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2008/09 UBC Annual Report 2009

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  2008/09 UBC ANNUAL REPORT
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THAT IS AT THE HEART OF THE UBC STORY.
Stories open minds. I hope the
stories here surprise and move you,
delight and inspire you. Some may
even stay with you. Good stories do.
Behind each one stands a
young institution open to the
kind of breakthrough thinking and
discovery that changes the world.
And that is UBC's story.
We leave behind a year in which
university endowments throughout
the world suffered significant
losses; good stories often have
their share of struggle. But UBC has
emerged able to grow and to meet
its goal of long-term economic
sustainability for future generations
of students.
We also look back on a year
when UBC was shown to have
had a $10 billion impact on the
British Columbia economy—far
higher than even we ever imagined.
It is clear that UBC innovations
and discoveries transform the
knowledge-based economy as
surely as they do individual lives.
These pages are filled with stories
of innovation and discovery, of
students, staff, faculty, and alumni
who find in UBC a place where they
can learn, discover, and contribute
in their own way. In fulfilling their
own promise, they also fulfill that
of the University. And the common
theme in every story? An open mind. UBC OKANAGAN TRUDEAU SCHOLAR TAMIL KENDALL
FIGHTS FOR THE RIGHTS OF MEXICAN WOMEN WITH HIV.
Tamil Kendall crosses a lot of
borders. She's based at UBC
Okanagan but does field work in
Mexico. For her interdisciplinary
PhD, she combines anthropology
with public health to study HIV,
human rights, and gender equity.
She aims to improve prevention of
mother-to-child HIV transmission
and promote the reproductive rights
of women with HIV in Mexico.
Now in her second year, Kendall
chose UBC because it allowed her
to tailor her PhD to her specific
interests. She also wanted to be
guided by supervisors who had
practical international experience.
"It's important to UBC that the
research done here has an impact
at home and beyond Canada's
borders, which is attractive as a
scholar and an advocate," she says.
"HIV affects the most vulnerable
members of any community.
Defending the rights of people with
HIV—including reproductive rights,
the right to health, and the right
to non-discrimination—promotes
social justice."
Kendall was one of three UBC
students to receive a 2009
Trudeau Scholarship, Canada's
most prestigious social sciences
and humanities award for doctoral
students. She was also honoured
with the Vanier Canada Graduate
Scholarship and is the only doctoral
student in Canada to win both
awards in 2009.
«5 SAUDER SUSTAINABILITY MBA STUDENT
MASOUD BEHZADIAN ISA MENTOR FOR FIRST YEAR MBAs.
When Iranian-bom Masoud
Behzadian lived in downtown
Vancouver during his first year at
the Sauder School of Business, he
missed out on impromptu study
sessions on campus. Now, the
second-year MBA student is the
Residence Manager at the school's
new MBA House on the Vancouver
campus.
"I can especially see the benefits
for first-year students," he says,
noting how often they gather to
discuss assignments.
The Robert H. Lee Graduate
School opened MBA House in
August, one of the first residences
in Canada for Master of Business
Administration students.
Behzadian recently completed
an internship at the Centre for
Sustainability and Social Innovation
(CSSI), where he prepared a report
for Coast Opportunity Funds.
The report showed how remote
communities in the Great Bear
Rainforest could stop relying on
diesel generators by harnessing
renewable energy sources.
Launched in April by the Sauder
School of Business, CSSI is working
with the business community
to address global issues and to
educate future green entrepreneurs.
Founded by the Swift family (ARC
Financial) and the Lalji family (Larco
Group of Companies), both of BC,
CSSI has also received support
from the Viewpoint Charitable
Foundation. UNDERGRADUATE GLOBAL CITIZEN AMELIA BOULTBEE
IS MOTIVATED TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.
"Global citizenship is exactly
opposite to the attitude 'If it's not
happening in my own backyard it
doesn't matter.' It means that the
world is your back yard and it does
matter."
That attitude has motivated
21-year-old Amelia Boultbeeto
organize an International Relations
Students' Association gala to
raise money to clear land mines.
The fourth-year political science
major has also participated in a
model United Nations conference
and recently was chosen as one
of four Global Vision Junior Team
Canada members who attended the
APEC summit in Singapore. "I see
government as a vehicle to improve
people's lives," Boultbee says. "I
want to be able to add my muscle
to that."
Boultbee isn't afraid to carve
her own niche. She joined UBC's
Young Women in Business club as
one of a small number of Faculty
of Arts members. Recognizing the
extend to which Arts students can
benefit from business, finance, and
networking skills, she has recruited
more Arts students and mentors
and is now the club's president.
"At UBC, you can get involved in
anything," she says. "You can really
take it in any direction you want."
i INTERDISCIPLINARY GENETICIST DAVID NG
USES HUMOUR TO BRING STUDENTS TO SCIENCE.
David Ng was once voted "coolest
geek" by his colleagues. The
Director of the Advanced Molecular
Biology Laboratory helps people see
science in a new way. "I get people
to think harder, and try to make
them smile at the same time."
Ng often reaches out to
elementary and secondary
students, using humour and pop
culture to open them up to science.
His lab hosts field trips where he
and UBC grad students prove that
scientists aren't just geeks: "It's
important to show that we come
in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and
personalities—just like any other
community."
Ng is also connecting science
with arts at the University. He's one
of the leaders of the Terry project,
which mixes the two disciplines
through a course, speaker series,
and student conference. The social
media-driven Terry site acts as a
hub to fuel student activism on
issues like climate change, war, and
poverty.
"The global issues are so big
that it really makes no sense to be
sequestered in your own single
topic area," says Ng. "Part of
problem solving is simply being
aware that other viewpoints do
matter."
i PHYSICS GRADUATE JOEL PEL ENSURES
GOOD IDEAS DON'T DIE IN THE LAB.
"We've got this idea. What can it be
used for?"
According to Joel Pel, this
is the question that connects
problems with solutions at UBC. A
cooperative spirit across disciplines
ensures that good ideas don't die
in the lab, but get used to make a
difference in society.
Pel recently graduated with a PhD
in physics. His thesis is based on
a particle manipulation technique
that was first demonstrated
mathematically by Prof. Lome
Whitehead, now the University's
Leader of Education Innovation for
the LEAD initiative. Whitehead
collaborated with Pel's PhD advisor,
Biophysics Prof. Andre Marziali, to
use this technique as a new way
to extract DNA and RNA from
small or heavily contaminated
samples, which was the focus of
Pel's thesis. This tool could help
lead to breakthroughs in forensic
investigations, molecular biology,
bio-defence, clinical diagnostics,
and more.
UBC ranks in the top 10 in North
America for commercialization
success, and the University Industry
Liaison Office helped create spin-off
company Boreal Genomics, which
Marziali heads and where Pel now
works as a researcher.
"Interacting with all sorts of
different fields has allowed us to
explore the whole range of uses
that this technology might have,"
Pel says.
\ STAFF AWARD WINNER MADELEINE MACIVOR FIGHTS
MARGINALIZATION AND ENGAGES ABORIGINAL YOUTH.
"I see access to meaningful
education as an issue of social
justice," says Madeleine Maclvor.
The associate director of the
First Nations House of Learning
explains that Aboriginal people
have historically been excluded
from post-secondary education
as a result of colonization. This
marginalization continues today
in the limited participation of
Aboriginal students and faculty at
the University.
Since 1989, Maclvor has
worked with others throughout
the University to change this. She
has helped develop outreach
initiatives that engage Aboriginal
youth, supported and advocated
for Aboriginal students, served as a
resource for the development of
Indigenous programming, and
collaborated on cross-cultural
events. Over the years, she has
contributed to the development
of policy and strategic planning
processes including the Aboriginal
admissions policy, TREK 2010, and
more recently the UBC Aboriginal
Strategic Plan. She is also active
in a number of community-based
organizations.
Maclvor was honoured with the
2009 President's Staff Award for
Global Citizenship in recognition of
her professional achievements and
contributions to the vision and goals
of the University. UNDERGRADUATE ENTREPRENEUR AARON CORET INVENTED
A WAY FOR TRICK SNOWBOARDERS TO PRACTICE MORE SAFELY.
"A lot of kids come to UBC because
it's in the mountains," says Aaron
Coret. "It's probably the most
beautiful campus in the world."
Coret well knows the lure of the
slopes. The 25-year-old was an avid
snowboarder until a fall in 2005
left him paralyzed from the neck
down. Back then, there was no way
to perfect tricks before trying them
out on hard snow. Coret used his
accident as inspiration to make the
sport safer for others.
A fourth-year student in the
Integrated Engineering (IGEN)
program, he and classmate Steve
Slen designed the Landing Pad as a
class project. The 15-by-27-metre
inflatable pillow provides a cushion
for snowboarders and skiers who
can ride their trick out if they land
properly, or fall safely if they don't.
Coret's start-up company,
Katal Innovations, is now doing
promotions for the Pad, which
he hopes will become a fixture at
resorts, along with a safety program
that will attract new enthusiasts.
"It's really about trying to bring
about a change in the industry that
we love," Coret says. Although he
no longer snowboards himself, he's
still pushing the limits of adventure. UBC OKANAGAN NURSING STUDENT VIDA YAKONG IS IMPROVING
THE LIVES OF WOMEN IN HER HOME OF NORTHERN GHANA.
When students ask Vida Yakong
what it's like to be a woman in
Ghana, it's a challenge for her to
answer. In rural northern Ghana,
the birth rate is nearly seven
children per woman and maternal
mortality rates are among the
world's highest. As she explains
why, she looks at the place she was
raised in a new way.
A UBC Okanagan graduate
student, Yakong is pursuing a PhD
in medical anthropology, nursing,
and anthropology of gender. Her
focus is the influence of gender
relations on women's reproductive
health in Ghana. After her studies,
she plans to return to Africa to
teach and to advocate for change in
health care policy.
Yakong has already made
a difference. In 2007, she
spearheaded Project GROW
(Ghana Rural Opportunities for
Women), which aims to improve
the health and economic situation
of women in northern Ghana. She
attributes its success to UBC's
open, supportive environment.
This year, she received the 2009
Outstanding Future Alumnus
Award. The World Bank honoured
her with the Margaret McNamara
Memorial grant, given to 10 female
graduate students from developing
countries who aim to improve
conditions for women and children.
For Yakong, innovative problem-
solving is key. "It makes you look at
things holistically," she says. "This is
how I see my education at UBC." THE YEAR IN HEADLINES
"IF A NEW [UBC] STUDY IS ANY GUIDE, THE COLOR RED CAN
MAKE PEOPLE'S WORK MORE ACCURATE, AND BLUE CAN
MAKE PEOPLE MORE CREATIVE." ™E,™,™s
@be$tarf(ork@btu$
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
ClH'U'asimuUonJJo'*!
16 /
UBC STUDENTS AND RESEARCHERS MADE HEADLINES AROUND
THE WORLD LAST YEAR WITH THEIR SCHOLARLY ACHIEVEMENTS.
I
The New York Times Feb 5,2009
Reinvent the wheel? Blue room.
Defusing a bomb? Red room.
"If a new study is any guide, the color red can make
people's work more accurate, and blue can make
people more creative.... 'If you're talking about
wanting enhanced memory for something like
proofreading skills, then a red color should be used,'
said Juliet Zhu, an assistant professor of marketing
at the business school at the University of British
Columbia, who conducted the study with Ravi Mehta,
a doctoral student. But for 'a brainstorming session
for a new product or coming up with a new solution
to fight child obesity or teenage smoking,' Dr. Zhu
said, 'then you should get people into a blue room.'"
BBC News Sept. 14,2009
Depression 'cuts cancer survival'
"Depression can damage a cancer patient's chances
of survival, a review of research suggests. The
University of British Columbia team said the findings
emphasized the need to screen cancer patients
carefully for signs of psychological distress. The
study, a review of 26 separate studies including 9,417
patients, features in the journal Cancer. It found death
rates were up to 25% higher in patients showing
symptoms of depression.... Lead researcher Jill Fan
Satin said: 'It is quite remarkable that the presence of
depressive symptoms or a diagnosis of a depressive
disorder can predict mortality in cancer patients.'"
TO READ THE COMPLETE
YEAR IN HEADLINES
ONLINE, VISIT US AT
WWW.UBC.CA/YIH
The Economist May 20,2009
News from the schools
"Twenty-two higher education institutions in British
Columbia have signed an accord to offer more
business education to First Nations Canadians...
UBC has been championing the cause through its
Ch'nook Aboriginal Business Education program. Its
Advanced Management course, which seeks to teach
business 'from an aborigine perspective,' recently
graduated its third class."
Financial Times (UK) Jan.9,2009
Muted response to racist abuse
"Why does racism persist even in the most
enlightened societies, in spite of the fact that
individuals exhibiting racist attitudes should attract
contempt? According to Canadian research published
in Science magazine this week, many people who
believe they would not tolerate racist behaviour
demonstrate indifference when put on the spot.
'One of the ways that people may stem the tide of
negative emotions related to witnessing a racial slur
is to reconstrue the comment as a joke or harmless
remark,' explained Elizabeth Dunn of the University
of British Columbia, an author of the study."
Brisbane Times Sept. 30,2009
Skinny friends, diet enemies
"That friend who stays thin despite eating anything
and everything is not just annoying. She might
also wreck your diet, new research suggests...
The findings, published in the Journal of Consumer
Research, suggest that seeing a thin friend devour
a big meal gives us implicit permission to do
the same. 'We think "if she can eat like that and
stay thin, so can I," or "she is having cake, then
can too,"' explained Dr. Brent McFerran, an
assistant professor of marketing at the University
of British Columbia in Kelowna, Canada."
17 MILESTONES
18 /
UBC'S INSTITUTIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS CONTRIBUTE TO
OUR POSITION AMONG THE WORLD'S BEST UNIVERSITIES.
I
UBC Wine Research Centre
Bridging the sciences of grape growing (viticulture)
and winemaking (enology), the Centre has attracted
world-renowned scientists and close to $17 million in
research funding. Of that, a new $3.4 million project
funded by Genome Canada and Genome BC will help
unlock the genetic secrets of grapevines and wine
yeasts while helping wineries boost the value of their
creations.
Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre
UBC announced the naming of the Thunderbird
Sports Centre in honour of hockey builder Doug
Mitchell in August 2009. Mitchell's family, friends,
and colleagues have pledged $10 million to UBC for
the winter sports complex in recognition of his
extraordinary contribution to Canadian amateur
sport. The centre, now known as the Doug Mitchel
Thunderbird Sports Centre, is a hockey and sledge
hockey host venue for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic
and Paralympic Winter Games.
Working Towards Zero Emissions
The Geoexchange system at UBC Okanagan,
which uses groundwater from under the campus
to heat and cool new academic buildings,
received $2.9 million from the BC Government
and the Government of Canada's Knowledge
nfrastructure Program in 2009 toward its goal of
carbon neutrality in 2010. The funds enabled UBC
Okanagan to expand the system to convert all
existing academic buildings currently using fossil
fuel technology to harvest energy to heat these
buildings from the Great Okanagan Aquifer. The
completion of UBC Okanagan's new and retrofit
geothermal facilities are major contributing factors
toward achieving its goal of zero emissions.
Academic Construction Surpasses $1B
Since 2000/01, UBC academic and institutional
infrastructure construction has surpassed the one
billion dollar mark for both new and retrofit buildings.
The following are some of the largest infrastructure
projects underway.
• Faculty of Law — Of the $55.9 million approved,
UBC has raised $22 million of the $24 million
fundraising goal, including a matching grant from the
Law Foundation of BC
• Biological Sciences — As part of Phase 2 of UBC
Renew's building renovations, the education and
research complex was given a $64.2 million boost
from Industry Canada's Knowledge Infrastructure
Program and a provincial government matching grant.
• Pharmaceutical Sciences — The Province invested
$86.4 million in a new $133.3-million Faculty building
that will house research and teaching spaces as well
as the Centre for Drug Research and Development.
• Earth Sciences — The Province is providing $37.5
million toward the new $75 million building, a high-
tech education and research facility that will feature
an expanded Pacific Museum of the Earth.
■  UBC Okanagan Engineering Management —
A new home for the Faculties of Engineering and
Management at UBC Okanagan, the $68.57 million
project received $33.57 in Provincial funding.
Athletics Highlights
• The Thunderbird Park redevelopment has brought
baseball and track and field back onto campus and
provides an all-weather facility for soccer, baseball,
and field hockey.
• Ninety-four UBC student athletes were honoured
with Academic All-Canadian status in 2008/09 for
maintaining a minimum GPA of 80 percent while
competing for a varsity team
• Annamay Pierse set multiple world records this
summer, including one for the 200 metre long course
breaststroke during the semi-finals of the 2009
Swimming World Championships in Rome.
19 MILESTONES
.WaM
■■■m
-—i
pkktiifP
top: uec museum of anthropology great hall the
RENEWAL PROJECT IS SCHEDULED FOR COMPLETION IN
JANUARY 2010.
photo: goh iromoto
left and bottom left: the newly opened university
centre at ubc okanagan also includes the j. peter
meekison student centre,
photo: jody jacob
bottom right: the ubc learning exchange's expanded
storefront on main street has led to twice the
enrolment in the esl conversation program and
growth of the computer skills program,
photo: chris koch
20 /
UBC'S INSTITUTIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS CONTRIBUTE TO
OUR POSITION AMONG THE WORLD'S BEST UNIVERSITIES.
I
Museum of Anthropology Expansion
UBC's Museum of Anthropology welcomed a $5
million donation from the Koerner Foundation in
March. The gift will support the Museum's $55.5
million renewal project, scheduled for completion in
January 2010. The project includes a new wing,
revitalized galleries, and the Reciprocal Research
Network, which will link the Museum with BC First
Nations communities and museums worldwide.
Restoring a Landmark
UBC School of Music marked 50 years of its Bachelor
of Music Program in September 2009. With plans for
a gala performance to open the newly restored Old
Auditorium next fall, the $20 million renovation is
part of UBC Renew, a BC government partnership to
retrofit buildings rather than construct new ones as
part of the University's commitment to sustainability.
The auditorium is a key rehearsal, performance, and
teaching space for the School of Music.
Research Funding
In 2008/09, UBC received nearly $475.3 million in
research funding for 7,313 projects, an increase of
$5.9 million over 2007/08. Primary funding sources
included government (67%), non-profit (24%), and
industry (9%) sectors. UBC researchers were
awarded more than $172.9 million through federal
research council competitions, and over $53.1 million
toward infrastructure projects from the Federal and
Provincial governments.
University Centre at UBC Okanagan
Students have a new hub of activity in the University
Centre at UBC Okanagan, which opened in summer
2009. The $33 million building offers three day
residences for commuter students and everything
from fresh food to financial aid. The UBC Students'
Union Okanagan contributed $3 million to the
project, and an anonymous donor gave over $1
million to establish the J. Peter Meekison Student
Centre located within the 79,000-sq.-ft. building.
Dentistry Bioimaging Facility
UBC Dentistry's bioimaging facility for bone imaging
and analysis is set to expand, thanks to new federa
and provincial funding. The Canada Foundation for
nnovation, created by the Government of Canada to
fund research infrastructure, has invested in the $9.4
million project, and the British Columbia Knowledge
Development Fund has provided matching funds.
Dentistry's current bioimaging facility will become a
state-of-the-art centre for all UBC researchers, to be
called the Centre for High-Throughput
Phenogenomics.
Learning Exchange Support
HSBC Bank Canada donated $2.17 million over seven
years to support two community initiatives in
Vancouver's Downtown Eastside and surrounding
neighbourhoods. HSBC's donation will support the
UBC Learning Exchange in bringing more UBC
student volunteers into inner city schools and offering
free educational resources for residents. The
donation, the largest UBC has ever received from a
financial institution, will also support the UBC Faculty
of Medicine, which is conducting cutting-edge
addictions research in the Downtown Eastside in
partnership with St. Paul's Hospital
Student-run Physiotherapy Clinic
BC's first student-run physiotherapy outpatient clinic
opened in summer 2009 at New Westminster's
Royal Columbian Hospital. A partnership between
Fraser Health and the Faculty of Medicine's
Department of Physical Therapy, the clinic offers
experience to UBC students and rehabilitation
services to the community. Another student-run
learning program—Community Health Initiates by
University Students—focuses on Vancouver's
Downtown Eastside. Since expansion of the medical
program began in 2004, UBC's Faculty of Medicine
has doubled MD undergraduate enrolment and
expects 288 students to enrol in 2011
21 TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE SOCIAL ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENTAL
Exemplifying Sustainability
UBC is committed to exploring and exemplifying all aspects of economic, environmental,
and social sustainability. This year, we report our progress against a campus-wide
sustainability strategy in Vancouver, and look ahead to the application of the Sustainability
Academic Strategy on both campuses in 2010. Visit www.sustain.ubc.ca.
Plans in Vancouver and the Okanagan will be informed by the vision and values
articulated in UBC's new strategic plan, Place and Promise: The UBC Plan
(www.strategicplan.ubc.ca). They will include integration of sustainability initiatives in
teaching, research, and operations; the implementation of a sustainable budget model; and
social sustainability through exemplary governance and campus planning.
above: the new wesbrook place community features a series of ponds and channels, allowing decanting
and infiltration of water into the aquifer for storage and re-use as irrigation—ensuring that rain is
treated as a resource rather than as waste.
22 TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE SOCIAL ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENTAL
Social Highlights
UBC is dedicated to creating a safe, inclusive, and rewarding living and learning
environment for students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community members. The past year
saw the development of an Aboriginal Strategic Plan and enhancement of campus spaces
to foster a greater sense of community. UBC opened 108 new childcare spaces and will
add up to 200 more in 2010 to meet the needs of parents who live, work, and learn here.
GOALS
1 Improve Human Health and Safety
2 Make UBC a Model Sustainable Community
3 Increase Understanding of Sustainability Inside and Outside the University
Targets
Understanding of Sustainability: Increase
participation in student mobility programs by 15%
(Go Global).
Results (2008/09)
731 students participated in Go Global, a 218% increase
over the base year.
Livable Campus: Develop a series of targets,
priorities, action plans, and measures for enhancing
the work environment at UBC.
• In 2008, UBC became one of the few Canadian
universities to have an institutional people practice
framework, www.focusonpeople.ubc.ca.
• UBC Okanagan earned a 2008 WorkLife BC Award
from the Ministry of Children and Family Development
for employee work life balance.
Model Sustainability Community: Use triple bottom
line for procurement at the unit level.
Supply Management developed a Sustainable
Purchasing Guide to assist staff, students, and faculty to
purchase sustainable products and services.
Human Health and Safety: Decrease campus
property theft incidents by 20% each year.
In Vancouver, the number of campus property thefts
decreased from 283 in 2007 to 210 in 2008, a 26%
reduction.
Model Sustainability Community: Offer fair trade
coffee at all eligible Food Service Units.
• In 2008, the Vancouver campus served 100%> locally
roasted organic shade-grown fair trade coffee at all
nonfranchise outlets.
• UBC Okanagan offered 15% organic and 95%>
fair trade coffee and locally sourced fruit (60%) and
vegetables (50%).
23 TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE SOCIAL ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENTAL
Economic Highlights
UBC is committed to aligning its resources with its strategic plan and stewarding them
in a sustainable manner. While UBC was not immune to the losses suffered by university
endowments globally, its overall loss at year end compares favourably at 20.9 percent.
UBC had a record fundraising year, and a new study showed the University's economic
impact on the British Columbia economy to be $10 billion.
GOALS
1 Ensure Ongoing Economic Viability
2 Maintain and Enhance the Asset Base
3 Maintain and Maximize the Utilization of the Physical Infrastructure
Targets
Economic Vitality: Strive to keep tuition rates at
25-30% of education costs for domestic students.*
Results (2008/09)
Tuition rates are now 28.3% of education costs for
domestic students.
Research Funding: Be a top recipient of government
research funding for Canadian Universities.
UBC received $475.3M in research funding in 2008/09
up from $469AM in 2007/08 and $399.5M in 2006/07.
Endowment: Increase the endowment investments
to $1 billion.
The endowment investment value was $939M as of
September 30, 2009.
Fundraising: Sustain UBC's margin of excellence
through gifts to teaching and learning, research, and
student support.
The 2008/09 fundraising target of$130M was
surpassed, for a total of $135.3M.
Control Space and Infrastructure Costs: Seek
provincial government support for Phase II of UBC
Renew. This initiative renovates deteriorated
buildings that would otherwise be replaced.
• UBC Renew Phase II received $64M in funding with
equal support from the Provincial Government and
the Federal Knowledge Infrastructure Program to fully
retrofit its Biosciences facilities in Vancouver.
• UBC Okanagan received $2.9M in funding from
the Provincial and Federal Government's Knowledge
Infrastructure Program to retrofit all existing academic
buildings on campus to geothermal heating.
* Proposed new target.
24 TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE SOCIAL ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENTAL
Environmental Highlights
UBC began work on a Climate Action Plan, setting targets and timelines for the reduction
of greenhouse gas emissions. Both campuses are creating hubs for sustainability
leadership and the integration of academic and operational initiatives. These include the
Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) in Vancouver and the Okanagan
Sustainability Institute and Office of Workplace Health and Sustainability at UBC Okanagan.
GOALS
1 Reduce Pollution
2 Conserve Resources
3 Protect Biodiversity
Targets
Reduce Pollution: Reduce CO2 and equivalent
emissions from institutional and ancillary buildings
by 25% from 2000 levels.
Results (2008/09)
• UBC achieved a 22%> reduction in CO2 emissions per
square metre in 2008/09.
• In the Okanagan, approximately 80% of thermal
energy is generated on-site through Geoexchange
technology.
Reduce Pollution: Maintain annual auto traffic at or
below 1997 per capita levels for UBC's Vancouver
campus.
TREK initiatives since 1997 have resulted in a 768%
increase in transit ridership and an 78% decrease in
automobile traffic, despite a 36%> growth in population.
Reduce Water Consumption: Reduce water
consumption in institutional and ancillary buildings
by 40% (adjusted for growth) from 2000 levels.
• In 2008/09, the Vancouver campus water
consumption was reduced by 29%>.
• All of UBC Okanagan's water fountains have filters
to decrease bottled water use and the campus was the
first North American site to install the energy efficient
PENTEK FreshPoint Ultrafiltration Water System.
Waste Management: Expand organics collection at
UBC Vancouver's on-site composter to include all
Food Services retail outlets.
• By using the Vancouver campus in-vessel compost
facility, the amount of waste going into the usual waste
stream was reduced by 175 tonnes in 2008.
• At UBC Okanagan 100%> electronic waste is diverted
from the landfill by its recycling waste program.
25 FOR FULL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
VISIT: www.finance.ubc.ca
Consolidated Financial Highlights 2009
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS (in thousands)
Total revenue
Operating (deficit) surplus for the year
Accumulated operating surplus at end of year
2009
1,472,140
(3,736)
8,431
2008*
1,529,924
5,252
12,167
REVENUES (in thousands)
Government grants and contracts
859,402
817,285
Student fees
326,425
302,573
Non-government grants, contracts and donations
136,130
136,364
Investment incomet
(186,797)
(49,715)
Sales and services
256,155
249,485
Amortization of deferred capital contributions
80,825
73,932
Total Revenues
1,472,140
1,529,924
EXPENSES (in thousands)
Salaries
Employee benefits
Supplies and sundries
Amortization
Cost of goods sold
Scholarships, fellowships, and bursaries
Travel and field trips
Professional and consulting fees
Grants and reimbursements to other agencies
Utilities
Interest on long-term debt
Total Expenses
878,701
127,143
176,663
163,857
34,253
62,235
43,412
63,867
82,545
28,581
25,923
1,687,180
810,074
118,582
171,619
151,881
33,071
57,970
40,127
47,045
72,551
25,446
21,965
1,550,331
ASSETS (in thousands)
Current assets
475,822
425,906
Investments
1,091,560
1,359,951
Capital assets
2,079,931
1,909,004
Total Assets
3,647,313
3,694,861
LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS (in thousands)
Current liabilities
202,991
165,510
Employee future benefits
4,829
4,957
Deferred contributions
370,665
332,243
Deferred capital contributions
1,147,487
1,086,789
Deferred land lease revenue
223,118
211,817
Long-term debt
436,169
436,857
Net assets
1,262,054
1,456,688
Total Liabilities and Net Assets
3,647,313
3,694,861
* Comparative figures have been reclassified where necessary to be consistent with the presentation adopted in the current year
tlncludes $209.2 million loss within the endowment, reflecting the exceptional volatility within global investment markets during fiscal
2008/09 (of which $118.7 million represents unrealized losses in endowment investments at March 31, 2009).
26 UBC DEANS, ADMINISTRATION,
AND BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Deans — Vancouver
Deans — Okanagan
Board of Governors
Graduate Studies
Land and Food Systems
Creative and Critical Studies
Graduate Studies
Health and Social Development
Irving K. Barber School
of Arts and Sciences
Management
Board Members
Medicine
Vice Provost Health and Dean
Administration
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Deputy Vice Chancellor,
UBC Okanagan
Sauder School of Business
Provost and Vice President,
Academic
ANNUAL REPORT PRODUCED BY
College of Health Disciplines
Vice President, Development
and Alumni Engagement
University Librarian
Ingrid Parent
College for
Interdisciplinary Studies
Michael Burgess
Director of Athletics
Robert Philip
UBC Continuing Studies
Vice President, External, Legal
and Community Relations
Stephen Owen
Vice President, Finance, Resources
and Operations
Vice President, Research
and International
PRINCIPAL PHOTOGRAPHER
Vice President, Students
UBC at a Glance Vancouver Okanagan
I f J OKA*
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TREES SAVED FOR THE FUTURE
WATERBOURNE WASTE NOT CREATED
38.1 kilograms
WASTEWATER FLOW SAVED
4/UZZ.3 litre
SOLID WASTE NOT GENERATED
623.2 kilograms
NET GREENHOUSE GASES PREVENTED
,227.8 kilograms
ENERGY NOT CONSUMED
20,714,947 BTUs
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