Ministry had been formally
approached about the use of the English Placement Test or some variant as one of the
criteria for admission, nor was it clear to what extent the committee had considered
other tests that could be available. He agreed that there had been admirable progress
in the schools but argued that no matter how good the system was standards varied
from school to school. What was needed was equity so that there would be fairness to
all students in the province.
In conclusion Dr. Wisenthal stated that people concerned with the issue in the
University should be consulted and it was not clear what consultation had taken place. Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee   (continued)
7255.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Dr. Wisenthal     ) That      Senate      request      the      Admissions
Rev. Burns ) Committee   to   continue   its   search   for   an
independent test of students' writing ability
and that the committee, in conducting its
enquiry, consult with interested parties in the
University.
Carried
Continuing Education
The annual report of the Centre for Continuing Education 1978-79 and the annual
report of the Office of Extra-Sessional Studies 1978-79 had been circulated together
with reports on continuing education activities in Health Sciences, Commerce and
Social Work.
Dr. MacDougall presented the following report of the Committee on Continuing
Education, which had been circulated:-
"I.  We are continuing the practice, begun in the 1976-77 year, of presenting to Senate
a report which summarizes the activities of:
1. Centre for Continuing Education;
2. Health Sciences, Division of Continuing Education;
3. Faculty of Commerce, Professional Programs; and
4. School of Social Work, Continuing Education.
This year we have also included:
5. Office of Extra—Sessional Studies
so that Senate members can have a more complete picture of this University's
educational activities over and above those offered in the regular winter session.
Mr. Kulich, the Director of the Centre, has agreed to compile a more detailed
composite report which will issue from the President's Office.
2.   The   total   registrations   in   these   programs   (previous   year's   registrations   in
parentheses) were as follows:
Centre for Continuing Education
40,844
(35,436)
Health Sciences
9,623
(11,246)
Commerce  (Executive programs)
2,390
(  2,030)
(Real Estate division)
3,369
( 3,612)
(Diploma division)
4,244
( 4,585)
Social Work
1,043
(      965)
Extra Session
(1)      Winter Session
3,206
( 2,464)
(2)      Spring Session
2,757
(  2,565)
(3)      Summer Session
4,153
(  3,975)
71,629 66,878
Although the reports "speak for themselves" some general comments should be
made. 7256.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Continuing Education    (continued)
"3. Professional Education. A considerable portion of the University's continuing
educational programs is concerned with professional education. Of the 40,844 who
registered for courses offered by the Centre some 10,850 were registered in
professional and technical programs. These programs are described in more detail
at pp. 23—32 of the report of the Centre. They include programs in education,
engineering, law, agricultural sciences, forestry, and urban planning. If you add to
this figure the 20,669 who registered for courses offered by the Health Sciences
(9,623), Commerce (10,003) and Social Work (1,043) it is obvious that this
University is making a substantial commitment to the continuing education of
professionals in practice in B.C.
The committee would draw your attention to p. 3 of the Health Sciences report
which reproduces the following comment from the Survey Team, Council of
Education of the Canadian Dental Association:
"204. The Survey Team found continuing education to be one of the
highlights of the school operation"
and
"234. The most excellent organizer of Continuing Dental Education
should receive adequate appreciation. This is such an invaluable
feature that all efforts must be pursued to ensure its continued
development and scope."
Obviously there can be considerable variety and flexibility in the "links" which
exist between a professional group and the University. In August, 1979, for
example the Continuing Legal Education Society separated from the Centre and
moved to its own offices in the Law Society Building. However it will maintain
close links with the Centre and the Faculty of Law. In the Health Sciences, the
Division of Continuing Education works in co-operation with a network of regional
co—ordinators. The responsibility for ensuring the maintenance, and improvement,
of professional standards rests primarily with the professions themselves. But the
University of B.C. represents one of the major resources available to such
professional groups and the various reports reflect the extent to which the
University has participated in continuing education programs for professionals.
4. Non-Credit Programs. The Centre offers a wide range of general, non-credit
programs. These programs are described in more detail at pp. 13—22 of the
Centre's report. The continued growth of the Women's Resources Centre deserves
a special note. As Women's Access Centres are established and funded by B.C.
community colleges (on an initiative from the Ministry of Education, Science and
Technology) the U.B.C. Women's Resources Centre is becoming a major training
resource for their staff and volunteers.
In addition two important free educational services are offered by the Centre:
1. the televised Public Affairs program on Channel 10;
2. the new noon-hour lecture series in Robson Square. 7257.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Continuing Education    (continued)
"4.   Non-Credit Programs  (continued)
The question of funding for general, non-credit programs remains a critical one.
However some 29,037 took advantage of these programs - including those who
registered for the Centre's first newspaper correspondence course, entitled Write
On!, offered in co-operation with The Province newspaper.
5. Credit Programs. The Office of Extra-Sessional Studies is responsible for the
co-ordination and administration of all Extra-Sessional credit courses and
programs with the exception of credit correspondence courses which are
administered by the Centre for Continuing Education. The office reports an
increase in the number of part time students attending winter evening and spring
sessions. The faculties of Science and Arts (as well as the Faculty of Education)
now offer a 3 year sequence of courses which allow completion of a major during
the winter evening and spring sessions. While this represents a substantial
attempt by the University to meet the needs of students who are unable to attend
the normal day classes it must be recognized that there are additional costs (for
both faculty and support services) in operating the University for the extended day
and over the extended year. The report from the Office of Extra—Sessional
Studies refers to several studies (p. 5; 6-7) which are intended to lead to more
rational planning to meet the needs of part—time students.
With the establishment of the Open Learning Institute the Centre has deliberately
limited the development of its correspondence (more accurately, guided
independent study) courses and concentrated on improvement of established
courses. There was a slight drop in the number of students registered in
degree—credit courses and an increase in the number of students registered in the
guided independent study program in Criminology. This program is currently
under review. In the current year two new courses leading to the Certificate in
Early Childhood Education will be available.
6. Location of Programs. Although the majority of the programs offered were
located within the Greater Vancouver area the University also attempted to meet
the needs of persons resident outside that area. On p. 51 of the Report on the
Centre it is noted some 3,593 attended (I) professional or (2) general education
programs offered outside the Greater Vancouver area. To this figure must be
added some of those registered in the guided independent study programs. The
Division of Continuing Education in the Health Sciences made significant progress
in developing Regional Networks of Continuing Education (pp. 9-11). Indeed one
reason for the apparent decline in the number registered in the Health Science
programs is the growth of these regional networks. More courses are now
originating in the local communities. Continuing education in the health sciences
has not declined but a different structure for delivering these programs is
developing. Some of the courses offered by the Faculty of Commerce were
offered in locations outside the Greater Vancouver area or were available, by
correspondence, to people resident outside that area. The report of the Office of
Extra-Sessional Studies describes a significant increase in the number of students
enrolled in off-campus courses offered by the Faculty of Education (p. 9). Some
of these programs are self sufficient in the sense that fees equal or exceed the
cost of offering the programs. Others have been made possible by the provision of
special funding from either the (i) Interior University Program Board or (ii) the
Universities Council of B.C. However this funding is not assured, and often
approved too late, to allow orderly and efficient planning and development. 7258.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Continuing Education    (continued)
"7. Other Activities. Even this report is incomplete. The credit programs offered by
Office of Field Development, Faculty of Education are contained in the report
from the Office of Extra-Sessional Studies but none of the reports before you
refers to their extensive non-credit programs. In addition several Faculties and
Schools (e.g. Social Work, Agricultural Sciences) are offering programs in the
interior with special funding from the Universities Council. Moreover many
continuing education activities are sponsored by individual Faculties and not
generally reported."
The Chairman expressed thanks and appreciation for the work done by
Dr. MacDougall and his committee and paid tribute to Mr. Kulich, Director of the
Centre for Continuing Education, and to all those involved in continuing education
activities.
Ad hoc Committee on Awards and Scholarships
Dean Beagrie, Chairman of the committee, presented the following report:-
"At a meeting held February 15th, 1978, the Senate established a Committee to make
recommendations on:
the University's policy governing the award of fellowships,
scholarships, exhibitions, bursaries and prizes to students;
and
the desirability of establishing a standing committee of Senate or some
other body to keep under review the Universitiy's policy governing
these awards.
The membership of the Committee on Awards and Scholarships was established at the
September Senate meeting. The Committee held five meetings and reviewed the
policies and procedures covering awards issued through the Office of Awards and
Financial Aid. It was noted that the Joint Faculty Committee on Prizes and
Scholarships had not been convened for a number of years and in the absence of any
formal instruction from Senate, the Director of Awards and Financial Aid had shaped
policy in consultation with the Registrar and others. The only comprehensive
statement of awards policy has appeared in the University Calendar.
I.   STANDING COMMITTEE
The Committee discussed the need for a standing Senate Committee to advise the
Director of Awards and Financial Aid and agreed to recommend that such a
committee be established.
RECOMMENDATION ONE
THE SENATE SHOULD ESTABLISH A STANDING COMMITTEE ON
STUDENT AWARDS TO ADVISE THE DIRECTOR OF AWARDS AND
FINANCIAL AID ON MATTERS OF POLICY. 7259.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Ad hoc Committe on Awards and Scholarships
"I.   STANDING COMMITTEE  (continued)
lt should be noted that the Committee reviewed only awards under the jurisdiction
of the Awards Office and did not consider direct awards made by other
organizations or a variety of graduate level awards made by agencies such as the
Medical Research Council, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council,
and the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council.
2.   TERMS OF ACCEPTANCE
The Committee considered the descriptions of several existing awards and
recommends the following terms of acceptance be adopted by Senate:
The University should use the following terminology:
(a) Scholarships
Scholarships are awards based primarily on the academic qualifications of the
candidate. In selecting recipients, qualifications such as participation in
University or community activities may also be considered. Students being
considered for scholarships will normally be ranked using an academic average
based on a full program of study in the most recent faculty and year. In order
to receive the scholarship, a student must normally register in the next regular
academic session and be enrolled in a minimum of 12 units (or 80% or a full
program where appropriate). Scholarships will not be awarded to candidates
with an academic average below 70%. Scholarships will normally be in excess
of $100 in value and unless otherwise stated in the description, will be
restricted to undergraduate students.
(b) Medals and Prizes
Medals and prizes are based on the academic qualifications of the candidate.
Prizes are normally $100 or less in value and both medals and prizes are paid
out or awarded in the academic session in which the award is made. Receipt
of the award is not dependent on the candidate returning in the next academic
session.
(c) Fellowships
Fellowships are based on the academic qualifications of the candidate. The
awards are normally in excess of $1,000 in value and are awarded to candidates
in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Holders of fellowships are expected to be
enrolled in a full-time program of study as determined by the Faculty of
Graduate Studies.
(d) Awards
Awards are not necessarily based on academic merit, however students must
be taking a minimum of 12 units in order to receive the award. Awards are
normally paid out in the academic session which they are made. Receipt of
the award is not dependent on the candidate returning in the next academic
session. 7260.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Ad hoc Committee on Awards and Scholarships
"2.   TERMS OF ACCEPTANCE  (continued)
(e) Bursaries
Bursaries are based on the financial circumstances of the candidate. While no
particular academic qualifications are required, candidates are normally
expected to be making satisfactory progress. Unless the terms of the award
specify to the contrary, students are normally expected to be taking a
minimum of 12 units.
The final decision in matters regarding the selection of candidates for University
awards shall lie with the University.
With the exception of awards established prior to January 1st, 1977, the
University will not normally adjudicate awards which may be tenable at other
institutions.
A significant number of awards are made possible through Wills of which the
University has had no prior knowledge. In some cases, the University may face
restrictions which it would have attempted to modify if it had had prior
knowledge. In the event that the terms are unsatisfactory to the University,
recourse is through the courts. The University would prefer to avoid this type of
action where possible.
Where prior discussion is possible, donors of University awards are encouraged to
provide funds on an unrestricted basis to enable the University to maintain
flexibility in respect to changes in programs and other circumstances. The
University will accept affirmative action awards which encourage students in
certain programs, of a particular sex, or of a particular minority group. These
awards shall be subject to the regulations of the Human Rights Act of British
Columbia.
RECOMMENDATION TWO
THE SENATE SHOULD ADOPT A STATEMENT OF TERMS OF
ACCEPTANCE COVERING AWARDS. THE FULL STATEMENT
APPEARS ABOVE, HOWEVER THE FOLLOWING SHOULD BE NOTED:
DONORS OF UNIVERSITY AWARDS ARE STRONGLY
ENCOURAGED TO PROVIDE FUNDS ON AN
UNRESTRICTED BASIS TO ENABLE THE UNIVERSITY TO
MAINTAIN FLEXIBILITY IN RESPECT TO CHANGES IN
PROGRAMS AND OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES. WHILE
NOT ENCOURAGING SUCH AWARDS, THE UNIVERSITY
WILL ACCEPT AFFIRMATIVE ACTION AWARDS WHICH
SUPPORT STUDENTS IN CERTAIN PROGRAMS, OF A
PARTICULAR SEX, OR OF A PARTICULAR MINORITY
GROUP. THESE AWARDS SHALL BE SUBJECT TO THE
REGULATIONS OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS ACT OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Committee reviewed the general policies of the Awards Office and discussed
the following specific areas. 7261.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Ad hoc Committee on Awards and Scholarships  (continued)
"3.   DEFINITION OF FULL-TIME
The Committee noted the distinction between "full-time" for purposes of
adjudication of applicants, and "full—time" for purposes of holding an award. In
general, it was agreed that scholarships should be adjudicated based on the normal
full program as defined by each faculty. The unit values may be adjudicated to
reflect different loads in each year of study. Where a student is taking an
overload course, the Awards Office has previously calculated the average based on
the normal load. The Committee felt that this practice should be changed and
students taking additional courses should have these courses included in the
calculation of their average.
RECOMMENDATION THREE
SCHOLARSHIPS ARE MADE AVAILABLE TO SUPPORT FULL-TIME
STUDENTS. "FULL-TIME" FOR PURPOSES OF ADJUDICATION AND
SELECTION OF RECIPIENTS SHALL BE DEFINED AS THE NORMAL
FULL PROGRAM AS ESTABLISHED BY EACH FACULTY.
The Committee discussed awards for part-time students. While the Committee is
sympathetic to the need for scholarships for these students, it was felt that until
adequate funding for full—time students is available, no major part-time support
programs should be undertaken. If and when additional scholarship funds become
available the Standing Committee should consider scholarships for part-time
students.
For purposes of retaining a scholarship, "full—time" shall be interpreted as 12 units
or in the case of professional programs, 80% of a full program. This coincides
with the current practice although the policy has been phrased in terms of a full
program of study.
RECOMMENDATION FOUR
FOR PURPOSES OF RETAINING A SCHOLARSHIP, "FULL-TIME"
SHALL BE INTERPRETED AS 12 UNITS OR IN THE CASE OF
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS, 80% OF A FULL PROGRAM.
4.   DEFERRED AWARDS
The current policy allows a student holding a scholastic award to defer the award
for one year. In the past, the option was open only to students who had attended
U.B.C. for at least one session. Students entering from Grade 12 could defer an
award only on medical grounds. In 1977, the policy with respect to students
entering from Grade 12 was relaxed to coincide with the general policy. The
Committee discussed deferment and holds the view that the policy should be
changed to permit deferment of an award only for medical or other extenuating
circumstances. It was suggested that the new Standing Committee awards could
consider individual appeals against the policy. 7262.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Ad hoc Committee on Awards and Scholarships
"4.   DEFERRED AWARDS  (continued)
RECOMMENDATION FIVE
A STUDENT SHALL ONLY BE PERMITTED TO DEFER A
SCHOLARSHIP WHERE COMPELLED FOR MEDICAL OR
COMPASSIONATE REASONS TO INTERRUPT HIS/HER STUDIES.
SUCH DEFERMENT SHALL BE ALLOWED FOR ONE ACADEMIC
YEAR.
5. EXAMINATIONS FOR STUDENTS ENTERING U.B.C. FROM GRADE 12
At one time, students entering U.B.C. from Grade 12 were required to write the
B.C. Government Scholarship Examinations if they wished to compete for U.B.C.
Entrance Scholarships. This requirement is still in force for most of the major
awards that are open to all students entering from Grade 12 but has been relaxed
where the number of students who are potential applicants is small (for example
where the award is for students from a specific school or area, or where it is for
dependents of employees of specific companies or organizations).
Adjudication of marks for entering students is made difficult by the varying
standards of marking applied across the high schools. While the government
scholarship results are provided in raw form, they are the only uniform set of
grades available. The Committee discussed the idea of entrance examinations and
endorsed the concept. It was noted that this idea has been discussed by Senate but
that no positive action seems likely. In the absence of uniform entrance
examinations, the Committee feels that all students entering U.B.C. from
Grade 12 and wishing to be considered for scholarships administered by the
University, should be required to write the B.C. Government Scholarship
Examinations.
RECOMMENDATION SIX
STUDENTS ENTERING U.B.C. FROM GRADE XII IN A B.C.
SECONDARY SCHOOL AND WISHING TO COMPETE FOR
SCHOLARSHIPS ADMINISTERED BY THE UNIVERSITY SHALL BE
REQUIRED TO WRITE THE B.C GOVERNMENT SCHOLARSHIP
EXAMINATIONS.
6. MAXIMUM VALUE OF AWARDS HELD BY AN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT IN
AN ACADEMIC YEAR
The Calendar provides for a limitation on the value of awards held by a student.
While no formal policy is in place, the Awards Office attempts to ensure that
scholarships are spread across the pool of eligible students as fairly as possible.
The Committee discussed the concept of scholarship "reversion" and agreed to
limit the value of scholarships held by an undergraduate student in a given
academic year to $2,500. This figure approximates the cost of fees, books, and
accommodation in residence and should be reviewed periodically. 7263.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Ad hoc Committee on Awards and Scholarships
"6.   MAXIMUM VALUE OF AWARDS HELD BY AN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT IN
AN ACADEMIC YEAR    (continued)
RECOMMENDATION SEVEN
THE AGGREGATE VALUE OF SCHOLARSHIPS HELD BY AN
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT IN A GIVEN ACADEMIC YEAR SHALL
BE LIMITED TO $2,500.
7. EARLY WITHDRAWAL
In some instances, after an award has been made, a student withdraws or does not
actually register. Under these circumstances, the award normally is reissued to
another student. Where the student withdraws after the initial installment has
been paid, there has been some pressure to reissue the award in a reduced amount.
There has also been some question as to whether the student should be expected to
repay the award if he/she drops out prior to the end of the term.
The Committee considered various options and agreed that:
RECOMMENDATION EIGHT
WHERE AN AWARD HAS BEEN MADE TO A STUDENT WHO
SUBSEQUENTLY WITHDRAWS OR FALLS BELOW FULL-TIME,
A) IF  THE  FIRST   INSTALLMENT  OF  THE   AWARD HAS  NOT
BEEN PAID OUT, THE AWARD SHOULD BE REISSUED, OR
B) IF  THE  FIRST  INSTALLMENT  OF THE AWARD HAS BEEN
PAID OUT, THE AWARD SHOULD NOT BE REISSUED.
8. UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS
The Committee reviewed the development of the "University Scholarship"
program which seeks to ensure a rational distribution of undergraduate awards
across the various faculties. The program was initiated in 1977/78 and provided a
minimum award of $250 to the top 5% of all full-time continuing undergraduate
students. In 1978/79, this was increased to $500 for the top 6% and $250 for the
next 2%. The Awards Office has proposed that the levels be increased to $750 for
the top 3%, $500 for the next 3%, and $250 for the next 2%. This would require
funding above and beyond that which is presently available.
In the event that additional funding is not available, the Committee recommended
that the three levels be implemented even if it meant reducing the percentage
involved in each level. 7264.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Ad hoc Committee on Awards and Scholarships
"8.   UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS (continued)
The Committee spent some time discussing the matter of whether the "University
Scholarship" program awards should be made to the top students regardless of
other awards held, or whether the value of other awards should be considered.
The program was initially conceived to ensure that the top students in each
faculty received at least a minimum level of academic award. It was agreed that,
while other awards held by a student should be considered, some special ceiling on
academic awards for purposes of the University Scholarship program only should
be established.
It was agreed that where a student was being considered for scholarships under the
"University Scholarship" program, the total value of academic awards held should
not exceed 150% of the value of the University Scholarship for a given student. In
other words a student who was academically qualified for a $500 University
Scholarship would be eligible to hold awards totalling $750 without any reduction
in the amount of "University Scholarship" support.
RECOMMENDATION NINE
THE "UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP" PROGRAM SHOULD BE
EXPANDED, FUNDS PERMITTING, TO PROVIDE A SCHOLARSHIP
OF $750 FOR THE TOP 3% OF THE CONTINUING FULL-TIME
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN EACH YEAR AND FACULTY,
$500 FOR THE NEXT 3%, AND $250 FOR THE NEXT 2%.
9.   AWARD TRANSCRIPTS
The Awards Office has developed a computer based record system for award
winners. Prior to 1968, the academic awards appeared on the student's transcript.
Since 1968, the information has not appeared on the record. However for the past
four years, it has been available in a computer file.
RECOMMENDATION TEN
THE REGISTRAR'S OFFICE AND THE AWARDS OFFICE SHOULD
JOINTLY DEVELOP AN "AWARDS TRANSCRIPT" THAT WILL BE
SENT TO ALL WINNERS OF ACADEMIC AWARDS.
10.  OTHER COMMENTS
The Committee reviewed the suggestion made on the 1976 Report to the President
on Women's Initiatives that the University offer "special funds to provide
fellowships for graduate study to women who have been out of school for five
years and... scholarships for women taking residency training in the health
sciences." It appears that no action has been taken with respect to this
recommendation and the Committee wished to draw this matter to the attention
of the Senate." 7265.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Ad hoc Committee on Awards and Scholarships  (continued)
Dean Beagrie    ) That Senate establish a standing committee on
Dr. Elder ) Student   Awards   to   advise   the   Director   of
Awards and Financial Aid on matters of policy,
and that recommendations 2 to 10 be regarded
as guidelines for the use of the committee.
During the following discussion Dr. Dennison expressed concern that all awards
were reserved for full-time students. He felt that perhaps some awards might be
open to both full and part-time students.
Mr. Niwinski referred to recommendation 5 and stated that students were strongly
opposed to this recommendation. He felt that a student who wished to take a year
out of university should not be denied a scholarship.
In amendment:
Mr. Niwinski   ) That    the    report    be    accepted    with    the
Mr. Short ) exception of recommendation 5.
Dean Beagrie stressed that the recommendations were guidelines for the proposed
committee.
The amendment was lost.
Senate agreed to a suggestion that the committee, when established, be requested
to report to Senate in due course concerning its activities.
The motion was put and carried.
Faculty of Applied Science
Senate agreed with the recommendation of the Agenda Committee in referring
proposed changes in admission policy to the Senate Admissions Committee before
discussion by Senate.
Faculty of Law
Proposed change in admission standard
A proposal that the minimum academic average be 65% for all categories of
applicants for admission to the Faculty of Law was referred to the Senate Admissions
Committee. 7266.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Faculty of Law    (continued)
Change in date of application for admission
It was explained in the material circulated that the current deadline date was
March 31 and that the proposed earlier date of December 31 would permit
notification of successful applicants at least by early summer. At present applicants
must wait until July or August before receiving notification of acceptance - a date
much later than that on which most other Law Faculties in Canada issue acceptances.
Dean Lysyk ) That   the  deadline  date  for applications for
Dr. MacDougall    ) admission to the Faculty of Law be changed to
December 31 of the year preceding admission.
Faculty of Medicine
Carried
Proposal that the Division of Audiology and Speech Sciences become a School of
Audiology and Speech Sciences
The following proposal had been circulated:-
"The present Division of Audiology and Speech Sciences was established within the
Department of Paediatrics, in the Winter Session of 1969, following examination by
committees in the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The
proposal for a Master of Science degree (Audiology and Speech Sciences) was
approved by the Senate New Programs Committee, earlier that year.
U.B.C. graduates in Audiology and Speech Sciences work in a variety of clinical
settings throughout British Columbia and Canada. The status of the Division within
the Department of Paediatrics and vis-a-vis other Departments and Faculties, has
been examined in detail by a number of committees within the Faculty of Medicine
and the University during the past ten years. The Division's status has also been
discussed by the Dean of Arts, Graduate Studies, Education and Medicine. The
concensus opinion of all these deliberations has been that education and training of
Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists in B.C., could be best attained as a
separate School within the Faculty of Medicine.
I.   TRAINING OF GRADUATES
While enrolled as graduate students within this program, individuals follow a
well-defined and closely supervised course of instruction built around a
core-curriculum with clearly defined but closely integrated academic and clinical
components.
All students are expected to follow the core-curriculum for the first year of
graduate studies. Following the successful completion of the first part of their
clinical training during the four months between 1st and 2nd years, students are
then free to decide on specialization either as Audiologists or Speech-Language
Pathologists.
On completion of their degree, graduates are eligible for membership in the
Canadian Speech and Hearing Association and all Provincial Speech and Hearing
Associations. At the present time there is neither Federal nor Provincial licensing
for workers in this professional field. 7267.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Faculty of Medicine
Proposal  that  the Division of Audiology and Speech Sciences become a School of
Audiology and Speech Sciences  (continued)
"2.   MANPOWER NEED
The Division has always given close attention to the need for trained Audiologists
and Speech—Language Pathologists, both in British Columbia and elsewhere in
Canada. For at least the next five years we foresee a need for approximately
20-25 graduates per year from a University program in British Columbia. This
number all lows for immigration into the Province from elsehwere and attrition by
marriage, pregnancy and retirement.
3. NUMBER OF APPLICANTS AND GRADUATES
At the present time the Division of Audiology and Speech Sciences receives over
100 applications for the positions which it has available and, in addition,
distributes over 350 separate "pieces" of information relating to letters of inquiry
(i.e. information regarding the U.B.C. program), received throughout the year.
Over the past few years the Division has developed feeder-programs in
cooperation with the Departments of Linguistics at the University of Victoria,
Simon Fraser University and U.B.C, which give undergraduate students careful
preparation for entrance into graduate work both at U.B.C and elsewhere in
Canada. The first effects of such structuring are being felt this year when there
are approximately 14 students graduating from the Department of Linguistics at
U.B.C. who have applied for admission to the University of British Columbia
program, and approximately eight students who have made application, who are
attending the other two Provincial Universities. The number of applicants will
likely increase dramatically as students become aware of the availability of this
type of preparation.
It is anticipated that a School of Audiology and Speech Sciences will have an
ongoing student population of 40. Enrolment for the Winter Session 1979-80 will
be 30.
4. ACADEMIC LEVEL OF DEGREE CONFERRED
Approval by both the Faculties of Medicine and Graduate Studies, and the
approval of the Senate New Programs Committee in 1969, and approved
substantive changes since that time lead us to conclude that the academic nature
of the program is at a level commensurate with University standards. The
Division of Audiology and Speech Sciences enjoys an international reputation for
its work in Psychoacoustics (Dr. D. D. Greenwood); Experimental Phonetics,
(Dr. A-P Benguerel); and Child Language (Dr. J. Gilbert). Examination of
curriculum vitae of faculty members attests to its active research program as
evidenced by the number of papers published and the number of international
meetings attended by its faculty.
5. THE STATUS AND ROLE OF "SCHOOLS" AT U.B.C.
The present Division of Audiology and Speech Sciences meets the guidelines for
establishment of a School. Such a change of status would also be in keeping with
University policy on Schools and their organization. Such a policy was detailed in
Senate Minutes (February 14, 1949), which contains a report from Dean Chant of a
"Committee on the Organization of the University". This report was subsequently
adopted by Senate. 7268.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Faculty of Medicine
Proposal  that the Division of Audiology and Speech Sciences become a School of
Audiology and Speech Sciences  (continued)
"6.   THE ADVISORY COUNCIL
The Advisory Council should consist of full-time members of the School of
Audiology and Speech Sciences, as well as one representative each from
Linguistics, Psychology, Otolaryngology, Paediatrics, Neuro-Sciences and
Education of the Hearing Impaired. In addition, it would be advisable to have the
President or delegate of the B.C. Speech and Hearing Association and a
representative of the Medical profession at large, as members of this Council.
The Director of the School should be chairman of the Advisory Council and all
members should have an equal vote. The Advisory Council should meet at least
twice a year and, when necessary, at the call of the chair.
As recommended by the Committee on the organization of the University (1949)
any matters pertaining only to the proposed School of Audiology and Speech
Sciences should be referred to the Council of the School. The Dean of Medicine at
his discretion, may refer any matters brought to Council to the full faculty.
Budgetary matters would be dealt with by the Director of the School in discussion
with the Dean and the Faculty of Medicine Budget Committee. Curriculum
revisions would be brought to the faculty of Medicine Curriculum Committee for
transmission to faculty.
The Council would in particular offer: (I) informed comment on new course
proposals and changes in the program proposed by faculty; (2) informed comment
on enrolment figures, continuing education proposals and other
academic/professional matters."
Dean Webber      ) That the proposal of the Faculty of Medicine
Dean Larkin       ) that  the  Division   of   Audiology   and   Speech
Sciences  become a  School  of Audiology and
Speech Sciences be approved.
Carried
School of Rehabilitation Medicine
Change in date of application for admission
Dean Webber    ) That  the deadline date for admission to the
Dean Riedel      ) School of Rehabilitation Medicine be changed
from April 30 each year to February 28 each
year.
Carried
Proposed changes in Admission and Examination and Advancement Policy
Proposed changes in admission policy and Examination and Advancement Policy
submitted by the School of Rehabilitation Medicine were referred to the Senate
Admissions Committee. 7269.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
School of Rehabilitation Medicine  (continued)
Degree-completion Program
Dean Webber     ) That   the  degree-completion  program   in  the
Dean Riedel      ) School of Rehabilitation Medicine be  phased
out with the last date for registration to be
April 30, 1980 and requirements for graduation
met by 1985.
It was explained in the material circulated that the program, which was approved
in 1975, was introduced to enable therapists holding a diploma to complete the
requirements for the B.S.R. degree, either in Occupational Therapy or Physiotherapy,
and consisted of 30 units of course work.
It was also explained that the intention of the School had been to offer the
program for approximately ten years and that there had been a gradual decrease in
enrolment over the last few years.
The motion was put and carried.
Academic Year 1980-81
A draft of the section of the Academic Year for inclusion in the Calendar had been
circulated for information.
Attention was drawn to the problem of scheduling examinations for those students
involved in the Geological Sciences field school. The Chairman suggested that the
Heads of the Departments of Economics and Geological Sciences, together with the
Deans of Arts and Science, attempt to resolve this problem.
Other business
Motions by Ms. Gardner, Ms. Johl and Mr. Watts
(i)        Ms. Gardner       ) That  a  committee  be  struck  to determine upper
Mr. Niwinski      ) limits on student/teacher ratios to be permitted in
laboratories,     tutorials,     discussion     groups     and
problem sessions in which:
(a) a teacher must give individual instruction or
assistance, or
(b) a teacher must lead group discussion, or
(c) a teacher must answer individuals' questions
although directing answers to all students
present.
In the following discussion it was agreed that tutorials were getting too large but
due to budgetary constraints this was unavoidable. The only solution would be to turn
students away and it was agreed that this would be undesirable. 7270.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Other business
Motions by Ms. Gardner, Ms. Johl and Mr. Watts (continued)
It was agreed that the word "determine" in the motion be changed to "suggest".
The motion was put and lost.
(ii)     Mr. Niwinski     ) That Senate forward to the Board of Governors
Mr. Short ) a recommendation that they not condone any
further expansion of the Discovery Park to be
located on the U.B.C. campus without a full
community hearing process.
In reply to a query Mr. Niwinski confirmed that the motion referred to expansion
on campus or into the Endowment Lands. It was pointed out that an agreement had
been made so that they could not expand into the Endowment Lands.
The motion was put and lost.
(iii)    Mr. Niwinski      ) That Senate forward to the Board of Governors
Mr. Lee ) a    recommendation    that    Senate    be    given
periodic progress reports on development of
the Discovery Park to be located on the U.B.C.
campus.
Carried
(iv)    Ms. Johl ) That Senate forward to the Board of Governors
Mr. Niwinski      ) a recommendation that the community to be
affected by the building of the Discovery Park
on the U.B.C campus be given full
representation on its Board of Management.
Said community including students, faculty and
staff of U.B.C, as well as the residents of the
University Endowment Lands.
Lost
(v)      Mr. Watts ) Upon receipt of an application in writing from
Mr. Niwinski      ) a  student,  the  Department  Head  concerned
will ensure that the student be allowed to view
his/her marked final examination paper within
two weeks of receipt of said application. This
policy to be stated clearly in the appropriate
section on appeals procedure in the University
Calendar.
Mr. Niwinski stated that there was no clear University policy on allowing students
to look at a final examination paper, and in the case of an appeal on academic
standing a student could appeal without being able to see the paper he was appealing. 7271.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
Other business
Motions by Ms. Gardner, Ms. Johl and Mr. Watts  (continued)
An opinion was expressed that there were opportunities for students to discuss
their papers with their instructors and that in the case of an appeal it would surely be
possible for the student to see the paper at the meeting at which an appeal was being
discussed.
Dr. Heaver ) That the motion be tabled.
Dean Wedepohl     )
Carried
Joint Meeting of the Faculties
The Chairman informed Senate that he would be calling a meeting of the joint
Faculties on Thursday, November 22, 1979 at 1.00 p.m. in Lecture Hall 2 of the I.R.C.
building to discuss the "mission" of the University. The Universities Council of B.C.
had requested the President's of U.B.C, Simon Fraser, and the University of Victoria,
to prepare individual statements on the mission, goals and objectives of the three
universities.
Registrar
The Chairman paid tribute to Mr. J. E. A. Parnall, Registrar and Secretary of
Senate, on the occasion of his retirement.
Report of the Tributes Committee
Dr.  Stager  presented the report of the Tributes Committee.    Members of the
gallery were asked to leave.
Memorial Minute
The following memorial statement had been prepared in accordance with the
custom of Senate in recognition by the University and the Senate of the late John F.
McCreary.
IN MEMORIAM
JOHN FERGUSON McCREARY
On October 14, 1979, this University lost one of its most beloved members when
Jack McCreary died suddenly at his home in Gibsons, B.C. In a lifetime spanning
nearly 70 years, the contributions that he made to health care, education and human
welfare were prodigious. 7272.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Report of the Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute  (continued)
Born in 1910 in Eganville in the Upper Ottawa Valley, he graduated from the
University of Toronto in 1934 with the degree Doctor of Medicine before undertaking
an internship and residencies in Medicine, Pathology and Paediatrics at Toronto's
General and Sick Children's Hospitals. He spent two years as a Milbank Research
Fellow at Harvard.
During World War II he served with distinction as an officer in the Medical Branch
of the R.C.A.F. In 1944 he was seconded to Supreme Headquarters, Allied
Expeditionary Force in Europe to conduct a clinical survey of children in the
concentration camps and occupied areas of Europe. For this work he was made an
officer of The Royal Orange Order of Nassau by the Government of the Netherlands.
Returning to civilian life in 1945 he devoted himself to a rapidly growing practice
of paediatrics in the City of Toronto.
In 1951 he accepted an invitation to come to The University of British Columbia
as Professor and Head of the Department of Paediatrics and Paediatrician—in-Chief
of the Vancouver General Hospital's Health Centre for Children.
In 1959 he became Dean of Medicine, a position he held until 1972. During this
period he was a member of Senate. As Dean he became the creator of and driving
force behind the concept of the Health Sciences Centre. He maintained that
members of the health professions who worked together as a team throughout their
professional careers should spend at least a portion of their preparatory educational
experience in a co-ordinated training program, that the rate of obsolescence of
current knowledge demanded the introduction of continuing education programs, and
that university health science centres should explore more efficient methods of
providing health care services to a larger proportion of the population. That some of
these ideas swept across the country was due primarily to his vision and energy. He
was an extremely popular lecturer and a superb teacher, loved and respected by his
colleagues, students and the public in general. In his roles as Professor and Dean he
was instrumental in building a strong academic Department of Paediatrics and in the
recruitment of top-notch faculty members for the various departments of the
Medical Faculty.
His leadership in the realm of medical education was not confined to his own
community and university. He served with distinction as President of the Association
of Canadian Medical Colleges and on two Federal royal commissions, and as Director
or Trustee of a host of other institutions and foundations of the community,
provincial and national levels.
His many contributions did not go unrecognized and he was the recipient of
numerous honours and awards. He received the Centennial Medal Award of the
Government of Canada and he was honoured as Knight of Grace of the Order of
St. John and as an officer of the Order of Canada.
He was granted honorary D.Sc. degrees by Memorial University and The University
of British Columbia and an honorary LL.D. by the University of Toronto. He was a
truly extraordinary man, characterized by an extraordinary unshakable optimism. At
times he encountered frustration and opposition but he never gave in to obstacles that
might seem insurmountable to others. He had many interests in life, including a great
love of nature and the outdoors. He was a vital, enthusiastic and happy man. If he
ever felt sad or depressed, he rarely, if ever, showed it. 7273.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
Report of the Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute (continued)
The Health Sciences Centre of our university will stand as one of his monuments.
The affection and esteem of his colleagues, his former students and patients will be
another enduring memorial.
Senate extends to his wife Dorothy, to his son James and other members of the
family, its deepest sympathy.
Dr. Stager ) That    the    Memorial    statement    for    John
Dean Webber      ) Ferguson McCreary be spread on the minutes
of  Senate  and  that  a  copy   be  sent   to  the
relatives of the deceased.
Carried
The meeting adjourned at 10.45 p.m.
The next meeting will be held on Wednesday, December 12, 1979.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 7274.
Wednesday,  November   14,   1979.
APPENDIX 'A'
New Awards recommended to Senate
Tommy Burgess Memorial Forestry Scholarship - A scholarship in the amount of $500,
provided by Mrs. T. E. Burgess, will be awarded to a student entering third year
Forestry. Preference may be given to a student primarily interested in the
production aspects of Forestry. The award will be made on the recommendation of
the Faculty.
Stuart Keate Award - An annual award in the amount of approximately $350 has been
made available by the Canadian Diabetic Association to honour Stuart Keate, a
former member of the U.B.C. Player's Club, the Board of Governors of the
University, and Publisher of the Vancouver Sun. The award will be made, on the
recommendation of the Department of Theatre, to a graduate student in Theatre.
Louise Elliott McLuckie Bursary Fund - Bursaries to a total of approximately $7,500
per annum have been made available by the late Mrs. Marjorie Louise McLuckie,
B.A. '24. The awards will be used to provide assistance for worthy and deserving
students entering The University of British Columbia from Grade 12. In selecting
candidates, recommendations from high school principals will be given favourable
consideration. 7275.
Wednesday,  November  14,   1979.
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Paediatrics/Audiology and Speech Sciences
New courses                 PAED    508 (2)
509 (2)
510 (2)
511 (2)
541 (1)
542 (1)
543 (2)
544 (2)
Clinical Audiology
Clinical Speech Pathology
Advanced Clinical Audiology
Advanced Clinical Speech Pathology
Clinical Practice in Audiology
Clinical Practice in Speech Pathology
Advanced Clinical Practice in Audiology
Advanced   Clinical   Practice   in   Speech
Pathology

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.senmin.1-0115409/manifest

Comment

Related Items