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University of British Columbia 2006/07 Annual Report 2007

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 ***-*°0*
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 2006/2007 ANNUAL REPORT
\ BE<^
** From the idea of a university
for British Columbia, conceived
with foresight a century ago...
2 FORESIGHT "One University,
providing higher
education in all
its branches."
A LEGISLATIVE ACT TO
ESTABLISH A UNIVERSITY
FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA
-MARCH 7,1908
2006/2007 UBC ANNUAL REPORT 3 ...we have become one of
Canada's finest universities,
ranking with the world's best.
4 FORESIGHT 2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 5 And today, with continuing
foresight, we aim to educate
exceptional global citizens,
promote the values of a civil,
sustainable society, and conduct
research that will serve the
people of British Columbia,
Canada and the world.
6 FORESIGHT '^ &'
41 g
§&
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 7 8 FORESIGHT FROM THE PRESIDENT
Stephen Toope
A Century of Milestones
An annual report is an opportunity to
look back, but it is also a license to look
forward—to practice a little foresight.
In 2008, UBC celebrates the centenary
of the University Act that established
BCs first and largest university. On
March 7,1908 provincial legislators
didn't just pass a piece of legislation;
they performed an act of foresight.
UBC's partnership with the Province
has produced generations of teachers,
health care providers, lawyers, athletes,
business leaders, researchers and myriad
social and cultural contributors who
helped propel a frontier society toward a
globally aware one.
In 1963, UBC's fourth president, John
B. Macdonald, delivered a report entitled
Higher Education in BC that set a
prescient course for the rest of the
century. It helped establish SFU and the
University of Victoria, allowing UBC to
expand graduate education and research.
Earlier this year, former BC Attorney-
General Geoff Plant produced another
milestone report, Campus 2020. Its
recommendations to the provincial
government would further shape the
missions of our post-secondary partners
in delivering teaching and research for a
complex, knowledge-based society.
The following pages highlight the
results of this continued foresight.
"The reputation that
UBC now enjoys as
one of the world's
finest universities
honours foresight
fashioned a century
ago. Such forward
thinking can set us
on a path for further
decades of real
achievement."
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 9 lO FORESIGHT UNDERGRADUATE
Angela Lin
I'll Be Working Here
Second-year medical student Angela Lin
remembers her first day in UBC's Island
Medical Program, based at the University
of Victoria, and part of UBC Faculty of
Medicine's distributed MD undergraduate
program: "All the staff already knew our
names," says Lin. "I felt so welcome, like
a big family."
The UBC Faculty of Medicine has
collaborated with the Government of
BC, the University of Northern British
Columbia, the University of Victoria and
BCs health authorities to launch the first
province-wide distributed medical
education program in Canada. The
program has doubled the size of the
medical class and is designed to educate
future doctors in a wider range of
communities where many are likely to
practise after they graduate, addressing
the Province's need for more health care
providers in rural and underserved areas.
Lin has shadowed doctors in emergency,
thoracic surgery and cardiology, and was
one of three students who went for an
international elective at Shanghai Fudan
Medical School in China. But BC is home,
and the connections she's made in the
local medical community could root her
in Victoria. "I don't know what
specialization yet, but over the long term,
I'll be working here."
Funded by the
Province, this
innovative model of
distributed medical
education invests
in the doctors of
tomorrow to better
serve the people of
British Columbia.
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 11 	
......
 ■ •
.   ■•••;;••
111
.-.-'
I
12 FORESIGHT GRADUATE
Rebecca Pearson
Where I Could Have an Impact
Earth Day, 1992. A trip to the zoo.
SO Simple Things Kids Can Do to Save the
Earth and Paul Hawkins's The Ecology
of Commerce. It is to these things that
Rebecca Pearson traces her commitment
to sustainable business.
Pearson is a second-year MBA student
with UBC's Sauder School of Business.
Ranked first in Canada by international
research rankings in 2006 and consistently
listed among the top 100 business
schools in the world, Sauder recently
launched a sustainability and business
specialization. Coupled with UBC's own
green building practices and reputation
for sustainability-focused curricula, the
new program convinced Pearson to leave
San Francisco, where she'd earned a
degree in sustainable development. She
hasn't looked back.
"The program provided some amazing opportunities," she says, including
a mentorship with former VanCity CEO
Dave Mowatt; an internship with Light
House Sustainable Building Centre; and
the chance to lead UBC's Net Impact—a
global network of business students
and professionals seeking to improve
the world through business. "This is a
growing area and it's going to be great for
future students."
"Sustainability leaders
have Corporate
Social Responsibility
embedded in their
central business
strategy. They don't
just offset any
damage done, their
central product or
service has a positive
impact on the
community and
environment."
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 13 14 FORESIGHT UBC OKANAGAN
Rick Gandha
My Image of a University
Rick Gandha is taking his time. Five years
into a four-year biology degree, the UBC
Okanagan undergraduate student says,
"I like to stop and look around a little bit
once in a while." He's not smelling the
roses; he's squeezing every last drop out
of campus student life.
A student residence advisor since 2004,
Gandha spent a year as Head Advisor,
supervising a team of seven and
coordinating events for students in
residence. As a Student Ambassador
for Recruitment Services since 2006, he
gives tours to prospective students and
their families who visit the Okanagan
campus. Gandha is the Barber School of
Arts and Sciences student representative
on the UBC Senate and recently became
a Big Brothers volunteer. He'll graduate
in May 2008, and plans to pursue a
graduate degree in science education,
also with UBC.
"I've seen a huge difference since my
first year," Gandha says in reference to
the days before the former Okanagan
University College campus became UBC
Okanagan in 2005. "Usually students
would come for class and leave, but since
UBC came, there has been so much going
on. My experience has been enjoyable and
I want to share this with other students."
UBC Okanagan
opened in 2005 as
a distinctive, small
university campus.
With a goal of
enrolling 7,500
students by 2009,
the campus is
growing to serve the
needs of both BC
and Canada.
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 15 l6 FORESIGHT ATHLETICS
Brian Johns
I'm Making Swimming a Priority
Two-time Olympian (2000 and 2004) and
Canada's most decorated university
swimmer. Thirty-three gold medals in
34 races. Holder of seven university
records. The only three-time (2002,2003,
2006) Canadian Interuniversity Sport
(CIS) swimmer of the year in history.
Canada's flag-bearer for the 2007 Summer
Universiade in Bangkok. Sport BCs
University Athlete of the Year. A likely
contender in the Beijing 2008 Olympics.
Brian Johns has been making swimming
a priority for some time.
Heavily recruited by top schools
throughout North America, the Richmond
native says, "I chose to come to UBC
because for me, it was home. UBC
definitely has one of the best swimming
programs in the world."
Both the men's and women's teams
have enjoyed a 10-year tenure as national
champions, and UBC Athletics has won
more national championships in 10 years
than any other university in Canada.
This year alone, they're CIS champions
in women's field hockey and soccer and
men's and women's swimming.
A Human Kinetics major, Johns is planning on a career as a teacher or coach.
But for now, swimming is his priority—
especially in Beijing.
UBC Athletics has
won more national
championships in 10
years than any other
university in Canada.
"UBC definitely has
one of the best
swimming programs
in the world."
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 17 In 2008, UBC will celebrate the centenary of the
This act of foresight helped shape the face of post-secondary education resulting
Students, alumni,
faculty and staff march
from downtown
students initiate first
Student Union Building
Brock Hall is named after
theformerDeanof
Grey campus to
UBC OFFICIALLY OPENS
AND GRADUATES
FIRST CLASS
UBCopensatsiteof
Vancouver General
Hospital and graduates
its first degree-holders
The University Act
Province of British
Columbia"
UBC Nursing	
UBC offersthefirst
Nursing degree
program in the British
Continuing Studi
Provides thefirst
year-round, provincial
education through the
Department of
University Extension
UBC OFFICIALLY RE-OPENS
versity occupies
1 Point Grey Campu
Pole is erected
outside Brock Hall by
the Kwickwasutaineuk
Chief William Scow.
Ch ief Scow also gives
UBC permission to use
the Thunderbird crest
as the mascot of its
a First Nations image
18 FORESIGHT 'iversity Act to establish BC's first university
in a Provincial collaboration that has touched the lives of every British Columbian
Robson Square opens
Cam pus creates U BC
presence in downtown
of Medicine
Established
Schools of Commerce
and Education
UBC President
John B. Macdonald
DELIVERS REPORT:
Higher Education in BC
Sets the course forthe
post-secondary BC
andfocusinggreater
attention on UBC
graduate education
and research
Women s Studies
UBC becomes first
Canadian university
C opens Institute
of Asian Research
Settingafocusfor
Asian partnerships,
research and student
to offer this program
Nobel Prize for
Exchange opens
a UBC presence
Downtown Eastsids
UBC'sfirst Annual
General Meeting
Asacommitmentto
report back the
acre land gift by
i-inning International inc
The gift creates a new
campus in Vancouverwith
secondary partners
UBC Okanagan opens
The new campus
increases accessto the
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 19 A Century of Support for UBC
generous individuals and
government partnerships
have made possible many
UBC programs, including
research initiatives,
student support and
infrastructure. Here are
some of those milestones.
Robert H.Lee
Lee Graduate Program at the Sauder School of Business
|   2005
I   2005
Institute of Mental Health
ssandTrishaBe
'ing K. Barb
Beaty Biodiversity Centre
I Irving K Barber School of Arts and Sciences at UBC Okanagan
I   2003
LLIAM AND MARJORIE-ANNE SAUC
Sauder School of Business
I Irving K Barber Learning Centre
ewart&Marilyn Blussc
I UBC's largest gift has supported 60+ research projects
BC Knowledge Development Fund (BCKDF) established
Government of Canada
'anada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) established
Opportunity
Campaign
CKChoi Family
CKChoi Building, housing the Institute for Asian Research
Peter
mland Ida Green
Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies
han Foundation
han Centre for the Performing Arts
University Matching Fund Program
Walter and Marianne Koerner
Museum of Anthropology building
Three Universiti
Capital Fund
Campaign
Ceciland Ida Green
JOROTHY KlLLAM BEQUEST
Fellowships
HR MacMillan & Family
braryand expanded graduate studies
111
PA Woodward
| UBC Hospital, Instructional Resources Centre, Biomedical Library
UBC's first
campaign for
private funds
HR MacMillan
Student awards
Walter Koernei
I Expansion of Main Library (south wing)
I First major gift inspires pre-med society UBC Medical School
20 foresight rT "   r*       jjB
ill
X
t
ALUMNI
Richard Van Camp
This is Goingto Be a Lifetime of Firsts
He is a storyteller, educator, editor and author. A
bridge between millennia of oral tradition and the
written word. Richard Van Camp is the first
member of the Northwest Territories' Dogrib
(Tlicho) people to be published, and among the
second generation of Aboriginal writers from the
north working in English.
"For the first time," Van Camp says, "the world
is going to be learning about Aboriginal people
directly from Aboriginal people." He is telling his
own stories and helping his students do the same.
He teaches Creative Writing with an Aboriginal
Focus in UBC's Creative Writing Department and
directly to young Musqueam people.
He believes the job of a teacher is to give hope.
The Lesser Blessed, which he wrote when he was
19, will be made into a film next spring and his
second novel, Blessing Wendy, is due next year.
His new baby book, Welcome Song for Baby: A
Lullaby for Newborns, was chosen as the gift for
every child born in BC in 2008 as part of the Books
for BC Babies Project. Van Camp is the recipient of
the 2007 Outstanding Young Alumnus award.
"I realized that
nobody was telling
my story, of driving
my skidoo to school
and checking my
brother's trap line,
and then racing
home to watch
Degrassi Jr. High."
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 21 COMMUNITY VOICE
Geri James
There Are No Ordinary Lives
How much can we lose and still remain whole?
Health, work, friends, home, esteem. Voice.
Geraldine James had lost them all by the time a
friend led her to the Learning Exchange, UBC's
storefront presence in Vancouver's Downtown
Eastside.
UBC opened the Learning Exchange in 2000 to
build bridges between the university and people
who live and work in inner city areas, as well as
advance Community Service Learning (the
integration of students' volunteer work with
classroom learning). Supported in part by HSBC
Bank Canada, the storefront offers coffee and
companionship, free computer access and
training, ESL groups and a Monday-night lecture
series taught by UBC faculty.
For James, it was "an oasis in a storm." Working
again and focused on her health, she has become
an articulate spokesperson for the Learning
Exchange and an advocate for those who have not
yet found their way. "I tell myself," she says, "just
because you've learned to stand on your feet again,
never forget those who are still on their knees."
"Nobody's looking
for a handout. People
are helped more by
learning how they
can go outside the
boundaries they've
set for themselves.
We have to knock
down these borders
of perception."
22 FORESIGHT fl
TEACHING
Dawn Biehler
Making the University Smaller
"Professors are always searching for ways to
help students see connections between different
disciplines," says Dawn Biehler. Biehler is one of
14 post-doctoral Teaching Fellows hired in 2007
under a $3 million, three-year Faculty of Arts pilot
program initiated by UBC President Stephen Toope.
Trained as a group through UBC's Centre
for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG) and
mentored by senior Arts researchers, Biehler and
her colleagues are teaching three undergraduate
courses each. Through this, they are adding nearly
50 new courses and fostering closer teacher-
student interactions. "We're able to give these
students a lot of individual attention," Biehler says.
Biehler, whose own research examines the
intersection of urban animals, public health and
housing, teaches in the Civil and Sustainable
Societies stream—one of four—within the new
Coordinated Arts Program (CAP). "My interests in
teaching are to get students to be critical thinkers
and informed citizens," says Biehler. "It's important
to me that students approach everything with a
critical, informed, engaged mindset."
As teaching post-
docs we can make the
university smaller,
make classes more
interactive and make
students more
engaged with the
instruction."
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 23 t
MICROBIAL DIVERSITY
Patrick Keeling
itUtfTE:
We Don't Really Know Very Much
With incomplete maps and a belief that the world
was flat, the great explorers set sail across
uncharted seas. We live in an age when that spirit
of exploration takes second place to the need
for results—practical contributions to human
welfare. But biologist Patrick Keeling says, "We
shouldn't have to make excuses for wanting to
discover the nature of the universe. That in itself
is a basic human need."
Keeling is Director of UBC's new Centre for
Microbial Diversity and Evolution, funded by a
$j million investment from the Tula Foundation.
One of six Principal Investigators working in the
Faculty of Science's botany, zoology, microbiology,
and earth and ocean sciences departments, Keeling
argues that only through basic research can
applied researchers know what questions to ask.
The Tula funding will provide positions for up
to 40 post-doctoral researchers over the next 10
years. "Exploring microbial life forms using new
technology and an interdisciplinary approach,"
Keeling says, "will allow us to make sense of the
world in which we live."
"We shouldn't have
to make excuses for
wanting to discover
the nature of the
universe. That in
itself is a basic
human need."
24 FORESIGHT research "Providing a visual
Stephen Sheppard <     . r   v
simulation of climate
change makes it
more real and opens
up the solutions to
a truly consultative
partnership."
Every Year Counts
"There are different pathways into the future," says
Prof. Stephen R.J. Sheppard, leader of the Future
Visioning of Local Climate Change project. In
partnership with the GEOIDE Research Network,
Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada,
BC Government, Metro Vancouver, the Fraser
Basin Council and others, Sheppard and his team
are producing visual simulations to show how
climate change, and our responses to it, could play
out within a generation or two. Informed by
consultations with local engineers, planners,
farmers and local citizens, his aim is to raise
awareness of the choices we face on climate change,
and to motivate action, both personal and political.
Sheppard is also seeking funding to take this
science-based visioning process into other communities and provide a roadmap for climate
change at the local level.
"Some components of climate change are
already irreversible," he says. "We've already
missed the window on avoiding significant sea
level rise." But his urgency is tempered with hope:
"People are ready to do something."
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 25 The Year in Headlines
This w,
and the
Year in Headlines highlights top research
md teaching stories as covered in the
world's media headlines.
/,
*
26 FORESIGHT Oct. 20,2006
The Washington Post
Women's math scores affected by suggestion
"In tests in Canada, women who were told that
men and women do math equally well did much
better than those who were told there is a genetic
difference in math ability... 'The findings suggest
that people tend to accept genetic explanations as
if they're more powerful or irrevocable, which can
lead to self-fulfilling prophecies,' [UBC psychology
professor Steven] Heine said." (photo left)
BBC
April 30,2007
The New York Times
May 1,2007
Scientists look to vaccines in the war on E. Coli
"The cattle vaccine developed by Bioniche is
based on the work of B. Brett Finlay of the
University of British Columbia, who helped
discover how [E. coli] O157 bacteria attach
themselves to the cattle intestines."
The Economist feb. 15,2007
Orion's belter: The world's first practical
quantum computer is unveiled
"On February 13th, [UBC spin-off company]
D-Wave Systems, a firm based in Burnaby, near
Vancouver, announced the existence of the
world's first practical quantum computer."
TIME Magazine Nov. 5,200s
Best inventions for transportation
"A team of Canadian engineering students won
the annual Supermileage race in Michigan with its
80-lb. carbon-fiber Mark V, which can travel 3,145
miles on a single gallon of gas. That's thanks to
details like a curved underbody, an ultra-fuel-
efficient 54-cc engine and a driver who
understands why the turtle beat the hare."
DNA search gives hope to tortoise
'"Lonesome George' was thought to be the only
survivor of a tortoise species native to the isle of
Pinta. Now, the journal Current Biology reports
the discovery of a hybrid—the offspring from
the union of a Pinta tortoise and another island
species...The researchers, led by Michael Russello
from the University of British Columbia
—Okanagan, Canada, took DNA samples from
tortoises living around Wolf Volcano on Isabela."
The New York Times
April 20,2007
Pill that eliminates the period gets mixed reviews
"'My concern is that the menstrual cycle is an
outward sign of something that's going on
hormonally in the body,' said Christine L.
Hitchcock, a researcher at the University of
British Columbia. Ms. Hitchcock said she worries
about 'the idea that you can turn your body on
and off like a tap.'"
The Globe and Mail
March 17,2007
Darwin on fast forward
"'Canada is a hotbed of evolution, producing
lots and lots of species very rapidly. But they go
extinct so fast we never end up having a lot of
species at any given time,' says Jason Weir, a
biologist at the University of British Columbia."
The Times of London feb.2o,2oo7
Fishing subsidies 'destroy oceans' say scientists
"'Eliminating global subsidies could render these
fleets economically unviable,' said Rashid Sumaila,
of the University of British Columbia in Canada,
an economist who led the analysis."
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
ffiljc toasljmgton $)ost
To read the complete Year in Headlines
online visit www.ubc.ca/yih
left and opposite Psychology Associate Prof.Steven Heine and PhDcandidatellan Dar-Nimrod
made international headlines with their study on women and math performance.
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 27 2006/2007 Milestones
Full of promise—partnering with alumni,
industry, government and community
helps shape new opportunities for future
eenerations of British Columbians
»i
lL1
v»f
above The spectacular John M.S. Lecky Boathouse provides a new home for the UBC Thunderbirds Rowing Program.
28 foresight New Rowing Home
Five thousand metres of uninterrupted water
—the first true home for the UBC Thunderbirds
Rowing Program since its start in 1921. The $5.8
million, externally funded John M.S. Lecky
Boathouse opened in Richmond, the result of
support by UBC rowing alumni, St. George's
School, the Province, the City of Richmond and
private sponsors. UBC Rowing's 72 Olympic
athletes have garnered 41 medals, (photo left)
Partnership for Digital Media
Great Northern Way Campus has launched a
Masters of Digital Media Program, to be offered
through an unprecedented academic partnership
of UBC, SFU, BCIT and Emily Carr. Housed in the
new Centre for Digital Media, supported by a $40.5
million contribution from the BC Government,
the program and new facility positions BC at the
forefront of the digital media industry.
Pulp Friction
BC's pulp and paper industry counts over $53 billion
in sales and $44 billion in exports each year, but its
refiners consume 11 per cent of BC's total energy
produced. Funded in part by NSERC, BC Hydro
and pulp industry partners, new research at UBC's
Pulp and Paper Centre will develop technologies
to cut production costs by 20 per cent and create
energy savings to power 100,000 homes.
UBC Theatre
UBC's Telus Studio hosts the World Premiere of
Life After God, adapted from a short story by
Gen-X chronicler Douglas Coupland. Set in
Vancouver, this penetrating look at the first
generation raised without religion was a
co-production between UBC Theatre and
Touchstone Theatre and features both current
students and alumni.
Historic Musqueam MOA
UBC and the Musqueam Indian Band Council
have signed an historic Memorandum of
Affiliation to expand programs that will encourage I
Aboriginal youth to pursue post-secondary
education and strengthen the relationship
between the UBC and Musqueam communities.
Community Generosity
A $300 personal cheque from 1970s UBC president
Walter Gage to a struggling geography undergrad
was repaid this year, with interest. Charles E.
(Chuck) Fipke, one of the discoverers of North
America's first viable diamond pipe, donated
$5 million to UBC Okanagan to found the Charles
Fipke Centre for Innovative Research. Another
$1 million donation will equip the lab with the
Laser-Ablation Microprobe Inductively Coupled
Plasma Mass Spectrometer, which will allow the
study of matter with the most innovative
technology available—placing UBC Okanagan at
the forefront of such research in Canada.
In support of a new home for UBC Law, the
Law Foundation has pledged $6 million, Borden
Ladner Gervais LLP (BLG) and the Ladner family
made gifts totaling $1 million, and Vancouver law
firm Farris made a gift of $1 million, the largest
from a firm, in support of legal education at UBC.
The Sauder School of Business welcomed
gifts of $5 million from an anonymous donor, $1.5
million from Canaccord Capital and $1 million from
Hari B. Varshney to support the revitalization of
the School's learning environment.
$100 Million Record
Technologies invented by researchers at UBC
have broken the $100 million mark in cumulative
licensing revenue for the University. Since March
1984, UBC has made over 350 licensing and
assignment agreements with industry through the
University-Industry Liaison Office (UILO) in areas
of human health, technology and environmental
wellbeing. Having generated more than $5 billion
in sales, UBC inventions are also widely
acknowledged as the impetus behind the growth
of BC's world renowned biotech industry.
Nobel Education Initiative
Nobel Laureate Carl Wieman joined UBC in
January 2007 to launch the $12 million Carl
Wieman Science Education Initiative (CWSEI).
Seven Faculty of Science departments are using
the evidence-based approach, involving
thousands of incoming UBC students, to
scientifically and systematically measure and
improve student learning at UBC, and eventually,
at universities worldwide.
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 29 TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE i) SOCIAL II) ECONOMIC III) ENVIRONMENTAL
Measuring Sustainability
In 2006, UBC became the first-ever Canadian university to launch a campus-wide
sustainability strategy, known as Inspirations & Aspirations: The Vancouver Campus
Sustainability Strategy. This five-year plan represents a university-wide commitment
to tracking the integration of sustainability targets in the university's operations,
programs, research and teaching. Organized around three pillars of social, economic
and environmental targets, it takes a comprehensive look at the university's Triple
Bottom Line. Visit www.sustain.ubc.ca to read the full sustainability strategy.
From the initial nine goals and 68 targets outlining the Vancouver campus'
commitment to improved accountability through sustainability reporting, a further
21 targets were developed in 2007 for the UBC Okanagan campus.
NEW HOME FOR THE UNIVERSITY NEIGHBOURHOODS ASSOCIATION
The Old Barn Community Centre is home to the University Neighbourhoods Association, the municipal-like
entity created to represent UBC's growing permanent community in University Town. With a UBC affiliation
rate of 68%, UBC is exceeding its target of 50% of new households having one or more members who work or
study atthe university.
30 foresight TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE i) SOCIAL II) ECONOMIC III) ENVIRONMENTAL
Social Highlights
Whether it is taking steps to increase the health and safety of our employees,
enhancing the learning experience of our students or providing service to our
communities, we are committed to creating the best possible environment in which
the UBC community of people can live, work and learn. Here are our primary goals:
a  Improve Human Health and Safety
b) Make UBC a Model Sustainable Community
c) Increase Understanding of Sustainability Inside and Outside the University
TARGETS
Liveable Campus: Official Community Plan goal
that not less than 50% of new market and non-
market housing serves households where one or
more members work at or attend UBC
RESULTS
UBC's residential luii 111 iuniLy,uinverbiLy iuwm,
68% of households occupied by a UBC affiliate
Liveable Campus: Work to maintain 25% ratio of
housing provided specifically for full-time
undergraduate students
Sustainable Purchasing: Use Triple Bottom
Line for procurement at the unit level
6,531 beds were available to 27.8% of full-time
unden
63% of RFBs 1 and 26% of RFP's included sustainability
requirements and $270 million of goods and services
were guided by ethical and environmental guidelines;
100% organic, fairtrade coffee became the UBC Food
Services' house brand
Awareness Building: Develop programs with
methods and materials assisting faculty members
to incorporate sustainability into teaching
UBC offers400+ sustainability-rela
including a new MBAspecializing in
Increase participation in student mobility
programs by 15%
There was a 25% increase in the number of students
placed in Go Global international initiatives. 6oostu-
dents received academic credit and 300 participated in
volunteer programs
his number excludes Hampton Place which was built prior to the Official Community Plan, t Request for Bids (RFBs) and Request for Proposals (RFPs)
UBC OKANAGAN FACT
The newly created Okanagan Sustainability Institute addresses issues related to urban sprawl in the Okanagan
region. In partnership with UBC Okanagan and with Aboriginal groups of the southern interior, the En'Owkin
Centre is developing programs and courses on Aboriginal culture, history, philosophy and knowledge.
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 31 TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE i) SOCIAL II) ECONOMIC III) ENVIRONMENTAL
Economic Highlights
Through the responsible management of public assets, the strength of our endowment
fund and the excellence of our research and innovation strengthening the local
economy, UBC's commitment to financial viability makes it possible to generate
long-term value for all students, employees, alumni, suppliers, governments,
businesses, campus residents and the wider community. Here are our primary goals:
a) Ensure Ongoing Economic Viability
b) Maintain and Enhance the Asset Base
c) Maintain and Maximize the Utilization of the Physical Infrastructure
Financial Viability: Implement
recommendations of Provincial Review Fundi
and work with government to secure sustainable
funding levels
Provincial Governme
funding now athreeyear model (historicallyoneyear)
and a new Academic Planning Process will linkto a three
year budget model
Use of Available Assets: Maintain an
appropriate credit rating level from Moody's and
Standard & Poor's which ensures ongoing
financial viability
UBC's long-term debt rating was upgraded byStan-
dard & Poor's from AA to AA+ and reaffirmed at Aal
by Moody's. This credit rating is unsurpassed by other
Endowment: Increase the endowment fund
to $1 billion
UBC increased its endowment fund by $184 million to
$1.01 billion—threeyearsahead of schedule
Research Support: Be one of the top
recipients of government research funding
for Canadian universities
UBC's average research revenuegrowth rate was 1
peryearoverthe past five years, with researchfun
up $139 million from five years ago, despite there b
fewer CFI* and BCKDF projects released this year
Control Space and Infrastructure Costs:
Seek provincial government support for Phase 2
of UBC Renew
I n 2006/07,70% of Renew Phase 1 was completed,
extendingthe life of morethan 36,455square metres of
buildings by 40years or longer
anada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and BC Knowledge Development Fund (BCKDF
UBC OKANAGAN FACT
Over $10 million dollars was raised for UBC Okanagan during the 2006/0/year, which is more than double the
fundraising revenue of the previous year.
32 foresight TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE i) SOCIAL II) ECONOMIC III) ENVIRONMENTAL
Environmental Highlights
Whether it's reducing our ecological footprint or increasing the number of our
students signing the Sustainability Pledge, the university provides leadership in the
integration of environmental considerations into overall planning, operations and
community engagement. Here are our primary goals:
a) Reduce Pollution
b) Conserve Resources
c) Protect Biodiversity
TARGETS
Reduce Pollution: Reduce CO2 and equivalent
emissions from institutional and ancillary-
buildings by 25% from 2000
Waste Management: Divert 55% of annual
operational waste from the landfill (by 2010)
RESULTS
ECOTrek retrofit of 277core building
24% CO2 emissions reduction per square metre since
I 2000 and savings of more than $2.6 million annually
UBC diverts 46% of its total waste stream from landfill,
upfrom4i%in2005
Waste Management: Expand organics
collection to the on-site composter to include all
Food Service retail outlets
Thefirst university in-vessel composter has digested
300+tonnes ofwastesince2004.lt collects material
from 46 sites including all food services, private housii
developmentsand institutional buildings
Conserve Resources: Reduce paper purchased by
20%. Reduce non-renewable energy consumption
by 30% and reduce water consumption by 40% in
institutional & ancillary buildings by 2010*
Paper use down 41% per capita since 1999.
Non-renewable energy consumption in institutional
HiraJaKra! JiEifea
Protect Biodiversity: Eliminate the use of
pesticides for cosmetic purposesT
Pesticide use has steadily decreasedfrom i2types used
ini997tozeroin20o6
Protect Biodiversity: Set targets to reduce
hazardous materials purchased
The new Chemical Inventory Database diverted more
than 1,500kg of chemicals from waste for use in other
labs, resulting in purchasing and disposal savings
* Adjusted for growth, t Defined by Metro Vancouver
UBC OKANAGAN FACT
UBC Okanagan is taking a big step towards improved air quality. The student body voted to bring the highly
successful U-Pass program to the Okanagan campus in September 2007, and a geothermal system to heat and
cool all campus buildings will prevent 38,000 tonnes ofC02 emissions over the next two decades.
d
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 33 Financial Highlights for 2007
For full financial statements, visit www.finance.ubc.ca
Financial Highlights (in thousands)
2007
2006*
Total revenue
',593,663
1,572,091
Operatingsurplusfortheyear
1,920
313
Accumulated operatingsurplusatend ofyear
7,M4
5,224
Revenues (in thousands)
Government grants & contracts
764,704
760,902
Sales.services and other
340,226
310,239
Studentfees
283,913
265,649
Non-government grants, contracts & donations
124,025
114,485
Investment income
80,795
120,816
Total
1,593.663
1,572,091
Expenses (in thousands)
Salaries and benefits
881,226
857,801
Suppliesandgeneral expenses
311,218
302,413
Depreciation
132,879
116,648
Costofgoodssold
40,525
42,772
Scholarships,fellowships and bursaries
55,992
51,722
Grants and reimbursements to otheragencies
74,692
61,314
Total
1,496,532
1,432,670
Assets (in thousands)
Current assets
nvestments
Property, plantand equipment
Total Assets
284,367
1,126,955
1,806,008
3,217,330
4M,699
959,628
1,652,021
3,026,348
Liabilities & Net Assets (in thousands)
Current liabilities
109,699
152,414
Employee future benefits
4,607
4,749
Deferred contributions
267,956
273,219
Deferred capital contributions
1,021,243
974,454
Deferred land lease revenue
152,439
98,695
Long-term debt
280,574
281,421
Net assets
1,380,812
1,241,396
Total liabilities and net assets
3,217,330
3,026,348
* As a result of an accounting policy change on const nentwas required and the zooi Bwith the March 2007 financial statements.
TOTAL REVENUE BY
SOURCE $1.6 BILLION
Fortheyearended
March 31,2007
(millions of dollars)
Sales & Services
("273.8)17%
Government
of Canada
Non- Government Grants,
Contracts and Donations
Investment
Province of
British Columbia
(578.5) 36%
Other Income
34 FORESIGHT Senior Administration & Board of Governors
DEANS UBC VANCOUVER
DEANS UBC OKANAGAN
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
APPLIED SCIENCE
Michael Isaacson
ARTS
NancyGallini
DENTISTRY
Charles Shuler (incoming)
Edwin Yen (outgoing)
EDUCATION
Robert Tierney
FORESTRY
JackSaddler
GRADUATE STUDIES
Barbara Evans (incoming)
Ann Rose (outgoing)
LAND AND FOOD SYSTEMS
Murray Isman
LAW
Mary Anne Bobinski
MEDICINE
Gavin Stuart
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Robert Sindelar
SCIENCE
Simon Peacock
SAUDER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Daniel Muzyka
COLLEGE OF HEALTH DISCIPLINES
Louise Nasmith (incoming))
Lesley Bainbridge (outgoing)
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
W.PeterWard (Acting)
COLLEGE FOR
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Jim Thompson (Acting)
DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS
Bob Philip
APPLIED SCIENCE
Michael Isaacson
CREATIVE & CRITICAL STUDIES
Robert Belton
EDUCATION
Robert Campbel
GRADUATE STUDIES
Marvin Krank
HEALTH & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
Joan Bottorff
IRVING K. BARBER
SCHOOL OF ARTS & SCIENCES
Bernard Bauer
MANAGEMENT
lan Stuart
ADMINISTRATION
PRESIDENT AND VICE CHANCELLOR
Stephen J. Toope
DEPUTY VICE CHANCELLOR,
UBCOKANAGAN
DougOwram
PROVOST AND VICE PRESIDENT,
ACADEMIC
David H. Farrar (incoming)
George Mackie (outgoing)
VICE PRESIDENT,
ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
TerrySumner
VICE PRESIDENT, EXTERNAL,
LEGAL AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Stephen Owen (incoming)
Dennis Pavlich (outgoing)
VICE PRESIDENT, RESEARCH
John Hepburn
VICE PRESIDENT, STUDENTS
Brian Sullivan
PRESIDENT AND VICE CHANCELLOR
Stephen J. Toope
CHANCELLOR
Allan McEachern
CHAIR
Brad Bennett
BOARD MEMBERS
Bonnie BatesGibbs
Nicole Byres
Belle Dale-Wills
James Eccott
JeffFriedrich
ArunGarg
Jacki Hoffman-Zehner
Andrew D.Irvine
Barry Lapointe
Gregory A. Lawrence
Bill Levine
Chief Robert Louie
H.B.McCullough
Darren Peets
Bryce Rositch
Krystal Smith
Ross S. Smith
Susan Yurkovich
PRODUCED BY UBC PUBLIC AFFAIRS
EDITOR
RobbinSimao
WRITERS
Diane Haynes, Robbin Simao
CONCEPT & GRAPHIC DESIGN
Demo Graphic Inc
ONLINE DESIGNER
Rob Wilson, iContext
PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHER
Martin Dee
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
TraceyAyton, Simon DesRochers, Darin
Dueck, Chris Petty, Tim Swanky
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
Squaml
VANCOUVER
ISLAND
TRANS CANADA HWY
OKANAGAN
WASHINGTON
Two campuses—one University
■   UBC AT A GLANCE
I Students
Faculty & Staff
I Faculties
| Campus hectares
UBCVANCOUVER
UBCOKANAGAN
2006/2007 UEC ANNUAL REPORT 35 kO8"20,
A
O
*£ Bt^
To view the online annual report and provide
feedback please visit www.ubc.ca/annualreport
printing foresight Printed on FSC certified paper with
100% postconsumer recycled content in place of virgin fiber
£f
Recycled
Supporting responsible use
offorest resources
#100%V
T? ^f~i     wvvw.fsc.org Certno. SW-COC-1563
©1996 Forest Stewardship Council

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