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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] May 23, 1984

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 8206.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
The Ninth regular meeting of the Senate of The University of British Columbia for
the Session 1983-84 was held on Wednesday, May 23, 1984 at 8.00 p.m. in Room 102,
George F. Curtis Building.
Present: President K. George Pedersen (Chairman), Vice-President R. H. T.
Smith, Dr. R. A. Adams, Mr. J. L. Armstrong, Mr. V. P. Battistelli, Dean G. S. Beagrie,
Mrs. H. M. Belkin, Dr. G. D. Bellward, Dr. W. E. Benjamin, Dean D. R. Birch, Mr. W. H.
Birmingham, Mrs. M. F. Bishop, Dr. T. H. Brown, Rev. P. C. Burns, Dr. K. 0. L.
Burridge, Dr. D. J. Campbell, Mr. A. L. Clarke, Dr. D. J. Connor, Dr. T. S. Cook, Dr. J.
Dahlie, Mrs. S. Dodson, Dr. D. Donaldson, Dr. A. J. Elder, Mr. D. B. Fields, Dean C V.
Finnegan, Mr. H. J. Franklin, Mr. M. D. Friesen, Mrs. E. D. Fulton, Dr. M. A. Hickling,
Ms. S. J. Holmes, Dr. W. M. Keenlyside, Mr. J. T. Kelsall, Dean R. W. Kennedy,
Dean P. A. Larkin, Dr. L. M. Lavkulich, Dr. D. Lupini, Dean P. A. Lusztig, Mrs. A.
Macdonald, Mr. B. Mah, Ms. C. E. McAndrew, Mr. D. Mclnnes, Mr. J. F. McWilliams,
Dr. W. R. Morford, Mr. W. G. Pegler, Mr. P. J. Penner, Dr. J. F. Richards, Dr. V. C
Runeckles, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. J. G. Silver, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Mr. J. A.
Smitton, Dr. P. Suedfeld, Dr. O. Sziklai, Dr. P. R. Tennant, Dr. A. Van Seters,
Miss C L. V. Warren, Dean W. A. Webber, Dean L. M. Wedepohl, Dean R. M. Will,
Dr. D. LL. Williams, Miss L. A. Williams, Dr. M. D. Willman, Dr. J. L. Wisenthal,
Mr. R. A. Yaworsky.
Observer:  Mr. J. A. Banham
Messages of regret for their inability to attend were received from Chancellor
J. V. Clyne, Dr. C. E. Armerding, Dean P. T. Burns, Miss D. J. Chow, Dr. J. D.
Dennison, Mr. R. M. Finnigan, Dr. H. E. Hirsch, Dr. R. F. Kelly, Dr. A. Kozak, Dr. D. S.
Lirenman, Dr. A. J. McClean, Mr. A. J. Pearson, Dean B. E. Riedel, Mr. J. M.
Rutherford. 8207.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Correspondence
The Secretary read to Senate a letter from Chancellor J. V. Clyne expressing
appreciation to Senate for conferring upon him the rank of Chancellor Emeritus.
Senate membership
Declaration of vacancy
As required under section 35 (6) of the University Act, the following vacancy was
declared:
Mr. B. McCloy - student representative of the Faculty of Education
Replacement
Mr. J. A. Smitton replaces Mr. B. McCloy as student representative
of the Faculty of Education
Minutes of previous meeting
Dr. Dahlie     ) That the minutes of the Eighth regular meeting of
Mrs. Bishop ) Senate   for   the   Session    1983-84,   having   been
circulated, be taken as read and adopted.
Carried
Business arising from the Minutes
Faculty of Arts - English Composition Test  (P.8196)
At the previous meeting a proposal from the Faculty of Arts concerning the
English Composition Test was referred back to the Senate Admissions Committee for
clarification.  Dr. Dahlie presented a revised motion.
Dr. Dahlie   ) That  students  who enter  the  University  before
Dr. Adams  ) completion of their first 30 units of course work
are expected to pass the English Composition Test
before registering in the Faculty of Arts for their
final 30 units. No student who has not passed the
test will be permitted to register in the Faculty of
Arts for the final 15 units.
Carried
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration - Suspension of admission to First
Year Licentiate Program for 1984/85  (pp.8192-3)
Senate had been informed at the previous meeting that the Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration would have to suspend admission to the First Year of the
Licentiate in Accounting Program. 8208.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Business arising from the Minutes
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration - Suspension of admission to First
Year Licentiate Program for 1984/85  (continued)
Dean Lusztig ) That admission to the First Year of the Licentiate
Mr. Fields       ) Program be suspended for the  1984/85 academic
year.
It was stated in the material circulated that recent cuts in the budget of the
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration necessitate suspending admission
to the Licentiate Program for the 1984/85 academic year so that the Faculty can
maintain its basic undergraduate and graduate programs.
The motion was put and carried.
Faculty of Education - Suspension of admission to the First Year of the Bachelor of
Education (Special Education) Program (pp.8192-3)
A proposal to suspend admission to the First Year of the Bachelor of Education
(Special Education) Program had been circulated. Dean Birch stated that the proposal
should also have included suspension of admission to the program leading to the
Diploma in the Education of the Mentally Retarded.
Dean Birch ) That Senate approve and recommend to the Board
Dr. Cook      ) of Governors  for  approval   the  decision  of  the
Dean of Education that no students be admitted to
Year I of the Bachelor of Education (Special
Education) program in 1984/85 and that no
students be admitted to the program leading to
the Diploma in the Education of the Mentally
Retarded in 1984/85.
Dean Birch explained that it was the intention of the Faculty to reinstate the
diploma program in the Education of the Mentally Retarded when the faculty member
concerned returns from leave-of-absence.
Dr. Lupini stated that the suspension of the programs would create some fairly
serious problems for the School Districts which are now being asked to integrate
severely disabled students and mentally retarded students into the regular classroom.
He stated that teachers trained in these programs were able to accept those children
and to provide a good education in both special classes and in regular classes. He
appreciated the University's situation but hoped that everything would be done to
reintroduce the diploma program as well as the five-year program in Special
Education.
The motion was put and carried. 8209.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Prizes, Scholarships and Bursaries
Mr. McWilliams )      That the new awards (listed in Appendix 'A') be
Dr. Burridge       )      accepted subject to the approval of the Board of
Governors and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried
Candidates for Degrees
Lists of candidates for degrees, as approved by the various Faculties and Schools,
were made available for inspection by Senate members prior to the meeting.
Dean Webber ) That the candidates for degrees and diplomas, as
Dean Finnegan ) approved by the Faculties and Schools, be granted
the degree or diploma for which they were
recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chairman of
Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried
Scholarships and Awards
The Chairman reported that Thomas Robert Stevenson was to receive the
Governor—General's Gold Medal. The Chairman noted that Mr. Stevenson had a
graduating average of 98.68% and had received marks of 100% in twelve of his courses.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Response   to   Ministry   of   Education's   proposed   Secondary  School   Graduation
Requirements
Dr. Dahlie presented the following report which had been circulated:
"The Senate Admissions Committee met April 24, 1984 to discuss the Ministry of
Education's "Secondary School Graduation Requirements: A Discussion Paper",
the so-called White Paper. At that meeting, Mr. Robert Overgaard of the
Ministry of Education provided some background to the White Paper and outlined
the major changes proposed by the Ministry. The Committee subsequently
discussed the proposals and made a number of recommendations, to Senate and for
submission to the Ministry.
1. The current University admission requirements for students entering from the
B.C. secondary school system will not change in light of the Ministry's
proposals. The Committee wished, however, to restate that secondary school
graduation would remain a requirement for admission to The University of
British Columbia.
2. The Committee noted with approval the proposal of the Ministry to institute
Communications II and 12, taking the view that this would strengthen the
existing courses, English II and English 12, and reduce the incidence of the
M.E. (Modified English) designations on the latter. However, the Committee
wished to restate that English II and English 12 would be required for
university entrance. 8210.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee
Response   to   Ministry   of   Education's   proposed   Secondary   School   Graduation
Requirements (continued)
"3. The Committee examined the proposal that graduation in Arts and Science
requires a "Minimum four '12' courses from Arts and Science Category." The
Committee strongly recommended that the Ministry consider a change in the
requirements to read a "minimum of four '12' level courses, three of which
must be from the Arts and Science Category." This change would allow
students to have the option of taking the fourth '12' level course from one of
the other subject areas in the Applied Arts and Sciences major (Business
Education, Industrial Education, Home Economics, or Visual and Performing
Arts), thus enabling students to broaden their educational background.
4. The Committee noted the trend to require more hours and courses, e.g.
mathematics, science, and languages, but agreed that the addition of
Japanese 12 and Chinese 12 is appropriate, considering both the University's
Asian Studies program and the province's Pacific Rim location."
Dr. Lupini commended the committee on its recommendations, particularly
recommendation 3. He stated that if the Ministry of Education's proposals were
to be implemented, many excellent secondary school programs would have to be
terminated. Programs such as Business Education, Industrial Education, Home
Economics and Visual and Performing Arts were no longer being selected by
students because of the emphasis on the Arts and Science programs. He felt that
students should be given the opportunity to take one elective from the areas
mentioned which were, in his opinion, essential for the broad and complete
education of secondary school students.
Dr. Dahlie  ) That  Senate  support  the  four  recommendations
Dr. Adams ) contained in the report.
Carried
Faculty of Applied Science - supplemental examinations
The committee recommended approval of the following proposal from the
Faculty of Applied Science:
"That   the  regulation  on  page  45  of   the   1983/84  Calendar  re  April
Supplemental privileges be rescinded, to be effective for April, 1985".
i.e. in the second paragraph delete the words, ... "except that for
students in their final year, supplemental examinations will be provided
during the period of the sessional examinations in April."
Dr. Dahlie )      That   the   proposal   of   the   Faculty   of   Applied
Dean Wedepohl  )      Science concerning supplemental examinations be
approved.
Carried 8211.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Admissions Committee  (continued)
Faculty of Arts - English 100
The committee recommended approval of proposals from the Faculty of Arts
concerning English 100.
Dr. Dahlie  ) (i)    That    the   Faculty   of   Arts   require   that
Dr. Adams ) students registered  in  the Faculty  of  Arts
satisfy   the   English 100   requirement   within
the first 30 units completed.
(ii) That the Faculty of Arts recommend to
Senate that the number of times a student
registered in the Faculty of Arts may repeat
English 100 be two times.
Carried
Appeals on Academic Standing
Annual Report
The following report had been circulated for information:
"Under the terms of reference the Committee is required to make an annual report
to Senate.  Clause 2.07 of the terms of reference states:
"The report shall state the number of appeals heard, their disposition,
and the general nature of the appeals, and shall draw the Senate's
attention to any other matters of general significance in the University
which have arisen out of the Committee's work."
This report covers the period April I, 1983 to March 31, 1984. During that period
the Committee heard twelve appeals. It denied eight of those appeals, and
allowed four of them.
Under its terms of reference the Committee is directed that it shall allow an
appeal where it decides that a decision has been arrived at through improper or
unfair procedures, and that as a result a wrong decision on the merits may have
been arrived at. In four of the appeals that were denied the appellants argued
that the Faculty had committed various procedural errors. In each of these cases
the Committee was not convinced that in fact any procedural errors had been
committed, or, if they had, was convinced that an erroneous decision on the
merits had not been arrived at. In two other appeals which were denied the
Committee was convinced that there had been significant procedural errors
committed in dealing with complaints made by the appellants after the writing of
final examinations. However in both cases the Committee also concluded that the
errors had not affected the original substantive decisions that had been arrived at
by the Faculties in question, and therefore the appeals were dismissed. Finally, of
the appeals that were denied, two turned solely on the interpretation of the
University calendar. 8212.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Appeals on Academic Standing
Annual Report (continued)
"The Committee allowed four appeals. In the first, the Committee decided that a
student had been ill at the date of writing an examination and had not had the
possibility of writing a deferred examination brought clearly enough to her
attention. The Committee therefore directed that she be permitted to write the
examination again. In the second a student had for a number of years been given
to understand that his progress as a graduate student was satisfactory. Then came
a rather abrupt change of opinion about the thesis proposal that he made, and he
was required to withdraw. The Committee felt this abrupt change of opinion in
such a short time was unfair, and directed that the student be given the
opportunity of submitting fresh thesis proposals. In the third appeal, the
Committee found three procedural errors: (I) a failure to make clear the basis of
assessment at the beginning of a course; (2) a failure on the part of the instructor
to assess the final submission of a student before arriving at the conclusion that
the student had failed the course; and (3) a suggestion that if the student agreed
not to enrol in the program in the following year he would be given a passing
rather than a failing mark in the course. The Committee thought that these were
substantial procedural errors, and they might well have had an impact on the
assessment of the student. It therefore directed that the student be given the
opportunity of completing the requirements for the course in question. In the
fourth case, the Committee concluded that the Faculty had erred: (I) by making a
deduction from a student's mark in respect to the late handing in of what was in
fact a Faculty evaluation; (2) by failing clearly to take into account certain
discretionary factors in arriving at a judgement about the student's performance;
and (3) by applying a process which quite legitimately attempted to prevent
discrepancies between the marks given by the various instructors in a clinical
program, but which, in the opinion of the Committee, operated in an unfair way,
particularly to poorer students. The Committee therefore directed that the
Faculty reconsider the student's standing in the course. That was done, the
student was awarded a passing grade, and therefore graduated.
The Committee is directed by its terms of reference to bring to the attention of
the Senate any matters of general significance to the University which may have
arisen out of its work. On this occasion there are three matters that Senate might
wish to know about.
First, the Committee again underlines the desirability of the procedure for the
assessing of courses being made clear at the outset of the course so that no
dispute can later arise as to what was in fact expected of students.
Second, Senate may recall that the Committee drew to Senate's attention the
desirability of reviewing the rules for the combined degree programs which are
offered at the University. That was done by the Faculties in question, and the
Faculties reported to the Senate at its March 1984 meeting.
Third , two of the appeals turned on the interpretation of the University calendar.
Some suggestion was made that the Committee did not have jurisdiction in such
cases. The Committee takes the view that it does, and will proceed on that basis
unless directed to the contrary by Senate. So far as the substance of the appeals
were concerned in one case the calendar was extremely clear, and in the second
clear enough, though perhaps not as clear as it might have been. It seems to the
Committee that, particularly in the respect of older regulations, Faculties,
Departments and Schools should review them to make sure that current practices
and the regulations are in accord." 8213.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate  (continued)
Budqet Committee
Dr. Scudder, Chairman of the committee, presented the following report:
"This report of the Senate Budget Committee summarizes the reductions that have had
to be made to the University operating budget over the last eight years, describes the
reductions for the current year, and outlines the academic implications of these.
Finally, it notes the urgent need for long-term academic planning at the University,
even though budgets are dependent on a yearly decision cycle.
Previous Budqet Reductions
The University has had to effect internal reductions in the operating budget now for
the last eight years (Table I.)
Table I  - Reductions in operating budget 1976-1983.
Fiscal Year Budget Reduction
Permanent Temporary
1976-77 $1,750,430.
1977-78 1,364,806.
1978-79 689,165.
1979-80 826,649.
1980-81 2,098,000.
1981-82 $3,446,056.
1982-83 7,483,000.
1983-84 5,088,000.
Analysis of the data on the $6,729,050 reduction between 1976-77 and 1980-81 shows
that 55% came from academic salaries, 36% from support staff salaries, and 9% from
non-salary items in the Faculty budget portion. In 1982-83 faculty salaries
constituted 47 per cent of the operating budget.
While the reductions in 1981-82 and 1983-84 were interim non-recurring reductions,
those in other years were permanent cuts, usually not on a pro-rata basis, although a
pro-rata cut of 1.7% was imposed in 1980-81.
The amounts specified in Table I translate into a significant number of lost positions.
In 1982-83, for example, as the Senate Budget Committee reported on April 21, 1982,
67.1 full-time equivalent academic positions were deleted, together with 94.0 full-
time equivalent support staff positions.
Interim Non-recurring Budget Reduction 1983-84
An interim non-recurring budget reduction was required to meet the University's
1983-84 cash flow requirements. The total deficit of $5,088,000 was met by
withdrawing funds from all Faculties and administrative units in the University. To a
considerable extent, the reductions were based on funds available from residual
salaries from faculty members on study leave, etc. Of the total $5,088,000,
$1,712,000 or 34% came from the Faculty budgets, while $3,376,000 or 66% came
from the non-Faculty budgets. 8214.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
"Budqet Reductions for 1984-85
The reductions for 1984-85 have been made within a relatively short time frame. The
President announced the possibility of a significant financial shortfall in December
1983. In January 1984 Vice-President Smith commenced consultations to determine
how this projected shortfall might be met. Although the Provincial Budget was
announced in February 1984, the completion of the consultation process was delayed
by the fact that UCBC did not announce the UBC share of the provincial grant until
April 5, 1984.
The Senate Budget Committee discussed the budget reduction proposals on April 16,
April 17, and May 2, 1984. However, the Committee has not had the opportunity to
make a full analysis of the details or academic implication of these reductions.
The operating grant from UCBC for 1984-85 is $171,676,981. This is $9,035,000 or
5% less than that allocated for 1983-84. There is no special allocation for Health
Care Teaching Costs, which again as in 1983-84, must be provided from the general
purposes operating fund.
Since the University's 1983-84 budget shortfall was met by an interim non-recurring
reduction as noted above, this year it is necessary to reduce the operating budget
base by both the accumulated shortfall for 1983-84 and that projected for 1984—85.
Originally the projected budget deficit for 1984-85 was $18 million. This was reduced
to $16.2 million when the operating grant for this year was announced. The increase
in Student Fees is anticipated to produce an additional $7,424 million in revenue. The
operating budget base must thus be reduced by about $8.75 million.
The Senate Budget Committee notes that in the development of the 1984-85 budget
plan, the principles enunciated in the Report of the President's Committee on Fiscal
Retrenchment, January 1982, carry the same force today that they did two years ago.
The Senate Budget Committee is pleased that the reductions are not
across-the-board cuts. It notes that Vice-President Smith calls attention to certain
limitations on the process of budget reduction, namely:
1. Time was a serious constraint, if only because of the delay in the announcement of
the operating grant.
2. The University is constrained in any budget reduction by contractual agreements.
3. The content of certain programs (for example, in Dentistry, Engineering, Medicine
and Nursing) is influenced by accreditation requirements.
We draw Senate's attention to the following Tables (Tables 11—IV) which summarize the
essential features of the budget adjustments.
The Senate Budget Committee notes with approval that it was decided from the
outset that the collections budget of the Library would not be reduced. However, the
Library operating budget has been cut by 3.9%. 8215.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
"Of the total reduction of $8,750,000, $5,940,000 or 68% is being obtained from the
Faculty budgets, and $2,810,000 or 32% from the non-Faculty budgets.
Table III. identifies the sources of the funds in the Faculty budgets.
It is readily apparent that all Faculties will feel the impact of this budget reduction.
For example, as Senate has already been informed, admissions to the Licentiate
program in Commerce will be suspended for 1984-85. In addition, undergraduate
courses in Commerce with fewer than 12 students will be cancelled, thus increasing
the class size elsewhere. MBA seminars with fewer than 10 students will be limited
to one per Division. It will be necessary to delete one of the four streams in the
daytime MBA/M.Sc program involving 40 students.
Table II. - Budget Adjustments:   1984/85
Reduction of
1983/84 Budget
Budget Unit (%)
Agricultural Sciences 5.9%
Applied Science 3.4
Arts 3.9
Commerce 3.3
Dentistry 5.5
Education 8.0
Forestry 3.5
Graduate Studies 4.8
Health Sciences Coordinator's Office 17.2
Law 5.5
Medicine 4.3
Pharmaceutical Sciences 5.6
Science 3.3   .
Vice-President, Academic 5.722
Vice-President, Univ. Services 4.553
Vice-President, Finance 5.0
President 0.5 k
Other (I5.IT
Footnotes
There was no reduction  in the Library Acquisitions budget;    however, Library
Operations was reduced 3.9%.   Student Aid was excluded but increased 14% (see
Other).    Extra-Sessional Studies was also excluded.   Utility costs were excluded
but increased 7.7%.
2
The Vice-President, University Services and the Vice-President, Finance, have
since been combined as the Vice-President, Administration and Finance.
3
The Vice-President, University Services and the Vice-President, Finance, have
since been combined as the Vice-President, Administration and Finance.
4
Most   of   this   increase   was   related   to   increased   student   aid  and  University
memberships.  Excluding these two items, the increase would have been 5.6%. Reports of Committees of Senate
Budqet Committee (continued)
8216.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
"In Education, there will be a suspension of the Community Education program, an
alternative "professional year" program developed in the mid-seventies to prepare
teachers for work in community schools, i.e. facilities which integrate school and
community programs and services. The Library Education concentration will be
suspended in both the B.Ed. (Elementary) and B.Ed. (Secondary) fields. Although this
coincides with recommendations of provincial and national associations, the Faculty
will be unable to replace these concentrations with the desired post baccalaureate
specialization.
Attrition in the important field of Special Education will result in a one—year
suspension of the Diploma in Education of the Mentally Retarded. Reinstatement of
the program will be considered in 1985-86 with the return of a faculty member from
study leave. Students now enrolled in the B.Ed. (Special Education), a program that
provides elementary teachers with skills to enable them to handle students with
moderate learning disabilities, will be accommodated by the maintenance of years
two through five of that program but no students will be admitted to the first year.
The number of sections in elementary professional year programs will be reduced
thereby increasing class size with a resulting reduction of interaction between
instructors and students. Of particular concern is a potential erosion of quality in
clinical supervision resulting from an increased student/supervisor ratio in school
practica.
In Law there will be a major increase in class size, and a reduction in the number of
electives. There will also be a shift of more responsibility onto "clinical"
appointments, that is honorary lecturers.
Arts and Science provide a substantial amount of service teaching, with almost 40 per
cent of their effort falling into this category. Thus, the reduction in these two
Faculties will not only affect their own students, but also those in many professional
programs. For this reason extreme caution had to be exercised in reducing the
budgets of these two core Faculties. Nevertheless, there will be elimination of many
course options, increased class size and crowding in laboratories and tutorials.
In contrast to previous budget reductions, most Faculties on this occasion have not
been able to find funds by reducing the provision for academic and teaching
assistance or for Supplies and Expenses. Indeed, the Supplies and Expenses budget in
the University has not been increased since 1976-77, and therefore even in this year
of severe financial restraint, a 5% increase is necessary.
The Senate Budget Committee notes, with some concern, the withdrawal of
"programs of distinction" in several Faculties (see Table III).
The Committee endorses the provision that has been made for replacement
appointments in several Faculties (Table IV), involving those positions deemed to be
essential to continue critical functions, some of which are in the academic service
area. However, it observes that the withdrawal of funds from positions available
through attrition is essentially an ad hoc management strategy and falls considerably
short of what is ideal.
While the Senate Budget Committee has not been able to conduct a thorough
assessment of the suspension of enrolment in 1984-85 in the four programs in
Education and the one program in Commerce, announced at the April 18, 1984
meeting of Senate, the Committee recognizes that the Deans concerned were obliged
to take these difficult decisions in the light of the reduced resources available. The
Committee assumes that these matters will be formally put before Senate at the May
meeting. 8217.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
Table III  -  Table showing source of reductions in Faculty budget.
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Agricultural Sciences
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Applied Science
X
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Arts
X
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Commerce
X
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Dentistry
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Education
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Forestry
X
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Graduate Studies
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Health Sciences
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Law
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Medicine
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Pharmaceutical Sciences
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Science
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X 8218.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budqet Committee  (continued)
Table IV.  -  Number of Faculty and Support Staff Positions Removed and Provision
for Eventual Replacement*
FACULTY
SUPPORT STAFF
Removed
Provision For
Removed
Provision For
Full
Partial
Eventual
Replacement
Full
Partial
Eventual
Replacement
Agricultural Sciences
3
3
0
1
1
0
Applied Science
4
4
3
3
0
0
Arts
33
0
14
1
3
0
Commerce
2
0
0
0
0
0
Dentistry
2
1
0
0
0
0
Education
20
1
9
12
0
2
Forestry
1
0
0
1
0
0
Graduate Studies
1
0
0
1
1
0
Health Sciences
1
1
0
1
3
0
Law
3
0
0
0
0
0
Medicine
7
0
0
7
4
0
Pharmaceutical Sciences
1
0
0
1
0
0
Science
15
0
0
5
0
0
Totals
93
10
26
33
12
2
*   Figures as presented to the Board of Governors on May 7,   1984. 8219.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
"Conclusions
1. The budget reductions for 1984-85 up to a point, reflect the principles of the
Senate's Academic Planning and Priorities Statement adopted on September 13,
1983. Circumstances, however, severely limit the degree to which these
reductions can be the expression of a clearly thought out system of priorities.
There is a critical distinction to be made between two types of budget planning:
a. A short-term plan which must ferret out large savings in a brief space of time
- in this case $8.75 million within four months.
b. A   long-term   plan  which   formulates  priorities  outside  the  context  of an
immediate financial crisis.
2. It is the view of the Senate Budget Committee that this is the last time the
University can afford "variable shared reductions" as a means of reducing the
operating budget base. Such reductions, shared by all Faculties and most units,
have been the pattern at UBC since the late I970's. The continuation of this
pattern will mean across-the-board mediocrity in the University.
3. When inflation is taken into account (as of course it must be), a 0% increase in the
budget of an academic unit is in effect a decrease in 1984-85. Thus the budget
plan for 1984-85 involves a reduction for all academic units. The parts of the
University that might appear to be "protected" are in fact being badly eroded. No
academic activity is really being protected. There is no significant growth and
development anywhere in the University. Shared reductions, even when they are
"variable" result in the general enfeeblement of the University, a general
weakening of the fabric of the institution.
4. Any further budget reductions that may be necessary must be selective. Certain
academic activities, selected according to the Senate's Academic Planning and
Priorities Statement, must be strengthened and allowed to develop; others will
need to be curtailed. As the Universities Council stated on April 6, 1984 "During
1984/85 many decisions will have to be taken at both the institutional and system
level to accommodate what appears to be the government's inability to provide
appropriate funding for the university sector". At the U.B.C. level we should take
the view that without adequate funding it is better for us to do fewer things well
than to maintain all units with the inevitable fiscal uncertainty.
5. The University needs to develop an academic plan, based on the Senate's
Academic Planning and Priorities Statement. In the development of such a plan,
the President would no doubt wish to seek advice from a number of sources. One
body that must be involved is the University Senate, which is charged by the
University Act (Section 36) with the academic governance of the institution. The
committee of the Senate that has been given a mandate "to make
recommendations to the President and to report to Senate concerning academic
planning and priorities as they relate to the preparation of the University budget"
is the Senate Budget Committee.
6. The Senate Budget Committee therefore proposes to proceed immediately to
formulate specific advice to the President on long-term academic priorities within
the University. We will recommend to the succeeding Committee of the new
Senate that they continue this task." 8220.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee (continued)
Dr. Scudder      ) That the Report of the Senate Budget Committee
Dr. Slonecker )        be received.
Carried
Curriculum Committee (See Appendix B')
Dr. Richards, Chairman of the committee, presented the report.
Faculty of Applied Science
Dr. Richards      )      That   the   proposals   of   the   Faculty  of  Applied
Dean Wedepohl  )      Science be approved.
Carried
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
Dr. Richards   ) That the proposals of the Faculty of Commerce
Dean Lusztig ) and Business Administration be approved.
Carried
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Dr. Richards   ) That   the  proposal   of  the  Faculty  of  Graduate
Dean Larkin   ) Studies  to  offer   M.Sc.  and  Ph.D.  Programs   in
Human Reproductive Biology be approved.
It was stated in the proposal circulated that there is a small but strong core
of well established tenured faculty members in the Medical Faculty who are
conducting very good basic research in the area of human reproductive biology.
The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology is a natural centre for
organization of research activities and graduate training in this area. This area is
growing rapidly and there is a demonstrated demand for graduates of such a
program.
Dr. Richards stated that the Curriculum Committee had noted that this was a
unique situation and should not be viewed as a precedent with regard to clinical
departments offering graduate programs.
The motion was put and carried.
The committee recommended approval of new courses and course changes
proposed by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, with the exception of
Commerce 581, 582, 583, 584, 585, 586 and 587 which have been referred to the
Statistics Subcommittee. 8221.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Curriculum Committee
Faculty of Graduate Studies  (continued)
Dr. Richards )
Dean Larkin  )
That  the  proposals  of  the  Faculty of Graduate
Studies be approved.
Carried
Faculty of Medicine
The committee recommended approval of new courses, course and program
changes submitted by the Faculty of Medicine and noted that MEDI 711 is to be
listed as being the same as PATH 709.
Dr. Richards   ) That the proposals of the Faculty of Medicine be
Dean Webber  ) approved.
Carried
School  of Physical Education & Recreation, Faculty of Science, and School of
Rehabilitation Medicine
Dr. Richards      )
Dean Finnegan  )
That the proposals of the School of Physical
Education and Recreation, the Faculty of Science
and the School of Rehabilitation Medicine be
approved.
Carried
Nominating Committee
The  committee  nominated  the  following  persons  to fill  vacancies on Senate
committees:
Academic Building Needs
Mr. R.M. Finnigan
Mr. S. King
Admissions
Mr. W. G. Pegler
Miss L. A. Williams
Agenda
Miss D. J. Chow
Miss L. A. Williams
Appeals on Academic Standing
Mr. M. D. Friesen
Mr. P. J. Penner
Mr. R. A. Yaworsky
Budget
Mr. J. L. Armstrong
Mr. P. M. Kendall
replacing:     Mr. T. S. Blasco
Mr. P. Nishihama
replacing:     Mr. B. A. Gilmour
Miss A. H. Rahme
replacing:     Mr. D. J. Rimek
Mr. S. Williams
replacing:     Mr. E. Dixon
Mrs. P. Jones
Mr. M. A. McCann
replacing:     Miss A. H. Rahme
(continuing member) 8222.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Nominating Committee (continued)
Continuing Education
Mr. J. A. Smitton
Curriculum
Miss E. T. Busza
Miss D. J. Chow
Mr. B. Mah
Extracurricular Activities
Mr. J. M. Rutherford
Mr. J. A. Smitton
Liaison with Post-Secondary Institutions
Mr. S. King
Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
Mr. S. King
Mr. A. J. Pearson
Mr. P. J. Penner
Student Awards
Mr. A. J. Pearson
Mr. R. A. Yaworsky
Tributes
Mr. R. M. Finnigan
University Library
Miss E. T. Busza
Mr. B. Mah
Mr. W. G. Pegler
replacing:     Miss S. M. Dickinson
replacing:
replacing:
Mr. B. A. Gilmour
Miss J. H. Querie
Mr. B. E. S. Waugh
Mr. J. B. Smith
Mr. S. Williams
replacing:     Mr. P. Nishihama
replacing:     Mr. E. Dixon
Miss J. H. Querie
Mr. J. B. Smith
replacing:     Miss S. M. Dickinson
Mr. J. B. Smith
replacing:     Mr. M. B. Thompson
replacing:     Mrs. P. Jones
Mr. B. E. S. Waugh
Ad hoc Committees
Standards in English
Mr. A. L. Clarke
Mr. J. M. Rutherford
replacing:     Mrs. P. Jones
Elections
Mr. A. J. Pearson
Courses
Mr. J. T. Kelsall
replacing:     Mr. S. Williams
replacing:     Miss S. M. Dickinson
Miss J. H. Querie
Affiliation of Carey Hall
Mr. P. M. Kendall
(continuing member)
Dr. Richards     )
Dr. Runeckles )
That   the   recommendations   of   the   Nominating
Committee be approved.
Carried 8223.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate (continued)
Tributes Committee
Emeritus status
Dean Larkin presented the following proposal for a change in the practice of
awarding emeritus status:
"How it has been
At The University of British Columbia, emeritus status has been granted to those
with the title of Chancellor, President, Dean, Professor, Associate Professor,
Assistant Professor, Senior Instructor, Librarian, Registrar, Assistant Registrar,
Clinical Professor, Clinical Associate Professor, Clinical Assistant Professor and
Clinical Instructor.
For all classifications, emeritus status has been granted virtually automatically
and for full time employees has been granted:
1. On the occasion of retirement at age 65, regardless of the age at first
appointment to UBC.
2. On the attainment of age 65, if on disability pension.
3. On retirement at an age between 60 and 65, if there has been ten years of
service.
4. For clinical appointees, if there has been 15 years of service at a significant
level, and if the award was recommended by the Dean of the Faculty of
Medicine.
5. In such other cases as the Senate Tributes Committee deemed appropriate.
Because of the increasing number of early retirements, the Tributes Committee
recently decided to recommend emeritus sfatus at any age of retirement provided
there has been ten years of service. The Committee also decided to treat
disability in the same way as early retirement.
The perquisites
Because emeritus status has been virtually synonymous with retirement, there has
been a tendency to believe that emeritus status is a requirement for eligibility for
the perquisites of retirement. This is not true. Parking privileges and library
privileges may be extended without reference to emeritus status. Insofar as the
Faculty Club is concerned, there is membership for both retired and the emeritus,
the former involving a fee and the latter not.
Practices elsewhere
With respect to emeritus status, practices at other Canadian universities vary.
Some follow more or less the same procedure as at UBC, giving emeritus status to
those who have completed a substantial term of service at any rank. Others are
more selective. Alberta, for example, grants emeritus sfatus only to full
professors, but to them, more or less automatically. Still others award emeritus
status only to a small proportion of those who retire. Laval, for example, grants
emeritus "to only about 15 per cent of retiring professors"; Montreal, "to four or
five professors per year"; Manitoba, "not too frequently, and it is seen as
somewhat of an event even after many years' service."
At Dalhousie, "not everyone gets it"; at McGill, "only outstanding professors" are
made emeritus. 8224.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Tributes Committee
Emeritus status (continued)
"At all of the institutions in which emeritus status is for only a very distinguished
few, there is a system of nomination, usually by the appropriate Dean,
recommendation by the equivalent of a Senate Tributes Committee, and
approval by the Senate.
Recommendation
It is the view of the Senate Tributes Committee that emeritus status should be
granted only to those who have made particularly outstanding contributions to the
University.
It is accordingly recommended that:
1. Effective July I, 1984, the present practice of granting emeritus status be
discontinued and replaced by the practice of awarding emeritus status only to
those who are deemed worthy of special recognition by the University by
virtue of their distinguished teaching or scholarly achievement or long service
to the University or the community.
2. The Senate Tributes Committee would, each September, call for nominations
of individuals who would retire in the forthcoming year. The Tributes
Committee would consider the nominations and make recommendations to
Senate."
Dean Larkin ) That recommendations I and 2 be adopted.
Dr. Tennant )
During the discussion that followed it was suggested that as the mechanism
for identifying distinguished teaching is imprecise a great deal of documentation
would have to be provided to enable the committee to determine whether an
individual should be granted emeritus status. It was also felt that those people
who had given satisfactory though not outstanding service for many years would
be disappointed at not receiving emeritus status.
In amendment:
Dean Lusztig ) That   recommendation   I   be   amended   to   read:
Mr. Fields       ) "Effective July  I,  1984, the present practice of
granting emeritus status be discontinued and
replaced by the practice of awarding emeritus
status to full professors and to those others who
are deemed worthy ... community."
Lost
The motion was then put and lost.
It was agreed that the Tributes Committee should continue to look at the
question of the granting of emeritus status. 8225.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate  (continued)
Ad hoc Committee on Courses
Dr. Adams, Chairman of the Committee, presented the following report:
"As charged by Senate at its March 1984 meeting, the committee has sought advice
from the Faculties and considered questions relating to the inclusions of numerical
averages on students' transcripts. Most Faculties favoured such inclusion of both
sessional and cumulative averages, and also that these averages should be based on
course marks, weighted according to unit value. Gradepoint averages were not
regarded as suitable in the context of UBC's I, 2, P, F grading system. The
committee was advised that most other institutions record averages on their
transcripts, and some have complained to our Registrar's Office that they have
difficulty interpreting our transcripts, partly because of the lack of posted averages.
We recommend, therefore, that sessional averages for each Winfer Session, and
cumulative averages for all courses taken at UBC, should appear in future on
students' transcripts. A cumulative average should extend over all undergraduate
studies in programs which accept students from high school or after one year of
university. A new cumulative average should begin when a student enters other
programs (Graduate Studies, Law, Medicine, etc.).
The committee also considered the effect on averages of courses unofficially dropped
(DNW marks). There was considerable divergence of opinion among the Faculties on
this matter, and the committee felt that the simplest and fairest solution is to
require that marks be reported for all students registered in a course (unless that
course is a pass/fail course without marks), and that all such marks be used in
calculating a student's average. A mark should reflect how much of the work of the
course (essays, assignments, projects, midterms, exams) was completed, and how well
it was done. Marks could range from zero to the maximum mark for the course. Thus
"DNW" could cease to be a valid entry on a grade reporting form. As is usual,
deferred standing can be granted when circumstances warrant it. (e.g. a student
misses an examination for medical or compassionate reasons.)
The committee feels that adoption of the requirement for marks for all students in a
course will result in greater uniformity in the significance of grades across all
Faculties. It also hopes that members of faculty will take more responsibility for
counselling their students and ensuring that they understand the rules concerning
dropping and adding courses and the implications of not completing a course. For its
part, the Registrar's Office will ensure that adequate notice is given to all students if
and when the changes we recommend take effect.
SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Sessional averages (for each Winter Session) and cumulative averages (for all
courses taken at UBC) should be included on students' transcripts, and should be
based on unit-weighted marks of all courses attempted, except courses for which
no marks are normally given.
2. A single cumulative average should cover all of a student's undergraduate studies
at UBC. A new cumulative average should be begun when a student enters a
graduate Faculty.
3. Numerical marks should be given to all students registered in a course, whether or
not a final examination has been written.  The "DNW" mark should not be used.
4. This ad hoc committee should now be discharged." 8226.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Reports of Committees of Senate
Ad hoc Committee on Courses  (continued)
Dr. Adams )        That recommendation I be approved.
Dean Kennedy  )
Dean Will stated that he was not convinced that there was an argument for
numerical or cumulative averages. The Faculty of Arts had discontinued the DNW
notation because it was unfair that students who remained in a course but did not
write the final examination were given the same notation on their record as students
who had attended class for only three weeks at the beginning of the year. He also
felt that if averages were to be included on students' transcripts such averages would
not be representative in cases where a student had withdrawn from a course a day or
two after the deadline date for withdrawing if it were the intention that marks be
submitted for courses dropped. A mark of say 5 or 10 out of 150 for a dropped course
would reduce the average to a 'C in cases where a student had obtained a B' average
in all other courses taken.
Dean Will     ) That recommendations  I, 2 and 3 be referred to
Dean Birch  ) the Faculties for consideration.
Carried
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration
W. M. Young Chair in Finance
Dean Lusztig   ) That  the proposal of the Faculty of Commerce
Mr. Fields        ) and Business Administration to establish the W. M.
Young Chair in Finance be approved.
Carried
New admissions to B.Com. Program
Dean Lusztig   ) That   the   Faculty   of   Commerce   and   Business
Mr. Fields        ) Administration  be  given  approval  to adjust  the
number of new admissions to the B.Com. program
during the next two months, should it become
necessary to do so, subject to the approval of the
Senate Admissions Committee.
It was stated in the material circulated that recent resignations and on-going
difficulties in finding reasonably qualified faculty as replacements had prompted this
request and that such measures would only be used as a last resort.
The motion was put and carried. 8227.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Change in name of Institute of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
Dean Larkin       )       That  the   Institute of  Applied  Mathematics  and
Dean Finnegan  )       Statistics    be    renamed    "Institute    of    Applied
Mathematics"   and   the   Calendar   statement   be
revised by the deletion of references to Statistics.
It was stated in the material circulated that the establishment of the Institute of
Applied Mathematics and Statistics was approved by Senate in June 1970. The prime
objective of the Institute was "to promote the growth of interdisciplinary research
activities in applied mathematics and statistics on the campus".
Since its establishment, the Institute has played an important role as a focal point
for graduate level activity in applied mathematics and statistics. A review
committee in 1980 commented enthusiastically on the role of the Institute,
particularly for its exceptionally fine series of seminars.
With the establishment of a Department of Statistics in the Faculty of Science,
which was approved by the Board of Governors in April 1983, a reduction in the scope
of the Institute to applied mathematics alone seemed appropriate, but was deferred
to ensure that there be a smooth transition of responsibilities for statistics at the
graduate level from the Institute to the new Department. With that transition now
complete, a change in the name and role of the Institute is timely.
The motion was put and carried.
Report of the Vancouver School of Theology
The annual report of the Vancouver School of Theology was presented for
information. It was stated in the report that I I I students were registered for degree
courses in the Winter Session; 139 students holding a first theological degree were
enrolled in advanced study in the Summer School courses in 1983 and 229 clergy were
involved in the School's continuing professional education programs during the Fall and
Spring semesters.
It was further stated in the report that under its new Librarian, VST Library has
increased its service to its own faculty, students and extra-mural readers. It has also
seen a gradual increase in use by the UBC community who borrowed 21% of the total of
books loaned in February 1984, compared to only 13% in the same period in the previous
year. In spite of a cut of $10,000 in the book fund, VST Library has continued to keep
abreast of basic works in the field and has appreciated cooperation with UBC in the
buying of peripheral texts, in periodical exchange, inter-library loan service and back-up 8228.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
Report of the Vancouver School of Theology  (continued)
reference  work.     It  was  also  stated that  in  May   1984 the following degrees were
conferred:
Master of Theology I
Master of Divinity 21
Master of Theological Studies (Honours) I
Bachelor of Theology I
Other Business
Members of Senate
The Chairman extended best wishes to those members of Senate who were
attending their final meeting and expressed thanks and appreciation for the
contributions made during their terms of office.
Report of the Senate Tributes Committee (in camera)
Memorial Minute
The following memorial statement had been prepared in accordance with the
custom of Senate in recognition by the University and the Senate of the late
Walter D.  Young.
IN MEMORIAM
WALTER D. YOUNG
Walter D. Young, Professor of Political Science at the University of Victoria, died
March 10 at the age of 51. A gifted teacher, scholar, and administrator, Professor
Young served on the faculty of The University of British Columbia for I I years.
Walter Young was born in Winnipeg, moving to Victoria at an early age. He received
his B.A. in honours English and History from UBC in 1955 and as a Rhodes Scholar, an
M.A. degree from Oxford in 1957. Upon his return to Canada, he took teaching
positions at the Canadian Services College, Royal Roads, United College in Winnipeg,
and in 1959—1960; in the Department of Political Science at the University of
Manitoba. He continued his graduate studies at the University of Toronto, receiving a
doctorate in 1965.
Professor Young came to UBC in 1962 and served as Head of the Department of
Political Science from October 1969 until his resignation in June 1973, when he took a
position at the University of Victoria.
Walter Young contributed numerous talents to a variety of departmental, faculty and
university enterprises. He was one of the organizers of the Arts I programme and,
with Margaret Prang, launched the major academic journal dealing with the history,
politics and society of British Columbia, B.C. Studies. He was elected to the
committee on long-range prospects of the University, and served on the Board of
Directors of the UBC Press. In 1969 he was elected to the Senate by the Joint
Faculties. 8229.
Wednesday,   May 23,   1984.
Report of the Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute  (continued)
Professor Young's research interests focussed on the CCF party, on which he wrote
the definitive history. He devoted a life-long interest to the NDP party in this
province and in the country. Never a narrow specialist, he personified the scholar
whose concerns bridge the divisions between the humanities, history, and the social
sciences.
He was an active participant in NDP party affairs, and in 1974 chaired the University
Government Committee whose report to the Minister of Education led to the creation
of the Universities Council.
Walter Young was a superb teacher, not only as a lecturer, but in his devotion of time
to the intellectual development of his students. He was acknowledged as one of
Canada's outstanding political scientists. He served as president of the Canadian
Political Science Association in 1980-81 and in many other ways contributed to the
development of the discipline in this country.
The Walter D. Young Prize for the outstanding student in the area of Canadian
politics has been established in his honour.
Senate extends deepest sympathy to his wife Beryl and their three children.
Dean Larkin ) That the memorial statement for Walter D. Young
Dr. Tennant ) be spread on the minutes of Senate and that a
copy be sent to the relatives of the deceased.
Carried
Emeritus status
Dean Larkin reported that the committee had recommended that Professor D. B.
Fields be granted the status of Professor Emeritus of Commerce and Business
Administration, and that Dr. D. E. Soule be granted the status of Professor Emeritus
of Theatre.
Dean Larkin     ) That    the    recommendations    of    the    Tributes
Dr. Lavkulich  ) Committee     concerning     emeritus     status     be
approved.
Carried
The meeting adjourned at 9.30 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, September 12, 1984.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 8230.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate
Forintek Canada Corporation Fellowship in Timber Engineering - A fellowship in the
amount of $15,000 has been made available by Forintek Canada Corporation. The
award is intended to support the training of graduate students in Civil Engineering in
areas relating to wood and wood products. Candidates will be enrolled in a program
leading to a M.A.Sc or Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering. The fellowship will
normally be open only to Canadian citizens or permanent residents. Subject to
satisfactory progress, fhe fellowship may be renewed for a further year of study for
students in the Masters program and for two further years of study for students in the
Doctoral program.  (This award will be made available in the 1984/85 Winter Session)
Thomas R. Greer Memorial Scholarship - Scholarships to a total of approximately
$6,000 have been made available by the late Thomas Ranson Greer. Thomas Greer
was born in Denbigh, Ontario in 1886 and came to B.C. in 1905. The awards will be
made to medical students including graduate students who are domiciled in the
Province of B.C., with preference given to students from the Okanagan Valley. The
awards will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine. (This award
will be made available in the 1984/85 Winter Session)
George K. Mapson Intramural Awards - A number of awards each consisting of a cash
prize and a plaque have been made available by George K. Mapson B.P.E., 1973,
M.Ed., 1979 to recognize student contributions to the UBC Intramural Program. The
awards will be made on the recommendation of the Director of the Intramural
Program.  (This award will be made available in the 1983/84 Winter Session)
James Russell Mills Memorial Award - An annual award in the amount of
approximately $300 has been established through donations by colleagues and friends
of the late Russell Mills. Russell Mills' life was dedicated to the development and
application of forest engineering principles in logging. After retirement from
industry he lectured in Industrial Management and Logging in the Faculty of Forestry,
U.B.C. from 1964 to 1969. He had a special interest and involvement in student
activities and served as the Honorary President of the Forestry Undergraduate
Society in 1967. The award will be made to a student entering the penultimate or
final year in the Faculty of Forestry who combines Russell's admirable qualities and
who demonstrates a similar dedication to the endeavours of the Forestry
Undergraduate Society and its members. The award will be made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Forestry in consultation with the Forestry
Undergraduate Society. (The award will be made available in the 1984/85 Winter
Session)
P. E. 0. Sisterhood, Chapter A. F. Bursary - A bursary in the amount of $400 has been
made available by the P. E. O. Sisterhood, Chapter A. F. The award will be made to a
female student who demonstrates financial need. (This award will be made available
in the 1984/85 Winter Session)
Jagannath Sundararajan Memorial Scholarship - A scholarship of $1,000, established in
honour of J. Sundararajan by his family, will be awarded annually to a student of
outstanding academic achievement and intellectual ability, graduating from the
English Honours program to continue study at the graduate level at any university.
The scholarship will be awarded on the recommendation of the Honours Committee of
the English Department. (This award will be made available in the 1984/85 Winter
Session) 8231.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Thomas M. C. Taylor Prize in Botany - A prize in the amount of approximately $100
honouring the late Dr. T. M. C. Taylor, has been made available by his friends, former
graduate students and colleagues. Dr. Taylor was a Professor of Botany at U.B.C.
from 1946 to 1968, and Head of the Department from 1954 to 1965. The award will
be made on the recommendation of the Department to an undergraduate student of
high academic standing in the field of vascular plant botany (based on academic
achievement in Botany 307 and/or Botany 311). (This award will be made available in
the 1984/85 Winter Session)
Ying Ying Chan Zee Scholarship - A scholarship in the amount of approximately $250
has been provided in perpetuity by the family of Mrs. Zee. The award was established
to commemorate her sixtieth birthday, and in appreciation of her years of loving
guidance and unyielding support, and in admiration of her exemplary generosity
towards the needy. The scholarship will be awarded annually to a student entering
the final year in the Chemical Engineering Department, with first class standing, who
was chosen by the class and the faculty to be the most helpful to others academically.
(This award will be made available in the 1984/85 Winter Session) 8232.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
APPENDIX B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Chemical Engineering
New course
Electrical Engineering
Change
CHML 473 (I)  Water Pollution Control
ELEC 361 (Ife) split into two courses, now:
ELEC 362 (I fe) Applications of Electromagnetic Fields
and     363 (I fe) Guided Waves and Radiation
Geological Engineering
Program change - second year:
Program changes - fourth year:
(Option II)
Program change - fourth year:
(Option III)
delete APSC 270 and 281 and add
MECH 260 and 280
delete MATH 300 and add MATH 356
delete MMPE 300 and add GEOL 368
delete GEOP 422 and add GEOP 426
delete GEOL 322 and add GEOL 351
Mechanical Engineering
Changes to existing Five-Year Program:
delete MECH 498
MECH 365 - change in hours
APSC 270 - change to MECH 260
APSC 275 - change to MECH 265
APSC 281 - change to MECH 280
MECH 270 - new course
Changes to courses and second year of five-year program:
MECH 260 - add prerequisite
MECH 265 - change desription, hours, add prerequisite
MECH 280 - change description, add prerequisite
MECH 270 - change description, add prerequisite
Second year of program - delete APSC 270, 275, 281
and add:  MECH 260, 265, 280, 270
Changes to Four-Year Program:
APSC 152 - change in hours and number now 151
MECH 265 - change description and hours
third year of program:  add Humanities (3)
ELEC 365 change from term I to 2
third and fourth years of program:  ELEC 370 change
from third year to fourth year;  METL 380 change from
third year term 2 to fourth year term I 8233.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
APPENDIX B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE (continued)
Metallurgical Engineering
Program change - second year:  delete APSC 270, 281 and add MECH 260 and 280
Mining and Mineral Process Engineering
Deletion MMPE 350
Program change - second year:      delete GEOL 300 and add GEOL 308
Program change - third year: delete GEOL 317, MMPE 250 and add GEOL 368
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Program change:  (change underlined)
Urban Land Economics
A. Third Year.    Proposed Requirements:  Commerce 307, 309, 322, 331, 337,
391, 376 or 371 or Economics 345 or 447;  6 units of electives.
B. Fourth Year. Proposed Requirements:  Commerce 407, 408, 491, 494 and
406 or 409, Planning 425;   9 units of electives.
Change COMM 455 (3)  split into two courses, now:
COMM 455 (I fe) Principles of Auditing
and       459 (Ife) Auditing Theory and Applications
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Animal Resource Ecology
Change AREC 500 - change in units and description
Anthropology and Sociology
Changes ANTH 527 and 528 - change in description
Botany
New course BOTA 502 (0)  Thesis Seminar
Chemical Engineering
Changes CHML 550, 551, 552, 553, 554, 555, 556, 558, 573, 574,
576, 577 - change units to (l-2)c
Chemistry
New courses CHEM 563 (I fe)  Advanced Physical Organic Chemistry
CHEM 566 (Ife)  Advanced Organic Synthesis
CHEM 570 (Ife)  Carbohydrates 8234.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
APPENDIX B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
Chemistry  (continued)
Changes
CHEM 500, 502, 508, 509, 51 I, 512, 513, 514, 515, 520,
522, 524, 531, 540, 560, 567, 573 - change in
units and hours
CHEM 505, 506, 507, 516, 518, 519, 521, 526, 530,
532, 568 - change in units, hours and description
CHEM 542 - change in units, description and prerequisite
Deletions CHEM 561, 562, 564, 565, 569, 571
Commerce and Business Administration
New courses
Comparative Literature
Change
COMM 567 (Ife)  Forecasting for Planning and Operations
COMM 595 (life)  Energy Policy and Management
COML 500 - change in units now (Ife/3)c
COML 547 - change in units now (lfe-6)c
Family & Nutritional Sciences
New course FMST 547 (I fe-3)c Directed Studies
Change HUNU 531 - change in description
Health Care and Epidemiology
New course
Changes
Change in program title:
Mechanical Engineering
New course
Change
HCEP 537 (Ife)  Health Law
HCEP 507, 508 -change in description
Health Care & Epidemiology  -  M.Sc. degree
(Health Services Planning and Administration)
MECH 579 (fe-lfe)c  Engineering Solar Radiation
MECH 574 - change in description
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
New programs:  M.Sc. and Ph.D. Programs in Human Reproductive Biology
The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs
in several areas of human reproductive biology, including female and male
reproductive endocrinology, immunology of reproduction, fertilization and early
embryonic development, perinatal metabolism, and fetal and neonatal physiology.
Facilities exist for animal research employing both small (mice, rats, rabbits,
guinea-pigs) and large (sheep) animal species. In addition, there are opportunities
for research involving human reproduction and pregnancy, in collaboration with
clinical members of the department. Credit for the following courses or their
equivalents as prerequisites must have been obtained: Biochemistry 300; one of
Physiology 301, Zoology 303 or Animal Science 320. 8235.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
APPENDIX B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES (continued)
Pathology
New course
Philosophy
New course
Physics
New course
Changes
Deletions
Psychology
New courses
Changes
Religious Studies
Changes
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Diagnostic Radiology
New courses
Medical Genetics
New course
Medicine
New courses
PATH 521 (3)  Research Topics in Pathophysiology
PHIL 507 (lfe/3)c Philosophy of Language
PHYS 513 (l-2)d  Topics in Advanced Spectroscopy
PHYS 501, 526 - change in units and description
PHYS 512, 530 - change in units, title and description
PHYS 519, 520
PSYC 525 (Ife)  Attitudes and Social Cognition
PSYC 526 (Ife)  Individuals and Groups
PSYC 527 (life)  Interpersonal Processes
PSYC 528 (Ife)  Advanced Methods in Social Psychology
and Personality
PSYC 529 (Ife) Special Topics in Social Psychology and
Personality"
PSYC 501 - change in title and units now (lfe/3)d
PSYC 518 - change in title and units now (lfe/3)d
RELG 500, 502, 503, 510, 512, 514 - change in units
now(lfe/3)c
RADI 710 Clinical Nuclear Medicine
RADI7II Progress in Nuclear Medicine
RADI 712 Clinical Investigation/Research
RADI 713 Quality Correlation in Nuclear Medicine
MEDG448(llfe-3)c  Directed Studies
MEDI 710 Nephrology Rounds
MEDI7II Renal Biopsy Rounds
MEDI 712 Nephrology Seminar
MEDI 713 Directed Studies in Nephrology 8236.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
APPENDIX B'
Course and curriculum proposals  (continued)
FACULTY OF MEDICINE  (continued)
Orthopaedics
New courses
Changes
Pathology
New courses
ORPA 425  Introduction to Orthopaedics
ORPA 450 Principles of Orthopaedics
ORPA 475  Orthopaedic Clinical Clerkshop
ORPA 715, 716, 717, 719, 720, 721, 722, 723, 724,
725, 904 - change in description and department
(from Surgery to Orthopaedics)
ORPA 718 - change in title, description and department
PATH 730 Clinical Nuclear Medicine  (see RADI 710)
PATH 731   Progress in Nuclear Medicine  (see RADI 711)
PATH 732  CIinical Investigation/Research  (see RADI 712)
PATH 733  Quality Correlafion in Nuclear Medicine
(see RADI 713)
Physiology
Change to second year of Honours Program, now:
Chemistry 205 or 201 and 202
(3)
Chemistry 230 and 203
(3)
Biology 200, 201
(3)
Mathematics 200
(Ife)
Arts electives
(3)
Science electives
(41fe)
(18)
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION
New course PHED 205 (I-3)c Exercise Programs
SCHOOL OF REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Changes
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Botany
Program change
Geological Sciences
New course
RHME 304 and 308 - change in title, description,
hours and units (now (I))
Change Major and Honours Botany third and fourth
year programs:  add Statistics 105
GEOL 308 (Ife)  Introduction to Mineralogy and Petrology 8237.
Wednesday,  May 23,   1984.
APPENDIX B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
Geological Sciences  (continued)
Change in Calendar statement following "Combined Honours Geology and another
subject" to: Students planning careers in Geological Sciences should consult the
Departmental Advisor for elective courses appropriate to their interests.
Deletions GEOL 107, 216, 300, 307, 317, 327, 417
Physics
Change PHYS 306 - change in prerequisite
Calendar statements
Change in Honours Program Calendar statement:
HONOURS PROGRAM: Full-time students must consult the Head of the
Department at the beginning of the Second Year and each subsequent year, since
permission to enter an Honours Program or to remain in an Honours Program must
be obtained from the Head of the Department(s) concerned before registration
each year. In addition to meeting the specific department course requirements (as
described in the Calendar), Honours candidates must complete 15 units with a
minimum overall second-class standing (65%) in each academic year. Honours
candidates are expected to complete the degree requirements within five
academic years measured from the date of first registration at a university or
regional college. Honours students may, with permission of the department(s)
concerned and the Dean, interrupt their studies for a period of one year. The
Honours Program is available, in certain degree programs, to part-time students
only with the permission of the Dean.
New Calendar statement:
Veterinary Medicine:
The Western College of Veterinary Medicine was established at the University of
Saskatchewan to serve the four western provinces. The prerequisites for
admission to the College are English (3), Physics (3), Mathematics (3), Chemistry
(including organic) (6), Biology or Zoology (including genetics) (4.5), plus electives
to complete at least 2 full years of study.
These prerequisites can be met in a number of departments in the Faculty of
Science. However, since genetics is offered only in third year, it will normally
take longer than the minimum time to meet all requirements. Students intending
to apply for entry to the College should register in one of the appropriate
programs at UBC leading to a B.Sc.
Further information regarding Veterinary Medicine may be obtained from the
Office of the Dean, Faculty of Science, UBC, or Faculty of Agricultural Sciences,
UBC;  or directly from the University of Saskatchewan.

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