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Report of the President for the Academic Year 1963-1964 1965

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Array 1963-1964
REPORT
OF THV
iisiis^iiiiiiisii'iii
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THE UNIVERSITY Ol   BRITISH COLUMBL
■■iiSHHmiHHHBl THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT
OF THE
1 RESIDENT
for the Academic Tear ig6j-ig64
BY JOHN BARFOOT  MACDONALD
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1965 EDITED BY MALCOLM F. MCGREGOR
PHOTOGRAPHS BY A. P. HOLBORNE
DESIGNED AND PRINTED BY
THE MORRISS PRINTING COMPANY LTD., VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREWORD
The Board of Governors,
The University of British Columbia.
Madam Chancellor and Gentlemen:
In the following pages you will find my report for the academic
year 1963-1964. As is usual and appropriate, I have summarized
the activities of the University and its Faculty and staff. In addition,
I have indicated the kind of services that are continuously rendered
to the province and the nation by the University; I have also
gathered some revealing statistics about the composition of the
student-body and the places where our graduates build their careers
and make their homes.
I trust that this record of our accomplishments in the past and
our hope for the future will elicit satisfaction and pride.
Very truly yours,
JOHN B. MACDONALD TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword 5
1. The University 9
2. The Faculties
3. Other Departments of the University 41
4. People and Places 59
Publications of the Faculty and Staff 1
THE UNIVERSITY
Universities today make so many practical contributions to our
very complex society that it is easy to lose sight of their central
purposes. The variety of programmes offered in a comprehensive
institution like the University of British Columbia is beyond simple
imagination. The Humanities and Social Sciences, the Fine Arts
and Pure Science are only part of a responsibility that includes in
addition professional Faculties {e.g., Medicine, Law, Forestry) and
Institutes {e.g., Oceanography, Fisheries, Industrial Relations). Beyond the campus the University's interests and influence not only
extend across British Columbia and Canada but are felt the world
over.
The intricacy and scope of a university's activities have led one
president to coin the term "multiversity," and one might be tempted
to ask, is there any predictable limit to the interests and functions
of multi-faceted giants like the University of British Columbia? My
own conviction is that there are limits, and that these should be
related to the central purposes of a university, the qualities that
distinguish a university from all other institutions. A President's
Committee on Academic Goals has this year been discussing those
qualities. They include the fostering of a permanent spirit of inquiry
and creativity, the engendering of powers of sound judgement, and
the developing of the cultural resources of society.
The implications of these purposes are broad. A university can
and should engage in those areas of human endeavour that offer
significant opportunity for intellectual inquiry into the nature of
man and the universe. Thus, the study of nuclear physics is appropriate: the study of hairdressing is inappropriate. Between such
obvious extremes lie areas in which the decision is more difficult. The
problem becomes acute in the effort to assess whether a particular field offers worth-while opportunities for furthering the primary goals
of the university. In general (but not always), professions are regarded as meeting the criteria, for instance, law, engineering, medicine, teaching; and it is perhaps fair to say that one of the attributes
that distinguish a profession from a vocation should be the extent to
which the former permits significant inquiry and contributes to
society's cultural resources.
Universities are often called upon to engage in activities that in
the judgement of most educated people lack the essential characteristics that would justify their inclusion in a university; the reader
will have no trouble in thinking of illustrations. Frequently these
pressures are the result of genuine needs in a community and the
only question that demands an answer is whether they should be
provided by the university or by some other institution. The late
Sidney Smith, President of the University of Toronto, offered as a
negative rule of thumb the principle that a university should engage
only in those activities that no other institution can perform so well.
These observations are pertinent to another characteristic of a
university. By its very nature it will always create a strained relationship between itself and the society of which it is a part. A university
offers not what is accepted, but what will become accepted. It seeks
the truth, not immutable and permanent, but the truth that is
forever on the horizon and changing, maturing, as society grows
and as man's knowledge increases. Thus, for example, lawyers in
practice want the university to produce lawyers competent to practise
law according to the best traditions of the day; the university seeks
as its first objective to produce lawyers who are thoughtful and
enquiring about the law, its history, its status, the extent to which
it serves man's present aspirations, the ways in which it evolves, and
the responsibility of lawyers not only to interpret but to encourage
evolution. The two views are not incompatible and each can be
sympathetically and helpfully translated by the two parties. Similar
problems beset all professions in their relations with a university.
It is to be expected that difficulties will arise from time to time in a
university's relationships with society. If they do not, one might
seriously question whether the university is being loyal to its basic
purposes.
I raise these issues by way of introduction because I wish to
emphasize in this essay the great contribution that the University
of British Columbia makes to society. We are proud of our con-
10 tribution but we urge an understanding of the paradox that, although tremendous practical benefits accrue to society from a university, its main purposes are more important and far less transient
than the annual dividends. With this conviction always in mind,
let us look at some of the direct contributions of this University to
the welfare of its immediate neighbourhood, the province, the
nation, and the world.
The University's graduates, those who leave with the spirit of the
University a permanent influence on their lives, are the most important contribution of the University to society. In 1963-1964 the
University enrolled 14,714 full-time students (see Table 1). Of
these, 12,817 were undergraduates, 919 graduates, and 978 students
of professional schools. The great majority were British Columbians
(89.5%). While most were residents of the lower mainland, about
16% had homes in the interior and upper coastal regions, and
more than 1,000 (7.5%) came from Vancouver Island. But the
University also serves the nation and the world. Nearly 1,000 students travelled from other Canadian provinces, and 631 came from
a total of 86 other countries. Table 2 summarizes these figures.
The full-time students comprise only a fraction. The Summer
Session (see Table 1) enrolled 5,463 students, two-thirds of whom
were teachers improving their qualifications. The Department of
University Extension (see Table 1) provided credit-courses for
2,761 students, about a quarter of them off the campus in fifteen
different centres, and nearly one-half of them by correspondence.
Nearly 13,000 attended evening classes, short courses, and seminars
on the campus. An additional 5,000 attended similar courses
throughout the province. Some 1,500 participated in discussion-
groups in forty-seven British Columbian communities; more than
2,500 took advantage of the Department's lending services.
In all, 45,198 persons shared in the opportunities to learn that
were planned by the University. Their interests ranged from a Ph.D.
in physics or zoology to the practical problems of fishermen and
sheep-raisers.
The courses given by the Department of University Extension
are designed to meet a wide variety of needs. Those enrolling in
language, for example, especially in French, include physicians,
bankers, lawyers, clerks, secretaries, architects, housewives, employees
of airlines, and university professors.
Courses for physicians enrolled some 30% of those practising in
11 WINTER SESSION
Undergraduate: Arts, Science,
Education, Professional
Graduate: Graduate Studies and
Post-Baccalaureate Professional
DEGREES GRANTED*
Undergraduate   2,411
Masters' 301
Ph.D. 56
TOTAL
2,768
Enrolment Totals
12,817    (87.1%)
1,897    (12.9%)    14,714
SUMMER SESSION (1963)
Teachers
3,498
Non-Teachers
1,876
Auditors
89
5,463
DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION
Courses for credit:
On the campus
819
Off the campus
723
By correspondence
1,219
2,761
Courses without credit:
Evening classes on the campus and
in Greater Vancouver
6,105
6,105
Conferences, short courses, seminars:
On the campus
5,763
Greater Vancouver
1,058
In the Province
5,257
12,078
Study-discussion:
Greater Vancouver
440
In the Province
1,069
[,509
Services:
Borrowers of film
1,231
Borrowers of records
817
Users of the Library
520
2,568
GRAND TOTAL
45,198
* The figures include the Congregations of May and October, 1964.
12 British Columbia. They were organized in fifteen centres, including
the campus and hospitals in Vancouver and Victoria. A doctor or a
team of two or three from the Faculty of Medicine sits down with
assembled doctors in an area, introduces briefly a number of new
developments in medicine over the past year, then throws the session
open to five hours of free discussion. The objective is to keep hardworking practitioners familiar with the advances that arise from the
tremendous volume of medical research.
The University in 1963-1964 granted degrees to 2,768 students.
Where do these graduates go? While the University of British
Columbia contributes a reasonable number of trained people to the
national and international scene, the statistics show that by far the
greatest number remain in this province and in Canada. The much-
discussed "brain drain" has been exaggerated. At the same time, the
developing provincial and national economies increase the prospect
of keeping more and more of our trained people at home. Growing
universities are creating a rising and insatiable demand for highly
qualified teachers. Opportunities for research at universities are
expanding, and can be expected to multiply and diversify as well in
government and industry, as the economies attain greater sophistication.
As to the so-called "brain-drain," the record of the Department
of Physics testifies to the exaggeration of the charges and to the
causes of whatever emigration does occur. Few think of Canada as
a country deeply involved in nuclear problems. Yet of the 84 Ph.D's
in physics (U.B.C.) who have settled into permanent occupations,
59 (7°%) have remained in Canada. Of these, 32 are teaching in
nineteen universities extending from Victoria to Newfoundland.
table 2
Geographical Origin of Students ig6j-64
Number
Percentage
13,164
89.5
British Columbia
9,738
66.2
Greater Vancouver and Lower Fraser Valley
1,106
7.5
Vancouver Island
2,320
15.8
Interior and Upper Coast
919
1       6.2
Other Canadian Provinces
631
I       4.3
Outside Canada (86 countries)
*3 There are 17 still in B.C. Of the 19 who went to the United States,
11 are engaged in American industries. But of the 59 in Canada,
only one is engaged in industry. That pattern will change dramatically over the years ahead as more and more industries oriented
towards science are established in Canada.
Another challenge to the often-heard claim of expatriation is
the distribution of the 196 engineering graduates of 1964. Of 148
(75.5%) who have settled into occupations, only 3 are employed
in American industry; 142 reside in Canada. Parenthetically, let us
note that British Columbia also draws extensively upon talent trained
outside the province. A recent study by Dean David M. Myers of
the Faculty of Applied Science reveals that, while 1,880 engineers
trained here have found employment elsewhere, there are 2,180
engineers at work in British Columbia with degrees from other
institutions.
And what has become of the estimated 34,000 living men and
women who graduated from the University during the last half
century? The locations of some are not known, but 26,529 have
provided their addresses to the Alumni Association and these furnish
a sampling large enough to give a reasonably accurate indication of
geographical distribution. It has long been our experience that
graduates who go to other countries are the most diligent in maintaining communication with us.
Of the 26,529 located graduates, 12,471 (47%) are living in
Greater Vancouver; 19,415 (73.1%) in British Columbia; 24,176
(91.1%) in Canada. In the United States are 1,348 (5.1%); in
other countries 1,005 (3-8%). It should be remembered that some
of those living outside Canada returned to their own countries after
obtaining degrees at the University of British Columbia. Tables 3
and 4 present these figures in graphic form.
Many benefits in addition to educated men and women accrue
to society from the University of British Columbia. The Library
is an excellent example of service rendered to the local community,
to the nation, and, indeed, far beyond the borders of Canada.
Though intended primarily for our own students and staff, it lends
books upon request to academic, public, and special libraries anywhere in the world. During 1963-1964, the Library mailed 1,215
volumes and 1,505 photocopies.
The facilities of the Library are available for a small fee to those
requiring material more specialized than is provided by public
14 TABLE 3
Geographical distribution, by percentages, of graduates by final
degrees, based upon known locations of 26,529 of an estimated
34,000 living graduates.
Degree
Number
%in
B.C.
%in
Canada
%in
U.S.
% in other
Countries
Bachelor of Arts
9,123
73
90
5.5
4.5
Bachelor of
Applied Science
3,164
65
90.4
5.2
4.4
Bachelor of Commerce
2,265
73.4
95
3.3
1.7
Bachelor of Law
1,196
85.1
96.3
1.2
2.5
Bachelor of Architecture
167
74.8
95.8
1.8
2.4
Bachelor of Education
2,411
92.3
97.4
.87
1.73
Bachelor of
Home Economics
573
70.3
93.2
5.2
1.6
Bachelor of
Physical Education
294
76.9
95
3.8
1.2
Bachelor of
Library Science
58
77.6
100
—
—
Bachelor  of Music
20
80
100
—
—
Bachelor of Science
in Agriculture
1,011
72.6
89
7
4
Bachelor of Science
1,087
79.3
92.5
2.5
5
Bachelor of Science
in Forestry
624
81.9
95.7
2.4
1.9
Bachelor of Science
in Nursing
513
72.1
93
3.7
3.3
Bachelor of Science
in Pharmacy
549
92.9
98.2
.72
1.08
Bachelor of Social Work
621
58
89.4
7.7
2.9
Doctor of Medicine
460
71
83.5
10.4
6.1
Master of Arts
951
57.5
80.9
14.3
4.8
15 Degree
Number
%in
B.C.
%in
Canada
%in
U.S.
% in other
Countries
Master of Architecture
15
60
93.3
6.7
—
Master of Applied Science
299
42.5
76
12.1
7.9
Master of
Business Administration
20
40
80
5
15
Master of Education
138
87.7
95.7
1.4
2.9
Master of Forestry
43
58.4
79
9.3
11.7
Master of Science
in Agriculture
190
52.6
80
12.1
7.9
Master of Science
255
43.9
71.4
14.9
13.7
Master of Physical
Education
9
77.7
88.8
11.2
—
Master of Science
in Pharmacy
3
66.6
100
—
—
Master of Social Work
282
58.2
86.5
8.5
5
Doctor of Philosophy
166
27.1
67.5
15.7
16.8
Doctor of Law
17
64.7
88
12
—
Doctor of Science
5
40
40
—
20
16 TABLE 4
Geographical distribution of graduates by final degrees, based upon known
locations of 26,529 of an estimated 34,000 living graduates.
Degree
Greater    Other
Vancouver   B.C.
Total       Other Total       United
B.C.      Canada      Canada      States     Others TOTAL
Bachelor of Arts
4,263
2,413
6,676
1,568
8,244
500
379
9,123
Bachelor of Applied Science
1,329
728
2,057
802
2,859
163
142
3,164
Bachelor of Commerce
1,312
363
1,675
473
2,148
74
43
2,265
Bachelor of Law
726
292
1,018
139
1,157
13
26
1,196
Bachelor of Architecture
94
31
125
35
160
3
4
167
Bachelor of Education
1,277
949
2,226
122
2,348
21
42
2,411
Bachelor of Home Economics
264
139
403
131
534
30
9
573
Bachelor of Physical Education
126
100
226
53
279
10
5
294
Bachelor of Library Science
34
11
45
13
58
58
Bachelor of Music
8
8
16
4
20
20
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 349
385
734
166
900
70
41
1,011
Bachelor of Science
560
308
868
137
1,005
27
55
1,087
Bachelor of Science in Forestry
247
264
511
86
597
15
12
624
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
234
126
360
117
477
19
17
513
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy
295
213
508
31
539
4
6
549
Bachelor of Social Work
251
109
360
195
555
48
18
621
Doctor of Medicine
209
118
327
57
384
48
28
460
Master of Arts
376
171
547
222
769
136
46
951
Master of Architecture
6
3
9
5
14
1
15
Master of Applied Science
99
28
127
100
227
45
27
299
Master of Business Admin.
8
—
8
8
16
1
3
20
Master of Education
70
51
121
11
132
2
4
138
Master of Forestry
15
10
25
9
34
4
5
43
Master of Science in Agriculture
53
47
100
52
152
23
15
190
Master of Science
89
23
112
70
182
38
35
255
Master of Physical Education
6
1
7
1
8
Master of Science in Pharmacy
1
1
2
1
3
—
3
Master of Social Work
133
31
164
80
244
24
14
282
Doctor of Philosophy
28
17
45
67
112
26
28
166
Doctor of Laws
7
4
11
4
15
2
17
Doctor of Science
2
—
2
2
4
5
12,471
6,944
19,415
4,671
24,176
1,348
1,005
26,529
47%
73%
91.1%   5.1%   3.8%
17 libraries; they grant incalculable assistance to small companies and
to commentators, and they even, on one notorious occasion, contributed to the knowledge of a gang who, having planned what became
a celebrated robbery of an armoured car, were thoughtfully organizing their "getaway" through study of the source-materials!
Our own staff designed the library of the B.C. Institute of Technology and chose its basic collection of books; all but one member
of the advisory staff are of the University of British Columbia. Our
staff gave advice to the architects of the library at Simon Fraser
University, and worked closely with that institution's librarian.
Furthermore, the Library has contributed several truck-loads of
books and periodicals to Simon Fraser.
The Library has under way a two-fold major expansion. An
addition costing $972,000 will anticipate an increase in the present
collection from 600,000 volumes to more than one million by 1970,
and will allow for construction of more carrells. The stock of books
must be doubled in order to supply the material that will be demanded by the growing numbers of graduate and professional
students whom we expect to welcome.
The P. A. Woodward Biomedical Library, which will serve the
Health Sciences Centre, has already opened as the first branch-
library on the campus. Similar specialized branches are planned for
the Forestry-Agriculture Complex and the new Engineering and
Music Buildings. These branch-libraries will not only bring books
to the centres of study; they will also, as another service to the community, be open to members of the relevant professions off the
campus.
The School of Librarianship is a model of co-operation among
the universities of Western Canada, for in training librarians for all
the western provinces it avoids wasteful duplication. Of the forty-
six students enrolled this year, about half came from the prairies,
where the academic and public libraries await their return and hope
to attract others.
The School of Social Work is a parallel case. The shortage of
social workers is familiar to every reader of newspapers across the
land. Our School is one of the oldest in Canada; it began work in
1935 and is to this day the only School of Social Work west of
Winnipeg, although another may appear soon at the University of
Alberta, Calgary. The opening of a sister-school comes at the right
time: the study of social work requires time in the field and the
18 number of social agencies to which apprentices can be attached in
any single area is limited.
During the past academic year the western universities agreed
that a single veterinary college should be established, at the University of Saskatchewan, primarily to serve the four provinces.
The University of British Columbia was one of eleven universities
represented in 1962 when the University Council on Education for
Public Responsibility was formed. This organization of Canadian
and American universities is aided by grants from the Fund for
Adult Education. Its major goal is "to bring the unique and special
resources of universities to bear on crucial problems of public policy,
so that universities may increasingly stimulate and participate in
educational activities that will result in the consideration and development of public policy on a more informed, responsible, and
widely-shared basis."
The University has shared in three principal activities of this kind
in British Columbia: with the B.C. School Trustees Association, it
holds seminars of two or three days to help trustees in the examination of their role and responsibilities, their opportunities and problems; with the B.C. Council of Women, it aids some 350 women
across the province in the acquisition of knowledge about Indian
problems; with municipal and regional governments, it has organized a series of conferences and seminars for the benefit of
community-planners.
The University's early entry into the field of computing science
has made available to business and government a centre to which
many complex problems may be referred. A number of enterprises
have learned through the Computing Centre how computers may
be applied to their operations and have since bought their own
computers. These include the B.C. Hydro and Power Authority and
two of the large industrial corporations in forestry. Our Computing
Centre has assisted traffic-studies conducted by the City of Vancouver in the calculations needed for the new Port Mann bridge
and has been similarly involved in several other developments in
Greater Vancouver.
The mere presence of the University guarantees that hundreds of
highly-skilled men and women in hundreds of fields are accessible
to business, to government, and to individuals for consultation and
recommendation. We do not know how many members of the
Faculty are engaged in consulting; we do know that the number is
19 large. At Stanford a Departmental Head recently observed that, "if
any full professor around here isn't engaged in consulting it must
be because something is wrong with him." That is an exaggeration;
even so, it is a measure of how vital the concentrated knowledge of
a university has become. I know of cases in which expert advice
from our professors has meant millions of dollars to specific industries in British Columbia.
Currently, a grant by the Canadian Council on Urban and
Regional Research is enabling Professor Walter Hardwick, of the
Department of Geography, to study the factors that cause certain
businesses to move in or out of the centre of a city. The results, in
the large, will broaden knowledge and be useful throughout the
country; specifically, they may be applied by public and private
bodies to the planning of the City of Vancouver downtown.
As an example of national service I cite the work of Professor
Frank Forward, until recently Head of the Department of Mining
and Metallurgy, of which he was a member for nearly thirty years.
Professor Forward won world-wide recognition, and a grateful endowment to the University, by evolving a radically new method of
extracting nickel and cobalt, which proved to be the making of the
Sherritt Gordon Mines Ltd. He was co-inventor of the process for
extraction of uranium used at Beaverlodge, Saskatchewan, and holds
some thirty patents on like processes; he is also author of the section
on hydro-metallurgy in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, an invitation
that is in itself an international tribute to his mastery of the field.
Professor Forward was called by the Federal Government: on leave
of absence for three years, he has been appointed Director of the
Scientific Secretariat to the Privy Council, a body charged with
giving advice to the Federal Cabinet on matters scientific.
Many members of the Faculty are asked to join Royal Commissions and other major investigating groups. This year, for instance,
Professor Harry B. Hawthorn, Head of the Department of Anthropology, was named Director of a national project to conduct research
in the participation of Indians in Canadian social and economic life.
This study was undertaken at the request of the Federal Minister
of Indian Affairs; the results, it is hoped, will help to guide national
policy in planning for the welfare of Canadian Indians.
Internationally, a team from the University of British Columbia
under the direction of Professor Leslie J. G. Wong of the Faculty
of Commerce is now in the final phase of a five-year intensive study
20 to provide Malaysia with a Malaysian civil service and to establish
faculties of commerce and business administration at the University
of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur and the University of Singapore. The
project has involved ten members of the Faculty; six hundred
Malaysians have enrolled for nine courses in accounting and business administration and seventy have been granted degrees with
commerce as a specialization. The programme was launched after
surveys conducted by Professor Wong in 1958 and i960, and was
underwritten up to $500,000 by the Government of Canada. When
the present phase ends in 1965, the University's men will be replaced at the Malaysian universities by nine Malaysians who have
completed post-graduate work in the Faculty of Commerce with
the aid of scholarships under the Colombo Plan. The Malaysian
programme was singled out in 1963 by the Congress of the Universities of the Commonwealth held in London, England, as an ideal
example of assistance in higher education to developing countries.
A briefer mission was undertaken by Vice-President G. Neil Perry,
who spent five months in Africa as economic adviser to the East
African Common Service Organization at the request of the United
Nations.
Dr. Jack C. Berry, Professor of Animal Science, is in India for a
year on behalf of the United Nations' Food and Agricultural Organization, working with the Indian government to improve the production of cattle.
Canada has no full equivalent to the United States Peace Corps.
But Canada does possess a vigorous and growing Canadian University Service Overseas, which the University of British Columbia
helped to found in 1961. Increasing contributions from the Federal
Government and from the public have enabled CUSO to train and
send overseas 130 volunteers, who are supported on their two-year
assignments by the governments of the hot countries and by private
agencies. This year sixteen young graduates, nine of whom took
their degrees in May 1964, were chosen to go to eight countries:
Jamaica, Tanganyika, Ghana, East Nigeria, Northern Rhodesia,
Grenada, Sarawak, and India. Two husband-and-wife teams comprise the group destined for Tanganyika, taking their skills in
forestry, nursing, teaching, and administration. There are nine other
teachers, as well as graduates in geology, civil engineering, and agriculture. All these talents will be of obvious benefit to the countries
in which they are applied, and the experience gained with CUSO
21 will be invaluable to these graduates in a world in which the most
distant country is only hours away.
I have mentioned examples of the enormous scope of the University's interest and contributions; yet this is only the beginning.
The accelerating complexity of modern society makes the University
each year more indispensable to that society. Old problems persist,
new and vexing problems appear: the wise use of leisure, an evergrowing population of older people, loyalty to huge and impersonal
corporate employers, growing urbanization, the production of food
and over-population, the permanent poor and the uses of wealth,
self-discipline in affluent countries. All these and many more are
the concern of universities. No other instrument of man has interests
so widely embracing and responsibilities so deeply felt. No other
institution offers so much hope for the future.
22 THE FACULTIES
THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
Members of the faculty, along with students, undergraduate
and graduate, continue to welcome improvements in facilities and
eagerly to await the consummation of the working drawings of a
new building that will house the Faculties of Agriculture and of
Forestry. During the past year the relocation of the outside laboratories was undertaken, to the special advantage of the Department
of Poultry Science; a field laboratory replaced the Agronomy and
Horticulture Barns; a sheep barn was constructed, thanks to the
generosity of the Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Woodward Foundation and
the B.C. Sheep Breeders' Association; services to improve drainage
and removal of waste were installed, which ameliorated conditions
for research.
The new building will without doubt foster a closer liaison between the Faculties of Agriculture and Forestry and will eliminate,
for students as well as members of the Faculty, the disadvantages
attendant upon scattered classrooms and laboratories.
The Faculty has persisted in its watch over a new curriculum
that aims at integration of its obligations in teaching and research.
In this connexion the Deans of Canadian Faculties of Agriculture
have met three times with representatives of the Canadian Department of Agriculture and the Division of Applied Biology of the
National Research Council to discuss agricultural education and
research; the benefits of these conferences have been mutual.
Conscious of its obligation to the province, the Faculty has collaborated with the Department of University Extension in holding
conferences and seminars in various locations; these conferences
have won the respect and so the support of officers of the provincial
and federal Departments of Agriculture. Independently, the Faculty
23 broke new ground in organizing instructive meetings, such as the
Turf Conference and the Light Horse Conference. Further, the
Faculty has assumed responsibility for the development of a page
in Country Life in British Columbia that will disseminate the views
of its members on problems concerning agriculture and the production of food.
The Faculty, along with scholars and senior students from the
United States, as well as other invited guests, derived memorable
satisfaction from the strikingly successful visit of Dr. Kenneth
Blaxter, of the Hannah Dairy Research Institute of the Agricultural
Research Council of Great Britain, whose tour of the Faculties
of Agriculture of Western Canada was sponsored jointly by the
National Research Council of Canada and the Nuffield Foundation
of Great Britain. In addition to participating in a two-day symposium
on education and research in Animal Science, he lectured, he gave
seminars, he engaged in informal discussion with senior students.
It is hoped that Dr. Blaxter has established a precedent for other
similar visits.
Dr. C. A. Rowles and Dr. T. L. Coulthard returned from their
respective assignments in Venezuela and Ghana. Dr. J. C. Berry
left for India after accepting a major task on behalf of the Food
and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. Dr. W. J.
Anderson, Professor of Agricultural Economics, resigned in order
to become the first Director of the Agricultural Economics Research
Council of Canada. Dr. J. F. Richards was appointed Assistant
Professor of Poultry Science, Dr. G. W. Eaton Assistant Professor
of Plant Science, Mrs. Audrey F. Gronlund Instructor in Animal
Science.
THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
A new era began for the Department of Electrical Engineering
February 3, 1964, when the Hector MacLeod Building was opened
in the presence of the Honourable Leslie R. Peterson, Minister of
Education. The design of the new quarters has already given satisfaction to students and staff. Dr. Hector John MacLeod, o.b.e., was
Professor of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering from 1936 to
1950, after which he served as Dean of the Faculty of Applied
Science until his retirement in 1953.
Study of the curriculum in Applied Science is still in progress
and substantial modifications have already been made to accom- modate recent developments in computing. In particular, the
changes being introduced in the School of Architecture are little
short of revolutionary and the School is becoming known as a centre
of experiment. Emphasis is moving in the direction of design and
aesthetics and away from the purely functional and technical aspects
of architecture.
At the annual Undergraduate Conference of Departments of
Chemical Engineering of the northwestern United States and
Canada, students from this Faculty carried off first and third prizes
for papers read. John P. Morgan (B.A. Sc. 1964) took the Essay
Prize awarded by the Chemical Institute of Canada. In Civil Engineering Dr. W. D. Finn received a fellowship from the Ford Foundation. Arthur Erickson, Associate Professor of Architecture, along
with his partner, Geoffrey Massey, won first prize in the competition
for the design of the initial buildings of Simon Fraser University.
After twenty-six years of continuous service to the University,
Professor J. F. Muir has retired as Head of the Department of Civil
Engineering; he will be succeeded by Dr. W. D. Finn, who will
spend 1964-1965 as Visiting Professor at the University of California. Dr. V. J. Okulitch, upon appointment as Dean of the Faculty
of Science, resigned the headship of the Department of Mining
and Geological Engineering, of which Dr. R. M. Thompson has
become Acting-Head. Professor W. O. Richmond has asked to be
relieved of his responsibilities as Head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering; he will continue, however, until a successor has
been found. Professor F. A. Forward has resigned as Head of the
Department of Metallurgy to accept appointment as Director of
the new Scientific Secretariat of the Privy Council (in Ottawa).
He has been granted leave of absence for three years and Professor
W. M. Armstrong has been named Head of the Department.
Dr. D. S. Scott, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, will
proceed directly from his leave of absence to the University of
Waterloo as Chairman of that institution's Department of Chemical
Engineering. Other resignations included F. Glen Furse (Instructor
in Mechanical Engineering), Dr. J. F. Szablya (Associate Professor
of Electrical Engineering), Margaret W. Jensen (Assistant Professor
of Nursing), Margaret E. Speirs (Instructor in Nursing). Jean
Moore, Instructor in Nursing, joined the Faculty in August and
died in February.
Wolfgang Gerson, Associate Professor of Architecture, spent the
25 year on leave, holding a Fellowship awarded by the Canada Council; Arthur Erickson, although officially on leave in connexion with
the design of Simon Fraser University, found time for some teaching. Mrs. Margaret Neylan (Instructor in Nursing) began her
year's leave in September. Others will enjoy leave of absence in
1964-1965: Dr. S. Cherry, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering;
Dr. A. D. Moore, Professor of Electrical Engineering, who as
National Research Council Fellow will take up residence in Cambridge; F. K. Bowers, Professor of Electrical Engineering, who has
been appointed Senior Visitor at the Mullard Radio-Astronomical
Observatory, Cambridge.
Two members of the School of Architecture, Lionel A. J. Thomas
(Assistant Professor) and Earl De Luca (Part-time Lecturer), have
been transferred to the Department of Fine Arts.
The following appointments will add to the strength of the
Faculty: Dr. D. A. Ratkowsky and Dr. R. M. R. Branion in Chemical Engineering; Dr. Lawrence Young (Associate Professor) and
Jack Douglas (Senior Instructor) in Electrical Engineering; Rose
Murakami (Instructor), Mrs. Jo-Ann Wood (Instructor), Carolyn
Larsen (Instructor), Sheila MacDonald (Part-time Lecturer) in
the School of Nursing.
THE FACULTY OF ARTS
S. N. F. Chant, a member of the Department of Psychology for
nearly twenty years and Dean of this Faculty for sixteen, retired
March 31, 1964. The author of the well-known Chant Report
persists in his service to the cause of education as Chairman of
the new Academic and Advisory Boards. Appropriate ceremonies
saluted the end of Dean Chant's long and fruitful term of office
at the University.
Dean Chant was succeeded as leader of the Faculty by Dr. K. D.
Naegele, Professor of Sociology.
It will be recalled that the Faculty of Science began its existence
as a separate entity July 1, 1963. Dean Naegele lost no time in
initiating examination of the problems faced by the Faculty of Arts
in its new form. Most significant, perhaps, is the thorough study of
the curriculum by a small committee under the Dean's own chairmanship. Aided by grants from the Fund for the Advancement of
Education (of the Ford Foundation) and the Koerner Foundation,
26 the committee has worked throughout the summer and hopes to
place its judgements and recommendations for change before the
full Faculty during the corning academic year.
A number of other investigations are in progress: the place of
Linguistics in the Faculty of Arts; the proper constitution of a
studio-programme in Fine Arts; the future of the Language Laboratory; the development of the Museum of Anthropology; the
academic relationship between this Faculty and the Faculty of
Education; the establishment of a statistical centre. In addition,
committees are debating the advisability of reducing the number of
exarninations given in December and of ehminating lectures on
Saturdays.
Religious Studies has now attained full departmental status, with
Dr. William Nicholls as Head. Economics and Political Science,
after a long life together as a single department, have agreed upon
harmonious separation.
The vitality of the departments of this Faculty is well illustrated
by innovations in the academic opportunities offered to students.
Among these are the new doctoral programmes approved for Economics and Political Science, German, and History; the replacement
of lectures by tutorials for students reading for Honours in History
and Philosophy; the intensification of instruction in Japanese and
Chinese at the elementary levels.
The Faculty of Arts remains the largest in the University; it is
also, and should be, by the very nature of its ideals, the most heterogeneous. Members of this Faculty teach and write on subjects as
diverse as Milton and automation, religion and Greek inscriptions,
African literature and Japanese pressure-groups, banking and disarmament, Goethe and the Polish parliament. Some there are whose
work does not appear in the normal printed form; rather, it consists
of plays directed, pictures painted, scores composed. The community
as a whole benefits intellectually from the creative efforts of the
Departments of Fine Arts, Music, and Theatre. There are others
whose names are not found in the University's Bibliography for
some years, for they are devoting themselves to the kind of long-
range scholarship that eventually finds its fulfilment in books. Such
men must not be subjected to the contemporary vulgar pressure to
publish.
A listing of the honours won by the students (undergraduate and
graduate) and staff of this Faculty would be long indeed and only
27 a few can be mentioned here. Professor Frederic H. Soward, after
forty-two years as a member of the Faculty, received the degree
LL.D. {honoris causa) from the University at the congregation of
May 1964. The same degree was conferred in the same month upon
Dr. Roy Daniells by Queen's University.
The following members of the Faculty were awarded grants or
fellowships by the Canada Council as aids to research: Dr. Shuiki
Kato and W. L. Holland (Asian Studies), Dr. C. W. Miller and
Dr. D. G. Stephens (English), Dr. R. C. Cragg and William S.
Hart (Fine Arts); Dr. Michael Batts and Dr. Marketa Goetz (German); Dr. John F. Bosher (History); Dr. Cyril Bryner (Slavonic
Studies); Mme. G. Bird (French); Dr. John Brockington and
Dr. Donald E. Soule (Theatre). Alexander Gazetas (Theatre) received a Fulbright Scholarship for study of painting and theatre
in Greece.
A further measure of the Faculty's reputation is attested by invitations to serve on various boards and commissions. Nowhere is
this more apparent than in the Department of Economics and
Political Science: Dr. John H. Young, Dr. Robert M. Will, and
Dr. Ronald A. Shearer were appointed to the staff of the Royal
Commission on Banking and Finance; Dr. Peter H. Pearse and Dr.
Robert M. Will to the staff of the Royal Commission on Taxation;
Dr. Robert M. Clark assisted the Ontario Committee on Taxation
and A. M. Moore was called to a Royal Commission in New
Brunswick. Bernard Blishen (Anthropology and Sociology) spent
the year as Director of Research for the Royal Commission on
Health Services. G. O. B. Davies (History and International Studies)
will be on leave in 1964-1965 as Executive Secretary of the Commission on the Future Financing of Higher Education in Canada.
The Governor-General's Medal was won by Patricia Mary Ellis,
who graduated in May with first-class honours in French.
The Faculty looks forward to completion of the new building
that is to house Commerce, the Social Sciences (Anthropology and
Sociology, Economics and Political Science), and Psychology. In
the meantime the School of Social Work has gratefully accepted
the invitation to move into the house on Marine Drive bequeathed
to the University by the late Ronald Graham. A notable milestone
in the life of Theatre was reached September 19, 1963, when the
new Frederic Wood Theatre, a graceful neighbour to the Lasserre
Building and the Faculty Club, was formally opened by President
28 Emeritus N. A. M. MacKenzie and Professor Emeritus F. G. C.
Wood.
A number of members of the Faculty were indebted to leaves of
absence for the opportunity of pursuing research in 1963-1964
without interruption:
B. C. Binning (Professor of Fine Arts).
Dr. L. L. Bongie (Associate Professor of French).
Dr. Liu Chun-jo (Associate Professor of Asian Studies).
Dr. Robert M. Clark (Professor of Economics and Political Science).
Dr. John Conway (Associate Professor of History).
Dr. D. T. Kenny (Professor of Psychology).
J. A. McDonald (Assistant Professor of Spanish).
Claude Treil (Assistant Professor of French).
Dr. W. J. Stankiewicz (Associate Professor of Economics and
Political Science).
Dr. Robert M. Will (Associate Professor of Economics and
Political Science).
Appointments in all ranks increased the size of the Faculty:
Dr. Ivan Avakumovic (Associate Professor of Economics and
Political Science).
Kay Belanger (Instructor in Social Work).
Padraig J. Blenkinsop (Instructor in French).
Ann C. Calver (Lecturer in Fine Arts).
Anne Carrow (Instructor in Home Economics).
Estelle Chave (Lecturer in Social Work).
Hsu-tu Chen (Assistant Professor of Asian Studies).
Dr. Kenneth D. Craig (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
A. L. Dartnell (Lecturer in Economics and Political Science).
Dr. Alcon G. Devries (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
Dr. Jean Elder (Instructor in History).
Heather Franklyn (Instructor in French).
Lorna Garrett (Field Instructor in Social Work).
Marion Gilroy (Assistant Professor of Librarianship).
Rene Goldman (Instructor in Asian Studies).
Harold Goodwin (Instructor in Social Work).
Philip J. Greven (Assistant Professor of History).
Dr. Robert Hare (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
A. P. Harshenin (Instructor in Slavonic Studies).
John K. Hodson (Lecturer in German).
Dr. Maw Lin Lee (Assistant Professor of Economics and
Political Science).
J. D. Legge (Visiting Professor of History).
George Lermer (Instructor in Economics and Political Science).
Dr. Arthur E. Link (Professor of Religious Studies).
Arne-Kjell Lund (Lecturer in German).
29 Ross McClelland (Instructor in Social Work).
Louis Medveczky (Lecturer in German).
Enzina Del Mercato (Instructor in Italian).
Dr. Julian Minghi (Assistant Professor of Geography).
John A. Munro (Instructor in History).
William Nicholls (Assistant Professor of Social Work).
Kenji Ogawa (Assistant Professor of Asian Studies).
Aram H. Ohanjanian (Lecturer in Slavonic Studies).
Ian Pratt (Assistant Technical Director in Theatre).
I. I. Poroy (Assistant Professor of Economics and Political Science)
Barry Pritchard (Lecturer in Creative Writing).
Dale Reubart (Assistant Professor of Music).
Dr. Giose Rimanelli (Visiting Professor of Italian).
George Rosenberg (Instructor in Fine Arts).
Fernando Sanchez (Instructor in Spanish).
Margaret Savage (Instructor in Geography).
Raouf Simaika (Assistant Professor of French).
Dr. Allen E. Sinel (Instructor in History).
Christopher W. Stacker (Instructor in History).
Dr. L. F. S. Upton (Assistant Professor of History).
Dr. R. C. Walton (Assistant Professor of History).
Dr. David Ward (Assistant Professor of Geography).
Gareth Williams (Lecturer in Slavonic Studies).
Eugene Wilson (Instructor in Music).
W. E. Wright (Instructor in Economics and Political Science).
The following members of the Faculty resigned their positions:
Ronald J. Baker (Associate Professor of English).
Dr. Robert L. Berner (Assistant Professor of English).
Charlotte Black (Professor of Home Economics and Director
of the School).
Dr. G. L. Bursill-Hall (Associate Professor of French).
Donald D. Cameron (Lecturer in English).
Dr. Liu Chun-jo (Associate Professor of Asian Studies).
Gerald W. Connaughty (Lecturer in English).
M. Fol (Instructor in French).
M. Gallostra (Visiting Lecturer in Spanish).
Simon Gray (Instructor in English).
Robert M. Hamilton (Associate Professor of Librarianship).
Dr. Colebrook Harris (Instructor in Geography).
Dr. John M. Headley (Assistant Professor of History).
Lionel Kearns (Lecturer in English).
C. Kershaw (Lecturer in French).
Milica KirkofF (Lecturer in Slavonic Studies).
Carol Kniebusch (Instructor in Music).
Dr. Maw Lin Lee (Assistant Professor of Economics and
Political Science).
30 George Lermer (Instructor in Economics and Political Science).
Doris Manning (Assistant Professor of Home Economics).
Ailsa McEachran (Assistant Professor of Home Economics).
Dr. H. Blair Neatby (Associate Professor of History).
Barry Pritchard (Lecturer in Creative Writing).
Dr. George Proctor (Assistant Professor of Music).
R. Ruberto (Lecturer in Italian).
Maurice C. Seymour (Assistant Professor of English).
Dr. Elizabeth B. Smith (Associate Professor of Home Economics).
James L. Smith (Instructor in English).
Leon Surette (Lecturer in English).
Miss R. Tsukimura (Instructor in Asian Studies).
Rose Vainstein (Honorary Lecturer in Librarianship).
Professor Frederic H. Soward, Director of International Studies
and for many years Head of the Department of History, and H. Ruth
Humphrey, Associate Professor of English, reached the age of
retirement.
THE FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The Faculty's programme for a Ph.D. in Business Administration
was finally revealed in the spring of 1964 and won acceptance in
principle first from the Faculty of Graduate Studies and then from
Senate. It is anticipated that candidates for the degree will be welcomed in September 1965.
The Malayan Project, in which members of the Faculty, at the
request of the Government of Canada, are assisting the Malaysian
Federation to establish programmes in business administration in
the Universities of Singapore and Kuala Lumpur, maintains satisfactory progress. During 1963-1964 L. G. Wong (Professor of
Finance), Director of the undertaking, profited from the collaboration of William Hughes (Associate Professor of Transportation and
Utilities), Harvey Babiak (Assistant Professor of Accounting), and
David Quirin (Assistant Professor of Finance).
In June 1964, Dean G. Neil Perry became President of the Association of Canadian Schools of Business. Philip H. White (Professor
of Finance) was retained by the New Brunswick Royal Commission
on Finance and Municipal Taxation. Three members of the Faculty
were granted Doctoral Fellowships by the Ford Foundation: P. A.
Lusztig (Assistant Professor of Finance), D. L. McDonald (Assistant Professor of Accounting), and J. M. Munro (Instructor in
Transportation and Utilities).
3i Resignations were submitted by William O. Perkett and Montrose S. Sommers (Assistant Professors of Marketing) and John A.
Crosse (Assistant Professor of Industrial Administration). David C.
Aird (Assistant Professor of Industrial Administration) was granted
leave of absence. Ralph R. Loffmark (Associate Professor of Finance), on leave as a candidate for the provincial legislature, not
only won his seat but was appointed Minister of Industrial Development and Trade and Commerce at Victoria. Additions to the
Faculty comprised Assistant Professors E. L. Affleck and G. Gorelik
in Accounting, Instructors W. C. Garriock (Industrial Administration) and J. M. Munro (Transportation and Utilities).
THE FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
With the present report the Faculty of Dentistry makes its debut
in these pages. In collaboration with Medicine, the Faculty has been
active in the planning of the clinical facilities that will be indispensable in the autumn of 1966. For the first class, eight students,
selected from seventy applicants, will begin their work in September 1964. A curriculum has been built and it is anticipated and
hoped that the attractions of its progressive features will reinforce
the Dean in his intensive search for staff.
Three new appointments bring the present academic strength
to four: Dr. Gilbert J. Parfitt, Dr. Richard H. Roydhouse, Dr.
Dan G. Middaugh.
Although the Faculty is unlikely to lack students, Dean Leung,
with the enthusiastic support of the B.C. Dental Association, has
addressed meetings in various parts of the province.
THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION
Since its birth in 1956 this Faculty has been confined to the
dismal slums at the foot of the old "Quad." The opening of the
new building a year ago brought relief to the students but not to
the Faculty. Thus the letting of the contracts for the completion of
two wings to the new building was the most welcome event of
1963-1964. These will be ready for occupancy in the autumn of
1964 and at last the staff will experience the luxury of sufficient and
appropriate offices and facilities.
The Elementary Division, led by its Director, Dr. F. Henry
32 Johnson, persists in its crusade to require potential teachers of the
elementary grades to obtain degrees before admission to the classroom. Progress is slow but Dr. Johnson and his staff are patient;
they are recommending that, from 1966, no interim teaching certificate be granted before completion of the third year of the programme leading to the Bachelor of Education. In the meantime,
students will be urged to proceed to the degree without interruption.
Simultaneously, the Division is encouraging an increase of academic
courses elected by students in the elementary programme.
Elsewhere in the Faculty programmes and courses are under constant examination, for the aim is to direct a steady flow of educated
and trained teachers into the schools of British Columbia.
The School of Physical Education and Recreation has been integrated into the Faculty without difficulty. It is worth noting that
Robert F. Osborne, Director of the School, travelled to Sao Paulo,
Brazil, in April as General Manager of Canada's Pan-American
Games team; and that Dr. Robert G. Hindmarch accompanied
Canada's Olympic ice-hockey team to Innsbruck in January as
manager.
During 1963-1964 the following joined or were appointed to the
Faculty:
Dr. D. E. Allison T. D. M. McKie
D. A. Bain Dr. J. S. Murray
Dr. Eric W. Bannister G. Pennington
Eric Broom Dr. L. Peter
S. G. Brough D. Lionel Pugh
Le Roi Daniels M. V. Ralston
Dr. J. Felty Miss Marilyn Russell
Mrs. Mary Forster Miss Esther Segal
Dr. R. Gray L. E. Wade
Dr. T. A. Howitz Brian Wightman
J. Johnson Mrs. C. I. Williams
G. A. Lewis J. Woodrow
D. Livingstone
A number of resignations were accepted: J. Dobereiner, Dr. F. E.
Ellis, Dr. D. Hambledon, Dr. J. M. Regal, Dr. A. Clingman, G.
Batho.
Research took members of the Faculty away on leaves of absence:
R. Leduc, Ruth McConnell, Dr. Vera MacKay, Neil Sutherland,
J. Reid Mitchell, Dr. David Kendall.
33 THE FACULTY OF FORESTRY
The new building planned for the Faculties of Agriculture and
Forestry will create greatly increased facilities for students, both
undergraduate and graduate, and for members of the staff, who
are even now studying the drawings and making their recommendations.
Dean T. G. Wright resigned as of June 30, 1964, and Dr. R. W.
Wellwood is again shouldering the administrative burden as Acting-
Dean. A. Van Slyke, of the University of New Brunswick, partially
replaced D. D. Munro, who spent his leave of absence at Oregon
State College studying for an advanced degree. Dr. S. Hagner, of
the Royal School of Forestry in Stockholm, found this campus a
pleasant base for his research and gave several lectures during the
first term.
THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
It has been recognized for some time that graduate work must
be stimulated in the major Canadian universities: as more and
more students seek higher education, so more and more professors
must be produced to undertake the teaching and the consequent
research. Thus it is with satisfaction but not surprise that the Faculty
of Graduate Studies reports an increase of students in almost all
categories. Furthermore, some Departments and Faculties were
heard of for the first time in connexion with doctoral work: candidates were accepted in Poultry Science, in Education, in History,
in Anthropology; doctoral programmes were approved in Geophysics, in German, in Commerce and Business Administration.
Activity in the Humanities and Social Sciences is particularly satisfying, for only two of these Departments, Classics and English, have
so far actually presented students for graduation with the Ph.D.
A similar zeal is evident at the level of the Master's degree:
twenty-four Departments or Faculties revised and, in most cases,
expanded their programmes.
Those with experience know that graduate work must be heavily
subsidized: the number of graduate students will grow in direct
ratio to the money poured into their support. This money must be
used to establish fellowships and to buy books and equipment. That
the Board of Governors are aware of this crucial fact is proved by
their allocation of more substantial funds to the support of the
34 Faculty. The sum available for open fellowships and scholarships
has been enlarged, as ambitious Departments are discovering. Once
again, the money made available to the Library for the purchase of
books indispensable to research has been increased.
The pursuit of research, not only by the students but especially
by the members of the Faculty, is a prerequisite for a reputable
Faculty of Graduate Studies. A glance at the bibliography compiled
in this volume ought to be reassuring. Here again, money is often a
sine qua non; here again, the Board of Governors have recognized
the principle. The grant for research, administered by a committee
under Dr. K. C. Mann to which applications are directed, has been
doubled to $200,000. Of these funds, 185 members of the Faculty
took advantage; the annual grant from the National Research Council made it possible to award 67 Associateships for research during
the summer.
The concern of the Board to foster graduate study is encouraging.
It would be folly, however, to pretend that the money so far voted
comes near to meeting the reasonable demand. Applications for
graduate fellowships and scholarships far outnumber the possible
awards; important materials cannot be purchased by the Library;
members of the Faculty engaged in research are hampered by lack
of funds. The University of British Columbia, which already possesses an enviable record, expects to maintain its position as the
post-graduate institution par excellence in this province and to
attain a reputation for research second to none in the country.
Scholars must be retained; others must be attracted. Graduate
students of superior talents, books and materials, grants for travel,
all must be within reach of the scholar. Money, money in amounts
inconceivable until now, will remove most of the existing barriers to
progress in scholarship. The Province of Ontario is now offering
some 1200 scholarships to graduate students. This is a goal that we
must meet and pass.
The newly formed Canadian Association of Graduate Schools,
which held its first meeting in Quebec in October 1963, should aid
the development of graduate study in Canada. The Association will
collaborate with the Canadian Universities Foundation and the
National Research Council in studying the financial demands of
graduate education and the requirements for admission to the
various Faculties of Graduate Studies in Canada, which should
benefit from the sharing of ideas that the Association envisages.
35 Four Institutes (Earth Sciences, Fisheries, Industrial Relations,
Oceanography) fall under the jurisdiction of this Faculty. Their
primary function is research and the training of graduate students.
Members of these Institutes are attached to other Departments and
the liaison thus formed is of reciprocal benefit. In Fisheries and
Oceanography, in particular, members do much travelling in the
furtherance of their research, of which tangible evidence may be
examined in the Bibliography.
At the end of the year the Dean of the Faculty, F. H. Soward,
retired after forty-two years of teaching and administration at the
University. He has been succeeded as Dean by Dr. Ian McTaggart
Cowan, Head of the Department of Zoology.
During the year Dr. Wilbert A. Clemens, the founder and first
Director of the Institute of Fisheries, died. Dr. P. M. Williams,
Assistant Professor of Chemical Oceanography, resigned; E. V.
Grill joined the staff in the same field and Dr. A. G. Lewis arrived
as Assistant Professor of Zoological Oceanography. D. A. Peregrine
came from Cambridge as Research Fellow in Oceanography for
one year. Dr. R. W. Stewart (Professor) and Dr. B. M. Bary (Associate Professor) took leaves of absence for part of the year, the
former as Visiting Professor at Harvard, the latter to work with
the National History Museum and National Institute of Oceanography in England. Dr. R. F. Scagel (Professor of Biological Oceanog-
graphy) was elected to a fellowship in the Royal Society of Canada.
THE FACULTY OF LAW
Three years ago the Faculty undertook to examine the curriculum, admissions, and standards, the first thorough review attempted
since the inception of a School of Law on this campus in 1945.
The result will be felt immediately by the students entering the
Faculty in September 1964.
This year the Faculty met the sharp rise in registration with
which other areas of the University are already familiar. This rise
emphasized the Faculty's need for additional space, without which
the graduate programme authorized three years ago can scarcely
be begun.
The death of Dr. M. M. Maclntyre in April removed the Faculty's
senior professor. Appreciable loss has been suffered by the resignations of Diana Priestly, Librarian and Lecturer, Associate Professor
36 S. M. Beck, and Professor A. W. R. Carrothers, who leaves to become Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Western
Ontario. While Professor C. B. Bourne sampled the atmosphere of
the Harvard Law School, the appointment of Assistant Professor
Maurice Carr partially compensated for his absence from this
Faculty.
The visit of Dr. Arthur Goodhart, until recently Master of University College, Oxford, and Visiting Professor at Harvard in 1963-
1964, was a notable and stimulating event.
THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE
The Health Sciences Centre has long been a dream of the Faculty
of Medicine. The magnificent gift of $3.5 million made by Mr. P. A.
Woodward brings the reality within sight, for the Federal Minister
of Health and the Government have increased their contributions to
$4 million and donations from the Nuffield and the Kresge Foundations will supply the balance required. The Rockefeller and the
John and Mary Markle Foundations had previously given assistance; thus four international Foundations will have shared in what
seemed, a few years ago, a formidable venture.
The Biomedical Library that will carry the name of the Mr.
and Mrs. P. A. Woodward Foundation has been under construction
and will open its doors in September 1964.
A first-rate Faculty of Medicine concentrates its attention upon
two major and inseparable activities: the training of doctors and
devotion to research. The success of the Faculty at the University
of British Columbia, and so the excellence of medical instruction,
may be judged by the many honours won by members of the staff,
honours far too numerous to mention here. It is worth recording,
however, that Dr. B. M. Fahrni and Dr. F. W. B. Hurlburt of the
Department of Medicine were elected to fellowships in the American College of Physicians; that Dr. C. E. McDonnell, Dr. H. W. L.
Buck, and Dr. T. W. Davis, of the same department, along with
Dr. C. W. Carpenter, Dr. James Dukelow, and Dr. Tom Mc-
Lachlin, of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, were
elected to fellowships in the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada; that Dr. J. A. Osborne, of the Department of
Medicine, was elected to a fellowship in the American College of
Cardiology; that Dr. A. R. M. Cairns (Medicine) and Dr. John A.
37 Birkbeck (Paediatrics) were awarded the highly coveted Markle
Scholarships; that Dr. D. O. Anderson (Medicine) received a
fellowship from the Canada Council; that Dr. Alexander Richman
(Psychiatry) has prepared a report for the Royal Commission on
Health Services.
Dr. B. Shallard (Clinical Instructor in Medicine), Dr. L. H. A. R.
Haggard (Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery), and Dr. G. C.
Johnston and Dr. G. C. Large (Clinical Instructors in Surgery)
reached the age of retirement. Death took Dr. J. W. Caldwell
(Clinical Instructor in Medicine).
The resignation of Dr. Bruce Graham as Head of the Department of Paediatrics was a serious loss but compensation was found
in the acquisition of Dr. Sydney Israel as his successor. Resignations
were submitted by Dr. F. A. Sreter (Assistant Professor of Anatomy), Dr. M. C. Weir (Instructor in Physiology), Dr. Thomas S.
Perrett (Clinical Instructor in Surgery), and Dr. J. A. McLean
(Clinical Associate Professor in Surgery). Leaves of absence were
enjoyed by Dr. Paris Constantinides (Professor of Anatomy), Dr.
George M. Ling (Associate Professor of Pharmacology), and Dr.
J. S. Tyhurst (Professor of Psychiatry).
Appointments included, in Anatomy, Dr. Carl T. Friz (Assistant
Professor); in Biochemistry, Dr. G. H. Dixon (Associate Professor),
Dr. P. D. Bragg (Assistant Professor); in Medicine, Dr. D. M.
Whitelaw (Professor), Dr. A. R. M. Cairns (Assistant Professor),
Instructors Dr. B. M. Carruthers and Dr. J. W. Morton, and
Clinical Instructors Dr. T. W. Davis, Dr. J. Dick, Dr. G. R. Gray,
Dr. J. H. Greig, Dr. J. W. Ibbott, Dr. D. M. M. Kavanagh-Gray,
Dr. J. D. Longley, Dr. C. E. McDonnell, Dr. G. I. Norton, Dr. F. A.
Olacke, Dr. D. Osoba, Dr. S. N. Stordy, and Dr. W. A. Young;
in Pathology, Dr. J. Newell (Clinical Assistant Professor) and, as
Clinical Instructors, Dr. David Hardwick, Dr. Ali Syed, and Dr.
John Bell; in Pharmacology, Dr. S. Eustace Douglas (Research
Associate); in Surgery, Dr. S. M. Drance (Associate Professor) and,
as Clinical Instructors, Dr. M. P. Banno, Dr. A. D. Courtemanche,
Dr. P. J. Doyle, Dr. G. S. Harris, Dr. A. C. Johnston, Dr. I. S.
Paterson, and Dr. J. A. Pratt-Johnson.
THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY
The first graduates of the new four-year programme took their
degrees in May 1964. Graduate study is now exercising an appeal
38 and three students are enrolled in courses leading to the Master's
degree. Considerable attention is being paid to continuing education
in pharmacy and collaboration with the Department of Continuing
Education in the Faculty of Medicine is anticipated.
George Wise, a member of the graduating class, won the E. L.
Woods Memorial Medal and Prize offered by the Canadian Foundation for the Advancement of Pharmacy for the best thesis based
on undergraduate research in Canadian Faculties of Pharmacy.
Michael Mezei (Instructor) resigned in order to complete his
doctoral degree at Oregon State University.
THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE
The Faculty of Science began its independent life July i, 1963,
with Dr. V. J. Okulitch as Acting-Dean. The adjective has now
been removed from the title.
The Curriculum Committee of the young Faculty, under the
chairmanship of Dr. Ross Stewart, worked so effectively that a new
curriculum, offering Honours, a single substantial major, and a
general course, has already been approved by Senate.
By October 1963, the Hebb Building had been finished and the
Department of Physics is now relishing its enlarged quarters; but
space for research, as is true of most departments, remains inadequate.
In the Department of Chemistry Dr. N. Bartlett and Dr. James
Trotter were elected to fellowships in both the Royal Institute of
Chemistry and the Chemical Institute of Canada. Dr. Charlotte
Froese (Associate Professor of Mathematics) won a P. Sloan Fellowship; Dr. Peter Bullen (Associate Professor of Mathematics) earned
a Senior Research Fellowship from the Canada Council. Dr. M.
Bloom (Professor of Physics) was granted a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. The University Medal was won by
A. S. Glass (first-class honours in Physics). Dr. Ian McT. Cowan,
who resigned his position as Head of the Department of Zoology
in order to accept appointment as Dean of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, became a member of the vitally important Academic Board
for Higher Education in British Columbia.
Dr. T. M. C. Taylor resigned in May as Head of the Department
of Biology and Botany. Dr. R. F. Scagel assumed his administrative
duties until the arrival of his successor, Dr. G. H. N. Towers. Dr.
39 Taylor will be absent on leave for a year. Dr. W. S. Hoar remains
Acting-Head of the Department of Zoology and Dr. K. C. Mc-
Taggart of the Department of Geology.
Dr. John Allardyce (Professor of Biology and Botany) retired.
The University mourned the deaths of Dr. W. A. Bryce (Professor
of Chemistry) and Dr. W. A. Clemens (Professor Emeritus of
Zoology, former Head of the Department). Resignations were tendered by W. H. Beck (Instructor in Biology and Botany), Dr. R. S.
Dickson and Dr. E. J. Wells (Instructors in Chemistry), Dr. A. J.
Surkan (Lecturer in Geophysics), Dr. R. C. Thompson (Assistant
Professor of Mathematics), Dr. S. A. Jennings and Dr. T. E. Hull
(Professors of Mathematics), N. Barton and Dr. J. Grindlay (Assistant Professors of Physics), Dr. W. N. Holmes (Associate Professor
of Zoology), and Dr. J. F. Eisenberg (Assistant Professor of
Zoology).
Several members of the Department of Mathematics were recipients of study-leave: Professors T. E. Hull, E. Leimanis, and
B. N. Moyls; Associate Professors Peter Bullen, Charlotte Froese,
and R. A. Restrepo. Other members of the Faculty were equally
fortunate: Dr. C. A. McDowell (Professor of Chemistry), Dr. A.
Rosenthal (Associate Professor of Chemistry), Dr. W. H. Mathews
(Professor of Geology), Dr. P. Rastall (Associate Professor of
Physics), Dr. R. W. Stewart (Professor of Physics), and Dr. M. D.
Udvardi and Dr. J. F. Bendell (Associate Professors of Zoology).
Resignations were more than balanced by appointments: in Bacteriology and Immunology, Dr. S. E. Juhasz as Assistant Professor;
in Chemistry, Dr. W. C. Lin as Associate Professor, Dr. J. R. Sams,
Dr. R. C. Thompson, Dr. L. D. Hall as Assistant Professors, and
Dr. R. S. Dickson and Dr. E. J. Wells as Instructors; in Geology,
Dr. A. J. Sinclair as Assistant Professor and G. L. Bell as Instructor;
in Mathematics, Dr. David Drake, Dr. Eberhard Gerlach, Dr.
William G. McWorter, Dr. Leif-Norman Patterson, Dr. K. M. Rao,
Dr. Earl Rogak, and Dr. Stephen Simons as Assistant Professors,
and S. D. R. Promislow as Instructor; in Physics, Dr. M. K. Crad-
dock, Dr. M. J. Crooks, Dr. J. M. McMillan, Dr. C. F. Schwerdt-
feger and Dr. N. H. Thyer as Assistant Professors, Dr. G. M. Bailey,
Dr. D. H. Goode, Dr. A. F. Rice, W. V. Olson, R. H. Parker, and
B. Ahlborn as Instructors; in Zoology, Dr. H. Dean Fisher as Associate Professor, and Dr. David T. Suzuki and Dr. David J. Randall
as Assistant Professors.
40 OTHER DEPARTMENTS OF
THE UNIVERSITY
THE OFFICE OF THE BURSAR AND TREASURER
Dr. e. d. macphee, Dean of Administration and Financial Affairs,
retired at the end of June 1963, to bring to a close a long term of
invaluable service to the University.
William White, the newly appointed Bursar and Treasurer, has
drawn up the appended tables. For nearly a decade the University
has lived with the steam-shovel and the crane; this uncomfortable
but necessary union will continue. The tables show the reader how
much capital has been expended on building since 1956 and the
source of that capital; and they anticipate the amount to be spent
for the same purpose over the next five years. The projection is both
striking and reassuring.
THE COMPUTING CENTRE
So rapid have been the advances made in the field of computing
that the IBM 1620 acquired in 1961 is already out of date and,
indeed, is being replaced by an IBM 7040. New fields will thus be
brought within reach of research on this campus and the staff is now
growing in order to keep pace with the demands of the more powerful computer. It is certain that more effective service will be at the
disposal of the many departments that use the computer.
Dr. T. E. Hull, Director of the Computing Centre, on leave at
the University of Toronto, resigned.
41 THE DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION
The Department has not lagged in its campaign to bring higher
education within reach of the general public and to stimulate the
community's interest in the University. Emphasis is being placed
upon courses carrying credit towards degrees and upon the development of a residential centre for special conferences. Nor should one
lose sight of the benefits and pleasures made available to the citizens
of the Lower Mainland in the series of lectures on various subjects
organized by this Department and given by members of the University's Faculty.
Resignations were submitted by Margaret Frederickson, Assistant
Supervisor in the Division of Liberal Education, John Grant, Supervisor of Programmes in Public Affairs, and John Wood, Supervisor
of Extra-mural Programmes for Credit. Q. H. Dibnar joined the
staff of the B.C. Work Study School, as did Dr. David Aird, already
a member of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration.
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
A year ago the Librarian hailed the substantial increase of funds
allocated to the Library by the Board of Governors. This year his
successor echoes the cry. There are other reasons for rejoicing. The
P. A. Woodward Biomedical Library, which will be ready by September 1964, is only the first of the branch libraries that must appear as the policy of decentralization is put into effect. Further,
study-areas will be drawn into the plans of all new academic buildings. Finally, work has already begun on an addition to the Library
that will bring relief to the crowded collection of books and to the
cramped readers.
The acceleration of research in the Humanities and Social
Sciences, the creation of novel areas of study, both graduate and
undergraduate, and the increase in the numbers of clients brought
tremendous pressure upon staff and facilities. More books circulated, more queries were answered, more services were used than
ever before. Behind the scenes, records were set in Acquisitions,
Serials, Binding, and Cataloguing. The chaotic appearance of the
reading rooms on a typical day is in one sense healthy; in another
it is ominous, for it reinforces the need for more space, more staff.
In December James Ranz, University Librarian, resigned to
return to his native Wyoming. Basil Stuart-Stubbs has been ap-
42 pointed in his place. Anne M. Smith, Assistant Librarian, retired
at the end of the year, after an extraordinarily faithful and productive career of thirty-three years at the Library.
Edith Stewart also retired and Audrey Malin died. Resignations
were outnumbered by appointments.
THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR
Once again, the story is one of inadequate space and a short-
handed staff. Yet the Registrar, with his devoted assistants, gathers
and organizes and files the academic data on every student; what
is more, a complete record is produced upon request in a matter of
minutes. The office is the nerve-centre of the University. Certain
of the statistics compiled by the Registrar are printed here in tabular
form.
43 Registration ig6j-64
(as of December 1, 1963)
FACULTY   OF   ARTS
Arts
MEN              WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
802              554
1356
Second Year
815              474
1289
Third Year
616              355
971
Fourth Year
525              258
783
TOTAL
2758           1641
4399
Music
First Year
21                21
42
Second Year
31                 24
55
Third Year
18                14
32
Fourth Year
10                 9
19
TOTAL
80                68
148
School of Home Economics
First Year
45
45
Second Year
1                67
68
Third Year
52
52
Fourth Year
49
49
TOTAL
1              213
214
School of Social Work
B.S.W.
49                50
99
M.S.W.
18                30
48
TOTAL
67                80
147
School of Librarianship
16                30
46
TOTAL IN FACULTY
2922           2032
4954
FACULTY
OF   SCIENCE
First Year
811              214
1025
Second Year
673                89
762
Third Year
453                54
507
Fourth Year
403                52
455
2340 409 2749 FACULTY   OF
APPLIED
SCIENCE
Engineering
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
287
2
289
Second Year
207
1
208
Third Year
206
206
Fourth Year
215
215
TOTAL
915
3
918
School of Architecture
First Year
31
2
33
Second Year
22
22
Third Year
3
1
4
Fourth Year
....
Fifth Year
19
19
TOTAL
75
3
78
School of Nursing
Basic Degree Programme
First Year
	
28
28
Second Year
	
25
25
Third Year
....
27
27
Fourth Year
	
22
22
Postbasic
First Year
11
11
Second Year
9
9
Third Year
....
6
6
TOTAL
....
128
128
Diploma Course
53
53
TOTAL
181
181
TOTAL IN FACULTY 990 187 1177
FACULTY   OF   AGRICULTURE
First Year
26
17
43
Second Year
48
10
58
Third Year
51
6
57
Fourth Year
39
3
42
Fifth Year
....
....
Occupational Course
5
....
5
TOTAL IN FACULTY 169 36 205
FACULTY   OF   LAW
First Year
105
3
108
Second Year
66
2
68
Third Year
64
3
67
TOTAL IN FACULTY 235 8 243 FACULTY   OF   PHARMACY
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
27
16
43
Second Year
33
11
44
Third Year
18
14
32
Fourth Year
31
9
40
TOTAL IN FACULTY 109 50 159
FACULTY   OF   MEDICINE
First Year
50
10
60
Second Year
56
5
61
Third Year
42
7
49
Fourth Year
38
5
43
TOTAL
186
27
213
School of
Rehabilitation Medicine
First Year
34
34
Second Year
....
19
19
Third Year
1
14
15
TOTAL
1
67
68
First Year
49
Second Year
50
Third Year
48
Fourth Year
42
TOTAL IN FACULTY 187 94 281
FACULTY   OF   FORESTRY
49
50
48
42
TOTAL IN FACULTY 189 .... 189
FACULTY   OF   EDUCATION
Elementary Division
First Year 60 359 419
Second Year 149 527 676
Third Year 93 308 401
Fourth Year 48 118 166
Graduates 52 29 81
TOTAL
402
1341
1743
Secondary Division
First Year
89
60
149
Second Year
155
63
218
Third Year
114
58
172
Fourth Year
92
34
126
Fifth Year
58
27
85
Graduates
130
66
196
Industrial Arts
51
51
689 308 997 School of
Physical Education
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
34
19
53
Second Year
60
10
70
Third Year
40
11
51
Fourth Year
36
4
40
TOTAL
170
44
214
TOTAL IN FACULTY 1261 1693 2954
FACULTY   OF   COMMERCE   AND   BUSINESS   ADMINISTRATION
First Year
224
5
229
Second Year
168
2
170
Third Year
115
3
118
Fourth Year
112
4
116
TOTAL IN FACULTY 619 14 633
FACULTY   OF   GRADUATE   STUDIES
Course leading to
Ph.D.
234
19
253
D.Ed.
4
2
6
M.A.
129
85
214
M.Sc.
127
24
151
M.A.Sc.
86
86
M.S.A.
24
1
25
M.F.
12
....
12
M.B.A.
26
	
26
M.P.E.
4
....
4
M.Ed.
8
5
13
M.S.P.
1
2
3
M.Arch.
	
	
Preliminary Year
105
21
126
TOTAL IN FACULTY
760
159
919
Unclassified
160
91
251
GRAND TOTAL
9941
4773
14,714
Extra-Sessional Classes
726
831
1557
Correspondence Courses
582
791
1373
Summer Session 1963
2755
2708
5463 Registration ig6j-64
COUNTRY   OF   CITIZENSHIP
North America
Europe
13176
Canada
10
Austria
3
Mexico
3
Belgium
190
United States
1
Czechoslovakia
17
Denmark
Central America
4
Eire (Ireland)
1
Bahamas
6
Estonia
3
Barbados
1
Finland
1
Costa Rica
17
France
4
Honduras., British
157
Germany — Western Zone
16
Jamaica
3
Germany — Eastern Zone
1
Salvador
436
Great Britain & N. Ireland
92
Trinidad
8
Greece
3
Other West Indies
32
Hungary
1
Iceland
South America
20
Italy
5
Argentina
2
Latvia
1
Bolivia
1
Luxembourg
1
British Guiana
81
Netherlands
3
Chile
15
Norway
1
Columbia
3
Poland
2
Paraguay
3
Portugal
2
Peru
1
Romania
4
Soviet Union
Asia
4
Spain
3
Ceylon
1
Sweden
56
China
8
Switzerland
62
Hong Kong
9
Yugoslavia
61
India
4
Indonesia
Africa
2
Iran
2
Egypt
1
Iraq
4
Ghana
2
Israel
5
Kenya
19
Japan
2
Nigeria
4
Korea
3
Sierra Leone
15
Malaya
4
Rhodesia, Nyasaland
15
Pakistan
1
S. Camaroons
1
Palestine
12
Union of South Africa
4
Philippines
3
Sarawak
Oceania
9
Singapore
21
Australia
1
Syria
12
New Zealand
5
Thailand
28
Stateless 1959-60 4734 207 160
1960-61 5314 198 177
THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Registration
Total
Arts Soc- Grad. Winter Summer Corr. ft GRAND
Session ft Sc. H.Ec. P.E. Mas. Ap. Sc. Nurs. Arch. Agric. Law Work Educ. Phar. For. Med. Com. lib. Rehab. Unclass. St. Sess. Year Sess. X-Sess. TOTAL
1920-21    687     ....     ....     -._    200      9     ....     51     ....     ....     ....     ....     ....     ....           15    962    1921     134    550    1646
1925-26   1083     ....     ....     ....    192     33     ....     51     ....     ....     57     ....     ....     ....           47   1463    1926     438    127    2028
1930-31    1494     ....     ....     ....    281     41     ....     50     ....     ....     71     ....     ....     ....          107   2044    1931     441    401    2886
1935-36   1211     ....     ....     .-    320     93     ....    67     ....     25     62     ....     ....     ....          160   1938    1936     566    223    2727
1940-41    1591     ....     ....     ....    452     72     ....    153     ....     26     71     ....     ....     ....          163   2528    1941     457    187    3172
1945-46   4034    148     ....     ....   1053    128     ....    376     87     67     47     ....     ....     ....    443         249   f6632    1946    2368    163    9163
1950-51   2951    185    139     ....    931     92     97    286    325    142    213    166    142     60    329         374   6432    1951     976    430    7838
1955-56   3040    168    123     ....    904    177     91    163    212     84    120    136    111    222    529         323   6403    1956    1810    1038    9251
1956-57   3284    170    101     ....   1032    216     94    153    231     77    905    142    129    209    572         384   7699    1957    3507   1649   12855
1957-58   3860    187    103     ....   1157    243    100    165    248     76   1125    119   *328    213    605    ....         457   8986    1958    3947   2406   15339
1958-59   4505    198    130     ....   1068    224    117    156    252     80   1445    125   »269    213    597         571   9950    1959    3828   2100   15878
....
1043
217
112
175
247
94
1826
141
•191
212
659    	
     624
10642
1960
4256
2196
17094
....
1051
198
87
179
240
102
2188
151
*183
203
635    	
     715
11621
1961
5156
2600
19377
1961-62   6412    207    195     ....    987    160     75    204    225    109   2376    139    181    210    617    31    19   124    679   12950    1962    5101   2701   20752
1962-63   6731    196    204    127    972    188     82    191    227    117   2415    147    186    208    616    36    35   176    744   13598    1963    5463   2941    22002
1963-64 ^ 2749    214    214    148    918    181     78    205    243     147    2740     159    189    213    633    W 68   2M    919   14714    1964 2930
f Includes Special Winter Session, 1946, Ex-Service Personnel.
* These figures include Sopron. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Degrees Conferred
Undergraduate
YEAR
B.A.
B.Sc.
B.H.E.   B.P.E.  B.Mus.  B.S.W.  B.A.Sc. B.Arch. B.S.N.  B.S.A.   LL.B.   B.S.P.
1956
Oct.
1957
Oct.
1959
Oct.
M.D.
B.S.F. B.Comm.   B.Ed.  B.L.S.  TOTAL
1951-55  2404
178
113
299
35
19
116
318
20
19
74   19
247   78   32   17
160   28
280
972
71
77
272
435
39
132
25
58
227
38
114
155
398
253
60
20
96
36
19
21
37
159
14
18
52
34
48
3
25
84
102
tG 48
S 1
E 10
19   1   45
13
G143
S 17
E 34
33   193
29   73   29   42
24
»63
89
G 25
S 27
E 36
20
41
3
* 5
12
G 25
S 32
E 60
May-Oct.
1916-20
205
	
11
216
1921-25
499
....
—
145
12
58
....
	
....
....
714
1926-30
882
-
....
...
151
25
40
....
....
...
....
....
...  1098
1931-35
1221
..
....
...
240
36
67
....
....
...
122
....
...  1686
1936-40
1268
..
....
...
319
38
102
....
	
	
158
...  1885
1941-45
1139
..
....
...
446
44
130
....
13
208
28
...  2008
1946-50
3321
198
66
330
1262
5  90
472
336
115
158
1001
240
...  7594
5949
865
272
905
Oct.
119
....
....
3
...
....
3
2
32
4
....
5
2
....
10
G151 1
S 7 \    .
E 25 J
363
1958
225
70
32
14
....
35
177
7
28
72
36
45
18
♦28
103
G 921
S 14 \     .
E 29 J
..  1025
388
1046
412
1960
Oct.
292   146   34   12
122
32
37   169   12
33   63   28   51
33
•20
116
G 8
S 35
E 37
24
1   49
G 12
20 S 44
E 86
....  1126
413
1961
Oct.
282   151
36
13
133   44
49   192
10
29
80
30
39
29
#24
95
G 7
S 32
E 51
1   23   3   60
16
G 12
S 45
E 85
1149
453
1962
Oct.
331   185   31
26
57   203   16
24   75   31   51
26
94
G 6
S 55
E 57
128   43
10
13   1   27
11
34
G 11
S 73
E 89
27  1302
1   460
1963     392   238   32   14   12   71   171   13
Oct.
30   60   12   49
26
117
G 10
S 76
E 92
163   49    1   18
2   24   4  26   10    1
29
G 17
S 95
E136
34  1449
581
t G - Graduate, S - Secondary, E - Elementary
* Sopron
YEAR
Oct.
1962
Oct.
1963
Oct.
Ph.D.
M.A.
M.Sc.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Degrees Conferred
Graduat*
M.A.Sc.       M.S.A.
M.B.A.
MiF.
M.S.W.
M.S.P.
M.Arch.       M.P.E.
M.Ed.
Total
Grad. ft
Und.rgr. CUMUL.
TOTAL Degrees TOTAL
12
21
20
16
25
25
29
34
39
29
10
31
14
17
29
19
29
28
19
15
21
24
100
122
32
147
11
39
148
150
553
607
731
May-Oct.
1916-20
11
1
«...
....
....
....    ....
....    ....
....
12
228
1921-25
46
....
15
4
....
....
....
....
....
65
779
1007
1926-30
	
71
....
8
7
....
....
....
....
....
86
1184
2191
1931-35
....
113
....
27
22
....
....
....
....
....
162
1848
4039
1936-40
....
145
	
31
27
....
....
....
....
204
2089
6128
1941-45
98
	
31
17
....
....
....
....
146
2154
8282
1946-50
4
241
....
79
51
....
....
48
....
....
422
8016
16298
1951-55
37
207
61
59
57
2
9
118
....
....
550
6499
22797
1956
12
22
11
10
5
1
1
18
....
....
80
945
23742
Oct.
7
17
10
5
1
....
....
2
....
....
42
314
24056
1957
4
15
10
8
6
1
1
17
....
....
62
967
25023
Oct.
7
9
12
4
2
....
2
2
....
3
41
404
25427
1958
8
26
18
12
4
3
8
....
3
82
1107
26534
Oct.
3
20
10
10
1
	
1
3
....
5
53
441
26975
1959
8
15
12
12
7
....
3
20
1
4
82
1128
28103
Oct.
9
10
23
12
....
1
....
1
8
64
476
28579
1960
18
22
25
13
5
4
4
13
1
8
113
1239
29818
Oct.
9
23
19
14
4
3
4
3
1
11
91
504
30322
1961
3
26
21
16
4
....
8
14
1
5
98
1247
31569
32122
1424   33546
34153
1597   35750
36481 Registration ^63-64
GEOGRAPHICAL  DISTRIBUTION  OF  STUDENTS
British Columbia (based on census divisions):
1) East Kootenay and Upper Columbia River 146
2) West Kootenay, Columbia River and Slocan Lake
519
3)  Okanagan, Similkameen, Kettle, and
Upper Shuswap Rivers
748
4) Lower Fraser Valley and Howe Sound
9738
5) Vancouver Island
1106
6)  North Thompson, Shuswap, Nicola, Chilcotin
South, Lillooet East, Bridge - Lillooet
329
7)  Bella Coola, Knight Inlet, Powell River
153
8)  Nechako - Fraser, Chilcotin North, Cariboo,
Skeena, Takla Lake
206
9) Atlin Lake, Skeena Coast, Queen Charlotte Islands
145
10) Northeast B.C.-Laird, Finlay-Parsnip, Beaton River
74
Alberta
333
Saskatchewan
135
Manitoba
77
Ontario
247
Quebec
63
New Brunswick
11
Nova Scotia
16
Prince Edward Island
3
Newfoundland
6
Yukon
19
Northwest Territories
9
Africa
25
Asia
213
British Isles
70
West Indies
94
Central America
17
Europe
40
Oceania
24
South America
21
United States
127 Educational Level
of Students Admitted for the First Time
in ig6j
University Entrance Standing
2325
British Columbia
13
Alberta
13
Saskatchewan
8
Manitoba
11
Ontario
3
1
Quebec
New Brunswick
1
Nova Scotia
1
Prince Edward Island
43
Non-Canadian
Senior Matriculation (Grade XIII,
588
British Columbia, full
574
British Columbia, partial
36
Alberta
35
Saskatchewan
14
Manitoba
43
Ontario
13
1
Quebec
Newfoundland
2
Nova Scotia
2
Prince Edward Island
42
Non-Canadian
73
66
6
120
One year, Victoria College
Two years, Victoria College
Three years, Victoria College
Undergraduates above
Senior Matriculation
384
Graduate
10
Non-Matriculation
Summary
2421
1423
University Entrance
Senior Matriculation
576
Above Senior Matriculation
10
(   Non-Matriculation THE   UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Honorary Degrees Conferred
YEAR
LL.D.
(honoris
causa)
D.Litt.
(honoris
causa)
D.Sc.
(honoris
causa)
Previous years
1930-34
1935-39
1940-44
1945-49
1950-54
1955 May
October
1956 May
October
1957 May
October
1958 May
July
September
October
1959 May
September
October
1960 May
October
1961 May
October
1962 May
October
1963 May
October
12
17
9
34
37
3
5
3
6
3
6
9
1
13
2
5
5
1
4
2
4
2
1
3
1
1
17
18
1
3
2
1
196
59
GRAND TOTAL
260 Sources of Capital Funds
April 1, 1956 - March 31, 1964
Government of the Province of British Columbia
Annual grants $8,000,000
Matching grants 7,500,000
Education Buildings, grants 1,952,729
B.C. Loans Acts and departmental funds 270,009    $17,722,738
Government of Canada
The Canada Council $3,854,651
Department of Health and Welfare 105,012 3,959,663
University of British Columbia
Development Fund 9,953,836
University of British Columbia
General revenues $1,052,483
Ancillary enterprises
(Food   and   Housing   services,   bookstore,
etc.), present and future net revenues 5.616,756        6,669,239
$38,305,476 Expenditure of Capital Funds
April 1, 1956 - March 31, 1964
Administration Building, addition
$     134,974
Agriculture
Beef-cattle research unit
Fur-animal laboratory
Plant Science, greenhouses
Poultry Science, facilities
Sheep laboratory
Education
Classrooms, laboratories, and offices
Association for Retarded Children,
29,663
17,666
13,308
18,125
12,437
$2,198,013
91,199
Biological Sciences, addition
1,271,400
Bookstore and bus stop, cafeteria
86,830
Brock Hall, addition
474,076
Buchanan Building  (Arts)
3,225,770
Buildings and Grounds, extension of offices
46,094
Central heating plant
695,585
Chemical Engineering
709,506
Chemistry
3,624,186
observation centre
7,140
2,205,153
Electrical Engineering
1,601,125
Faculty Club and University Social Centre
894,716
Fine Arts Centre
(Architecture, Fine Arts, and Theatre, addition
to scenery shop)
1,489,594
Institute of Fisheries, building for storage
8,506
International House
212,548
Library, additions
1,958,268 Medical Faculty and Pathology Building
(at Vancouver General Hospital)
Residences
Accommodation for single students
Family units: Wesbrook Villa
Family  units:   Toronto  Road
$6,432,708
57,000
243,042
Social and recreational facilities for students at
Acadia and Fort Camps, Agriculture Common
Room, Armoury, Home Economics and Home
Management House
189,494
Medical Sciences
2,876,300
Music, temporary accommodation
8,440
Ophthalmic Research Centre
(at Vancouver General Hospital)
49,845
Paediatrics, addition (at Vancouver General Hospital)
17,500
Panhellenie House
100,629
Personnel Services, addition to offices
17,696
Pharmacy, addition to Wesbrook Building
606,706
Physical Education, pavilion
21,472
Physics
1,521,294
Ponderosa Cafeteria
571,741
School of Rehabilitation
25,316
Sculpture, studio
11,483
Theological Colleges                                                       238,000        6,970,750
Thea Koerner House (Graduate Student Centre)
655,904
Totem Pole workshop and building for storage
9,455
War Memorial Gymnasium, additional facilities
97,103
Winter Sports Centre
534,793
Woodward Biomedical Library
954,961
Services and campus-development (including
agricultural and recreational field-development)
2,946,136
11,246 Teaching and Research, equipment, including books
for Library
475,088
Donations of capital funds earmarked and paid  to
Theological Colleges
$37,402,882
216,888
$37,619,770
Preliminary Planning
Expenditures of capital construction
Projects included  in  the five-year programme,
1964-1969:
Commerce and  Social  Sciences $   378,627
Dentistry, including expansion of basic
Medical Sciences 99,940
Engineering 4,468
Forestry-Agriculture complex 25,000 508,035
Preliminary Planning
Expenditures for special project:
Medical Sciences Centre 177,671
$38,305,476 Summary of Revenue and Expenditure
(Excluding Capital Additions to Endowment, Student Loan and Capital Development Funds)
April 1, 1963 —March 31, 1964
GENERAL FUNDS
1962-1963
TRUST FUNDS
I
For Specific Purposes
Endowment
I Teaching and
General
Purposes
%
Fellowships, Scholarships, Prizes and
Bursaries
i    i
Research
Province of British Columbia: grants
Government of Canada: grants
United States Government
Students' Fees
Gifts and grants (Commerce, Industry,
Associations, Foundations and
Individuals)
Miscellaneous
$ 8,945,074.00       49.2      $ 70,102.97
2,900,260.35        16.0        155,711.75
9,341.00
5,429,084.23        29.9
890,790.45
4.9
718,192.11
12,170.45
7.3      $    1,100.00
16.1 19,425.00
1.0
74.4       471,333.57
1.2 943.15
0.2      $    36,153.12 1.0
3.9       2,410,538.60       66.5
145,930.75 4.0
95.7        1,029,095.63        28.4
0.2 4,782.17 0.1
108,266.94     100.0
$ 9,052,430.09
38.8
$ 7,686,395
36.7
5,485,935.70
23.5
5,181,228
24.8
155,271.75
0.7
203,097
1.0
5,429,084.23
23.2
5,086,887
24.3
2,218,621.31
9.5
1,977,517
9.5
1,016,953.16
4.3
779,698
3.7
$18,165,209.03      100.0     $965,518.28      100.0     $492,801.72      100.0     $3,626,500.27      100.0     $108,266.94      100.0     $23,358,296.24      100.0     $20,914,822      100.0
EXPENDITURE
Academic Faculties and Departments
and Associated Academic Services
Administration
Service Departments and maintenance
General expenses
Athletics
Fellowships, scholarships, prizes,
and bursaries
Research
Miscellaneous
$14,119,913.64
77.7
$818,241.22
84.8
939,674.76
5.2
....
2,638,537.06
14.5
4,987.13
0.5
217,343.63
1.2
10,960.77
1.1
61,183.64
0.3
77,886.65
8.1
213,742.00
1.2
....
108,911.82
0.6
....
36,654.65
0.2
	
458,406.97        93.0
3,575,169.56       98.6
$ 11,651.04
10.8
$14,949,805.90
64.0
$13,123,514
62.7
939,674.76
4.0
855,076
4.1
2,643,524.19
11.3
2,424,803
11.6
228,304.40
1.0
283,914
1.4
139,070.29
0.6
154,869
.7
54,600.10
50.4
726,749.07
3.1
612,562
2.9
3,684,081.38
15.8
3,131,922
15.0
36,654.65
0.2
41,364
.2
$18,335,961.20      100.9     $912,075.77        94.5      $458,406.97        93.0     $3,575,169.56       98.6     $ 66,251.14       61.2     $23,347,864.64      100.0     $20,628,024       98.6
Reserves carried forward from 1962-1963
to meet expenditures in 1963-1964
Buildings, including furnishings, equipment,
and campus development
Trust funds for specific purposes carried
forward to meet expenditures in
1964-1965
Endowment Fund Income carried forward
to 1964-1965
(480,030.09)      (2.6)
309,277.92 1.7
695.00 0.1
52,747.51 5.4 34,394.75
7.0
51,330.71 1.4
42,015.80        38.8
(480,030.09) (2.1)
309,972.92 1.3
138,472.97 0.6
42,015.80 0.2
36,907 .2
222,285 1.1
27,606 .1
$18,165,209.03      100.0     $965,518.28      100.0     $492,801.72      100.0     $3,626,500.27      100.0     $108,266.94      100.0     $23,358,296.24      100.0      $20,914,822      100.0 Capital Fund: Goals
April 1, 1964 - March 31, 1969
GENERAL BUILDING PROJECTS
1964-1965    Commerce and Social Sciences $ 2,538,000
Education, additions 900,000
Dentistry*, including expansion of basic
Medical Sciences 4,116,000
Library, completion of stacks and reading space 972,000
1965-1966    Forestry-Agriculture complex 3,427,000
Music 1,585,000
1966-1967    Metallurgy 1,580,000
Biological Sciences, including
Oceanography and Fisheries 6,000,000
Alterations to Agriculture and Forestry
Buildings (for Mathematics and
Geography) 50,000
1967-1968    Engineering:     Common Block $   900,000
Civil Engineering 1,380,000
Mechanical  Engineering 1,400,000
Equipment 670,000        4,350,000
1968-1969    Social Work 525,000
Alterations to Engineering Building
(for Geology and Earth Sciences) 125.000
Other projects (five-year progressive
development):
Agriculture:  development of fields 500,000
Physical Education and Recreation,
development 250,000
General services and development
of campus 2,842,000
$29,760,000
SPECIAL PROJECT
1964-1969    Medical Sciences Centre:
Teaching Hospital $18,000,000 Capital Fund: Goals
April 1, 1964 - March 31, 1969
SOURCES   OF   FUNDS
GENERAL BUILDING PROJECTS
Government of the  Province of British Columbia $18,000,000
Combined universities (Simon Fraser and Victoria
University and University of British Columbia,
appeal for capital funds) 11,760,000
Special Project
(Medical Sciences Centre: Teaching Hospital)
$29,760,000
Government of the Province of British Columbia
$ 9,000,000
Government of Canada
4,000,000
*Gifts and grants
5,000,000
$18,000,000
*Gifts and grants received
Mr. P. A. Woodward $3,500,000
The Nuffield Foundation 150,000
U.B.C. Development Fund 39,150
The Kresge Foundation 20,000
$3,709,150 PEOPLE AND PLACES
The beginning of the year (July 1963) found the University
represented in London at the Ninth Quinquennial Congress of the
Universities of the Commonwealth by Chancellor Phyllis G. Ross,
President John B. Macdonald, President Emeritus N. A. M. MacKenzie and Professor Malcolm F. McGregor. It was comforting to
learn that Universities all over the Commonwealth face in common
the familiar problems arising from increasing applications for admission, the necessity of providing more buildings and added institutions, and the adjustment of existing programmes and the establishment of new ones to keep pace with constantly changing conditions. The Congress allowed delegates to share their own ideas
and to assimilate others.
No sooner were lectures under way than the new and beautifully
designed Frederic Wood Theatre was formally opened. Chancellor
Ross occupied the chair and, after remarks by Mrs. W. J. Dorrance,
British Columbia's representative on The Canada Council, and
Dean S. N. F. Chant, the Official Opening was conducted by President Emeritus N. A. M. MacKenzie and Professor Emeritus F. G. C.
Wood, whose name, so well known to graduates and especially to
members of the Players Club, the Theatre commemorates. The
audience then received with exhilaration the first performance of
Salad Days.
Two days later Chancellor Ross presided at the traditional Cairn
Ceremony, at which President Macdonald also spoke; it is a pity
that more undergraduates do not attend a function that is so hallowed by the University's history.
The finishing and occupation of an addition to the Physics Building (now to be called the Hennings Building in honour of Albert
59 Edward Hennings, Professor of Physics, 1919-1948) were recognized formally on October 25, when Chancellor Ross introduced President Macdonald, who delivered the major speech. Dr.
George M. Volkoff, Head of the Department, expressed his thanks
for the building, including in his words an appreciation of Thomas
Carlyle Hebb, Professor of Physics from 1916 to 1938, after whom
the building is named.
Professor Hebb's son, Dr. Malcolm H. Hebb, stayed on the campus to address the Autumn Congregation November 1 and to receive the degree Doctor of Science {honoris causa); his distinguished
colleague on the platform, James A. Baldwin, accepted the degree
Doctor of Letters {honoris causa).
Homecoming is always a time of rejoicing; in 1963 the pleasure
of the Faculty and Alirmni was increased when President Emeritus
N. A. M. MacKenzie joined the company of Great Trekkers.
Remembrance Day, November 11, was the occasion for the usual
impressive ceremony in the War Memorial Gymnasium. A memorial
service of a different kind was arranged in the Armoury November
26 after the tragic and premature death of President John Fitzgerald
Kennedy. Both Chancellor Ross and President Macdonald spoke in
words that deeply moved a hall overflowing with students and
members of the Faculty, many of whom were American.
The reception given by the Board of Governors for the Faculty
of the University fell this year on the afternoon of February 1. Two
days later, further tangible evidence of the advances being made
by the building programme became public when the Hector MacLeod Building for Electrical Engineering was opened by the
Honourable Leslie R. Peterson, Minister of Education, the principal
speaker. Dean Emeritus MacLeod, Professor of Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering from 1936 to 1950 and Dean of the Faculty
of Applied Science from 1950 to 1953, was in attendance to unveil
the plaque; Dr. Frank Noakes, Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering, participated, and President Macdonald sat in
the chair.
Another milestone in the topographical history of the University
was reached on February 28 when P. A. Woodward himself laid
the cornerstone of the Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Woodward Foundation
Biomedical Library.
Friday and Saturday, March 7 and 8, had been chosen for Open
House, when the University opened its doors to the public. Students,
60 Departments, and Faculties spent months in the planning of displays. The fine weather helped to swell the numbers of the visitors
and it is estimated that some 100,000 people toured the campus
scrutinizing the exhibits.
The Tri-Service Parade is an annual event. This year, on March
13 at a colourful ceremony in the Armoury, commissions and scrolls
were presented by the Lieutenant-Governor, Major-General the
Honourable George R. Pearkes, to sixty-six officers and officer-
cadets as tokens of their successful completion of training in the
three service-units on the Campus, the University Naval Training
Division, the Canadian Officers' Training Corps, and the Reserve
University Squadron R.C.A.F.
According to custom, May was set aside for the graduating classes.
The Reverend Dr. John A. Ross preached the sermon at the Baccalaureate Service and on the next two afternoons a filled Armoury
applauded as the Chancellor acknowledged the record numbers of
graduates who passed before her. Honorary degrees were conferred
upon Dean Frederic H. Soward (LL.D.), Cecil H. Green (D.Sc),
Dr. Arthur Dill Kelly (D.Sc). Dean Soward's address was received
with such enthusiasm Thursday that he was asked to repeat it on
the second day.
For those interested in listening to visiting authorities in many
fields of learning the fare at the University of British Columbia is
rich indeed. The Committee on Lecturers, under the chairmanship
of Dean F. H. Soward with Sir Ouvry Roberts as secretary, examines
scores of nominations from all divisions of the University. The
result is a plentiful and varied programme. In September Dr. Peter
Swann of Oxford lectured on "Four Centuries of Tradition and
Revolt: Chinese Painting 1350-1750." In October Dr. J. B. Cond-
liffe (Consulting Economist of the Stanford Research Institute)
discussed "Economic Development Contrasts: the Experience of
Australia and India" and Profesor Helmut Motekat turned to
"Bertoll-Brecht: the Playwright and His Theatre." The pace
quickened in November. Dr. R. T. Sussex (Professor of French at
the University of Canterbury in New Zealand), with aid from the
Canada Council and the Carnegie Foundation, devoted two meetings each to Australian Literature and French Literature. Dr. A. R.
Hibbs (Chief, Arms Control Study Group, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology) selected as his subject
"Space Technology:  the Threat and the Promise." Dr. Paul
61 Wheatley (Universities of Malaya and California) brought historical geography to the Campus: "Ecological Adaptation in Colonial
Malaya." Travelling under the auspices of the Canadian Association
of Physicists, Sir Harrie Massey (University College, London)
shared his views on atomic physics and space-research. Professor
Joseph Langland (University of Massachusetts) closed the term
with a lecture on American poetry.
W. S. Livingston, Professor of Political Science at the University
of Texas, led off the second term with a lecture ("The Future of
Government in the U.S.A.") and seminar. The Leon and Thea
Koerner Foundation sponsored two visitors: Dr. S. Van Valkenburg
(formerly Director of the Graduate School of Geography at Clark
University) and Dr. R. E. Boltz (Director of the Engineering Division, Case Institute of Technology). The former asked "Can Europe
Unite?"; the latter followed with "The Trends of Engineering Education in the U.S. and Some Challenges for the Future"; each man
participated in a seminar for graduate students and members of the
Faculty.
The Festival of the Contemporary Arts, organized by the Department of Fine Arts at the end of January, built its programme
around Dr. Marshall McLuhan (author and critic, Toronto), who
lectured twice and led a panel discussion ("Art Becomes Reality").
The H. R. MacMillan Lecture in forestry was entrusted to R.
Silversides, Forest Engineer with the Abiti Power and Paper Company: "Developments in Logging Mechanization in Eastern Canada." A fascinating and unusual hour was provided February 7 by
Dr. W. Starkie, who describes himself as author, lecturer, and
wanderer; he introduced a large audience to "The Gypsies of Spain
and Other Lands." The Garnett Sedgewick Memorial Lecture in
the middle of February was prepared by Dr. James G. McManaway
(of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, editor of The
Shakespeare Quarterly), who used the title "Shakespeare: A
Modern Man."
The Department of Classics entertained two guests in successive
weeks in February. The President of the Classical Association of
Canada, Dr. G. M. A. Grube (Professor of Classics and Head of
the Department, Trinity College, Toronto), visited this campus
partly under the auspices of The Canada Council and considered
"How the Ancients Looked at Literature." T. B. L. Webster (Professor of Greek, University College, London, and Assistant Director
62 of the Institute of Classical Studies) held the attention of a general
audience with "Menander: Production and Imagination," and
analysed "Alexandrian Poetry" for the benefit of graduate students
and Faculty.
Dr. R. Niklaus (Dean of Arts and Science and Professor of
French, University of Exeter), who lectured on "The Age of the
Enlightenment," shared Education Week with Dr. J. H. Holiday,
of Pierce College (California), who presented the topical subject
"Junior and Community Colleges: Fact and Fiction" to a Saturday-
evening audience, thanks to the collaboration of the Vancouver
Institute. A notable feature of Education Week was the ceremony
at which Chancellor Ross, on behalf of the Alma Mater Society,
handed suitably inscribed certificates to the two leading students of
each Faculty and School.
"Life and Death of Greenland Colony," by Professor Gwyn
Jones, archaeologist and writer, took students into a world far different from Vancouver in mid-March. Dr. Gilbert Bagnani (Professor
of Roman History at University College, Toronto), in "Lucullus
Dines," moved from Roman gourmets down to Edwardian times;
his discussion of Petronian textual criticism, before graduate students and Faculty, however, was just as gripping and far more
serious. The Department of German welcomed Dr. K. D. Bracher,
of Bonn University, whose paper bore the title "The German Discussion of the Second World War."
Mention has already been made of the visit of Dr. K. Blaxter (of
the Hannah Dairy Research Institute, Ayrshire, Scotland), whose
public lecture, "Physiological Effects of Cold," was a small part of
his activities, especially in the Faculty of Agriculture, on this campus.
Not all visitors arrive under the auspices of the University's Committee on Lectures. Departments and Faculties, undergraduate and
graduate clubs, academic, social, religious, political, are constantly
taking the initiative; thus it is seldom that a noon-hour lacks a
special lecturer, sometimes a visitor, sometimes a member of the
University's Faculty. These attractions at noon form in themselves
a seven-month festival of culture.
1964 is an Olympic year. If one recalls the place of the Olympic
Games in the life of the Greeks, it does not seem out of place to
notice these Games in an academic report. It is no longer a novelty
for the University's rowers to be found in Olympic company and
this year the rowing team will include John Larsen (Arts), Daryl
63 Sturdy (Education), Eldon Worobieff (Education), David Overton
(Arts), Roger Jackson (Physical Education), and George Hunger-
ford (Arts). Accompanying them will be David Miller (Commerce), who will compete in yachting. For Canada to send a field-
hockey team to the Olympic Games is an innovation. The University
learns with pleasure that the sixteen-man team includes four of her
students: John Young (Architecture), Lee Wright (Physical Education), Peter Buckland (Commerce), and Victor Warren (Education).
The zeal of the Alma Mater Society, led by the Students' Council,
was responsible for the erection of the Winter Sports Centre. Canada's ice-hockey team trained and played here, as did the University's; but its value is much broader, for the Centre offers pleasure
and exercise to all members and friends of the University.
64. ACADEMIC AWARDS
The Chancellor and the President congratulate leading students.
DEAN FREDERIC H. SOWARD RECEIVES AN HONORARY DEGREE
AT CONGREGATION IN MAY.
1 El
ft     Mil
1 KASPAR D. NAEGELE
Dean of the Faculty of Arts
V. J. OKULITCH
Dean of the Faculty of Science THE BEGINNING
Registration, Faculty of Arts THE OLD FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE m
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THE NEW FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE THE BEGINNING
Registration, Faculty of Education IAN MCTAGGART COWAN
Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies
THE OPENING OF THE FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Professor Emeritus Wood, Chancellor Phyllis Ross. Dorothy Somerset
(Theatre), President Emeritus Norman A. M. MacKenzie, John Mason
Brown   (Drama Critic, New York). I
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THE BLOOD DRIVE
Clare Choate, president, Vancouver Branch, Canadian Red Cross
Society, presents a plaque to the President and to Malcolm Scott,
president, Alma Mater Society.
THE FREDERIC LASSERRE BUILDING Re: Faculty and Staff Publications
To reduce file size, the publications section has not been included. For this information,
contact the University of British Columbia Archives.
1956 Main Mall
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1
Canada
Telephone: 604-822-5877
Fax: 604-822-9587

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