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[Meeting minutes of the Senate of The University of British Columbia] Sep 16, 1981

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Array 7587.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
The First regular meeting of the Senate of The University of British Columbia for
the Session 1981-82 was held on Wednesday, September 16, 1981, at 8.00 p.m. in room
102 of the Buchanan Building.
Present: President D. T. Kenny (Chairman), Chancellor J. V. Clyne, Dr. R. A.
Adams, Dr. C. E. Armerding, Dean G. S. Beagrie, Dean D. R. Birch, Mr. W. H.
Birmingham, Mrs. M. F. Bishop, Dr. T. H. Brown, Rev. P. C. Burns, Mr. G. D. Burnyeat,
Dr. K. 0. L. Burridge, Dr. J. J. R. Campbell, Mr. B. J. Coulson, Dr. J. Dahlie, Mrs. S.
Dodson, Dr. D. Donaldson, Dr. A. J. Elder, Mr. D. B. Fields, Dean C. V. Finnegan,
Mr. H. J. Franklin, Mr. C. P. Fulker, Mrs. E. D. Fulton, Dean J. A. F. Gardner, Dr. R. F.
Gray, Mr. S. T. Henderson, Dr. A. M. Hick ling, Dr. R. F. Kelly, Dr. R. W. Kennedy,
Dean W. D. Kitts, Dr. A. Kozak, Mr. J. Kulich, Dean P. A. Larkin, Dr. L. M. Lavkulich,
Dean P. A. Lusztig, Dean K. M. Lysyk, Dr. J. P. Martin, Ms. C. E. McAndrew, Mr. M. A.
McCann, Dr. A. J. McClean, Mr. D. Mclnnes, Mr. J. F. McWilliams, Mr. I. C. Miller,
Dr. W. R. Morford, Dean B. E. Riedel, Miss R. E. Robinson, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dr. M.
Shaw, Dr. J. G. Silver, Dr. C. E. Slonecker, Dr. R. H. T. Smith, Dr. R. A. Spencer,
Dr. R. Stewart, Dr. P. Suedfeld, Dr. N. Sutherland, Mr. R. Tan, Dr. P. R. Tennant,
Dean W. A. Webber, Dean L. M. Wedepohl, Dean R. M. Will, Dr. D. LL. Williams,
Dr. M. D. Willman, Dr. J. L. Wisenthal, Ms. D. Wong.
Observer:  Mr. J. A. Banham
Messages of regret for their  inability to attend were received from Dr. D. S.
Lirenman, Dr. D. Lupini, Dr. J. F. Richards, Miss C. L. V. Warren, Mr. V. G. Wellburn.
Minutes of the previous meeting
Dean Webber        )   That the minutes of the Ninth regular meeting of
Dr. Suedfeld )    Senate   for   the   Session    1980-81,   having   been
circulated, be taken as read and adopted.
It was noted that the names of the following persons had been omitted from the
list of those in attendance at the previous meeting: Mr. B. J. Coulson, Mr. S. T.
Henderson, Mr. J. Kulich, Mr. M. A. McCann, Mr. I. C. Miller and Mr. R. L. Mullen.
The motion was put and carried. 7588.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Business arising from the Minutes
Financial problems and priorities within the University (P.7564)
In reply to a query concerning the establishment of a committee to discuss jointly
with the Finance Committee of the Board of Governors financial problems and
priorities within the University, the Chairman stated that the committee had not yet
met.
Senate membership
Declaration of vacancies
As required under section 35 (6) of the University Act, the following vacancies on
Senate were declared:
Mr. B. A. Elliott - student representative of the Faculty of Education
Dr. J. H. McNeill - representative of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Ms. T. R. Murakami - representative of the Faculty of Applied Science
Ms. L. P. Stewart - student representative of the Faculty of Law
Mr. R. S. Szeliski - student representative of the Faculty of Graduate Studies
From the Board of Governors
Notification of approval in principle of Senate recommendations - subject, where
applicable, to the proviso that none of the programs be implemented without formal
reference to the President and the formal agreement of the President; and that the
Deans and Department Heads concerned with new programs be asked to indicate the
space requirements, if any, of such new programs.
(i)      New courses and course changes recommended by the Faculty of Applied Science
(P.7557)
(ii)     New  courses,   course   and   program  changes  recommended  by  the  Faculty  of
Education (P.7557-9)
(iii)    New course recommended by the Faculty of Forestry (P.7559)
(iv)    New courses and course changes recommended by the Faculty of Graduate Studies
(P.7559 & P.7580)
(v)     New course recommended by the Faculty of Law (P.7580)
(vi)    New course recommended by the Faculty of Medicine (P.7559)
(vii)   Course and program changes recommended by the Faculty of Science (P.7560)
(viii) Science   route   into   the   Bachelor   of   Medical   Laboratory   Science   Program
recommended by the Faculties of Science and Medicine (P.7586) 7589.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
From the Board of Governors (continued)
(ix) Combined B.Sc. and D.M.D. degree program recommended by the Faculties of
Science and Dentistry (P.756I)
(x) The report of the Senate Academic Building Needs Committee was received for
information and for use as a source document in relation to the preparation of
future five-year plans for capital expenditures.
Prizes, Scholarships and Bursaries
Mrs. Bishop )    That the new awards (listed in the Appendix) be
Mr. McWilliams   )    accepted subject to the approval of the Board of
Governors and that letters of thanks be sent to
the donors.
Carried
Annual Financial Report of the University, March 31, 1981
As requested under Section 31 (2) of the University Act, the Board of Governors
had forwarded to Senate copies of the Annual Financial Report for the fiscal year ended
March 31, 1981.
Report of the Senate Admissions Committee
(i)  Faculty of Medicine proposals
The committee recommended approval of the following proposals of the
Faculty of Medicine concerning admission of students by transfer, the Medical
College Admissions Test, and deferred entry. (Guideline I under "Deferred entry"
has been modified by the committee.)
Admission of students by transfer
The  second  paragraph  of  the  Calendar  entry  concerning  admission  of
students by transfer should be amended to read:
"The acceptance of transfer students will depend upon the existence of
vacancies in the class year for which they are applying. The student
will only be considered if attending a medical school in Canada or the
United States that is accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of
Canadian Medical Schools and the Liaison Committee on Medical
Education."
The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT)
The second sentence of the first paragraph of the Calendar entry concerning
the Medical College Admission Test should be amended to read:
"It is recommended that applicants complete this examination in the
fall of the year prior to the year that they apply for entrance to
medical school." 7590.
Wednesday,  September 16,   1981.
Report of the Senate Admissions Committee
Faculty of Medicine proposals (continued)
Deferred Entry
The following is a new Calendar Statement:
"Under some limited, special circumstances, admission may be deferred for
one year at the discretion of the Admission Selection Committee.
Guidelines:
1. The  applicant  must  have  a recognized degree prior  to entry  into
Medical School.
2. The year's experience will be useful in the practice of medicine.
3. That the student pay a first year deposit.
4. Each   request   will   be   considered   on   an   individual   basis   by   the
Admissions Selection Committee and its decision be final."
Dr. Smith )   That  the proposals of the  Faculty of  Medicine
Dr. Dahlie )   concerning admission of students by transfer, the
Medical   College   Admission   Test   and   deferred
entry, be approved.
Carried
(ii) Proposal of the Faculty of Applied Science to control enrolment in Engineering —
for information
In presenting the report Dr. Smith stated that under the authority granted
the committee by Senate on April 19, 1978, the committee had approved proposals
concerning control of enrolment in the engineering program. This action had been
necessary so that students enrolling in First Year engineering in September could
be forewarned.
Following is an extract from the report of an ad hoc Committee to Consider
Controlled  Enrolment,  established  by  the  Faculty  of  Applied  Science,   which
contains the recommendations considered by the Admissions Committee:
"In its Mission Report of 1980 this Faculty subscribed to the principles
of accessibility and excellence in our engineering programs. This means that
every talented and qualified individual in British Columbia wishing to
become an engineer should have the opportunity to do so, and that the
quality of the engineering education he or she receives should be truly
excellent. This committee subscribes to these principles but profoundly
regrets their incompatibility under current circumstances. 7591.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Report of the Senate Admissions Committee
(ii) Proposal of the Faculty of Applied Science to control enrolment in Engineering
— for information (continued)
Since 1973 total undergraduate enrolment in the engineering programs of
this Faculty have increased steadily from 844 to 1632, and further growth is
projected. The marked increase in the number of students has seriously impaired
the teaching programs in the larger departments.  Examples are cited below.
1. In Civil, Electrical, Mechanical and Chemical Engineering the number of
undergraduate students currently enrolled far exceeds the design capacity of
the department facilities.
2. Large classes, some with 100 to 150 students, are taught at senior levels in
Electrical, Civil and Mechanical Engineering. This is very much above
acceptable levels. The classes cannot be sectioned because not enough faculty
members are available.
3. Some design and problem classes have in excess of 75 students and a single
instructor.  This has proved ineffective.
4. Some laboratory groups are so large that some students must stand and watch
rather than do experiments.
5. There is insufficient workspace for undergraduate students to carry out the
required senior design and research projects. In Chemical Engineering
hallways are being used for these purposes.
6. There are insufficient laboratory assistants and problem markers to deal
adequately with the student numbers involved.
7. Faculty members are required to devote an inordinately large portion of their
time and effort to supervising an increasing number of laboratory and problem
sections and in marking. This seriously reduces their ability to update courses,
develop new initiatives, and engage in research.
It has been clear for some time that, if additional financial and space
resources are not provided to cope with the student numbers accepted into the
faculty, educational quality will suffer. Budget requests have been presented for
a number of years asking for substantial additions to resources, but these have not
been supplied. Instead, the average effective support per student has decreased
by a factor of nearly two as the enrolment has doubled.
Paradoxically at a time when severe stresses are being felt by some
departments, others are not using their resources to capacity. The maldistribution
of students between programs results from the present complete freedom of
choice as students enter second year.
It is therefore evident to this committee that some form of enrolment control
is necessary. 7592.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Report of the Senate Admissions Committee
(ii) Proposal of the Faculty of Applied Science to control enrolment in Engineering —
for information (continued)
Conclusions and Recommendations
The Committee concludes that serious overcrowding in certain of the larger
departments has led to unacceptable deterioration in academic quality. At the
same time it is clear that the resources available in certain of the smaller
departments and programs are not fully utilized.
Accordingly it recommends:
(a) that the number of students entering first year engineering be limited;
(b) that the number of students transferring into second year engineering from
outside the Faculty be limited, in consultaton with the other B.C. institutions;
(c) that second year enrolment in each engineering program be limited, with
allocation into programs made according to student preferences and academic
qualifications until each program limit is reached;
(d) that the admission and program registration limits be reviewed annually and
revised as faculty resources change;
(e) that henceforth all students entering first year engineering be advised at the
time of acceptance that point (c) above will apply from September 1982
onwards;
(f) that in September 1982 the number of students admitted to first year
engineering be limited to 450 and that the number of students admitted from
outside the faculty to second year be limited to approximately 100 students.
(g) that those institutions preparing students to enter our second year programs be
consulted as soon as possible and that every effort be made to avoid hardship
for individual students in the transition period;
(h) that the Committee on Admissions, Standing and Courses implement the above
recommendations and report to Faculty."
Senate was informed that the Admissions Committee had approved the
recommendations on behalf of Senate, as follows:
Recommendations (a), (b), (c), (e), (f) and (g) were approved.
Recommendation (d) was approved with the following addition:  "and forwarded
to Senate for approval."
Recommendation (h) - no action was taken in that the plan for implementation
must be approved by Senate when it is established by the Faculty.
Centre for Continuing Education
Reports on Certificate and Diploma Programs
In accordance with Senate policy the following annual reports had been circulated
for information: 7593.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Centre for Continuing Educction
Reports on Certificate and Diploma Programs  (continued)
Certificate Program in Criminology
Tightening of the requirement that allows admission only to individuals who are
currently working in the field of criminology reduced new admissions to the
program to I I in 1980-81.
Of the 108 students presently enrolled in the program, 85 live in British Columbia
and 23 are from other provinces. Fifty-one (60%) of the B.C. students reside
outside the Greater Vancouver area.
Sixty—four of the enrolled students were registered in one or more courses during
the year. One student was awarded the Certificate, bringing the total of
completing students to five.
Diploma Program in Administration for Engineers
This diploma program is offered jointly by the Faculty of Applied Science and the
Centre for Continuing Education.
1. There were thirty-eight admissions into the program this year. Of these
twenty-nine were in Greater Vancouver and nine at interior locations.
2. Total enrolment in the program since its inception in 1968 now stands at 982.
3. Sixty-seven graduates have received their Diploma in Administration for
Engineers to date.
4. There were 458 registrants for the 28 courses offered on-campus and in the
Greater Vancouver area.
5. Fifteen courses were offered out-of-town with a total of 201 registrants.
6. A total of thirty-four professional foresters were admitted to the parallel
Diloma Program in Administration for Foresters; nine of them enrolled this
year in courses offered in the Diploma Program in Administration for
Engineers.
7. Although not "credited" to the Centre for Continuing Education, Engineering
Programs also arranged all aspects of the delivery of three graduate (M.Eng.)
credit courses in Victoria with the following registrations:
CIVIL 565  Water Chemistry & Treatment   13
CIVIL 566  Water Pollution Control I 12
CIVIL 569  Waste Treatment 14
Total      39 7594.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Centre for Continuing Education
Reports on Certificate and Diploma Programs  (continued)
Certificate Program in Early Childhood Education
This Certificate program in Early Childhood Education is offered by the Centre
for Continuing Education in cooperation with the Faculty of Education.
1. There are at present 325 registered candidates in the Program and III
certificates have been awarded.
2. Twenty-eight courses were attended by approximately 675 students.
3. A grant from the Interior University Programs Board permitted the
development of another certificate course by Guided Independent Study,
Administration of Early Childhood Centres. This brings to three the number of
certificate courses available by Guided Independent Study. A fourth course is
presently being developed.
4. Of particular significance was the Summer 1980 program of short courses and
workshops. Many early childhood candidates from throughout the province
spent the month of July taking courses. Two hundred and fifty registrations
were received for the 13 courses offered.
Dr. Wisenthal reminded Senate that in September 1979 he had drawn Senate's
attention to the non-credit courses being offered through the Centre for Continuing
Education and had queried whether its offerings were adequately representative of
the academic enterprise at U.B.C. Senate had agreed that the question be referred to
the Senate Committee on Continuing Education. Since there had been no response,
Dr. Wisenthal suggested that the committee be requested to draft a statement to
inform Senate: (I) of the purpose of the non-credit program; (2) the criteria used
for the selection of non-credit courses; and (3) the degree of involvement by U.B.C.
Faculty in the selection of non-credit offerings.
Senate was informed that an advisory committee was in the process of examining
the course offering of the Centre.
It was agreed that this matter be referred to the Committee on Continuing
Education.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Establishment of an International Research Centre for Music Periodical Literature
The following material had been circulated in connection with the proposal to
establish an International Research Centre for Music Periodical Literature: 7595.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Establishment of an International Research Centre for Music Periodical Literature
(continued)
"The development of musical romanticism coincides with the parallel development of
musical journalism and the creation of a very large number of periodicals dealing
either entirely or in part with musical activities. Specialized music reviews (over two
thousand in number), Feuilletons in daily newspapers, articles in literary periodicals,
in theatrical journals and in magazines de mode, as well as engravings and lithographs
in the illustrated press constitute, therefore, a documentary resource of monumental
proportions that is of primary and unquestionable importance for the music historian.
In spite of the wealth of information contained therein, however, two problems have
prevented this material from being exploited: (I) the limited number of libraries
possessing the journals, newspapers and reviews, and (2) the difficulty encountered
when one attempts to locate specific information within an available source. Because
indexing of 19th- and early 20th-century periodical publications dealing with music is
extremely rare, the scholar wishing to consult articles or iconography on a given
subject must, in most cases, simply resign himself to turning literally hundreds if not
thousands of pages to locate relevant documents. Clearly, gaining bibliographical
control and consequently access to this exceptional source of information is among
the highest priorities in musicological research.
During the past two years meetings have been held with members of the executive
councils of the Socita Italiana di Musicologia and the Societe Francaise de
Musicologie as well as with numerous North American and European specialists in
order to determine the structure of an undertaking aimed at dealing, through
international cooperation, with this imposing amount of unexplored literature.
Briefly stated, what has been suggested is the creation of two research centres ~
one, a European Centre in Parma, established under the auspices of the Emilia
Romagna regional government and directed by Professors Elvidio Surian and Marcello
Conati; the other, a North American Centre which Professor H. Robert Cohen has
been asked to direct ~ devoted to the study, cataloguing and indexing of writings on
music and musical iconography in English, French, Italian, and German 19th— and
early 20th-century periodical literature. Parts of a single structure, these Centres
will work together to gather the sources described above on microfilm, in order to
establish two research archives of international significance. Moreover, to facilitate
access to this material by scholars on both continents, the microfilms will be
duplicated and housed at both the European and North American Centres.
In addition to functioning as a research archive, the principal activity of the Centres
will be the cataloguing and computer-programmed indexing of the collected
materials. Because of the scope of the undertaking and the number of languages
involved, this aspect of the project will require the collaboration of a number of
scholars. For this reason, regional and national indexing groups — at European and
North American universities and conservatories — are presently being organized in
order to participate in the indexing of specific periodicals under the direction of the
two Centres. Moreover, once the structure is firmly established and work is
progressing with regularity, the directors of the Centres will coordinate and supervise
the publication of the resulting catalogues in a new series of reference volumes, Le
Repertoire International de la Presse Musicale du Dix-Neuvieme Siecle. 7596.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Establishment of an International Research Centre for Music Periodical Literature
(continued)
The goals of the proposed Centre, then, are these: (I) to serve as a research archive
and to thus facilitate and promote the exploitation of the 19th-century press as a
documentary resource for the historian; (2) to offer an opportunity for faculty
members and graduate students interested in working in this area to do so within a
clearly defined, internationally sanctioned structure; (3) to develop a method — to be
applied uniformly by all collaborators — for cataloguing and indexing writings on
music and musical iconography in 19th-century periodical literature; (4) to regroup
and to oversee the publication and distribution of the resulting reference tools; and
(5) to make available, through the Centre, copies of articles and iconography brought
to light by the cataloguing effort.
This undertaking has already received an initial endorsement from the International
Association of Music Libraries, Archives, and Documentation Centres, an association
representing more than two thousand institutions throughout the world. And, to
assure the essential international nature of the Centre, an International Advisory
Board — composed of eminent scholars and archivists from Canada, England, France,
Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Sweden and the United States — has been
established. Moreover, because 19th-century periodicals dealing with music
frequently contain materials of interest to scholars in a variety of humanistic
disciplines, a University Advisory Council composed of five 19th-century scholars at
The University of British Columbia has also been created in order to play a
consultative role in the Centre's research activities.
The Centre will function within the Department of Music in consort with the
University Library and will be placed under the jurisdiction of the Dean of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies. The Centre will be directed by Professor H. Robert
Cohen in collaboration with Mr. Hans Bumdorfer (the University Music Librarian) who
will function as Director of the Archive. Professor Cohen and Mr. Burndorfer will be
assisted and counselled in their tasks by the Centre's University Advisory Council, its
International Advisory Board, a policy committee and a finance committee.
Funding for the Centre will be sought from external sources. There is no
commitment of, or request for, University operating funds for the Centre."
Dean Larkin )  That  the  proposal  of  the  Faculty  of Graduate
Dean Will )  Studies   to   establish   an   International   Research
Centre    for    Music    Periodical    Literature    be
approved.
Carried 7597.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Calendar statement concerning Research Administration
The following Calendar statement concerning Research Administration, which had
been approved by the Board of Governors, was circulated for information:
"All matters concerning the administration of research grants and contracts are
handled by the Office of the President (Research Administration) to which enquiries
concerning research policies and procedures should be directed. Students do not
normally have occasion to deal with matters of research administration, but they are
included in the University Patent and Licensing Plan which provides that, if a student
"proposes to patent or license an invention or discovery and University facilities or
funds administered by the University were used in making the invention or discovery",
then "a disclosure must be made to the University and the rights assigned to the
University in return for a share of any proceeds arising from the invention or
discovery." Details of the Plan are available from the Office of the President
(Research Administration)."
Report from St. Mark's College
The following report had been circulated for information:
"The report from St. Mark's College is presented to the Senate in accordance with the
regulation in the Affiliation Agreement of 18 January 1978 which requires that a
theological college "shall submit a resume of its academic operations of the Senate
annually.'
The academic staff consisted of Father Daniel Mulvihill, C.S.B., Ph.D. and
Father Paul Burns, C.S.B., B.Litt., Ph.D., Father Bruno Tesolin was the bursar and
registrar of the College. The courses offered by the College are described in the
Calendar of the college. Father Burns continued to be on loan to the Faculty of Arts
and he also represented the College on the Senate of the University.
Continuing education is part of the purpose of the College. Among the papers
presented by the faculty to professional and alumni groups are the following:
Father Mulvihill "The role of the Church in Developing countries", Father Burns
"Vergil in Medieval Schools", "Some themes in fifth century latin Hymns", and "Two
current approaches to Thomas More". Father Burns also published a critical study on
some aspects of fourth century christology which was put out by the Latern
University Press.
The Library holdings number about 10,500 volumes. The College faculty believes that
this collection, though relatively small, is nevertheless a valuable contribution to the
University community. A retired member of the University Library staff has joined
us this year. We would like to return to the former practice of having this collection
included in the main Library catalogue so that our Library will be fully available to
the University.
St. Mark's College also provides Catholic chaplaincy services to the University and
Father Bruno Tesolin has taken over direction of these activites. A brochure
describing the chaplaincy program is available.
Father Mulvihill retired as Principal of the College at the end of June and he will
return to Ontario.  A search is currently underway to find a successor.
The College continues to be grateful to the wisdom and patience of Dean CV.
Finnegan who represents the University Senate on the Board of St. Mark's." 7598.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Report of the Registrar on Spring Session Enrolment 1981
The report of the Registrar on Spring Session Enrolment  1981 was received for
information.
Report of the Registrar on Summer Session Enrolment 1981
The report of the Registrar on Summer Session Enrolment 1981 was received for
information.
Other business
Library Policy - Senate Library Committee
Dean Larkin presented the  following report which had been circulated at the
meeting:
"Rapidly increasing costs of publications, averaging 20 to 25 percent per annum,
coupled with the proliferation of publications, has necessitated careful analysis of
library acquisitions policy.
At present, many expensive publications are purchased in sufficient quantity to
provide copies at two or more branches or reading rooms. While this practice is
commendable as a service and is consistent with the thrust of the Senate approved
policy on Branch Libraries and Reading Rooms it will not be possible, in the next few
years at least, to continue all multiple purchases.
It is also apparent that there may be pressure on the library budget for operations
with the attendant risk of a deterioration in service, at a time when the library is
increasingly in demand as a keystone library in a provincial network.
In view of these developments the Senate Library Committee, at recent meetings has
developed several recommendations to help guide the library through the present and
forthcoming period of difficulty.
Recommendations
1. The university administration is commended for the strong support it has provided
the library in the past, and is urged to continue its strong support in the future.
The maintenance of an adequate budget for collections is of central importance to
the university.
2. Increasing attention should be drawn to the role of the library as a provincial
resource and the importance to the province of maintaining collections and
services.
3. The guiding principle of library policy should be the maintenance of as
comprehensive a collection as can be afforded and provision of high quality
service to make the collection accessible.   It follows from this general statement:
a)       Unique copies should take precedence over duplicate copies.
b)     To preserve an appropriate balance in the collections the serials budget
should not exceed 60% of the total budget for acquisition. 7599.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Other business
Library Policy - Senate Library Committee (continued)
"c) The integration of some of the materials in reading rooms and smaller
Branch libraries into the Main Library or the larger branches should occur
wherever there are economies that are not associated with significant
reduction in service. The Librarian has been requested to undertake an
appropriate study.
d) Wherever possible staff reductions should be in areas that are not associated
with reduction in the number of hours that the library system is open.
Reduction in hours of service should only occur after other economies have
been made.
4.   All charges to users that are made by the library for its various services should be
reviewed to ensure that subsidies to users are minimized.
Consistent with these recommendations the library is currently reducing book orders
and cancelling subscriptions according to a contingency plan developed in a detailed
analysis by the library staff. Faculty and departmental library representatives are
being extensively consulted to ensure that the reductions in acquisitions are as highly
selective as possible. Because of the length of time that elapses between ordering of
books and their receipt and of the advance notice required by various publishers it has
been necessary to act immedicately to make savings in the current budget year."
Dean Larkin )    That    the    recommendations    of    the    Library
Mr. Mclnnes )    Committee be adopted.
In reply to a query concerning recommendation 3 (a) the Acting Librarian stated
that the question of where a unique copy should be kept could only be answered after
reasonable study.
In reply to a further query, Mr. Mclnnes stated that the Library did link up to a
data base which povided considerable information. He stated that this method of
providing information would not save money but it would increase access to resources
in the long run.
During the discussion some members suggested that Departments be consulted
before subscriptions were terminated.
Concern was expressed about recommendation 3 (b) and it was felt that Senate
should be given more time to consider the implications of this recommendation before
voting on it.
In Amendment:
Dean Lysyk )  That recommendation 3 (b) be considered at the next
Dean Lusztig )  meeting of Senate. 7600.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Other business
Library Policy - Senate Library Committee (continued)
In speaking to the amendment, Dr. Spencer stated that, in his opinion, there should
be a recommendation to maintain an appropriate balance between periodicals and
books. If the rate of inflation were twice for periodicals than for books, freezing the
percentage of the acquisition budget for one part of the collection would not preserve
that balance. If the rate of inflation for periodicals continued to be higher for
periodicals than for books there would be a gradual shift in the other direction; there
would be more and more books and fewer periodicals. It was felt that setting the
acquisitions budget at 60% for periodicals and 40% for books would not ensure that an
appropriate balance in the collections and serials budget would be preserved.
The amendment was put and carried.
The motion, as amended, was put and carried.
Fiscal circumstances of the University
The President made the following remarks on the fiscal circumstances of the
University.
"I would like to speak to you tonight about the financial circumstances of the
University, because I believe it is essential that all members of Senate be fully
informed on this matter.
This University has reached the bottom line - academically and fiscally.
It is clear that our present financial resources cannot continue to support both
the quality, the size and the scope of the academic programs we now have,
much less sustain sufficient capacity to lead in the exploration of new academic
areas. Of course, our current fiscal situation is not unique among institutions of
higher education in North America. McGill, for example, has an estimated
$15.5 million deficit for 1981-82.
Our finances are in a state of grave uncertainty for three main reasons:
(a) double-digit inflation;
(b) operating grants from government that have fallen significantly below what
the university has requested; and
(c) the University does not have the same ability as most of industry to offset
rising costs with rising productivity -- there are few, if any, shortcuts to
producing highly educated people. 7601
Wednesday,  September   16,   1981
Other business
Fiscal circumstances of the University (continued)
"Let me say a few words on this last point.
The University of British Columbia has become a great university, largely
through its firm commitment to quality. It will be able to retain that stature
only by continuing to insist on quality. Some of the difficult planning choices
that confront the University would be eased superficially if the University were
to accept lowering of scholarly standards. But the long-term academic
interests of the University, the province and the nation will not be served by
letting our standards slip.
Quality education is expensive.
But then, one must ask: What are the costs of having mediocre higher
education?
Without a strong commitment to first-class higher education, British Columbia
will be condemned to a second-class future.
Let me make a few observations about operating grants from the government.
From fiscal year 1975-76 to 1981-82, the cumulative shortfall between grant
requested and grant received has been close to $90 million. The shortfall for
the current year was over $8 million. I know, and I am sure the Board knows,
that the requested grants have always been on the fiscally prudent and
conservative side.
Do these shortfalls convey a message to the University?
The provincial government in recent years seems to be saying: "We can afford
some higher education, but not too much." Governments can readily contract
publicly—funded institutions by stopping to feed their financial growth.
"Obvioulsy the University must seek to demonstrate to the province that the
need for higher education is as important as many other public priorities and
that the University will return invaluable economic and social benefits in
exchange for the province's investment. Perhaps we have not sufficiently
communicated to the public and the government the social, cultural and
economic benefits of the University. I would welcome any suggestions on how
the University may place this issue before the public and the government.
In making suggestions, however, remember that all governments are being told
to curb their spending and to stop attempting to balance their budgets on the
taxpayer's back.
I know that the continued shortfall in grants is of concern to you. This
University had to remove from continuing operating costs in the last five fiscal
years approximately $7 million dollars, because operating grants had not kept
pace with inflation of salaries and non-salary costs. Obviously, such
retrenchments are fraying our shoestring budget and are bringing on acadmic
malnutrition.
Our retrenchments were not delusions. - They were real. And they have
threatened the whole academic enterprise. 7602.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Other business
Fiscal circumstances of the University  (continued)
"The belt—tightening already began in 1976, and by 1980 the academic ribs could
be counted. The cumulative effect of this compression of funds, plus the
announcement of 11.83 per cent increase in the 1981-82 operating grant, which,
incidentally, is totally inadequate to meet salary and wage increases and the
higher costs of materials and supplies, adds up to a financial crunch of major
proportions.
Higher education is not a source of inflation; it is a victim of inflation.
Inflation has drastically increased our operating costs, but our income has not
increased correspondingly. Inflation is the heaviest tax we have, for we have no
direct control over many of our costs. University costs follow the inflationary
spiral upward.
About 15 per cent of the total cost of running the university is in non-salary
items. Many of these expenses are virtually non-controllable costs, such as
heat, light, water, insurance, telephone, paper, books and so forth. For 1982-83
the University has estimated an inflation factor on four distinct components of
its budget as follows:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
utilities
books and periodicals
scientific equipment
other supplies
25%
22.5%
17.5%
13%
16.9%
The inflation on supplies will add about $4.7 million to our operating costs in
1982-83.
And this brings me to an assessment of the financial consequences of the
arbitrator's award for faculty salaries  in 1981—82.
As I said, the University received an increase in the 1981-82 operating grant for
general purposes of I 1.83%. This represented the limit of the University's
ability to pay salary increases in 1981-82. Accordingly, the University's final
offer to the Faculty Association was a salary increase of 12% for continuing
members, which included 3% for career adjustments.
The Arbitrator, Mr. Bird, awarded an across-the-board increase of 18% in
addition to the 3% for career advancement adjustments. Thus, the shortfall is
9% of the salary base and associated fringe benefits for continuing members of
the bargaining unit, i.e. 9% of $80,405,000 or $7,236,450.
Hence there is an annual shortfall of over $7 million. While Mr. Bird's
appreciation of the need for substantially higher salaries for faculty may be
commended, the award totally ignores the University's financial realities, not to
mention the serious impact which it must have on the quality of our academic
programs.
I have taken three steps to assure that the additional costs and commitments
arising from the arbitrator's award can be met. First, I recommended to the
Board of Governors that they request the shortfall of over $7 million from the
Universities Council in order to maintain the integrity and excellence of
existing programs. 7603.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Other business
Fiscal circumstances of the University  (continued)
"After a lengthy and detailed discussion on this matter, the Board of Governors
authorized me to ask the Universities Council for the additional financial
resources to meet this shortfall. This request was discussed this morning at a
joint Board of Governors and Universities Council meeting. I was encouraged by
the Council's reponse to this request, for they indicated a willingness to take up
our cause with government.
While I am confident that the University and the Universities Council can and
will make a strong case for a higher level of government support, I cannot be
too optimistic that the government will bail us out.
We have entered a period of financial stringency. If the goverment fails to
respond favourably to our request, then we will have to trim our programs to fit
our financial resources.
Second, I have taken steps to cope with the immediate shortfall this fiscal year
and to minimize its effect on requirements for future years. Various budget
control policies have been implemented to see us through the current year
without a deficit and over the long run to adjust commitments so that they are
consistent with expected revenues. I fully recognize that these belt—tightening
policies are academically painful, but they are necessary to avoid a
deficit — which we are not permitted to incur.
Third, and for the longer term, I am in the process of appointing a committee to
advise me on the nature and location of retrenchments that may be necessary. I
hope this committee will never have to make its recommendations to me. For
if they do, succeeding generations will be the losers even more than we
ourselves. The maintenance of quality universities is one of the few
investments we can make in the future of society. Such an investment must not
be thwarted."
At the invitation of the Chairman, Dr. H. J. Greenwood, faculty representative on
the Board of Governors, commented briefly on the efforts being made by the Board of
Governors to rectify the situation; he also noted the effect lack of adequate funding
would have on the future of the University.
Dr. Elder requested that the following extract from the September, 1981 edition
of the Faculty association newsletter quoting from the Arbitrator's Award, July 1981,
be included in the Senate minutes:
"Cost-of-living
In my opinion, the basic presumption ought to be that in the absence of a
case made for more or a case made for less, salaries should be adjusted only
to keep up with the inflation rate. There is a presumption, in the absence of
specific evidence, that people continue to earn their salaries by doing work
of the same real value and the employer is still obligated to pay the same
amount in real dollars so that the employees' purchasing power is unchanged.
There was no evidence placed before me that could, by any stretch of the
imagination, justify a general reduction in the purchasing power of salaries.
Accordingly, I conclude that the Faculty Association's members are entitled
to a basic salary increase which at least includes a cost of living or
inflationary adjustment. I assume that inflation will continue more or less
at that rate. 7604.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Other business
Fiscal circumstances of the University  (continued)
"Catch-up
The range in starting salaries is quite remarkable. For example, in the
academic year 1980—81 the lowest starting salary for an assistant professor
was $16,500.00 and the highest was $33,000.00. The average was $23,913.00.
When one considers the investment in professional education that is
necessary in order to qualify one for appointment as an assistant professor
at The University of British Columbia, one cannot help being s"rprised by
the lowest starting salary and even the average salary is not much higher
than the top of the clerical salary range. Reference to the 'help wanted'
advertisements of the daily papers will show that the pay range of assistant
professors and the pay of those in ranks below assistant professor overlap
with the upper levels of clerical salaries.
In recent years the U.B.C. salaries have slipped in comparison with the
earning of many others in the community. There appears to be no
justification for the recent considerable decline in the relative position of
U.B.C professors' salaries in the Vancouver area. The decline is contrary to
the generally accepted belief of what is fair. I refer to the beliefs held in
the community which helps to pay the salaries. . . .
To assert that the earnings of graduates have no relationship whatsoever to
the professors who taught them is to assume that the professors' skills are
marketable only in the restricted area of university employment. This is, of
course, not so. Those who teach surgery, those who teach accounting and
those who teach geology, as examples, have skills that are widely
marketable. The general community should be looked at in order to ensure
that prevailing rates of remuneration are not so high in relation to academic
salaries that professors will be attracted in unacceptably high numbers to
positions outside the university.
The Association has recognized that the sky is not the limit. It believes that
its case for catch-up goes far beyond what it actually asks for in this
arbitration.
The Faculty Association made a strong case for a catch-up well beyond what
is awarded, being 3.8%. . .but I am obliged to give effect to the University's
inability to pay argument. In doing so I am honouring the provision in
'Framework' which requires me to take inability to pay into account. To go
beyond what has been awarded would in my judgment based on the evidence
create such a level of disruption and distress in the affairs of the University
that I would not have taken 'inability to pay' into account in arriving at the
determination.
I was invited by Counsel for the Faculty Association to tell the Government
to stop squeezing academics' salaries by increasing university grants. The
University argued 'public policy' as a justification for 'less than inflation
increases'. The Faculty Association countered by referring me to recent
substantial salary increases which members of Parliament and members of
the Legislature granted themselves. I do not propose to lecture the
Government of British Columbia, Parliament or the Legislature. So far as
public policy is concerned, in my opinion the members of the faculty have
already done more than their share in fighting inflation and under this award
will likely continue to do so but in lesser measure." 7605.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Other business (continued)
Financial problems and priorities within the University
Attention was again drawn to the establishment of the President's committee to
discuss financial problems and priorities within the University. It was suggested that
a person from the business community be appointed to the committee. The Chairman
stated that it had already been agreed that a Convocation senator would serve on the
committee.
Report of the Tributes Committee (in camera)
Honorary Degrees
Dean Larkin reminded members of Senate that the Tributes Committee wo"ld be
pleased to receive nominations for possible honorary degree recipients. These should
be submitted to Dean Larkin, Chairman of the Senate Tributes Committee,
incorporating the reasons for the nominaton, along with curricula vitae.
Memorial Minute
The following memorial statement had been prepared in accordance with the
custom of Senate in recognition by the University and the Senate of the late Jacob
Biely.
IN MEMORIAM
JACOB BIELY
Professor Jacob Biely, an internationally-known Poultry Scientist, died at The
Vancouver General Hospital on June 3, 1981, after a brief illness. Professor Biely's
association with The University of British Columbia spanned almost 60 years as a
student, teacher and researcher.
Jacob Biely was born in Russia in 1903 and was educated in the Siberian town of Chita.
He came to Canada with his family following the outbreak of the Russian Revolution.
He enrolled at UBC in 1922, and graduated in 1926 as head of the graduating class for
the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture degree.
He undertook graduate studies at Kansas State College, where he received the degree
Master of Science in 1929. Returning to UBC, he earned the degree Master of Science
in Agriculture in 1930.
Professor Biely worked for the Canadian National Research Council before joining the
UBC Faculty on a full—time basis in 1935 as an Instructor in Poultry Science. He was
appointed Full professor in 1950, and two years later was named Head of his
Department, a position which he held until his retirement in 1968. 7606.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
Report of the Tributes Committee
Memorial Minute (continued)
Even in retirement, however, there was no let-up in the energy which Professor Biely
devoted to teaching and research at UBC, and he was a frequent visitor to his campus
laboratory up to a week before his death.
At the time of his official retirement his brother, George Biely, established the
Professor Jacob Biely Faculty Research Prize for outstanding research. This is the
premier research prize awarded by UBC annually to one of its faculty members.
In 1970 UBC conferred on Professor Biely the honorary degree Doctor of Science in
recognition of his outstanding contributions to his Alma Mater and to the field of his
research.
He was the author of nearly 250 papers on topics related to nutrition and diseases of
poultry, and was frequently called on by governments and the poultry industry in an
advisory capacity.
His recognition as a researcher led him to be elected a Fellow of the American
Association for the Advancement of Science and the Agricultural Institute of Canada.
The Poultry Science Association of America elected him a Fellow in I960 and also
presented him with the Ralston Purina Teaching Award for his contributions to the
teaching of Poultry Science students. He also received a number of other leading
awards for teaching and research, including the Earle Willard McHenry Award of the
Nutrition Society of Canada. He was a former president of the Nutrition Society of
Canada and former chairman of a number of committees of the National Research
Council and the Federal and Provincial Departments of Agriculture.
He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, this country's most prestigious
academic organization; Fellow of the Agricultural Institute of Canada; Fellow of the
American Society of Poultry Science and the recipient of numerous awards for his
distinguished achievements in research.
He represented the Faculty of Agriculture on the UBC Senate from 1948 to 1954.
Senate expresses its deepest sympathy to his wife, Judith, his brothers, George and
Miguel, his sons, Robert and Gordon, his daughters, Mrs. Martin Barer and Mrs. Burle
Yolles, and other members of the family.
Dean Larkin )  That the memorial statement for Jacob Biely be
Dr. Shaw )  spread on the minutes of Senate and that a copy
be sent to the relatives of the deceased.
Carried
The meeting adjourned at 10.00 p.m.
The next regular meeting of Senate will be held on Wednesday, October 14, 1981.
Secretary
Confirmed
Chairman 7607.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate
Alcan Fellowships in Japanese Studies - A fellowship in the amount of $6,000 is made
available by the Aluminium Company of Canada Ltd., for a student who has
completed his or her undergraduate program and is continuing studies at The
University of British Columbia leading to a master's or doctoral degree in Japanese
studies. Preference will be given to applicants who wish to pursue studies in the field
of the contemporary Japanese economy. During the tenure of the award, the holder
may not accept any position of employment except such teaching duties as may be
assigned by, or at the discretion of, the Head of the Department. The award will be
made on the recommendaton of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The award will be
available for two years commencing in the 1981/82 academic year.
American Academy of Oral Pathology Award - The American Academy of Oral
Pathology will make available a certificate of merit for the graduating student
showing the greatest interest and ability in the field of oral pathology.
American Association of Endodontists' Award - A certificate and subscription to the
Journal of Endodontics has been made available by the American Association of
Endodontists for the student demonstrating exceptional ability in the area of
endodontics during his/her dental training. The award will be made on the
recommendation of the Faculty.
American Association of Orthodontists' Award - The American Association of
Orthodontists will provide a certificate of merit to the graduating student who
demonstrates exceptional interest in the development of the oro—facial complex. The
award will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty.
American Concrete Institute, British Columbia Chapter, W. G. Heslop Scholarship in
Civil Engineering - A scholarship in the amount of $1,000 has been established by the
British Columbia Chapter of the American Concrete Institute to honour the memory
of the late Wilfred Gibson Heslop, Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering at The
University of British Columbia. The award will be made on the recommendation of
the Department of Civil Engineering to a graduate student carrying out research
which will lead to an improvement in the design, construction, manufacture, use or
maintenance of concrete products or structures.
American Institute of Architects Certificate of Merit - A certificate of merit is
made available annually by the American Institute of Architects, to the second
ranked graduating student in each architecture program accredited by the National
Architectural Accrediting Board. The award will be made on the recommendation of
the Faculty.
American Institute of Architects Henry Adams Medal - A medal and certificate is
made available annually by the American Institute of Architects, to the top ranked
graduating student in each architecture program accredited by the National
Architectural Accrediting Board. The award will be made on the recommendation of
the Faculty.
B.C. Association of Laboratory Physicians Prize in Pathology - A prize in the amount
of $500 has been made available by the B.C. Association of Laboratory Physicians. It
will be awarded on the recommendation of the Department of Pathology to a member
of the graduating class who has demonstrated proficiency and interest in the study of
Pathology in the undergraduate program. 7608.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Bell Farms Ltd., Fellowhip in Economics - A fellowship in the amount of $3,000 has
been made available by Bell Farms Ltd., to support a graduate student writing a
dissertation in the area of "guaranteed annual income" or "negative income tax"
schemes of social security. The award will be made on the recommendation of the
Department of Economics.
Bell Farms Ltd., Fellowship in Pomology - A fellowship in the amount of $3,000 has
been made available by Bell Farms Ltd., to support a graduate student whose thesis
research is directed toward improvement of knowledge of the cranberry plant, its
culture and production. The award will be made on the recommendation of the
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences.
Bell Farms Ltd., Fellowship in Transportation - A fellowship in the amount of $3,000
has been made available by Bell Farms Ltd., to support a graduate student in the
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration doing research in connection with
bus cooperatives or 'bus pools' and their relevance to urban transportation. The award
will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty.
William G. Black Memorial Prize- A prize in the amount of approximately $1,000 has
been made available by the late Dr. William G. Black, B.A. 1922, who retired from
the Faculty in 1963 after after many years of service. The award will be made for an
essay on a topic related to some aspect of Canadian citizenship. The topic will be
established annually and the winner selected by a committee consisting of
representatives of the Faculty of Law and the Departments of Anthropology and
Sociology, History and Political Science. The University reserves the right to
withhold the award in any given year if there are no essays submitted of an
appropriate calibre. Further information on the award may be obtained by writing to
the William G. Black Memorial Prize Committee, c/o the Department of
Anthropology and Sociology. Deadline for submission of completed essays is April
1st.
Warring Paxton Clarke Graduate Scholarship in Finance - This scholarship is to be
awarded annually to a graduate student at The University of British Columbia in the
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration who has completed the first year
toward the Master of Business Administration or Master of Science degree with the
highest standing and is proceeding to full time study in the second year with a
concentration in finance and/or security analysis. The scholarship is in the amount of
$1,000.
Dr. Derek Daniel Wolney Memorial Resident Prize for Clinical Proficiency in
Anaesthesia — An annual prize in the amount of $200 has been established in memory
of Dr. Derek Daniel Wolney, by his friends and associates. Dr. Wolney, M.D. U.B.C.
1976, was in the final year of his four-year post-graduate training program and at the
time of his passing in 1980 he was Resident-in-Chief. He is remembered well for his
excellence in clinical anaesthesia. The prize will be awarded to the resident in the
Department of Anaesthesiology Resident Training Program (any year of Training
eligible) considered by the Department as having demonstrated the highest level of
clinical proficiency in anaesthesia. 7609.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Faculty of Applied Science Prize - A prize in the amount of $200 has been made
available by Dr. V. J. Modi, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, on the occasion of
his receipt in 1981 of the Jacob Biely Faculty Research Prize in recognition of his
outstanding contributions to the fields of satellite mechanics, aerodynamics, ocean
engineering and biomechanics. This prize, to promote and recognize academic
excellence, will be awarded to a student in the graduating class in the Faculty of
Applied Science on the recommendation of the Dean.
Oscar Engelbert Forsberg Memorial Scholarship - A scholarship of $500, established
as a memorial to Oscar Engelbert Forsberg, who immigrated to Canada from Sorsele,
Sweden in 1928, by his wife Winnifred, is offered to a medical student with a good
academic record to provide assistance with the cost of the student's education. The
award will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Medicine.
Donald C. Gibbard Scholarship in Music Education - A scholarship in the amount of
approximately $100 has been established in honour of Donald C. Gibbard, who was for
several years Chairman of the Music Education Department. It will be awarded, on
the recommendation of the Department, to an outstanding student in Music Education
in the Faculty of Education.
Hosptial Employees' Union (Lions Gate Unit) Bursary - A bursary in the amount of
$500 is offered by the Lions Gate Unit of the Hospital Employees' Union, Local 180.
The bursary is available to students who are continuing or proceeding in the fall from
Grade 12 to a full program at The University of British Columbia, University of
Victoria, Simon Fraser University, or any of the colleges in British Columbia, in any
field leading to a degree, or leading to a diploma in technology at the B.C. Institute
of Technology. To be eligible, an applicant must be a member or the son or daughter
of an active member of the Union ("active" being interpreted as on the staff of a
hospital within the jurisdiction of the H.E.U., or on the staff as of January I of the
year of award but since superannuated). The information given in the application
must clearly establish the applicant's connection with the H.E.U. The bursary will be
awarded to the candidate who, in the opinion of the University (in consultation with
the Union), is best qualified in terms of financial need.
Investment Dealers Association Bursary - A bursary in the amount of $700, the gift of
the Investment Dealers Association of Canada, is offered to a student entering the
final year of the B.Com. program in a course of study related to the investment field.
Dr. Peter Gee-Pan Mar Memorial Scholarship - A scholarship in the amount of $300
has been made available by family and friends in memory of the late Dr. Peter
Gee—Pan Mar. The award will be made on the recommendation of the Department of
Biochemistry, to a student entering fourth year Science and proceeding toward the
degree of B.Sc (Honours) in Biochemistry. Preference will be given to candidates
born in Canada, of Chinese ancestry. 7610.
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981.
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Monenco Scholarship -A scholarship in the amount of $750 has been made available by
Monenco Limited to commemorate the 75th anniversary in 1982 of the Montreal
Engineering Company Limited. The award will be available for a five year period
commencing with the 1982/83 academic year and will be awarded to a student
entering the final year of Engineering. The candidate selected will be deserving both
from the stand point of academic ability and overall contributions to the life of the
University. The award will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty of Applied
Science.
Pfizer Canada Inc. Scholarship in Pharmacy - A scholarship in the amount of $500 has
been made available by Pfizer Canada Inc. The award will be made to a student
entering the final year in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and will be made on
the recommendation of the Faculty. In making the recommendation, the financial
circumstances of the candidate may be a consideration.
Porte Realty Ltd., Scholarship - This scholarship of $500, a gift of Porte Realty Ltd.,
is offered annually to a student specializing in Urban Land Economics in the Faculty
of Commerce and Business Administration.
Robert Y. Porte Community Pharmacy Residency Memorial Scholarship - A
scholarship provided from the revenue of the funds established by the Shopper's Drug
Mart Associates will be awarded annually to a student accepted into the Community
Pharmacy Residency Program. The maintenance of a satisfactory scholastic record,
interest in student and professional affairs and financial need will be considered in
the selection process.
Rotary-Todokoro Prize in Cardiology - This prize of $500 is given annually to the
resident who has put forth the best research effort in the two year program in
Cardiology at the U.B.C. Faculty of Medicine.
Jean Marie Sherwin Bursary in Law - A bursary in the amount of approximately $450
has been made available by the late Jean Marie Sherwin of Victoria, B.C. The award
will be made to a student at either the undergraduate or graduate level in the Faculty
of Law. In selecting the candidate, the student's ability, enthusiasm and aptitude will
be considered.
Jean Marie Sherwin Bursary in Social Work - A bursary in the amount of
approximately $450 has been made available by the late Jean Marie Sherwin of
Victoria, B.C. The award will be made to a student at either the undergraduate or
graduate level in the School of Social Work. In selecting the candidate, the student's
ability, enthusiasm and aptitude will be considered.
Harry and Hilda Smith Foundation Scholarships - one or more scholarships to the
amount of approximately $1,000 have been made available by the Harry and Hilda
Smith foundation. The late Harry Smith was a pioneer in the wholesale book business
in Vancouver, having opened the first such facility in the city in 1933. He had a
life—long interest in books which is continued by his wife Hilda. The scholarship or
scholarships will be made on the recommendation of the Department of Creative
Writing to a student or students, graduate or undergraduate, on the basis of ability in
Creative Writing and of financial need. 7611
Wednesday,  September  16,   1981
APPENDIX
New awards recommended to Senate (continued)
Texaco Canada Fellowship in Coal Pyrolysis - A fellowship in the amount of $6,500
has been made available by Texaco Canada Resources Limited to support a student in
the field of coal pyrolysis. The award is available to students in mechanical,
chemical, electrical, or civil engineering and will be awarded on the recommendation
of the Faculty of Applied Science, in consultation with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.  The award may be renewable, subject to satisfactory performance.
James Robert Thompson Fellowships - One or more fellowships totalling
approximately $7,200 have been made available by the late James Robert Thompson.
B.Com., 1967. The awards will be made on the recommendation of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies to a student or students planning a career related to preservation of
the natural environment. It was the expressed wish of the donor that recipients of
the fellowship would demonstrate a desire to use their talents and abilities to
establish a significant career role in preserving the natural and wilderness areas in
B.C. and the Yukon.

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