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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] 1985-11-13

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 8493.
November  13,   1985
The Third Regular Meeting of the Senate of The University of British
Columbia for the Session 1985-86 was held on Wednesday, November 13, 1985 at
8.00 p.m.   in Room 102,   George F.   Curtis Building.
Present: President D. W. Strangway (Chairman), Chancellor W. R. Wyman,
Acting Vice- President D. R. Birch, Ms. P. M. Arthur, Dr. E. G. Auld, Dr.
T. M. Ballard, Dean G. S. Beagrie, Mr. J. M. Beard, Mrs. H. M. Belkin, Mr.
N. B. Benson, Mr. J. Blom, Dr. T. H. Brown, Dr. N. R. Bulley, Rev. P. C.
Burns, Dean P. T. Burns, Mr. G. D. Burnyeat, Dr. T. S. Cook, Ms. L. M.
Copeland, Ms. C. Davidson, Dr. J. D. Dennison, Dr. A. J. Elder, Dr. C. V.
Finnegan, Mr. H. J. Franklin, Mrs. E. D. Fulton, Dr. J. Gaskell, Dr. J. H. V.
Gilbert, Dr. M. A. Goldberg, Mr. G. C. P. Gray, Mr. J. A. Hamilton, Mr. K. D.
Hancock, Dr. M. A. Hickling, Mr. S. H. Hill, Dr. K. J. Holsti, Dr. J.
Ingman-Baker, Mrs. C. J. R. Jillings, Mrs. D. Jones, Dean R. W. Kennedy, Mr.
A. C. Kimberley, Dr. J. P. Kimmins, Mr. J. Kulich, Dr. D. S. Lirenman, Dean
P. A. Lusztig, Dr. B. C. McBride, Mr. J. M. McConville, Acting Dean T. D.
McKie, Mr. M. G. McMillan, Dean J. H. McNeill, Dean A. Meisen, Dean R. C.
Miller, Jr., Dr. A. G. Mitchell, Miss D. J. Moore, Mr. S. R. Pearce, Mrs.
G. E. Plant, Dean J. F. Richards, Dr. D. F. Robitaille, Dr. E. S. Schwartz,
Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. L. de Sobrino, Dr. R. A. Spencer, Dr. J. K.
Stager, Dr. R. Stewart, Dean P. Suedfeld, Mr. M. Sugimoto, Dr. P. R.
Tennant, Dr. R. C. Thompson, Mr. R. E. Thomsen, Dr. A. Van Seters, Dr. J.
Vanderstoep, Dean W. A. Webber, Dr. L. S. Weiler, Dean R. M. Will, Dr.
D. LL. Williams, Mr. J. A. Williamson, Dr. J. L. Wisenthal, Miss N. E. Woo,
Mr.   R.   A.   Yaworsky.
Messages of   regret for  their  inability to attend  were  received from
Dr.   C.   E.   Armerding,   Mr.   D.   W.   Barron,   Mr.   B.   E.   Bengtson,   Miss  A.   Kimsing,
Dr.   H.   J.  Matheson,   Mr.   D.   Mclnnes.
Senate membership
Rep1acemsnts
Dr.   C.   V.   Finnegan  -   replacing  Dr.   J.   R.   Stein  as  a  representative  of   the
Faculty  of   Science
Ms.   Christina  Davidson   -   replacing  Miss  D.   J.   Chow as  a   representative   of
the   students  at-large 8494.
November 13, 1985
Minutes of previous meeting
Dean Webber    )  That the minutes of the Second regular
Dr. Stager     )  meeting of Senate for the Session 1985-86,
having been circulated, be taken as read
and adopted.
Carried
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate reconmendations - subject,
where applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented
without formal reference to the President and the formal agreement of the
President; and that the Deans and Heads concerned with new programs be asked
to indicate the space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
(i)    Proposal of the Faculty of Medicine that the name of the Department
of Diagnostic Radiology be changed to the Department of Radiology
(p.8474)
(ii)   Proposal of the School of Nursing that admission to the First Year of
the B.S.N, program be restricted to 80 for the 1985/86 Academic Year
(p.8470)
Chairman's Remarks
In chairing his first meeting of the U.B.C. Senate, the President stated
that the concept of the Senate was very important and that he looked forward
with great interest to working with the Senate. Dr. Strangway informed
Senate that he would be meeting with members of the Social Credit caucus
later in the week and that he would be briefing them on his perception of
some of the issues facing U.B.C. He also stated that, at the end of
November, he would be meeting with members of The Universities Council of
British Columbia and that he would report back to Senate on issues raised at
that meeting.
Dr. Strangway stated that the membership of the Presidential Advisory
Committee for the Selection of a Vice-President, Academic had now been
constituted.   In addition to the three members elected by Senate,  the
President had appointed Mr. W. L. Sauder, Chairman of the Board of
Governors, Chancellor W. R. Wyman and Dr. L. R. Peterson to serve on the
Committee. 8495.
November 13,   1985
Chairman's  Remarks     (continued)
Dr. Strangway concluded his remarks by stating that he was extremely
pleased to be at U.B.C. and that he looked forward to chairing Senate and to
working with the members  in the years  ahead.
Prizes,   Scholarships and Bursaries
Dr.   Williams
Dr.   Gilbert
)     That  the new awards  listed in Appendix   'A'
)     be  accepted subject to the  approval   of the
Board of  Governors  and that  letters  of  thanks
be  sent to the donors.
Carried
Candidates for Degrees
Lists of candidates for degrees, as approved by the various Faculties
and Schools, were made available for inspection by Senate members prior to
the meeting.
Dean Webber
Rev. Burns
) That the candidates for degrees and diplomas,
) as approved by the Faculties and Schools, be
granted the degree or diploma for which they
were recommended, and that the Registrar, in
consultation with the Deans and the Chairman
of Senate, make any necessary adjustments.
Carried
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Dr. Scudder presented the following report, which had been circulated
for information:
"Introduction
In the May 23, 1984 report to Senate, the Committee outlined the operating
budget reductions for the period 1976-84, totalling $22.98 million.  At
that time, it was stated that 1984-85 was the last time the University
could afford "variable shared reductions" as a means of reducing the
operating budget base.  The report stated "Such reductions, shared by all
Faculties and most units, have been the pattern at U.B.C. since the late
1970's.  The continuation of this pattern will mean across-the-board
mediocrity in the University."  It continued "Shared reductions, even when
they are "variable" result in the general enfeeblement of the University,
a general weakening of the fabric of the institution." 8496.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Introduction  (continued)
Our May 23, 1984 report concluded with the following three points:
1. Any further budget reductions that may be necessary must be
selective. Certain academic activities, selected according to the
Senate's Academic Planning and Priorities Statement, must be
strengthened and allowed to develop; others will need to be
curtailed. As the Universities Council stated on April 6, 1984
"During 1984/8 5 many decisions will have to be taken at both the
institutional and system level to accommodate what appears to be the
government's inability to provide appropriate funding for the
university sector". At the U.B.C. level we should take the view that
without adequate funding it is better for us to do fewer things well
than to maintain all units with the inevitable fiscal uncertainty.
2. The University needs to develop an academic plan, based on the
Senate's Academic Planning and Priorities Statement. In the
development of such a plan, the President would no doubt wish to seek
advice from a number of sources. One body that must be involved is
the University Senate, which is charged by the University Act
(Section 36) with the academic governance of the institution. The
conmittee of the Senate that has been given a mandate "to make
recommendations to the President and to report to Senate concerning
academic planning and priorities as they relate to the preparation of
the University budget" is the Senate Budget Committee.
3. The Senate Budget Committee therefore proposes to proceed immediately
to formulate specific advice to the President on long-term academic
priorities within the University. We will recommend to the
succeeding Committee of the new Senate that they continue this task.
Using the Senate's Academic Planning and Priorities Statement adopted on
September 13, 1983, the Committee proceeded to review data on all programs
and units in the University in order to formulate specific advice to the
President. Meetings were held through June and July 1984 and some
tentative proposals developed. This task was continued by the new Senate
Budget Committee in the fall of 1984.
On April 24, 1985 the Budget Committee set before Senate, an Elaboration
of Academic Planning and Priorities Statement, in which we attempted to
provide a more detailed consideration of some of the factors being
considered, and how they could be assessed. At that time the discussion
on the floor of Senate was recorded and a transcript of the proceedings
was prepared and made available to the Budget Committee: it served as a
further guide for deliberations. The April 24, 1985 report of the
Committee was approved by Senate, and this was circulated to all Faculty
members by the President pro tern, on May 2, 1985: the Senate's Academic
Planning and Priorities Statement had been distributed on March 25, 1985. 8497.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
Review of Academic Support Services
During the fall of 1984, the President set up several Ad Hoc Committees to
review various academic support services on campus. A member of the
Senate Budget Committee was either chairman or included as a member on
each Committee. Reports were made available to the Senate Budget
Conmittee as they were completed.  The following reviews were examined:
Office of the Co-ordinator of Health Sciences
Credit course offerings outside the regular Winter Session
The Botanical Gardens
Co-operative Education and Internship Program
The Centre for Continuing Education.
Budget Planning 1985-86 and Beyond
On October 22, 1984 the Office of Budget, Planning and Systems Management
advised that a budget shortfall of $6.6 million was anticipated in the
Operating Budget for 1985/8 6 on the assumption that there would be a 0%
increase in the Government grant. This projection was the basis for the
Memorandum to all members of the U.B.C. Community, issued by the President
on November 5, 1984. In this communication, the President noted that (1)
cuts would have to come out of the on-going salary base, (2) it continues
to be inappropriate to address a possible shortfall by allocating pro rata
targets to the various academic and administrative units on the campus,
and (3) while attrition in the faculty and non-faculty appointments must
be carefully managed, it is no longer appropriate, or possible, to use
attrition as the primary means of addressing the anticipated shortfall.
The options viewed by the President as reasoned responses to meet the
probable financial deficit included:
(i)   voluntary  and  involuntary  termination  of  faculty  and  staff
appo i ntme nt s.
(ii)  the discontinuation of academic and non-academic programs and/or a
reduction in the scale of programs, and
(iii) an increase in revenue.
The President announced that he had instructed Vice-Presidents Smith and
Gellatly to examine each of the budget areas for which they were
responsible and, after due consultation (including the Senate Budget
Committee where appropriate), to develop a plan for addressing an
anticipated $6.6 million shortfall.
At a meeting on November 20, 1984, the Senate Budget Committee was
apprised of these developments. The Committee reiterated its previous
recommendations on further cuts, and advised that program discontinuation
could probably no longer be avoided. 8498.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Budget Planning 1985-86 and Beyond  (continued)
The process of this "Academic and Budget Planning, 1985/86 and Beyond" was
described to Senate in a Memorandum from the President pro tern, dated
March 20, 1985. In outline, throughout November and December 1984, and
January and February 1985, the Senate Budget Committee discussed the
programs and units in the University and provided specific advice to the
Office of the President on all Faculties. The Vice-President, Academic
wrote to each of the Deans directing consideration to various programs,
activities and units: while many of these items for consideration were
identical to those suggested by the Senate Budget Conmittee, the
Vice-President did not  act on all  of the  Committee's  recommendations.
Deans responded to these directives, and the submissions were shared with
the Senate Budget Committee. Additional advice was given to the
Vice-President       on      all      Faculties. In      some      instances,       additional
information and further  responses were  requested from some Deans.
At that time, it was known that the operating grant to the University had
been reduced a further 5% and that the shortfall was thus in the order of
$9.4 million rather than the originally anticipated $6.6 million. It was
the considered opinion of the Senate Budget Committee that such a
reduction could not be  achieved in  one year.
In April 1985, when the Acting Vice-President, Academic had developed a
penultimate set of proposals on items that needed the approval of Senate,
the Senate Budget Committee were present at the final meetings held
between the appropriate Deans, Directors or Heads and the Acting
Vice-President. As a result of these discussions, the Senate Budget
Conmittee provided final advice. The Office of the Vice-President then
developed the proposals that were eventually presented to Senate on May 25
and   27,   1985.
Tables 1-111 report on the adjustments made to the operating budget in the
various Faculties during the current series of reductions. Not only do
the totals include the decisions made by Senate, but there is a listing of
other adjustments, many of which include early voluntary termination of
appointments.
The Senate Budget Committee wishes to stress that those recommendations
that were presented to Senate by the Acting Vice-President, Academic, were
in all cases consistent with the advice given by the Committee. However,
it should be noted that the Committee made recommendations on all
Faculties. The Senate Budget Conmittee did not participate in setting the
specific budget cut figures for all Faculties. The decisions to proceed
on some items and not on others, and the method of promulgation, were made
by the Vice-President,   Academic. Organizational Unit
RETRENCHMENT/OPERATING BUDGET
1985/86       1986/87       1987/88
1988/89
Table [
Page 1 of 2
1989/90      TOTAL
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3
94
,301
$  62
,888
309
,663
225
,463
706
261
340,
436
33
,088
36
,092
39
,834
130,
049
597,
424
555,
431
58,
123
0
43,
323
26,
233
35,
000*
C
)
381,
233
273,
601
271
,742
104
,313
0
480,237
392,598
0
33,279
264,068
0
0
0
324,865
0
$      0
13,596
60,705
0
0
141,374
0
0
0
20,913
0
$  0
0
0
0
0
41,703
0
0
0
0
0
$ 157,189 ro
1,028,959 g
3
VICE-PRESIDENT. ACADEMIC
Faculties
AGRICULTURAL SCI.
APPLIED SCIENCE
ARTS
COMMERCE G BUS. ADMIN.
DENTISTRY
EDUCATION
FORESTRY
GRADUATE STUDIES
LAW *
MEDICINE
SCIENCE
TOTAL FACULTIES
FACULTY FTEs
''One-time retrenchment occurring only in 1985/86.
Note: In the 1985/86 retrenchment exercise, no reductions were sought in the general purpose operating funds
budget of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Retrenchment related reductions did occur, however,
in prior years' operating budgets of the Faculty.
11 July/85; Revised 12 Sept/85; 30 Sept/85; 30 Oct/85
1,500,000 5"
c
ro
69,180 £
203,162
1,600,000
58,123
69,556
35,000*
1,000,612
376,055
$2,569,992
$1,754,506
$1,495,047
$236,588
$ 41,703
$6,097,836
34.86
32.52
30.21
A.33
.75
102.67
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Retrenchment/Operating Budget
Organizational Unit 1985/86
Page 2 of 2
1986/87
1987/88
1988/89
1989/90
TOTAL
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Assoc. V-P, Academic
Audio Visual
Botanical Garden
Centre for Cont.Ed.
Extra Sessional St.
University Press
Canadian Lit.
Pacific Affairs
Library
23,223
84,496
299,644
119,631
52,000
3,145
7,474
216,088
2,447
14,760
7,739
23,707
750
25,670
100,006
307,383
119,631
52,000
3,145
7,474
239,795
Assoc. V-P, Student Serv.
Athletics 200,000
Recreation UBC 7,000
TOTAL V-P, Academic       3,58 2,693
1,803,159
1,495,797
236,588
41,703
200,000
 7,000
7,159,940
V-P, ADMIN. 5 FINANCE
Facilities Planning 10,771
Physical Plant 1,476,345
TOTAL V-P, Admin. 6 Fin.   1,487,116
10,771
1,476,345
1,487,116
GENERAL EXPENSES
Alumni
Ceremonies
Legal Fees
Travel 6 Removal
18,500
7,700
25,000
25,000
11 July/85>  Revised 12 Sept/85; 30 Sept/85
18,500
7,700
25,000
25,000
TOTAL General
Expenses
76,200
76,200
BENEFITS
500,000
201,233
152,571
24,131
4,253
882,188
GRAND TOTAL
$5,646,009
$2,004,392
$1,648,368
$260,719
$45,956
$9,605,444
53
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F.T.E. RETRENCHMENT 1985/86 - OPERATING BUDGET
1985/86
1986/87
1987/88
1988/89
1989/90
To
tal
Organizational   Unit
Acad.     Support
FTE             FTE
Acad.
FTE
Support
FTE
Acad.     Support
FTE              FTE
Acad.     Support
FTE              FTE
Acad.     Support
FTE             FTE
Acad.
FTE
Support
FTE
TOTAL
FTE
VICE-PRESIDENT.   ACAOEMIC
1
1
Fjculties
AGRICULTURAL  SCIENCES
1.50           .16
1.60
3.00
.16
3.16
APPLIED SCIENCE
6.53        1.25
6.63
10."»0           d.00
.25           .33
23.81
5.53
29.39
ARTS
7.7d        3.00
<».3I
6.00
1.00
19.05
3.00
22.05
COMMERCE S  BUS.   ADMIN.
-
0.
DENTISTRY
1.00
2.25"
.75
.75            -25
d.OO-
1.00
5.00
EDUCATION
5.67
12.33
5.75
2.50
.75
27.00
-
27.00
FORESTRY
1.00
1.00
-
1.00
GRAOUATE STUOIES
.25       1.00
.75
1.00
1.00
2.00
LAW
HEOICINE
SCIENCE
i.ai      1.05
2.90
Z.69
1 .00
.40
2.86            .20
.25
7" 2 7
3.90
f.90
n.
9.1.7
3.9P
TOTAL  FACULTIES
28.do        6.<(6
31.37
1.15
25.76         It.US
3.75-         .58.
.75
90.03
12.61*
102.67
Assoc.   V-P,  Academic
Audio-Visual
Botanical   Gardens
Centre  for  Cont.Ed.
Extra-Sess.   Studies
Library
.89
.d5        2.00
"i.75        d.26
1.00        1.00
2.52
.21
.25
1.20
.11
.01
.67
5.00
1.00
3.72
1.00
2.00
<i. 26
1.00
1.00
2.67
9-26
2.00
3-72
TOTAL. ASSOC.  V-P,  ACAOEMIC
8.72        8.15
1.66
.11
.01
10.39
8.26
18.65
TOTAL,  V-P.  ACADEMIC                          [     37-12       Id.61
33.03
1.26
25.77          d.<(5
3.75            .58
.75
100.112
20.90
121.32
VICE-PRESIDENT.   AOMIN.   £   FINANCE
.60
28.00
-
.60
28.00
Facilities  Planning
Physical   Plant
.60
28.00
TOTAL,   V-P,   AOMIN.   S.   FINANCE
28.60
-
28.60
28.60
GRAND TOTAL
37.12    '•3.21
33.03
1.26   1
25.77         d.d5
3.75            .58
.75
100.112
<t9.50
I*»9.92
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26 Aug/85
Rev. 12 Sept/85:  30 Sept/85 . 30 Oct/85
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RETRENCHMENT   1985/86 - OPERATING BUDGET
The Amount of Retrenchment  Not  Allocated an  FTE Number
""- ■   "■ 196VU
1986/87'
1987/83
1988/89
e.  1989/90.
Organizational Unit
Academ i c
Salaries
Other
Salaries
Non-
Salary
Cost
Recovery
Academ i c
Salaries
Other
Salaries
Non-
Salary
Academic  Other
Salaries Salaries
Academic
Salaries
Other
Salaries
VICE-PRESIOENT, ACADEMIC
Faculties
APPLIED SCIENCE
ARTS
COMMERCE
DENTISTRY
EDUCATION
GRADUATE STUDIES
LAU (soft funds)
MEOICJNE
$ 17.300
173.109
66.75't
35.000
100,000
26,000
5.019
255.300
11.188
P.P.
$  3.000
30,000
35,000
■ 2,097
30,000  35,000
TOTAL FACULTIES
392.163
31.019
266,488
0
33,000
35.000
2,097
30,000  35.000
Assoc. V-P, Academic
Audio-Visual
Centre for Cont.Ed.
Extra-Sess. Studies
University Press
Canadian Lit.
Pacific Affairs
Library
76,000
6.521
2,906
953
600
38,*97
3.1*5
1)0,000
52,000
Assoc. V-P, Student Serv.
Athletics
Recreation UBC
200,000
7.000
TOTAL, V-P, ACADEMIC
474.684
3*,878
418.730
259.000
33.000
35,000
2,097
30,000  35,000
VICE-PRESIDENT, ADMIN, t FIN.
7,000
2*5,3*5
Physical Plant
TOTAL, V-P, ADMIN. £ FINANCE
7,000
245,3*5
GENERAL EXPENSES
Alumni
Ceremonies
Legal Fees
Travel t Removal
18,500
7,000
25,000
25,000
Benefits-
3*1.917
158,083
164,035
, 5.677
139,169  10.207
27.759
625
TOTAL, GENERAL EXPENSES
3*1.917
176.583
57,000
164,035
5.677
139.169  10,207
27.759
625
GRAND TOTAL
$616,60)
$211,461
$*82,730
$50*.3*5
$197,035
$40,677
$2,097
$169,169 $*5.207
$27,759
$625
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28 Aug/05;    Revised  12 Sept/85 i  30 Sept/85
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. 8503.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Budget Planning 1985-86 and Beyond  (continued)
It should also be reported that the Senate Budget Committee recommended
more program cuts than those finally adopted. This recommendation was so
as to provide funds for moving the Unviersity forward in a positive
planning stance. The Committee is concerned over the lack of forward
progress in many of the high quality core areas in the University.
Faculty morale is low, many faculty are considering leaving, and there is
little opportunity for developing new initiatives.
Consequences of budget reductions
The University is now faced with the full impact of program discontinuance
and restrictions, enrolment limitations, course deletions and
curtailments, unreasonable class sizes, unprecedented teaching loads,
restrictions in research activity, and so on. The ability to provide high
quality education and training is now in jeopardy. Any further cuts are
bound to have disastrous consequences. It is unlikely that the University
will be able to fulfil its aims and objectives if additional funds are not
forthcoming immediately.
The Deans have provided details of the consequences of the 1985-86
retrenchment, emphasizing in most cases the fact that this budget
reduction has come on top of ten years of cuts and restrictions. The
Committee's understanding of the situation in each faculty is given below.
Agricultural Sciences
Faculty positions were removed in Animal Science, Plant Science and
Poultry Science. The loss of faculty positions in Animal Science has
forced the department to abandon some graduate and undergraduate courses,
and to staff others with part-time sessional, University Research Fellows
and graduate students (on leave). The merger of Poultry Science with
Animal Science will require the rationalization of resources for both
teaching and research. The loss of a faculty position in Plant Science
will seriously impact on the maintenance of a critical mass in the area of
economic entomology and insect pathology.
Applied Science
Faculty positions were lost in Nursing and Architecture. The loss of
seven full-time and two part-time academic positions, and one secretary
this year forced enrolment restrictions in Nursing (from 113 to 80).
There will be a restructuring of the B.S.N, program.
The loss of 1.5 senior positions, plus the changing requirements for
practicing architecture, has forced the School of Architecture to reduce
first year enrolment from 43 to 35 students, and review the B. Arch,
program.
Restrictions on funding in Engineering for supplies and expenses, teaching
assistants and part-time lecturers have had an adverse impact on programs. 8504.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
Arts
The size of this Faculty has provided flexibility and manoeuverability for
reductions without the discontinuance of units or major programs. Of the
25 faculty positions to be removed from the Faculty over the next three
years (2.6 of the 25.1 F.T.E. faculty mentioned above are teaching
assistants), 7 represent vacancies attributable to resignations and 15.5
are the result of retirement. The four staff positions are in service
areas - specifically in computer programming and reading room maintenance
and supervision. The consequences of the 1985/86 retrenchment, when its
impact is fully felt, will be excessively large classes, a reduced range
of electives for students in Arts and other faculties, elimination of some
areas of study, increased workload for faculty, reduced research effort,
and reduced quality of programs leading to diminished reputation in areas
of traditional strength. The Faculty is considering further restrictions
on enrolment.
Commerce
Resignations this year have resulted in the elimination of all
undergraduate courses with enrolments of 12 or fewer students, the further
reduction in the range of electives offered in the part-time evening MBA
program, and the reduction in the number of sections in some undergraduate
courses. As a consequence, some students entering Third year were unable
to enrol in the option of their choice.
Dent ist ry
Over the past few years faculty positions have been retrenched in Oral
Biology, Oral Medicine, Oral Surgery and Preventive and Community
Dentistry.     There  is  concern   over the   loss  in  these areas.
In 1986 the Diploma Program in Dental Hygiene will be transferred to
Vancouver Community College, but owing to circumstances beyond the
University's and Faculty's control, this transfer has not been smooth.
The fate of the program is not yet clear and there is some concern that
Senate's desire to protect   students  adequately could well  be   foiled.
The  Faculty is  actively pursuing a B.Sc.program in  Dental Hygiene.
Education
Retrenchment, in general, has increased class size, has forced an uneven
pattern of down-sizing, and caused concern over critical mass in certain
areas.  There is extensive restructuring of programs in Education.
In Mathematics and Science Education the loss of faculty has increased the
instructional load carried by sessionals and TAs, class sizes have
increased and laboratories are oversubscribed. Although discontinuation
of technical courses in Industrial Education was approved by Senate, no
substitute has yet been arranged at a Community College.  With the 8505.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee
Education  (continued)
dropping of courses in Communications, Media and Technology (CMTE), the
Faculty will need to ensure that all students in teacher education
programs receive adequate instruction in the employment of information
management techniques and technological development. To date, the need
toensure that graduate students in CMTE are able to complete their
programs, appears to be satisfactory, providing they move along in their
studies reasonably expeditiously.
The School of Physical Education and Recreation has successfully planned
the phase-out of the BRE programs, and considerable progress has been made
in eliminating "performance course" requirements in the School.
In the Area of Art and Music Education, there are ongoing discussions
between the Faculties of Arts and Education.
Forestry
One faculty position has been lost in Harvesting and Wood Science, and the
Faculty  is without  a  full-time  Director  of  the University Research  Forest.
Graduate Studies
The Institute of Animal Resource Ecology will be phased out over two
years. Faculty will need to be assigned full-time elsewhere, and other
units  will be   required to absorb the  administrative  responsibility.
Law
There has been no program discontinuance or enrolment limitation thus far,
but the increasing dependence on non-permanenent faculty is a source of
concern.
Medicine
This faculty reduced the intake into first year from 130 to 120. The
Division of History of Medicine will be eliminated unless external funding
is found. Rented space in hospitals has been reduced by 17,000 square
feet. The operating budget of the Department of Biomedical Communications
was cut by 20%: a further 5% reduction will occur over the next three
years, with consequent diminuation of support for both teaching and
research. There is concern that the budgetary reduction within Medicine
will have an adverse effect on the relationship the Faculty now enjoys
with the teaching hospitals.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Although not subject to retrenchment in 1985-86,  loss of faculty and
budget cuts over the last two years have resulted in increased work loads
for faculty, loss of support staff and increased pressure on the supplies
and expenses budget. 8506.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
Science
This year budget reductions resulted in the net loss of 3 faculty
positions through retirement and early voluntary termination of
appointment. The consequences of retrenchment, inflation and enrolment
increases over the past decade have been such as to now severely limit the
Faculty's ability to provide essential instruction. There is currently an
overload of students desiring to take technologically demanding courses
which, coupled with the increased costs of supplies and up to date
scientific equipment, has exceeded the Faculty's resources. Class sizes
have exceeded room capacity in many departments, and some laboratories
have been curtailed or cancelled."
Dr. Scudder    )  That the report of the Senate Budget
Dr. wisenthal  )  Committee be received.
In the discussion that followed, Dr. Wisenthal suggested that the Senate
Budget Committee should submit to Senate fcsr discussion, proposals
concerning the academic direction of the University. He proposed that the
following areas be explored:
1. The appropriate balance between graduate and undergraduate studies.
2. The relationship between the first two undergraduate years and the
second two undergraduate years.
3. U.B.C.'s place in the post-secondary world of British Columbia.
Dr. Wisenthal felt that the third issue was a critical one and that the
University  should  adopt  a  position  and argue  it vigorously  in the
province.  He further stated that the University's position in relation to
the Colleges needed investigation and even more urgently its position in
relation to the other two publicly funded universities was in need of
serious enquiry.  Dr. Wisenthal stated that these were very difficult and
complex  issues  and  that  it would  not be  easy  to  reach clear  cut
conclusions but suggested that it would be desirable to consider issues of
this kind since it would put the University in a much stronger position if
it had a clearer sense of what its academic directions are. 8507.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
Dr. Spencer referred to item 3. of the report and suggested that before
giving the President advice on long-term academic priorities, the Budget
Conmittee should present its proposals to Senate for discussion and
approval.
In response to a query, Dr. Scudder explained that the Acting
Vice-President, Academic had requested that the Deans provide information
concerning the consequences of the 1985-86 retrenchment. This information
was shared with the Senate Budget Committee but the Deans were not asked
to provide reports for Senate.
Dean Beagrie responded to a query concerning the Diploma Program in
Dental Hygiene. He stated that in his opinion the proposed transfer of
the program to Vancouver Community College should be delayed for a further
twelve months. He felt that in order to protect and effectively transfer
the program a conmittee should be established for that purpose and that
the immediate appointment of a coordinator was essential if the interests
of the students were to be protected.
In response to a further query, the Acting Vice-President, Academic, Dr.
Birch, stated that The Universities Council of British Columbia had
commissioned Dr. Kenneth Strand to prepare a set of recommendations
regarding the process of planning but they had not commissioned him to
prepare a five-year plan for the universities. Dr. Strand's report, which
was in two parts, had been received and circulated to the Deans and to the
Senate Budget Committee to comment on the process. Council then chose to
adopt an entirely different process than that recommended by Dr. Strand, 8508.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate
Budget Committee  (continued)
and     in     attempting     to     respond     to     the     Premier's     invitation     to     the
universities,   either   individually,   collectively,   or  under  the   guidance   of
Council,    to   prepare   and   present   five-year   plans,    Council   divided   its   own
membership   into   four   task   forces  working  on   various   aspects   of   planning.
In    that    process    they    requested    the    Presidents    of    each    of    the    three
universities    to    present    their    own    statements    on    a    variety    of    issues
relating  to  their   institutional  missions.     They  also  presented  a   series  of
questions   to  which  each university was   asked  to   respond,   and the Minister
of    Universities,     Science    and    Communications    was    asked    to    respond    to
another   sub-set   of   the   questions.      Council   staff   themselves   then   raised  a
third    sub-set.       The    Council   will   attempt   to   respond    on   behalf    of    the
universities    to    the    Premier's    request    for   a    five-year   plan.       It    is    a
matter    of    very    great    concern    to    each    of    the    universities    that    the
opportunity  for the universities  to   really  engage   in that process  has  been
very   limited.      It   is   understood   that   a   draft  report  will   be   prepared  by
November   26,   which   is   to   be   reviewed  by   Council   on   December   9   and   16  and
presented to the  Minister  almost   immediately  thereafter.
Dr. Finnegan suggested to the Senate Budget Committee that it would be
more useful if the tables could show a ten year situation to display what
has occurred both with regard to the reductions in dollars and the full
time  equivalents  that have been reduced in the various Faculties.
After further discussion the motion was put and carried.
Dr.   Spencer )     That before  giving the  President  advice
Dr.   Weiler )     on long-term academic priorities,   the  Senate
Budget  Committee  should present   its  proposals
to Senate  for  discussion  and  approval.
Carried 8509.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees of Senate  (continued)
Curriculum Committee  (See Appendix 'B' )
Dr. Thompson presented the report.  The committee recommended approval
of proposals from the Faculty of Arts, subject to the following:
ANTH 217, 220 and 221 to be added to the list of general Anthropology
courses having no prerequisite.  (p.70 - 1985-86 Calendar)
French 419 change the word "Quebec" in course description to read
"French Canada".
Major in Music History and Literature
should read:
Third Year and Fourth Year
Third Year
(300) Theory of Music V 1.5
(301) Theory of Music VI 1.5
(382) Music Performance 2
Fourth Year
(400) Theory of Music VII  3
(482) Music Performance    2
15
18
Page 10 - RELG 431 - Insert the words "Seminar on ..." at
beginning of description and change hours to read (0-3;
0-0)
The conmittee also recommended approval of a new course and course
changes submitted by the Faculty of Dentistry; curriculum proposals
submitted by the Faculty of Education, with the exception of proposed
changes to the Business Education Concentration and Major being withheld
pending consultation with the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration, and a new course submitted by the Faculty of Medicine.
Dr. Thompson  )  That the proposals of the Faculties of
Dr. Brown     )  Arts, Dentistry, Education and Medicine
be approved.
Carried 8510.
November 13, 1985
Reports of Committees  (continued)
Nominating Committee
In presenting the report Dr. Elder explained that Dr. Finnegan had been
coopted to the Senate Admissions Committee as a non-Senate member. Since
he had recently been elected to serve on Senate, his membership on the
committee required ratification as a Senate member.
Dr. Elder      )  That Dr. C. V. Finnegan's co-opted position
Dean Miller   )  on the Senate Admissions Committee be changed
to that of Senate member.
Carried
Dr. Elder     )  That Ms. C. Davidson replace Miss D. J. Chow
Dean Burns     )  on the Committee on Student Appeals on Academic
Discipline and on the Library Committee.
Carried
Dr. Elder reported that Dr. J. L. Wisenthal had resigned from the Senate
Budget Committee following his appointment as Associate Dean of the
Faculty of Arts.
Dr. Tennant    )  That Dr. Wisenthal's resignation not
Dr. Finnegan   )  be accepted.
Lost
Dr. Elder     )  That Dr. J. A. S. Evans replace
Mrs. Fulton   )  Dr. Wisenthal on the Senate Budget
Committee.
Carried
Senate agreed to a suggestion that the Nominating Committee be requested
to discuss the question of whether Department Heads should be included in
the membership of the Senate Budget Committee. 8511.
November 13, 1985
Academic Year 1986-87
A draft of the section of the Academic Year for inclusion in the
Calendar had been circulated.
Dr. Finnegan   )  That the proposed dates for the
Dr. Goldberg   )  Academic Year 1986-87 be included
in the Calendar.
Carried
Report on Enrolment 1985-86
The report on enrolment for 1985-86 had been circulated for information.
The Registrar agreed to a request to provide information on enrolment at
Simon Fraser University and the University of Victoria at the next meeting.
Other business
Mediaeval Workshop
Dr. Elder drew Senate's attention to the annual Mediaeval Workshop to be
held on November 15 and 16.
Report of the Tributes Committee  (in camera)
Memorial Minutes
Dr. Dennison presented the report. The following memorial statements
had been prepared in accordance with the custom of Senate in recognition
by the University and Senate of the late David Gordon Laird and the late
Neville Vincent Scarfe.
MEMORIAL MINUTE
DAVID GORDON LAIRD (1889-1985)
David Gordon Laird, who died on October 16, 1985, was truly a pioneer,
both as a teacher at this University and as a researcher in his chosen
field of soil sciences. 8512.
November 13, 1985
Report of the Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute  (continued)
Dr. Laird was born in Prince Edward Island in 1889 and received his early
education at Prince of Wales College. In 1908, at the age of 19, he moved
west and became the teacher of a one room school at Fairview, British
Columbia, and later at Gibsons Landing and Steveston.
He returned to Ontario and completed his degree in Agriculture at Guelph
Agricultural College in 1915. After a period of service with the
Canadian Forces in France, during which he was severely gassed, Dr. Laird
returned to British Columbia and was appointed to the Faculty of
Agriculture in 1920.
Among his other accomplishments, David Laird undertook the first soil
survey in British Columbia, travelling by foot and by horse throughout the
Pemberton Valley. He was honoured by a number of organizations, a Fellow
of both the Canadian Society of Soil Science, and the Agricultural
Institute of Canada and elected to the Senate Club of the British Columbia
Federation of Agriculture. Furthermore, Dr. Laird played a major role in
the formation of the Natural Resources Conference in this province. He
also served as President of the B.C. Academy of Sciences, as a member of
the Senate of the University from 1936 to 1942, and on the first board of
the British Columbia Research Council.
Dr. Laird's teaching abilities were legendary. He was loved and respected
by his students, many of whom now serve in key positions in government and
industry.
David Laird died at the age of 96. He gave thirty-four productive years
to the service of the University, and played a large part in building the
reputation which it now enjoys.
To his surviving family the Senate of this University extends its deepest
sympathy.
Dr. Dennison   )  That the memorial statement for
Dean Richards  )  David Gordon Laird be spread on
the minutes of Senate and that a
copy be sent to the relatives of
the deceased.
Carried 8513.
November 13, 1985
Report of the Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute  (continued)
MEMORIAL MINUTE
NEVILLE VINCENT SCARFE (1908 - 1985)
Neville Vincent Scarfe, the founding Dean of the Faculty of Education at
this University, died on October the eighth, 1985.
Rarely has a member of the academic community played such a significant
role in the development of public education in this province. Through his
ideas, his words and his actions, Neville Scarfe stimulated a wave of
reform in both pedagogical theory and practice.
Dean Scarfe was born in 1908, in rural England. After completing his
schooling at the King Edward VI Grammar School, Chelmsford, Essex, he
earned the only scholarship then available to continue his education at
the University of London, where, at age 19, he graduated at the top of his
year, with First Class honours in Geography.
During the pre-war years his reputation as a student and teacher of his
discipline grew rapidly. Among his most significant achievements during
this period was the preparation of a curriculum which was adopted in all
British schools.
After a distinguished record with the Ministry of Information during the
war years, Neville Scarfe accepted the Deanship in Education at the
University of Manitoba in 1951.
In 1956, Dean Scarfe undertook the responsibility of integrating all
professional preparation of public school teachers at The University of
British Columbia. It was a time when the need for creative and
authoritative leadership was critical - - and Neville Scarfe filled the
role with distinction.  He served as a member of Senate from 1956 to 1973.
As a geographer and an educator, Neville Scarfe was truly an
internationalist. He represented his adopted country as a keynote speaker
at conferences on four continents. His name featured prominently during
the creation of UNESCO as a force in the development of international
understanding and humanitarianism. At the same time, Neville Scarfe
possessed a sensitive artistic nature which was expressed through his
unfailing support for the advancement of fine arts on the campus of this
University.
In his outstanding contribution to public education, Neville Scarfe*s
commitment was unparalleled. His ideas were creative, provocative and
widely respected. He challenged his profession, stimulated his
contemporaries and articulated his philosophy in a passionate yet always
dignified manner. As is so often the case with those who challenge the
status quo, Neville Scarfe was not free of criticism, but his
determination never weakened, no did his ideals waver. 8514.
November 13, 1985
Report of the Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute  (continued)
Neville Scarfe was a scholar, an administrator, a teacher and a public
figure - - but over all, he was a compassionate and tolerant human being.
His coitmitment to a life of learning will continue to flourish through the
lives of an entire generation of British Columbians.
To his wife Paddy, and to his sons and their families, the Senate of The
University of British Columbia extends its deepest sympathy.
Dr. Dennison     )  That the memorial statement for
Acting Dean McKie )  Neville Vincent Scarfe be spread on
the minutes of Senate and that a
copy be sent to the relatives of
the deceased.
Carried
The meeting adjourned at 10.00 p.m.
The   next   regular   meeting   of   Senate   will   be   held  on Wednesday,   December
11,   1985.
Secretary
Confirmed,
Chairman 8515.
November 13, 1985
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate
Community Pharmacy Residency Scholarship - This scholarship in the amount of
approximately $300 has been endowed through contributions by the Medications
Awareness Society and the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia. The
award will be made to a community pharmacy resident who obtained high
academic standing in the undergraduate pharmacy program and whose personal
and professional qualities strongly reflect the active and caring role of
the pharmacist in community health. The award will be made on the
recommendation of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. (The award will
be available in the 1986/87 Winter Session.)
Claire Goddard Memorial Prize - A prize in the amount of $175 has been
established in perpetuity in memory of Claire Goddard. The award will be
made on the recommendation of the Department of Political Science, for the
best in class essay, submitted in any course in Political Science, on the
subject of Australasian affairs. (The award will be available in the
1986/87 Winter Session.)
Lindsay Kenney Bursary - A bursary of $1,000, the gift of the legal firm of
Lindsay Kenney, Barristers and Solicitors, will be awarded to a student in
the Faculty of Law. The award will be based on financial need and
preference will be given to a male student supporting a family including
children. The bursary will be available for a student attending any of the
three years of legal studies. (The award will be available in the 1985/86
Winter Session.)
Ted le Nobel Memorial Scholarship - An annual scholarship in the amount of
$250 has been endowed in memory of Ted le Nobel by his family. The award
will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Law, with preference
given to a woman student entering the second year of the undergraduate
program.  (The award will be available in the 1986/87 Winter Session.)
R. E. McKechnie Graduate Scholarship - A scholarship in the amount of $1,000
established through a bequest from the late Chancellor R. E. McKechnie, will
be awarded on the recommendation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies to a
deserving graduate student at The University of British Columbia who is
proceeding to an M.A. or M.Sc. degree. (The award will be available in the
1986/87 Winter Session.)
Lee Paikin Memorial Bursary - A bursary in the amount of $250 has been made
available by friends and colleagues in memory of Professor Lee S. Paikin.
The avard will be made to a student demonstrating financial need, and an
interest in the field of civil liberties. The award will be made in
consultation with the Faculty of Law. (The award will be available in the
1986/87 Winter Session.)
Provincial Court Judges' Bursaries - Four bursaries of $500 each, the gift
of the Judges of the Provincial Court of British Columbia, will be awarded
annually to students in the Faulty of Law. The awards will be made by the
University to students needing financial assistance. (The award will be
available in the 1986/87 Winter Session.) 8516.
November 13, 1985
APPENDIX 'A'
New awards recommended to Senate  (continued)
Gordon Merritt Shrum Memorial Scholarship - One or more scholarships to a
total value of $1,300 have been made available by family and friends in
memory of Professor Gordon M. Shrum, O.C, S.M. , O.B.E., M.M. , E.D. , Ph.D.,
F.R.S.C, LL.D., D.Sc. (1896 - 1985). Dr. Shrum joined the U.B.C. Physics
Department in 1925 and served as its Head from 1938 until his mandatory
retirement in 1961. During this time, his distinguished contributions to
U.B.C. also included the roles of Dean of Graduate Studies, Director of the
Extension Department, Director of the B.C. Research Council, and Director of
Housing, to name but a few. His service to the Province of B.C. was no less
distinguished; for example, in his post-U.B.C. career, he served as
Chairman of B.C. Hydro, directing the Peace and Columbia River projects and
in the same period, he built Simon Fraser University, subsequently becoming
its first Chancellor. This scholarship will be made on the recommendation
of the Department of Physics to a student entering the final year of study
in the Honours Physics program or the Engineering Physics program. (The
award will be available in the 1986/87 Winter Session.) 8517.
November 13, 1985
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Anthropology and Sociology
New courses
Changes
ANTH 217 (1.5) Culture and Communication
ANTH 220 (1.5) Indians of British Columbia: Cultures
and Resources
ANTH 221 (1.5) Indians  of British Columbia: Art and
Myth
ANTH 351 (1.5) Ethnography of the Pacific Islands
ANTH 352 (1.5) Ethnography of East Asia
ANTH 353 (1.5) Ethnography of Latin America
ANTH 202 - change in title
ANTH 302, 402 - change in title and description
ANTH 303  - change in number,  title and description
(formerly 302-3)
ANTH 403-5 - change in number and title (formerly 402-5)
TaNTH 301 - change in units, title and hours
SOCI 476 - change in course rider
Deletion
ANTH 476
Change in program description:
Major (and) Honours, Third and Fourth Years, Three units from among
Anthropology 302-304, 351-353, 401-405
Add following program note, p.68 before paragraph beginning "Each May"...
Native Peoples
Students who want to concentrate in the study of Indian and Inuit
peoples and cultures may choose from among the following courses
beginning in the second year:
Anthropology 220 (1.5)
Anthropology 2 21
Anthropology 301
Anthropology 304
Anthropology 321
Anthropology 329
Anthropology 331
Anthropology 4 01
Anthropology 420
Fine Arts 261
Fine Arts 343
Fine Arts 369
Fine Arts 469
History     30 2
(1.5)
(1.5)
(3)
(1.5)
(3)
(3)
(3)
((1.5/3)d
(1.5)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Indians of British Columbia: Cultures
and Resources
Indians of British Columbia: Art and Myth
Contemporary Indians of British Columbia
Ethnography of the Northwest Coast
The Canadian Far West in Prehistory
Native Peoples of Canada
Anthropology of Art
Indians of North America
Archaeology of British Columbia
Native Arts of the Americas
Canadian Art
North American Indian Art
Seminar in North American Indian Art
History of the Native Peoples of Canada 8518.
November 13, 1985
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS
Anthropology and Sociology  (continued)
The following courses also regularly include materials relating to
native cultures:  Anthropology 332, 341, 407, 408, 424.
Students who want to major in Anthropology with an emphasis on Native
Peoples of Canada may do so by completing Anthroplogy 300; 3 units from
among Anthroplogy 400, 450, 460, 470; Anthroplogy 304 or 401; 6 or more
units from among Anthropology 304, 329, 331, 401, 420, 431.
School of Family and Nutritional Sciences
Description of Option,(p.126, column 2. 1984-85 Calendar) between
"Notes"  and "Five-Year Program  ..."
Dietetic Qualification Study
Graduates holding a Bachelor's degree in Science, Food Science or Home
Economics may undertake additional study in the School of Family and
Nutritional Sciences to qualify for application to a Dietetic Internship
Program (not available in universities). Completion of this study does
not lead to a degree in Dietetics and does not guarantee placement in an
Internship Program. Interested students should consult with a Dietetics
Adviser  in the  School.
Changes   in  course designation:
All undergraduate courses listed under Home Economics, p.296, are to be
moved and listed under "Family and Nutritional Sciences." Where "Home
Economics" appears in designation of courses in program listings, the
term is to be replaced by the code "FNSC", p.125-126. under
"Admission",   'I'   is to read:
I.     A minimum total of   24 units   is  required of   courses  in  Family  and
Nutritional  Sciences.
French
New course FREN 419   (3)       Women's    Literature    in    France    and    French
Canada
History
New courses HIST 271   (1.5)   Japan and the West  since  1600
HIST 273   (1.5)  Korea  in the Modern World 8519.
November 13, 1985
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
Music
Change in program description, p.82, the Third Year of the "Major in
Orchestral Instrument" should read:
Third Year
Specialized Ensemble
2Large Ensemble
Elective  in Arts
1
1
6
18
p.83, change notes 3 and 6 to "Major in General Studies" as follows:
■'The large and small ensembles chosen are normally ... to the needs
of the ensembles. Students completing concentrations in historical
instruments will take three units of small ensemble (usually Collegium
Musicum, starting in the second year) and three units of large ensemble.
6...where the student wishes to exceed the total 65 - unit
requirement. Students completing keyboard concentrations must take
Music 149. Those completing harpsichord concentrations must take Music
233 and 333.  Those wishing to ...
p.83, revise the First Year of the "Major in Secondary Music Education"
to read:
First Year
Large Music Ensemble    (1)
Music Education 103    (1)
p.84, revise the last two years of the "Major in Music History and
Literature" to read:
Third Year
(300) Theory of Music V 1.
(301) Theory of Music VI 1.
(382) Music Performance 2
Fourth Year
(400) Theory of Music VII  3
(482) Music Performance   2
15
18
Change
MUSC 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 159, 160,
162, 163, 164, 165  - change in units to (l/4)d
161, 8520.
November 13, 1985
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF ARTS  (continued)
Psychology
New courses   PSYC 323 (1.5) Tests and Measurements II
Change        PSYC  303  -  change  in  units,  title,  description,
prerequisite, hours
Religious Studies
New courses   RELG 361 (1.5) The New Religions of Japan
RELG 366 (1.5) Taoism, Buddhism, and Popular Religion in
China
Changes       RELG 354, 452 - change in title, description
RELG 364, 365 - change in units, title, description, hours
RELG 431 - change in number, units, hours (formerly 363)
RELG 367 - change in number (formerly 392)
Deletion      RELG 395, 460, 462, 471
FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
Orthodontics
New course    ORTH 7 01 Advanced Clinical Orthodontics
Changes       ORTH 700 - change in title and description
ORBI 410 -change in units
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Office
New course    EDUC 141 (1.5) Cultural Studies
Change in program description:
(11) Native Indian Concentration
Fourth Year:  Education 479; one of Anthropology 301 or 329 or Education
342;  3 units selected from:  Curriculum and Instructional Studies 396;
Education  240,  342;   English  Education  486,  489;   Social  Studies
Education 402.
Educational Psychology and Special Education
Change        SPED 317 - delete course prerequisite 8521.
November 13, 1985
APPENDIX 'B'
Course and curriculum proposals
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Language Education
Change in program description:
3.  Academic Preparation of Graduates who wish to become School Teachers
(b)  for one year program (Secondary), ...
Applications will be accepted from ... Italian*, Japanese*,
mathematics, ...
Delete concentrations - "(7) Library Education Concentration"
- School Librarianship C
- "(18) Library Education Concentration"
Delete program       - "(ii) Two Year Joint Program in School
Librarianship and Education"
Course deletion       - Library Education 404
Change program description:
(4) French Education Concentration - Second Year: French 202 and 220
Third and Fourth Years: Modern Languages Education 393 and 6 units
from Modern Languages Education 340, 394, 396, 489, French 302, 305,
306, 316, 334, 335, 402, 404, 414-418 (inclusive)
Mathematics and Science Education
Change program description and units:
(22) Physics Concentration and Major -
Concentration
Third and Fourth Years:  Physics 311, 319, 326, and 3 additional units
of approved senior physics courses (Physics 412 is strongly recommended).
Major
Third and Fourth Years:  Geology 105; Mathematics 315; Physics 311, 319,
326, 412, and 7.5 additional units of approved senior physics courses.
FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Surgery
New course SURG 451   (1.5)  Assessment  and Early Management of  Multiply
Injured Patients

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