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Report of the President of the University of British Columbia for the academic year ending August 31st,… 1937

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Array r '
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
■ ■mwi—' ■"»■■*' *■■* ' ■"'■ "■   iii ii   mmmmmm wmmmmmm   m*m mm mmP «  ' ■ ■   Pi«"pj—J#rfp>"
FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR ENDING
AUGUST 31st.   1936.
f CONTENTS
Page
Report of the President;
Introduction. 7  1
New Appointment s  1
Promotions  2
iX0 S l^ilSLu XOilS «*«eo«4o***««*««*a44*o*ee«*«««**«*o««***** C,
Leaves of Absence .  2
Appointments necessitated by Leaves of Absence........ 2
Appointment following attainment of Retiral Age  2
Obituary...,  2
Honorary Degrees <>  3
Appointments of Mr0 Eric Wo Hamber  3
Twenty-first Anniversary  3
Special Bursary Fund  4
Full Restoration of Salaries in the Lower Brackets..., 4
Carnegie Art Teaching Set.,,  5
Outside Lectures and Exhibits  5
Maintenance of Buildings, Services and Equipment...... 5
Need for Museum Accommodation  6
Development of the Forest Area  6
Growth of the Unorganized Services  7
Limitation of Registration." •.  7
Increased Accommodation Required.  8
Physical Education.  8
University Extension.  9
Co-operative Undertakings with the Dominion and the
Provincial Departments of Government.,.  10
Report of the Registrar:
Registration.. I».. ,  11
Classification and enrolment of Students who are
not taking the full undergraduate oourses • 12
Nationalities of Students • 12
Geographical Distribution of Students.. ,. 12
Occupations of Parents ......o..,,.  13
Location of Graduates , • • •'  13
Comparative Statement of Attendance Session 1932-33
to 1935-36  14
Comparative Statement of Degrees Conferred 1933 to
1936  14
Honorary Degrees Conferred 1934 to 1936 • 14
Comparative Statement of Diplomas Issued 1933 to
193 6  15
Scholarships, Fellowships and Bursaries Awarded
to Graduates,•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••«•••• A"
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science... 18
Report of the Acting Dean of the Faculty of Applied
Science •«»•»»•••»•»••••••••••••••*'•••'••••••*•••••••••• <-y
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture........ 26
Report of the Dean of Women  28
Report of the Director of the Summer Session  31
Report of the University Extension Committee  35
Report of the Instructor in Physical Education for Men., 39
Report of the Instructor in Physical Education for Women 40
Report of the Medical Examiner to Students.  42
Report of the Public Health Supervisor  45
Report of the Officer Commanding Canadian Officers'
Training Corps, University of British Columbia »*
Cont inge nt,,,,,,,...,.....,o • * •«••,..»••»««•••»....... 4 7
Publications ,....,....  53 REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT
To the Board of Governors and
the Senate of
The University of British Columbia.
Ladies and Gentlemen:-
I have the honour to submit the following
report on the work of the University for the academic year
ending August 31, 1936:
New Appointments:
John No Finlayson, B.Sc, M.Sc (McGill), Dean of the Faculty
of Applied Science and Professor and Head of the Department
of Civil Engineering.
Clarence Otto Swanson, B.Sc, M.A.Se (Brit .Col.), Fh.D.#fis.),
Professor of Mineralogy and Petrography.
CE.Dolman, M.E.C.S. (England), M.B., B.S., M.R.CP. ,D.P.H.,
Ph.D.(London), Associate Professor of Bacteriology and
Preventive Medicine and Acting Head of the Department, and
Acting Head of the Department of Nursing and Health.
Robert England, MoA.(Queen's), Director, Department of University
Extension and Associate professor of Economics.
A.E.Foreman. B.So. (McGill), M.E.I.C, Associate Professor of
Civil Engineering,
Joseph E. Morsh, B.A.(Brit.Col.), Ph.D.(Johns Hopkins),
Lecturer in Philosophy.
Victor Dolmage, B.A., HuD»(Mass.), F.R.S.C, Lecturer in
Geology and Geography.
Miss Sylvia Thrupp, B.A., M.A.(Brit.Col.), Ph.D.(London),
Instructor in History.
Miss Dorothy Blakey, B.A., M.A.(Brit.Col.), Ph.D.(London),
Instructor in English.
Miss May L. Barclay, M.A. (Brit.Col.), Instructor in
Mathematics.
Stanley D.Lash, B.Sc, M.Sc (Univ. of London), Ph.D. (Univ.
odf Birmingham), A.MaloCE,, Instructor in Civil Engineering.
Maurice Van Vliet, Esq03 Instructor in Physical Education for Men.
Miss Gertrude E. Moore, Instructor in Physical Education for Women. 2.
Promotions:
Dr. Mo Y. Williams, Professor of Palaentology and Stratigraphy
to the Headship of the Department of Geology and Geography,
Dr. D. 0. Evans, Professor of French to the Headship of the
Department of Modern Languages.
Dr. Blythe A. Eagles from Associate Professor and Acting Head to
Professor and Head of the Department of Dairying.
Mr, T. Larsen from Associate Professor to Professor of English.
Mr. F. H. Soward from Associate Professor to Professor of History.
Mr. Lo Richardson from Associate Professor to Professor of
Mathematics.
Mc Tv7, H.  Gage from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor  of
Mathematics.
Mr. W. B. Bishop from Assistant to Instructor in Metallurgy.
Miss Miriam Ashton from Assistant to Instructor in Botany.
Resignations;
Dr. H. Vickers, Professor and Head of Department of Mechanical
and Electrical Engineering.
Dr. Ho F. G* Letson, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
A.E.Foreman, B.Sc, M.E.I.C., Associate Professor of Civil
Engineerings
Dr. H.W.Hill, Acting Head of the University Health Service,
Leaves of Absence:
Dto W* A. Carrothers, Professor of Economics, for one year from
September 1, 1935.
Dr. H.F.GoLetson, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering, for one year from September 1, 1935.
Dr. J0 Allen Harris, Research Assistant in Chemistry, for the
duration of the Legislative Assembly.
Appointments necessitated by leaves of absence:
DeWitt M. Taylor, Esq., B.S., for Dr. H.F.G.Letson.
John S. Aliely, Esq., for Dr0 W. A. Carrothers.
Appointment following attainment of Retiral Age:
UponTeaoTTing the retiral age in April, 1936, Mr. John Ridington,
Librarian, was appointed for a period of one year*
Obituary:
jlii the passing of Edward E, Jordan, Associate Professor of
Mathematics, the University suffered a distinct loss. Professor
Jordan was one of the original members of the Department of
Mathematics and, prior to his appointment to the University, was 3.
a member of the professorial staff of McGill University College.
Professor Jordan's, memory will long be cherished by his associates
for his sterling worth and for his unselfish devotion to duty.
Honorary Degrees:
The following Honorary Degrees were conferred on the occasion
of the twenty-first anniversary of the University:
Ernest Albert Cleveland, Esq., Chief Commissioner of the
Greater Vancouver Water District.
Harold Hibbert, Esq., Ph.D., D.Sc, F.R.S.C, Professor of
Industrial Chemistry, McGill University.
Sir Ernest MacMillan, B.A., Mus.Doc, F.R.C.M., F.R.C.O.,
Principal of the Toronto Conservatory of Music.
The Honourable Mr, Justice Denis Murphy, B.A., The Supreme
Court of the Province of British Columbia.
Robie Lewis Reid, 'Esq., K.C, F.R.S.C
David Thomson, Esq., B.A., Professor of Latin, Vice-President
Emeritus, University of Washington.
Appointments of Mr. Eric W. Hamber.
In the fall of 1935, a letter was received from the Deputy
Provincial Secretary in which he announced that His Honour the
Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council had appointed Mr. Eric Werge
Hamber, B.A., of Vancouver, a member of the Board of Governors
of The University of British Columbia for the unexpired term of
the Honourable Mr. Justice F. G. T. Lucas, deceased.  Early in
the following year, upon his appointment as Lieutenant-Governor
of the Province of British Columbia, Mr. Hamber tendered his
resignation as a member of the Board of Governors of the
University.
During his brief tenure of office as a member of the Board of
Governors, Mr. Hamber had shown himself wise in counsel and
broadly experienced in administrative affairs; and his associates
on the Board of Governors, while deeply regretting the necessity
for his resignation, were muoh gratified that, as Lieutenant-
Governor of the Province of British Columbia, their former
colleague was now the Visitor of the University.
Twenty-first Anniversary.
To celebrate the twenty-first anniversary of the founding of
the University of British Columbia, a special Congregation was
held on May 6, 1936. At this Congregation the Honorary Degree
of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa.was conferred on six distinguished 4.
citizens whose professional and public service entitled them to
this well-merited recognition.
An anniversary brochure was prepared by a Committee consisting of Professor T. Larsen (Chairman), Professor R. H. Clark
and Professor P. A. Boving.  This little booklet, which was
well illustrated, and which set out in concise and attractive
form the principal accomplishments of the University from the
time of its establishment, v/as widely circulated and did much
towards creating an informed opinion with respect to the growth
and development of the University during the twenty-one years
of its existence.
Aside from the activities which are common to Anniversary
celebrations, special mention should be made of the decision to
undertake the erection of a Students' Union Building,  This
Building, which is to be known as the Brock Memorial Building, is
to be erected in honour of the late Dean R.W. and Mrs. Brock. The
necessary work of organization was enthusiastically undertaken and
a substantial sum was raised as a beginning towards this worthy
project.
Special Bursary Fund.
During the period under review, the Board of Governors
made available for special bursaries the sum of $5,100.00. 118
applications were received by the Committee in charge. Of this
number, 73 were from junior or senior matriculants and only 45
were from students who had previously attended the University.
The awards, 59  in number, were made on the basis of scholarship
and financial need.  The amounts granted per student ranged from
#40.00 to $150.00.
From the experience of the past few years the Committee
is of the opinion that the awarding of special bursaries is
advisable, and that the sum available for the year covered by
this report was sufficient for the need.
Full Restoration of Salaries in the Lower Brackets.
In conformity with the decision of the Board of Governors
to follow the action of the Provincial Government with respect to
the restoration of the salaries of civil servants, all salaries
under $1,800.00 were restored as from April 1,1936. Salaries above
$1,800.00 were restored to the extent of $187e50 per annum. These
restorations were made possible by an increase of '$50,000.00 in
the legislative grant for the fiscal year 1936-37* Carnegie Art Teaching Set.
At the beginning of the academic year 1935-36, the
Carnegie Corporation of New York very generously presented the
University with an "Arts Teaching Equipment Set," intended to
create a wider and more understanding appreciation of the fine
arts. The gift includes almost two hundred volumes and eighteen
hundred reproductions; it aims to illustrate the history of art
from the earliest times to the present, not only in the fields of
painting, architecture, and statuary, but also in those of general
design and ornament. Although the collection is called a
"teaching set," it is not, in the narrow sense of the word, an
academic collection, but a treasury of beautiful things from all
lands and all ages, and the University will best fulfil the
intention of the donors by making it as accessible as possible
to all who wish to profit thereby.
Outside Lectures and Exhibits.
In January and February of 1936 five free lectures were
given at the University by Mr. Allard de Ridder, the conductor
of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, assisted by his daughter,
Miss Elsje de Ridder, and nineteen professional musicians. Half
of eaoh lecture-period was devoted to a discussion of musical
form, and half to demonstrations. The leotures were attended
not only by a large proportion of the Faculty and of the student
body but also by hundreds of the general public, many of whom
expressed the hope that such a series of illuminating leotures
would be given every year.
In late February and early March there was on view in
the University Library a most interesting and instructive
exhibition of posters, books, prints, and maps, all issued by
the Government of the United Kingdom and illustrating not only
the varied industries of the Empire but also many art treasures
and historical relics belonging to the British nation.  The
exhibition was arranged by the Library of the University, in
co-operation with His Majesty's Trade Commissioner in Vancouver
Maintenance of Buildings. Services and Equipment.
With the passing of time, the expenditure under this
heading is certain to increase if the heavy capital investment
is to be proteoted. TO date the University has been able, from
its regular budgeted funds, to meet the demands made upon it
for repairs and renewals; but the time has come, as recent 6.
experience has shown, when the University must build up a
sinking fund to meet a major breakdown such as occurred
this year in the services to the Theological Colleges; or as
confronts it in the Department of Botany, for example, where
the value of the equipment, according tothe statement by the
Head of the Department, is $10,000.00 less than it was in 1929.
Need for Museum Accommodation.
Special mention must be made of the lack of adequate
rnmseum-space. Every year the University would be presented with
many valuable objects if fireproof accommodation were available
to house theiru At present more than one rich, collection of
British Columbian material, - - flora, fauna, geological and
anthropological specimens of great scientific value - - , must be
declined through lack of space, and will thus in all probability
be lost to the University and to the Province,
Development of the Forest Area.
A part ofthe work of the Department of Forestry is the
development of the 105 acre University Forest. The main object in
this development is to provide a productive forest for laboratory
and demonstration purposes; not only for students in forestry and
other departmentss but also as a demonstration for the general
publico Other aims in mind are to provide a windbreak or shelter-
belt for the University Areaj, to enhance the aesthetic value of the
site, and to provide an area for nature and wild-life study, and
for reoreation.  In the systematic efforts which are being made
towards the attainment of these objectives, the students in
Forestry take as active a part as time permits.
As a result of the Young Men's Forestry Training Plan,
inaugurated by the Provincial Government in 1935$ a number of
young men were employed on the Forest for a period of three months.
Prior to this, a small crew of men from the Unemployment Relief
Camp cleared three aores in the Forest in preparation for planting.
The Young Men*s Forestry Training Plan was continued this year
on the same basis as that established in 1935" Growth of the Unorganized Services.
Every day the University receives many letters from
the general public asking for specific information in respect
to different branches of knowledge. With the expansion of the
industrial life of the province these requests have increased
enormously; and, with the growing interest in Adult Education,
there has been a marked increase in the number of enquiries concerning matters of general culture. The organization of a
Department of University Extension, and the consequent encouragement of the eager questioning spirit that alone preserves the
individual from mental stagnation, have added to the volume of
this form of service, and have resulted in additional demands
being made on the time of the professorial and clerical staffs.
Although this service is an excellent link between the
University and its constituents in all parts of the province, it
is becoming increasingly difficult to continue it on the present
basis. To answer many of these requests satisfactorily calls for
personal visits; others necessitate time-consuming laboratory
analyses, while still others require oonferenoes among several
members of the Faculty before authoritative replies can be given.
The University's efforts to keep this service within
reasonable limits have met with "little success. When a request
is made for information3 the enquirer expects a prompt and full
reply.  At present this is not always possible,since the task
of complying with these requests is not equally distributed as
among departments and individuals.  In some instances the
University is the only organization in the province which has
the personnel and the laboratory facilities necessary for the
solution of the problems presented.
If this increasing demand for information on "a
wide variety of subjects is to be met promptly and adequately,
without interfering with the teaching and research activities of
the professorial staff, the number of the teaching staff must
be increased, or else special provision must be made in certain
departments for a staff of junior assistants to take oare of
the routine part of this service.
Limitation of Registration.
In 1931, legislation was enaoted whereby the Board of
Governors was empowered to determine the number of students who
would be admitted to the University.  In the same year the
maximum registration in Arts and Science and in Agriculture was
fixed at 500, in Teacher Training at 60, and in First Year Nursing and Health at 15. The following year the Board of
Governors fixed the maximum number of Seoond Year Applied
Science students at 120.
At the meeting of the Board of Governors in September,
1935, the President directed the attention of the members to the
fact that the regulations governing the number of students
entering Applied Science had been disregarded and that instead
of registration being limited! to 120 students In Second Tear
Applied Science and 15 students in First Year Nursing and Health,
as the regulations required, 138 students had registered for
Second Year Applied Science and 30 for First Year Nursing, As
suoh a large increase had not been anticipated, and as no
regulations had been drawn up indicating how limitation was to be
made effective, the Board of Governors felt that every effort
should be made to provide accommodation for all who had registered.
This, however, could not be done without waiving certain
regulations of Senate which it is generally felt are essential
to the maintenance of academic standards. This increase in
registration so overcrowded classrooms and laboratories that the
Board of Governors instructed the President and Deans to prepare
and submit regulations to prevent the recurrence of such a
condition in the future.
Increased Accommodation Required.
Every year the problem of congestion becomes more and
more acute. In such circumstances the University organization -
academic and administrative - must carry a very considerable
overload, and in the long run its efficiency cannot but suffer.
When eighty students must be crowded into a classroom designed to
hold fifty, - when ten students must work at a laboratory table
planned for six,- when the student who wishes to study in the
Library can find no vacant seat,- when two or three or even more
instructors must interview students at the same time in one small
office,- a heavy handicap is imposed which hampers staff and
students alike, and which even the most efficient organization
cannot overcome. The result can be only one of two things: either
the percentage of failures will automatically Increase in the
final examinations, or else an excessive number of the students
who have been working under admitted disadvantages will have
to receive the dubious "benefit of the doubt.w
Physical Education.
In the fall of 1935^ the Students' Council requested the
Board of Governors to provide courses in physical education for all students who might wish to avail themselves of the
instruction offered. The request met with the approval of
the Governing Bodies of the University, and at the opening of
the second term a beginning was made on an experimental,
voluntary, and non-credit basis.
Two instructors were appointed, one for men and one
for women. Some minor alterations were made in the gymnasium;
a limited amount of equipment was purchased; a varied program
of activities was drawn up, and an effort was made to encourage
play and to induce a large number of students to take regular
physical exercise.
The response on the part of the students was most
gratifying; and, considering the many disabilities under which
the instructors laboured, a very satisfactory beginning was made
Coaching for the major sports is not one of the duties
of the instructors, since it is the policy of the University to
provide instruction in Physical Education for the many, rather
than to make special provision for the intensive training of
the few.
University Extension.
In the President's report for last year, reference was
made to the status of University Extension prior to 1935; to the
action of the Senate and of the Board of Governors in constituting a Department of University Extension; to the appointment of a Survey Committee to study the need for University
Extension in all parts of the Province; to the provision for the
appointment of a Director of this important branch of University
service, and to the gift from the Carnegie Corporation of New
York which made possible the survey and the two years of preparatory work.
During the period under review, the administrative work
of the Department of University Extension was conducted by a
Committee of two, of which Dr. 0. J. Todd was Executive Secretary,
As the result of the energy and the organizing ability of the
JSxecutive Secretary, combined with the active co-operation of the
professorial staff, the work of the year v/as highly satisfactory
from nearly every point of view. Although the program was
frankly experimental and planned as an extension of previous
undertakings rather than as a precedent for the future, the
experience gained was of great value as a guide for later developments . 10.
The report of the Executive Secretary will well
repay a careful reading by all v/ho are interested in the
development of University Extension.
Gratifying progress has been made in recent years in the
matter of establishing and extending co-operative arrangements
between the University and governmental departments and agencies,-
Dominion and Provincial.
Since 1932, the Dominion Department of Agriculture, through
its Cereal Division, has co-operated with the University in a research
project on soft milling wheats. For this investigation the Dominion
Department Of Agriculture made special grants totalling $3,250.00.
During the past two years the same Department, through its Division
of Forage Crops, granted $800o00 to the University to make possible
the continuance of the breeding work with alfalfa. As the result
of this co-operative action, much valuable research, material which
otherwise would have been lost was preserved for propagation and
multiplication.
Recently a number of new co-operative research projects
were undertaken. In several instances these were instituted after
they had been correlated and approved by an exeoutive committee
representing two or more of the Departments most directly concerned.
By means of conferences and annual reports, provision was made for
full and frequent interchange of information between the co-operating
bodies. A plan of operation and control was evolved which ensured
that these projects would be carefully supervised from the time of
their inception until the publication of the final results.
The establishment and the development of these various
oo-operative arrangements have proved of great value to our
students, since the material made available has been invaluable
for classroom instruction, for theses subjects, and for breeding
work. It is a pleasure to record that each year has witnessed a
broadening of the base of these agreements, until at the present
time in a number of instances the extent of these undertakings is
limited only by the amount of finances at the disposal of the
University.
Respectfully submitted,
LEONARD S. KLINCK,
President.
April 23. 1937. REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR
XX <
REGISTRATION:
Women  Men  Total
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE;
«c X1?S u    x6ar# •••((••••■•••*««•»•••
O800Qu       IBS!*.   «••••*•«••••••••»##
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE:
* *  • •
Second Year  ......
J. 11X2X1   x@€mt* «*o« •»••*•■*****««#•
U 0\ix MJtl  X©O.X» #«*•** »*»9»««*«««ftN
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE (NURSING):
First Year	
Second Year.
Third Year.......
Fourth Year	
J: XX Xtli    X © 9.X* ••*•«•*
• • * • a
e w • # •
• • • • <i
• * • ft o
• * *
• • *
• »
• •
*. *
• *
124
273
397
143
206
349
113
134
247
93
125
218
27
10
12
7
12
1211
130
130
82
82
54
54
54
54
320
27
10
7
68
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE:
First Year	
Decond iear,«.,,».««,,«*.,.»««*
xmru xear. •«.**.,»..«•»«,«•»..
Fourth Year,..«.,,.......,,*,.,
2
15
17
2
12
14
-
12
12
3
16
19
62
GRADUATES:
Arts and Science,	
Applied Science,
Agriculture.,
'••«•*•••
* • » « »
• «••••
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE	
4
92
126
•
16
16
2
16
18
29
33
62
160
62
TOTAL  1883 Classification and Enrolment of Students
who are not taking the full undergraduate
Courses:
Summer Session - Arts and Science (1935)
(Degree Course).......
Extra-Sessional Classes
(Degree Course)......,
Directed Reading Course
(Degree Course)	
Social Service
(Diploma Course)	
Public Health Nursing
(Diploma Course).....
Occupational Course in Agriculture
t Diploma Course),.»...
Evening Class in Botany.	
8
. e o
Women
Men
324
Total
140
464
23
82
105
35
55
90
4
21
25
25
-
25
1
13
4
15
5
28
Nationalities of Students:
British 1725; American 40', Belgian 1; Chinese 22; Danish 1;
Dutch 2; Finnish 4; French 3; German 4; Greek 1; Icelandic 1;
Italian 12; Japanese 24; Jewish 10; Lithuanian 1; Norwegian 7;
Polish 3; Roumanian 1; Russian 11; Serbian 1; Swedish 6;
Swiss 2; Ukranian 1.    -   Total 1883.
Geographical Distribution of Students:
(a) From Vancouver and Vicinity*  1219
(b) From Victoria „..»... 100
(c) From New Westminster.*,...........,...«•«««••*• 97
jdj From Other Provincial Points..  404
le] From Other Provinces. ........ • ..»*«« 4T-
(f) From Other Gountries... ....•■.......,,....«..*.. 16
TOTAL..  lbo3 13.
Occupations of parents:
The following occupations were most largely represented:-
Accountant 46; Agent 57; Broker 30; Business man 24;
Carpenter 19; Civil Service 23; Clergy 55',    Clerk 25;
Contractor 38; Dentist 19; Doctor 71; Engineer 108;
Farmer 54; Inspector 16; Insurance 30;  Lawyer 53;
Lumberman 25; Manager 43;  Merchant 102; Rancher 18;
R. R. employee 62; Salesman 30; Teachers 55;    University
Faculty 17;
(This does not include the Teacher Training Course).
Location of Graduates:
Number in,-
Vancouver 2029; Other parts of B.C. 1042; Other
Parts of Canada 207; United States of America 172;
British Isles 32; Australia 1; India 2; Africa 5;
France 1; South America 4; China 12; Japan 9;
Other Countries 9;
Number deceased  59
Number whose address is
unknown  318
Total   3902 Comparative Statement of Attendance
Sessions 1932-
-33 to 1935-36
Teacher
Total
.on
Arts and
Science
Applied
Science
Nursing
Agri
Training
Winter
Summer
Short
Grand
Sessi
culture
Course
Session
Session
Courses
Total
1932-
1933-
1934-
1935-
■33
•34
•35
■36
1265
1147
1238
1337
288
287
320
336
Compg
47
48
57
68
71
63
71
80
64
61
66
62
1739
1606
1652
1883
404
370
377
464
181
124
165
278
2324
2100
2294
2625
irative Statement of Degrees
Conferred - 1933 to 1936.
M.A.
B.A.Sc.
Grand
Year
B.A.
B.Com.
M.A.Se.
B.A.Sc.
Nursing
M.S.A.
B.S.A.
Total
Total
1933
19
4
215
46
22
5
8
3
44
5
7
4
12
1
331
64
3212
3276
1934
11
6
204
36
31
5
3
1
37
5
5
. 4
1
12
3
307
57
3583
3640
1935
14
12
196
45
23
5
8
57
5
13
2
19
1
332
68
3972
4040
1936
15
175
22
6
50
7
5
16
296
4336
LL.D.
Honorary
Degrees Conferred
1934
1935
1936
1
2
6
• < . .. Teacher
Training
Comparative Statement
of
Diplomas issued.
Public
Health
;     Nursing
Soci
Sen?
al
Occupational
Course in
Year
'ice  Agriculture
TOTALS
1933
58
13
1
4
5
-
75
6
1934
61
3
10
3
-
71
6
1935
65
1
15
3
7
3
86
8
1936
60
15
12
-
75
12 SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS AND BCJRSARIES AWARDED TO GRADUATES
During the year many scholarships, fellowships and bursaries have been won
by graduates of the University,  The following list does not include awards
which have been made in The University of British Columbia.
Name
Award
Value  Subject
Where Tenable
Armstrong,Gwendolyn
Bickerton,Jack M.
Black, Edgar C.
Carl, CClifford
Davidson, Donald
Halley, Elizabeth M.
Hart, Josephine F.L.
Hillary, Bertrand B.
Johnson, Arthur J.
Kane, George
MacLaurin, Donald J.
Neal, G.Morley
Niven, Ivan
Ormsby, Margaret A.
Graduate Scholarship $200.
Scholarship 750.
Teaching Fellowship 800.
Teaching Fellowship 400.
Senior Teaching Fellowship 600.
The I.O.D.E.Travelling
Scholarship 1400.
Teaching Fellowship
Teaching Fellowship 400.
Rhodes Scholarship (3 years)
400 pounds a year
Special Open Fellowship 500.
Cellulose Research 600.
National Research Council
Bursary 500.
Fellowship 500.
Graduate Scholarship 400.
History
Plant Pathology
General Physiology
Biology
History
Botany
Biology
Botany
History
English
Chemistry
Zoology
Mathematics
History
Clark University
Cornell University
Univ. of Toronto
Univ. of Toronto
Univ. of California
Cambr idge,England
Univ. of Toronto
Univ. of Toronto
Oxford University
Univ. of Toronto
Inst, of Paper Chemistry, Appleton, Wis.
Univ. of Toronto
Univ. of Chicago
Bryn Mawr.College SCHOLARSHIPS. FELLOWSHIPS AND BURSARIES AWARDED TO GRADUATES (continued)
Name
Award
Ridland, G.Carman
Snow, William E.
Wilson, Robert J.
Wood, Alexander J.
Value   Subject
Where Tenable
Teaching Fellowship
Graduate Fellowship
^400.
300.
Banting Research Foundation
Scholarship 1,000.
New Zealand Department of
Scientific and Industrial
Research Scholarship  100 pounds
Geology
Geology
Bacteriology &
Preventive
Medicine
Dairying
Princeton University
California Institute
of Technology
The University of
British Columbia
Dairy Research Inst3
Palmenton North,N.2
NOTE:  In many cases these scholarships and fellowships carry with them free tuition
or exemption from fees in addition to their monetary value.
Value cf scholarships, fellowships, and bursaries won bv our graduates in "
other Universities and in Institutes in 1936........,.*..*... .£ 15,211.00
Total value of scholarships, fellowships, and bursaries won by our
graduates in other Universities and in Institutes since the first
awards were made in 1917*..,••••••••*•.••••*«•••*•*...........*..,
526,225.00
Respectfully submitted,
STANLEY M. MATHEWS,
Registrar, 18.
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY
OF ARTS AND SCIENCE.
Loss of Professor E. E, Jordan
The session 1935-36 marked the passing of another of
the pioneers of higher education in British Columbia in the death
of Edward Elliott Jordan, Associate Professor of Mathematics, He
had been connected with the Department since its formation and
prior to that time had taught in McGill University College of
British Columbia.  "He had many admirable qualities- friendliness,
unfailing good humor, loyalty to truth and justice, devotion to
his students especially to those for whom the way was difficult.
For these he spent himself in hours given to their special needs
and that bravely up to a few days before his death. .. He was
worthy of the highest regard, a man of sound learning and firm
character, agreeable, helpful, one whom we shall, do well to
remember as an example of right living." (Faculty minute)»
Adult Education.
The academic year under review witnessed the greatest
effort made thus far to make the Province University-conscious. I
refer to the splendid work of the members of the staff in carrying
out an extensive programme of Adult Education made possible from
a portion of the Carnegie Grant. The lectures delivered throughout
various parts of the Province were of a diversified nature and
created a much greater interest in the work and achievements of
the University,
While this work was being carried on outside the University
the statistics show that not many classes missed their quotas of
leotures inasmuch, as there was a great deal of doubling-up of sections,
taking over the lectures of the absent instructors by other members
of the department or of other departments, increasing the number of
lectures after the instructor's return, and in one or two cases
engaging outside or former instructors. It must be noted, however,
that in spite of these arrangements there was a certain amount of
loss in the efficiency of the work within the University.
In connection with Adult Education, reference should be
made to the contributions of the members of the staff to the pro-
frammes of the Vanoouver Institute, the Natural History Society,
he B.C.Academy of Science, The Royal Astronomical Society and
various other organizations in close affiliation with the University. 19
Directed Reading Course.
As noted in the report for 1934-35 final approval of the
Directed Reading Courses was given too late to offer any course for
that year. In September 1935, it was decided to offer History 11(a)
Development and Problems of the British Commonwealth. The course
began with a registration of 106, of whom 78 wrote the final
examination. The median mark of these was 70.5% while only four '
failed. " During the session two essays and three shorter reports
were required of each student. Through the appointment of a special
assistant in the Library and the purchase of tfbOO worth of books
covering the course CD&-00 available from a special vote of the Board
of Governors, and $200 from the Summer Session Association - both
thankfully received), the Library was able to afford very efficient
service. Approximately 200 books were used for the course and the
total circulation amounted to 1095. Much credit is due the Department of History for the very efficient way this course was conducted
and for the very high initial standard achieved.
Extra-Sessional Classes.
Two classes were offered, viz., English 2 and Philosophy 9,
with a total registration of 105. The high standard of this work
continues.
With these classes and the Directed Reading Course, 175
students, mostly teachers throughout the Province, were able to
continue throughout the winter their studies for the B.A. or the
M.A. degree.
Accommodation.
The comments which follow are made not in any spirit of
criticism because of the lack of space or staff or equipment, but
merely as a matter of information to all who are interested in the
welfare and growth of the University.
There is, actually, a physical limit to the number of
students that can be accommodated, it is of course higher than the
efficiency limit. Bearing both these aspects in mind, the University
authorities at various times have fixed an upper limit. But as soon
as that limit was reached and exceeded, an effort was made to
accommodate the excess.  (The only exception, I believe, is in the
case of the Teacher Training Course- and even there a few extra
candidates had been admitted, particularly teachers of experience
from outside the Province who were required to take the Second
Term only.) 20.
At the present time (March, 1937) we have far exceeded
our most efficient limit and in certain cases the physical limi* also
has been reached. - The latter is particularly true in the case of
those subjects requiring laboratories.
The reports of-the Heads of Departments show the following:
Bacteriology - Honours laboratory has eight students - fitted for
four.   Large laboratory has to accommodate several
different classes of students simultaneously.
Botany
Chemistry -
Economics
Geology
Physics
About the most crowded Department in the institution-
not only for space but also for time. Each of the
three members of the Department has a lecture schedule
in excess of 25 hours per week in addition to laboratory preparations.  Biology 1 lecture sections
(Ap.Sc.100) are the largest science classes in the
University, being three times the number of students
accommodated in the ordinary lecture sections in the
other sciences.  "Thanks are tendered for the
improved acoustic conditions in Applied Science 100,"
Lockers are now plaoed in the halls. Too many students
working at the same desk for the best efficiency.
Accountancy - Accountancy 1 laboratory is conducted
in the Drafting Room of Applied Science under conditions of inconvenience: Accountancy 2 laboratory
in the Geological room on the quite low tables
designed for the distinct purpose of geological
investigation3
Statistics - "In Statistics 1 work was done in a
room holding 12 without overcrowding* A Statistics
laboratory has since been set up v/hich will hold 20,
But the class numbers 65 and the two sections into
which it is divided are very seriously overcrowded."
The trend towards Economic Geology during these days
of intensive mining development has produced almost
overwhelmingly large classes in Mineralogy and Petrography. The Petrography laboratory was built for a
maximum of nine students and twenty were enrolled
for 1935-36. "Not only were the students forced to
work in relays and in rooms not fitted for the use of
the microscope, but the individual attention so
badly needed was not always available."
Numbers must be limited to the maximum seating
capacity of the lecture rooms. 21.
Zoology  -  "Our illustrative material, much of which is the
best of museum material, is increasing in amount
steadily and not by any means slowly. Even now,
it would take several times the amount of space
there is available to arrange it in such a way that
even a reasonable amount of use might be made of
it. Much of it is not seen even by the students in
zoology except at the times that it is used to
illustrate a lecture or is brought out for laboratory
work. Much of it has to be kept locked up in a
corridor or in rooms that, in general, must be left
open to any one who may come along. If suitable
accommodation were available;, it would be an easy
matter to increase the museum material, as several
collectors would be pleased to give valuable
donations."
"There is a decided lack of room for sorting out,
classifying and labelling material to be placed on
the shelves or in cupboards."
Seminar and Reading rooms are greatly needed by the Departments
of the Humanities and the Social Sciences.
Equipment and Supplies,
During the last five or six years there has of necessity
been a reduction in the amounts available for Equipment and Supplies;
The Departments concerned were able to carry on by making use of
certain accumulated reserves. In some cases these reserves have
been nearly exhausted and "a collapse of the working equipment is
imminent •"
Certain Departments have been handicapped by the inadequacy
of their library grants.
Curriculum Changes,
During the session, and for some time previous, consideration was given to the establishment of Introductory Courses
in the four fields, the Biological Sciences, the Physioal Scienoes,
the Social Sciences, and the Humanities - these courses, in whole or
In part, to be required of all students. The question is still
(March 1937) under consideration.
The Dean of the Faculty wishes to reoord his appreciation
of the wholes-hearted cooperation of the various members of the
Faculty and particularly of the Heads.
Respeotfully submitted,
D. BUCHANAN,
Dean. 22.
REPORT OF THE_ ACTING DEAN OF THE
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE.
Developments in Forestry.
For some years, the Department of Forestry has been
handicapped by a curriculum which was confined largely to logging
engineering. This emphasis placed the course out of line with
those given in such schools as Toronto and California. Inadequate
staff and funds, together with a lack of a Head, resulted in a
small enrolment of students and insufficient contacts with the
industry.  This lack of contact in turn was reflected in little
practical interest being shown by the industry in the work of the
Department.
During the past three years Mr. Knapp has made creditable
efforts to remedy these conditions, as far as the above handicaps
permitted. In 1935-^6 Mr. Knapp continued his connection with the
Provincial Government's Young Men's Forestry Training Plan, giving
a course of leotures in the summer of 1936, and a group of young
men, under the plan, worked in the University forest, paid by the
Government. 12 men worked 1500 days, in 5 months, which at -A.75
per day, represents et benefit to the forest of $2,625.00.  The
University provided tools, and obtained a revenue of §450.90 from
the sale of products.
Improvements in Industrial-Contacts and interest are shown
by the following gifts in the Academic year 1935-3&.
Phil. Wilson Forestry Scholarship of $225.00, (later doubled)
by the B.C.Loggers'Association.
Set of Panels, valued at $200.00, by the B.C.Lumber and
Shingle Manufacturer's Association.
Loan of Tractor by the Caterpillar Co. and other minor gifts.
Continuation of special lectures in the Department by five
outside members of the Industry.
In February 1936, Mr0 Knapp submitted a very full report
to the Committee on Curriculum, giving the ideas and details of a
modern curriculum in Forestry. This was followed in June 1936.
by a memorandum to the President, by Acting Dean Turnbull, on the
outlook for the Department, accompanied by a statement of conditions
and data by Mr. Knapp.  During the summer of 193& correspondence
was entered into between the President and Dr. P. M. Borr, of
California, leading towards active participation by Dr. Borr in 23.
the problems involved and their solution. Thus, during the year,
the groundwork has been partially laid for a major development in
Forestry, and it should be possible, if funds are available, to
put the Department on a thoroughly efficient basis, in staff,
curriculum and contacts, within two.or three years, attracting a
much larger and better group of students to the service of this
Industry. Service to Industry is of course a major argument for
support to the University, and any such Improvements should be
publicized.
Extensions in Mining and Metallurgy.
The increased laboratory space, made available last year by
completing the upstairs flooring in the mining building and moving
the fire assay equipment upstairs, greatly relieved the former
congestion during the past session. During the summer of 1936
the old storeroom upstairs was removed and the chemical laboratory
downstairs was extended and remodelled, together with much minor
rearrangement and remodelling of the laboratories. The capacity
of the laboratories, without undue congestion, has been practically
doubled and will accommodate 20 students in each of the fourth and
fifth years, corresponding to the increased registration which has
arisen from present conditions in mining. A rock slicing saw,
installed in the mining building, together with the much publicized
polishing machine of the Department of Geology, both designed by
Mr. Gillies, and the microscopic equipment of the mining department,
constitute a valuable and modern research unit for both departments.
To meet the urgent demand of the mining industry for trained
mill superintendents, the undergraduate course cannot be sufficiently
specialized, and a graduate course in metallurgy will be required.
By further remodelling, space can be made in the mining building
to instal a graduate research laboratory in milling at a cost of
about |l,500.00, with a further §2,000.00 for equipment.  (Five
students in the present fourth year have announced their intention
of proceeding in Metallurgy next session, 1937-38, and the relative
importance of Metallurgy has been greatly increased by the developments of the last few years.)   Completion of this extension will
enable the department to put on a good graduate course im milling,
(ore dressing), with seme minor teaching assistance.
Studies looking toward revision of curriculum.
For forty years Universities have maintained a four year
curriculum in Applied Science, in spite of vast increases in
technical knowledge and its applications as well as great changes
in the human aspects of engineering.  To meet the pressing problems of this situation, the Faculty of Applied Science appointed
a standing committee on curriculum, which began its' studies in
1935-36. Progress must be slow and aimed at a well-considered goal, 24.
otherwise excessive dislocations and lack of,co-ordination with
other Universities would result? Many controversial questions
must be settled. Much discussion took place in committee, and
in February 1936, Mr0 Knapp brought down his report on the
Forestry section, the effects of which are indicated above
under "Developments in Forestry".  In March Mr. Cullwick brought
down a report on "Honours Course in Engineering Science," which
dealt with a fundamental type of course for the high grade type
of student, Mr. Ker brought down a report on "The teaching of
English in the Faculty of Applied Science", which suggested the
advisability of an informal type of course,  Some suggestions,
from a group of graduates, were also submitted.  Among the
questions discussed were those of limitation of enrollment and
the raising of examination standards. The concrete proposals
of the committee, for 1936-3"# session, were to interchange two
courses, Graphical Statics (Civil 4) and Descriptive Geometry
(Civil ll between the seoond and third years, and the introduction
of a summer essay in English for students entering the third year.
These were placed in the Calendar for 1936-37.  The former change
was for the purpose of lightening the congested seoond year
curriculum to some extent0
The committee has available a vast amount of research
and experience on these problems, particularly in the United
States, and it seems probable that progressive change will be
more effective than radical or hasty revolutionary changes, irt
spite of the advertising feature of the latter. The most pressing
problem at present is "probably to revise the foundational seoond
year, which involves questions of Limitation, Entrance and
Examination Standards, Reduction of Wastage, due to failures, and
the Selection of Fundamental Courses most suitable for an
efficient modern curriculum.
Limitation in Second Year Applied Science,
In September 1935, 136 qualified candidates registered
for admission to Applied Science. While calendar regulation
limited the number to 120, no method of selection was stated in
Calendar, Therefore the whole number were admitted. The
situation was taken care of by appointment of several temporary
assistants and by a rearrangement of the time table which allowed
for more sections. Overcrowding inevitably/ lowered teaching
efficiency, which was reflected by the complete failure of 28
students at Christmas, and of 20 more in the Spring examinations,
in spite of a less severe standard of failure which was applied
in considering examination results. In addition to the injurious
effect on the whole group, the effect is a tendenoy for a larger
number of repeaters to apply for registration in the following
session, making the difficulty cumulative. 25.
Easing and improvement of the second year curriculum will
tend to reduce the number of failures, but will of course also
tend toward progressive increase in congestion in the upper years,
which would have to be taken care of in turn. The job value to
the students, and the value to industry, of degrees in Applied
Science, suggest an increasing pressure on our facilities, in the
future, in the form of larger numbers of applicants for registration
in the second year. Raising the entrance standards seems opportune
at tho present time, and would be the most desirable and efficiency
increasing method of limitation provided our physical capacity is
not nevertheless exceeded.
General Considerations.
The appointments of a Dean and a Head of the Mechanical-
Electrical Department, with the improvements in Forestry and Mining,
have improved! the organization at the end of the year.  The reorganization of the Drawing courses, on a more fundamental basis,
is still a problem for consideration. Increase in physical capacity
is also needed, which will be helped by publicity of the type
of "Open House Day." It is suggested that this day be restored to
the management of the Engineering Society, because it takes about
300 students to put it on and this society is of just the right
enthusiasm and size to run it, whereas greater diffusion kills the
initiative and enthusiasm necessary to success.
In conclusion I, as acting-dean during the year, would like
to record my deep appreciation of the kindly help and support I
received from the President, the Deans and many members of the
other Faculties and of Senate, and of the office departments, and
finally of the loyal and wholehearted co-operation of the staff
and students in Applied Science, during the year, which reduced
internal friction to the vanishing point, and maintained a high
degree of morale, in spite of many difficulties.
Respectfully submitted,
J. M.  TURNBULL,
Acting-Dean. 26.
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY
OF AGRICULTURE.
The academic year ending August 31st v/as quite uneventful.
The general instructional work v/as carried out according to Calendar.
Research problems were undertaken by students as a port of thoir
instruction.  There wore no changes in general policy.
As in the previous year, the lands and equipment of tho
outside departments were operated under lease.   The lessees have
co-operated wholeheartedly in an endeavor to maintain the efficiency
of the instruction.  I know of no precedent on tho part of a -
public institution for operation and maintenance of teaching equipment by lease similar to the arrangements that are in effect in
The University of B.C.   Generally speaking, the lessees not only
maintain the teaching equipment, but assist in the preparation of
class materials as well.   While the arrangement cannot be said
to bo ideal, it has been nevertheless not too unsatisfactory.
Outside Services
During the year, 288 outside lectures were'given by
members of the staff.  In addition, approximately 7,200 letters
were written in connection with departmental business and in reply
to letters requesting information on specific topics. The requests
for information have in most cases been given prompt attention,
but some delay is still experienced in examining soil samples and
in diagnosing diseases in poultry. Scores of samples and.specimens
came to the Faculty within the year, and since we are not fully
manned and equipped for this type of service, a prompt reply is
not always possible.  Tho general policy with regard to such
services is a matter of curx'ent discussion.
Wheat and Alfalfa
Grants from the Dominion Experimental Farms were continued
for the wheat work and the alfalfa work. Tests on tho wheats have
been brought to a conclusion and the results will bo summarized
during the coming year.  The alfalfa work has been extended, and
it is hoped to obtain seed from the hay type and the pasture type
during the year.
But for the assistance rendered by the Dominion Department of Agriculture this progress would not have been possible.
Pullorum Testing
During the year approximately 100,000 blood samples from
poultry were tested for S. pullorum.  Under a co-operative arrange- 27.
ment v/ith tho Provincial Department of Agriculture and the
Health' of Animals Branch of the Dominion Department of Agriculture, the blood testing policy has become established. The
University provided the laboratory, the Dominion Government
provided the technical expert, and the Provincial and Dominion
Governments together collected the samples. Tho work is being
continued.
Animal Pathology Laboratory
During the early part of the summer a start was made
on the construction and equipment of a laboratory for Animal
Pathology.  This is planned not only for student instruction,
but for convenience in diagnostic work as well.
International Dairy Cattle Judging Competition
Tho Dairy Cattle Judging Team placed first in Ayrshires
and first in Hoisteins in koen competition with teams from the
Colleges of the Pacific North-West.  Mr. Frank Clark, of the
U.B.C. team, placed first in the contest and set a new high
record with 1463 points out of a possible 1600. -  The contest
has been running since 1918.
Equipment
Speaking generally, an important problem"in the Faculty
at present is the maintenance of supplies and equipment. Much of
the equipment is now from 10 to 20 years old, and careful attention
will have to be given to replacements in the near future.
Noon Hour
The extension of the noon period to one and a half
hours has been of little value to students in Agriculture.  The
general feeling seems to be that it simply delays the laboratory
periods by one half-hour and consequently delays completion of
the day's work by that period of time.
Donations
In memory of the late Tokaji      B.S.A. 1933, M.S.A.
1935, Mr. and Mrs. Uyeda and family        the Department with
a sum of money ($25.00) to be        for the purchase of books
for use of students specializing in     Nutrition,- the subject
in which Mr. Uyeda carried out his studies.  These books have
been ordered and are to be placed on a special shelf in tho
Horticultural Library.
Respectfully submitted,
F. M. CLEMENT,
Dean. 28.
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN
The most important development on the campus as far
as the women students were concerned during 1935-36 was the
appointment of an instructor in Physical Education.  The
interest shown by the women students, although the work was
not organized until the term was well advanced, fulfilled all
expectations.  It is greatly to be desired that this work—
at least one hour a week in the Gymnasium under the physioal
education instructor— should be made compulsory for at least
first year women.  The need for this is recognized in universities generally and compulsory courses, without credit, from
one to three hours a week, are required of the students of
the first year, frequently of the first and second years. Compulsory courses even without credit would be welcomed by the
women on our campus.
Already it has been demonstrated that not only does
the work in physical education add to the physical development
of the women students through the training in posture and the
development of health habits generally, but also, that it convinces the students of the desirability of inter-class and inter-
faculty games over those of the league games where the time and
the conditions under which they must play are arranged by a
committee with a complete disregard for time tables and examination
schedules and the general conditions of student life.
Another fact of interest was that In addition to their
two regular bursaries, each of $300.00 a year for four years,
the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire awarded from their
War Memorial Bursary Fund four special bursaries varying from
175.00 to $200.00 a year for four years.  These were awarded
on the basis of the financial need of the applicant, the war
record of the father and, especially, on the record of the student.
This was the largest number of bursaries awarded in any province.
The scholarship offered by the War Memorial Scholarship
Fund of the I.O.D.E. for 1935-36, open to both men and women, was
won by Elizabeth M. Halley, who is making an excellent record at
Cambridge. Miss Halley is an honor graduate in the department of
Botany and was for some time an assistant in this department in
our University. An interesting fact in connection with her early
education is that up to matriculation it was received entirely
from her mother, who is a graduate of Newnham College at which Miss
Halley is now working.
Aside from the introduction of Physical Education, no
significant change occurred in the opportunities for the women
students. Until the time when more courses are introduced for
which women students are asking, to prepare them for vocations
in which they are interested, such as Journalism, Physical 29.
Education, Library Service and Household Economics; until the
present surplus of women teachers is absorbed, and until a
residence is erected which will attract students who are
entering other universities because of their residence privileges,
it is not likely that there will be a noticeable increase in the
number of women students enrolled. Also, until the erection of
a Women's Union Building the activities of the women students
cannot be further extended nor brought under the much needed
further supervision. During the past year because of the congestion in the library the Women's Common Rooms in the Arts
Building were used almost entirely as study rooms.
The loans and bursaries offered by the University and
applied for at the beginning of the year, were not sufficient
to cover all the students whose ability, and ambition and willingness to work entitled them to whatever educational opportunities
they might desire, nor could they take care of the unexpected
situations which, in the case of many students, occurred during
the year. An attempt to meet these emergencies was made and
money, as well as clothing and text books, given or lent to
deserving students.
During the year money given and lent amounted to $2562,00,
an increase of approximately $1200.00 over the preoeding year. Of
this amount $1432.00 was reoeived from the Toronto Alumnae Association, Queen's Alumnae, the University Women's Club, the Faculty
Women's Club, the Lions Club, the Kappa Kappa Gamma and the
Gamma Phi Beta sororities, Kappa Alpha Theta Alumnae, the Provincial Chapter of the I.O.D.E., Mr. W. G. Murrin, Mrs. J.M.
Lefevre, and other sources including three anonymous gifts of
$300.00, $60.00 and $50.00.  $1037.00 was returned by students.
A number of women students earn their way through in
whole or in part, doing housework and caring for ohildren in
return for room and board during the winter and working during
the summer and Christmas vacations. Among the reports on work
whioh indicate the determination of some students to continue
their education was that of a young woman who having worked for
wages on a dairy farm on Lulu Island during the summer was able
to continue her living there in return for services which included getting up at 4:30 in the morning to milk and "do the
chores" before setting out on her journey to the University.
Another report on the summer tells of work during July and
August in a bag faotory, turning bags at the rate of 1000
a half hour for $10.00 a week.
In the spring of 1935 an organization was formed of
especial interest to women students. Its object "to uphold the
ideals of the University of British Columbia and to further a
spirit of friendliness among the women of this University," 30.
was steadfastly upheld during the year under review. This
organization, known as Phrateres, aims to get into its membership the unsocial and the socially inexperienced girls, and
to bring them together under conditions which will break down
the inhibitions caused by timidity, supersensitiveness, lack
of money and other causes, and which, as a consequenoe, will
help to prepare them for the experiences they will meet after
leaving college. The fees are kept at the minimum —$2.00 a
year — and provision is made without embarrassment to the
students concerned, for membership for those who cannot afford
even this small amount. Meetings are held in the afternoon
between lectures and dinner in a room near the campus, and
membership is open to all who apply. The new organization
thus offers to all students the finer features of the fraternities
without the less desirable.
Respectfully submitted.,
MARY L. BOLLERT,
Dean of Women. 31.
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF
THE SUMMER SESSION.
The seventeenth summer session--of The University of
British Columbia opened on Monday, July 6th, 1936 and closed
on Friday, August 21st.  The  total enrolment for the session
Was 566 as compared with 463 in 1935: of these (and this is
true of both years) less than three per cent, came from outside the bounds of British Columbia. The increased enrolment
was met by an increase in the number of courses from 23 in the
session of 1935 to 28. The policy of bringing in outside
lecturers of national and international reputation v/as continued and extended, the visitors coming from the Universities
of Texas, California, Indiana, Queen's and Toronto,  In 1935
the University had made provision for a course of public lectures
largely, but not wholly, given by visiting professors on subjects
of general interest.  In 1936 this course v/as replaced by a
oourse in Musical Appreciation and Choral work under Professor
Ira Dilworth, Director of the Bach Choir.  As in each case
there has been general approval, it would be well to consider
the possibility of offering both courses in 1937 instead of
selecting one or the other.  The University administration in
making financial arrangements for the session had been sanguine
in~Its estimates of attendance and consequent revenue and there
may well have been fear that it had been too sanguine.  The
event however showed that its estimates had fallen short of the
reality.
Registration by Years
(presented
for purpos
es of
comparison).
.. .
	
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
Partial        -32
±4
17
10
12
9
2i
First Year     165
164
109
84
88
98
116
Seoond Year    136
134
125
98
118
143
202
Third Year      46
3t
46
52
47
66
71
Fourth Year     28
36
50
48
50
52
43
Graduates       49
52
59
73
65
95
110
Social Service
-4
a***
5
  ; * -
1
TOTAL         1%
'56?: 32.
Tho following table shows the oourses offered with the
instructor and the registration in each course:
COURSES,
BIOLOGY 1(a) ....
CHEMISTRY 1
CHEMISTRY 2
ECONOMICS i
ECONOMICS 6
ECONOMICS 7
EDUCATION 1
EDUCATION 21
ENGLISH
ENGLISH
ENGLISH
ENGLISH
FRENCH
FRENCH
FRENCH
2
5
17
19(b
1
2
3(c)
GEOGRAPHY 1
GERMAN, BEGINNERS
GERMAN
HISTORY
HISTORY
HISTORY
LATIN
LATIN
LATIN
1
4
18
Ka)
2(a)
4
.«
MATHEMATICS 1(a)
MATHEMATICS l(b)
MATHEMATICS l(c)
MATHEMATICS 10
PHILOSOPHY 1(a)
PHILOSOPHY 1(b)
PHILOSOPHY 7
ENROLMENT, AND INSTRUCTORS:
52 Dr. A. W. Haupt, California
(Los Angeles)
15 .....Dr. William Ure
9 .....Dr.E.H.Archibald
63 .....Dr. C.W.Topping
28.....Mr. G.F.Drummond
11 Dr. C. A. Curtis (Queen* s)
32 Mr. C. B. Wood
24 ,....Dr.J.Wyman Pilcher
51 ...••Mr. Earle Birney
9 Mr. Thorlief Larsen
43 .....Mr. Ira Dilworth
23 .....Dr. E. J. Pratt (Toronto)
18 .....Dr. D.O.Evans
44- .... .Miss Janet Greig
6 .....Dr.Dorothy Dallas
70  Dr.Thomas B.Williams (Calgary)
20 ....•Mrs.Alice Roys
4 Dr. Isabel Maclnnes.
34 .....Dr.F.Lee Benns (Indiana)
29 .....Dr.W.N.Sage
52 ....•Mr. R. G. Trotter (Queen*s)
8  Dr. 0. J. Todd
•9 .... .Mr .Lemuel Robertson
6 .....Mr.Lemuel Robertson
Dr. 0. J. Todd
28
34
32
15
9i
1&
46
)
Mr. Walter Gage
Dr. F.S.Nowlan.
Dr. Joseph E.Morsh
Mr. James Henderson
Dr. E. T. Mitchell (Texas)
PHYSICS
1, 2
16
Dr. A.E.Hennings, 33.
Here follows an analysis of the registration which
may be of some interest and value.
REGISTRATION IN SUMMER SESSION 1936
Number of students from outside the
Province (partial, or wishing to do work
here to be transferred to other Universities) - 15
Number of students of winter session writing
off supplementals or taking work in Summer
Session to make up for failures in winter
session -   67
Number of students combining winter and summer
session work -   73
Number of students registered for first time -   92
Number of students doing summer session and
related courses only (chiefly) -  202
Number of graduate students registered -  110
Number withdrew * 7
TOTAL NUMBER. OF STUDENTS REGISTERED    - ~JSG
YEAR
ENROLLED
WROTE EXAMINATIONS
COMPLETED YEAR WITH-
DREtf
PARTIAL
19
18
i
mm
„,
FIRST
118
113
17
4
SECOND
2-04-
2S0
32
2
THIRD
66
64
29,
wi
FOURTH
49
49
19(B.A.)
<pp>
GRADUATES
110
92
m*
,1
TOTALS
566
536
,97,
7
In addition to the total number enrolled, 7 students
registered but cancelled their, registrations. 34.
The enrolment in the Summer Session of 1936 was about
twenty per cent, above that of 1935.  An examination of the
enrolment by years will show that the greatest increase was in
the second year, that there were minor increases in the first
year and in the graduate class, while the third and fourth years
showed very little increase. The increase in 1935 over 1934 was
similarly distributed.  These figures would seem to justify the
belief that a similar increase in enrolment will be found in
1937>- coupled with a corresponding increase in revenue.
The forms that increased expenditure should take are in
my judgment as follows:
(a) The courses in the sciences and the same is true of the
languages, but perhaps in a lesser degree, should be materially
extended without any proviso as to the numbers offering for any
course. As matters stand every student looking forward to a degree
is compelled by our rule to take one science course. But he is
discouraged from taking more by our requirement of majors and
minors in the last two years, for he is not going to follow
further than he has to a line of study in which he can not find
either his first or his second line of work.
(b) The greatest service that we can render to the High-
Schools is to provide courses leading to the Master's degree,- in
the subjects that are taught in the High Schools in-the first
instance. The High Schools are full of graduates of our university who have fulfilled all the undergraduate prerequisites for
entering upon graduate work.
(c) We would do well to offer, without university credit,
refresher courses covering Senior Matriculation work. These courses
would be very different from first year courses in the corresponding
subjects and would have to be conducted separately.
In making these recommendations, I am not breaking entirely new ground.
There was perhaps reason in the past fcr feeling that the time for
putting them into effect had not yet come. Today they are as necessary and as desirable as they were and have been made possible by
increasing revenues.
In the case of courses that open up new fields such as
refresher courses and graduate courses and courses that aim at
extending the curriculum into the upper years in the sciences and
languages, it would be well to waive the regulation requiring a
minimum enrolment in each course. While the session as a whole is
conducted without financial loss to the University there is no real
need of scanning too closely the operation of individual classes,
especially where such classes are necessary to the general rounding
out of the curriculum.
Respectfully submitted,
L. F. Robertson,
Director. 35^
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION COMMITTEE
I have the honour to present the following report of
the activities of the University Extension Committee from
April 1st, 1935 to September 15th, 1936.
A Survey Committee of three, appointed by the President
on authority of the Board of Governors, held conferences early in
April 1935 with the Minister and the Deputy Minister of Agriculture,
the Minister of Mines, the Provincial Mineralogist, the Superintendent of Education, and Messrs. J. W. Gibson and J. Kyle of the
Department of Education, to ensure a common understanding among
all adult education agencies. The Committee then proceeded to get
in touch by letter with somewhat over 350 Farmers' and Women' s
Institutes, and the three members visited 91 points throughout
the Province, holding meetings at which needs and desires were
discussed as fully as possible.  At 32 places committees were
organized to care for local arrangements. Stress was laid, both
then and later, on having the University efforts supported not by
a group but by the community as a whole.
It was ascertained by this Survey that the general
desire was for personal visits of University lecturers, supplemented
by discussions and guidance in reading, particularly in the fields
of Agriculture, Current History, Economics, Literature, technical
subjects, Psychology, Science, and Parent Training.
The Senate and the Board of Governors, upon*consideration
of the Survey Report, approved on September 13 and 16, 1935 of an
emergency adult education program to be carried out by the President
and an Executive Secretary. After consultation with the Deans and
Heads of Departments, the Extension Committee v/as able to begin
lecture tours in three major areas on October 21st, in three others
in the first week of November, and in a seventh on November 25th.
On October 25, 1935, a decision was reached to grant $10
for each lecture delivered (in the case of summer tours in agricultural regions this was interpreted to mean $10 for each active
day) and to pay for replacements at the rate of $5 per lecture
given by members of the University Staff and ^10 for those given
by lecturers brought in from the outsido.  Payment was later
authorized for the marking of examination books and essays for
six members of the Faculty on tour.
Lectures provided by the Committee numbered 573, with
a total estimated attendance of 37,870, an average of about 66.
18 other lectures wore arranged, but were cancelled because of
lack of interest, Ill-health of the lecturer, impassable roads, 36.
or bad weather.
(In addition to tho program carried out by the
Committee, information was asked from tho Faculty as to lectures
arranged independently; reports submitted indicate that 34 radio
addresses were givon and 320 lectures, with an estimated total
attendance of 32,500).
Lectures arranged by the Committee were distributed
geographically as follows:-
The Metropolitan Area, 48; the Fraser Valley (16 points) 75;
Vancouver Island( 12 points) 85; the rest of the Coast (9 points)
29; the main line of the C.P.R. and Barriore (11 points) 58; the
Okanagan (8 points) 76; Merritt, Princ-eton, Hodley, Greenwood,
and Grand Forks, 29; the Kootenays (16 points) 91; the Cariboo
and McBride (13 points) 40; the Nechaco (13 points) 25; the
Peace River Area (16 points) 19.
In certain major areas outside the city of Vancouver,
the chief centres v/ere included in a circuit so that a lecturer
might move from place to place on successive days and thus cover
the circuit in a week.  On Vancouver Island, in tho Okanagan,
and in the Kootenays, it was possible to select six centres and
thus enable each one to have lectures exactly a week apart.  In
the circuits from Lytton to Field and from Merritt to Grand Forks,
this arrangement had to be modified somewhat, and in other parts
of the Province where such groupings could not be made the
lectures had to be arranged at more irregular intervals.
The fields among which these lectures were distributed
were:
Agriculture, general 17; Agronomy 58; Animal Husbandry
29; Dairying 21; Horticulture 19; Poultry Husbandry 11.
Biology 6; Genetics 6; Bacteriology 1; Botany 1;
Entomology 1.
Chemistry 12; Physics 10; Geology 14; Mineralogy 19;
Palaeontology 3.
Internal Combustion Engines 6; Heating 1.
Arts and Crafts 10; Drama and the Theatre 4; Literature 33.
Economics 96; Sociology 33; History 46.
Education 35 J Psychology 67. 37.
Adult Education Program 3; Athletics 1; Town Planning 1;
Travel 9.
In same fields from 2 to 6 lectures were givon at various
centres in series, as'hero indicated: Agriculture 3 of 2 lectures,
4 of three, 4 of four, 5 of five, and 1 of six; Economics, 1 of
two lectures, 2 of three,--11 of four; Education, 12'of"two lectures
and 2 of three; Geology, 6 of two lectures; History, 17 of two
lectures; History and Economics, 1 of five lectures-; Internal
Combustion Engines, 3 of two lectures; Literature, 3"of two and
5 of four; Mineralogy, 1 of four lectures; Mineralogy and
Economics, 10 of 2 lectures; Psychology, 1 of three lectures and
16 of four; Sociology, 6 of four lectures.
Lectures were supported to same degree by bibliographies
furnished by sixteen of the lecturers and by the loan of 457 books
in 33 different centres, 30 of which reported atotal circulation
of 829.
46 tours lasting from about 1 to 3 weeks wore undertaken
by 27 of the lecturers. Of these, there wore 11 of just under one
week, 8 of one week, 2 of just under ten days, 7 of just under two
weeks, 12 of two weeks, 4 of just over two weeks, and 2 of three
weeks.
During the absence of members of the Faculty, 184 1/2
class -lectures and laboratory periods were provided by colleagues
and-26l by others outside the University staff, including 101
by a Professor-Emeritus and 23 by another former University
instructor; in addition, certain themes and Christmas examination
papers were marked for professors who were going on tour. The
matter of replacements was so arranged by Heads of Departments
that the number of seniors giving instruction during the year was
relatively increased and cancellation of lectures totalled only
16 hours.
Except in a very few cases, contributions from lecture
centres were not made to the University but were devoted to caring
for local expenses such as advertising and hall rental. In seme
places the University made up deficits in these accounts.
In one or two instances a feeling has been expressed that
the lecturer was "talking down" to his audience; but on tho viiolo
the articles appearing in nearly a score of newspapers and tho
comments (unsolicited) mado both to tho Committee and to individual
lecturers through personal statements and numerous letters have
been highly favourable.
The local committees were informed that the University
would not be able to provide as large a number of lectures hereafter 38.
and that probably the  emphasis would be upon the formation
of study-groups,   a few of which were already in operation
during tho winter of 1935-36.    Suggestions for next yearfs
program were invited and have been put on file for the
use of the Director of Extension.
Respectfully submitted,
0. J. TODD
Executive Secretary. 39.
REPORT OF THE INSTRUCTOR IN
PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN.
Physical education at the University of British Columbia,
although only on a temporary basis for this year, has been quite
successful, especially since it was necessary to start in midyear. The actual work done was evenly divided between the regular
class work and the intramural program.
The following outline sums up the various phases of
work that have been under the control of the Men's Department of
Physical Education:
A.  This Year's Program:
1. Total number of registrations 172
2. Class attendance (average per week)     175
3. Number of men participating in Intra
mural Athletics during the year      350
4. Men contacted through exercising the
various teams and individual
instruction 400
5. Equipment slips issued (February 10th
- April 9th) "i^
B.  Next Year's Program:
A number of suggestions have been made for the coming
year. These include the arrangement of a definite class
schedule free -from conflicts, the revision of shower
rooms with liquid soap and foot baths, a training room
for the proper care of students who are injured in
physical activities, and more adequate locker space. With
these ideas in mind the Physical Education Department
looks forward to a very successful and progressive year.
Respectfully submitted,
MAURICE VAN VLIET,
Instructor in Physical
Education for Men. 40.
REPORT OF THE INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICAL
EDUCATION FOR WOMEN.
Organization and registration for Physical Education during
the first week of January resulted in three hundred registrations.
Gymnasium.
In the gymnasium classes, health and posture were stressed.
Practically all women registered attended the classes twice a week
and a number of these made a perfect record attendance. One hundred
and thirty-five girls were charted. This charting consisted of
taking height and weight and comparing it with the average. Posture
tests were given and explained. A folk dancing class was held every
Wednesday at eleven o'clock for about thirty students.
Sports.
Seventy-five girls registered for archery. All women learned
the sport sufficiently to practice by themselves. A final "shoot"
was held at the end of the term.
Eighty-three girls registered for Beginners Badminton. A
tournament was held at the end of the term, but there were no awards
made.
An attempt was made to teaoh new group games which might be
used by the women in outside groups such as those found in school
and summer play grounds, and also to introduce games such as volley
ball, which could be developed later for intramurals. This games
period, however, was so badly interrupted by demands for the use
of the gymnasium floor that very little was accomplished. There
were ten teams with ten girls on each team and prospects were very
bright for a successful activity.
Theory.
One hundred and fifty students expressed their desire on
the registration forms for the theory class. It was impossible to
arrange a suitable time for such a large number. About thirty students
attended the class on Wednesday at 10 o*clock.
The principles upon which the program was drawn up were:
1. To relate Physical Education to General Education.
2. To give work for the average girl, including the strongest
girl with the greatest amount of previous training and
the weakest without any, avoiding as far as possible 41.
activities with risk to students working without
medical examination.
3. To use activities with the widest appeal for the
largest number of students, the ideal being to
have every woman playing rather than a specialized
few.
4. To stimulate play and encourage sports whioh give
the greatest opportunity for continuance after
college.
My recommendations for the program for next year are:
1. A time table adjustment which will include Physical
Education,
2. The organization of an intramural sports program.
3. Arrangements made for the training of student
leadership in sports, for women interested.
4. That the system of awards for women be revised.
5. Medical examinations for all women students.
Respectfully submitted,
GERTRUDE E. MOORE,
Instructor in Physical
Education for Women, 42,
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL EXAMINER TO STUDENTS.
I beg to submit the annual report upon the physical
examinations of the students entering the University for the
first time, those re-entering after a period of five years,
certain students who were re-examined for various reasons, and
twelve of the women athletes.
Dr. Monica Saunders conducted the examination of the women
students.
On the opening day I addressed the first year men on the
subjects of our Health Service, and the importance of keeping
physically fit during their university course. Mrs. Lucas, Public
Health Supervisor, addressed the women students on the same subject.
As each student was examined his physical condition was
discussed with him, and advice given when necessary.
I regret that I have to report two serious cases that were
discovered this session.
A student in Nursing and Health, whose medical history card
gave no indication of tuberoulosis and whose examination at the
Edmonton Hospital in August was negative, came up for her regular
examination on October 9th. There were found, slight loss of weight,
an unproductive cough, slight elevation of temperature and indefinite
moist r&Ies in the apex of the right lung. The patient was sent
home to bed with instructions to save any available sputum. On
October 17th sputum examination was positive for tubercle bacilli,
and the patient was admitted to Vancouver General Hospital on October 19th. On October 27th she was taken to her home in Edmonton
whence word was later received that she had died on November 12th.
As a precautionary measure, all the other members of the
nursing class as contacts, were sent to the Chest Clinic at the
General Hospital for X-ray examination of the lungs.
Another student in Nursing and Health who had no history
of pneumonia, tuberculosis nor pleurisy, whose clinical and X-ray
Examination in Edmonton in August, as well as her regular examination
here on October 25th. showed no indication of trouble, was found at
this special check-up on November l6th to have symptoms of a "oommon
cold" with slight rise of temperature. X-ray examination revealed
definite pleurisy over the lower lobe of the left lung. She was
token by her mother to her home in Edmonton on November 25th.
I note with satisfaction an improvement in the daily routine
of the students, by the lengthening of the noon-hour. It is hoped 43.
that this interval will not be filled with special lectures, so
that the much-needed time for luncheon and general refreshment may
not be curtailed.
Once more,, this session, as the examinations progressed
during October and November,. I was struck with the fact that the
students were becoming paler and more fatigued,, usually (not always)
from over-work and lack of time for physioal exeroise. Observation
of this fact each year for many years prompts me to venture the
opinion that the duration of the session is too short for the amount
of work covered, and that in the interest of the health of the
students the session should be lengthened by at least one month.
The temporary arrangements by which the women students
were examined in the small rooms of the Health Service, proved to
be unsatisfactory to all concerned,, and I hope we may be able to
make better arrangements for next session.
The change back to the former system of making appointments for the men at short intervals proved to be satisfactory
to everyone as much waiting v/as eliminated. The men were fairly
punctual in keeping their appointments.
The statistical report is as';f.ollows:
/
/ STATISTICAL REPORT OF PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF STUDENTS
- ■ -   - ■ - ■■ - ■ ■■- ■ - -• - ■ ■  ■- ■■  ■ —    ■ ■* ■ ■ ■---— -■—■—.————.— ■.— .——^——^
SUMMARY -
Number of 1st Year Arts students examined .••••
Number of 2nd Year Arts students examined ^
Number of 3rd Year Arts students examined• ..•••••
Number of 4th Year Arts students examined. ,........«
Number of Graduates examined	
Number of Teaoher Training students examined ............•••
Number of Partial students examined         ....,,♦
Number of Social Service students examined	
Number of 2nd Year Applied Science students examined  ,,.io
Number of 3rd Year Applied Science students examined ...............
Number of 5th Year Applied Science students examined
Number of Nursing students examined .00.,,......
Number of Public Health students examined.	
Number of Agriculture students examined...
00c o o 0 e c o o
o o « o e
341
135
32
4
5
4
at
6
55
2
1
34
13
19
528
124
TOTAL &JMBER OF STUDENTS EXAMINED   652
Respectfully submitted,
HAROLD WHITE.
Medical Examiner to Students.
•p» 45.
REPORT OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SUPERVISOR.
I have the honour to present the ninth annual report of
the Student Health Service of the University of British Columbia.
During- the academic year two thousand two hundred and
twenty-six (2226) persons sought advice. The services rendered
(Including first aid, health advice, investigations and inspection
of contacts) numbered four thousand eight hundred and sixty (4860).
An outbreak of Mumps and Rubella (German Measles) occurred.
A stricter observance of the Public Health and University regulations
would eliminate the possibility of a second student coming dov/n with
a communicable disease.
One thousand seven hundred and forty-one (1741) student
days were lost through communicable diseases. Tho days saved by
daily inspection of the contacts concerned, as against the loss which
would have resulted had they been excluded from the University,
numbered seven thousand four hundred and seventy-seven (74-77). This
represented a very considerable saving of time and money to the
students and to the University.
A report to the effect that certain mouth infections were
contracted from vessels used in the University Grill was investigated,
A thorough inspection based on bacteriological tests proved that the
report was unfounded.
We have to report with sincere regret the death of two
students. As a result of this sad happening, and of similar experiences
during the past nine years, certain recommendations in reference to
the medical examination of students are appended for your serious consideration. These recommendations are based upon consultations with
the Provincial Board of Health and Dr. H.W.Hill. STATISTICAL REPORT
i» mi) »■ i
Total number of Staff
and Students receiving
attention
2226
Total number of
consultations
4393
Total number of
services rendered
4860
L^.
Services specified
T"
j Referred  .Referred  Referred'to Referred to jExcluded   Health First Inter-  j
to Medical by Medical; "Family  il Dentist   ;tempor-    [Advice ] Aid views   j(
I Examiner  jExaminor  Physioians |
660       53       247    I  26
arily (ill) |
104      J2083
TOTAL
exolusive of
Ire vacc j contact interv.!
1-23
132
3728
u
Iveports to Deans and Professors    Consultations with Parents and j Medical Certificates
_[_ Physicians       ■ from Physioians
421 !      248
Vaccination
interviews re
Vacoination
Conscientious
Objectors
Students to be vaccinated
later
Total No. of Freshmen
students unvaccinated
(including CO.s)
132
20
29
130 COMMJNICABLE DISEASES
Mumps
28
Rubella
86
Measles
Scarlet
Fover
To B.
Pneumonia
Throat
Infections
37
Chest
Conditions
Skin
Condit
Influ-i Conjunc-
enza
Comm.
Cold
134
tivitis
Days lost through
Communicable Diseases
1741
Total Days Lost
through illness
1BW
t—
Days Saved by
Daily Inspection
of Contacts
7477
Financial
Students? Time Saved
at $3 per day
$22,431*00
Number of Student Contacts
375
Student Contact Inspections
905
Deaths COMMUNICABLE DISEASES REPORT
NAME
NUMBER
Mumps
2&
Rubella
86
Measles
1
Scarlet Fever
1
Contacts Excluded
16
TOTAL
131
DAYS LOST
342
569
13
29
122
1075
SAVED
7477
* •»
Number of Student Contacts ...»
Number of Contact Interviews •»	
Number of Contact Inspections	
Students' time saved based on $3 per day
375
»  1132
905"
$22,431.00
Respectfully submitted,
CELIA A. LUCAS,
Public Health Supervisor.
co 49.
REPORT  OF THE OFFICER  COM!LANDING
CANADUT OFFICERS'   TRAINING CORPS
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA CONTINGENT.
Officer Personnel
ii n    m     ■ —wphpphp.,1 up   ipj   ii   ii.    p. .i.i.. .pup-.-
Lieut.Col. H.F.G.Letson, M.C, E.D.,  Commanding Officer
(Tenure of command extended to 3/IO/36)
Authority a.P, & R. No. 23, 1935.
Major G.A.Lamont, C.a.M.C, Medical Officer (attached)
Captain G.M.Shrum, 11.11,
2/Lieut. A.J.Johnson, Acting Adjutant.
"A" Company
2/Lieut. G.S.Allen
2/Lieut.H.P.Godard.
"B" Company
2/Lieut. V.R.Hill
2/Lieut. A.D.Greenwood.
Instructors from P.A.M.
WPP»PiP»i-pJP«WP«»pp|^«ppp1
(i)  Captain Bostock, R.C.E., gave a series of lectures to
the candidates preparing for certificate "A" Engineers.
(ii) Sgt.Inst.White, R.C.E., assisted this officer with the
engineer course and gave several lectures to the candidates.
(iii) Q.M.S.I., A.A. Smith again carried out instructional and
other duties for the year. The work of this W.O. was again outstanding, and a great measure of the success achieved by the Corps
was due to his untiring and competent services.
Training, - General.
(i)    The training season was divided into three parts
as shown:
(a) Fall Term 2/10/35 to 27/11/35-
(b) Training - Wk.Pt.Barracks  1/ 1/36 to 5/ 1/36
(c) Spring Term 8/ 1/36 to 4/ 3/36 30.
Training;   - General ( centinuod)
Fall Torm.
The parados v/ore held on tho University Campus in the
Mechanical Engineering Laboratory oach Wednesday evening from
6:00 to 8:00 P.M.  Drill in the somewhat cramped quarters was
supplemented by movement outside in an area specially lit for the
purpose.
(iii) Training - Work Point Barracks.
A party of officers, N.CO's and "cadets underwent a
period of training at Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt, B.C.  The
oo\irse was conducted by PoA.M.Officers and Instructors. It was of
a general nature and inoludod drill, tactical exeroisos, instruction
in gas discipline, and lectures dealing with the tactics of various
arms of the service.
(iv)  Spring Torm^
Tho parades wore hold each Wednesday evening from
7:45 to 10:15 P.M. at the Beatty Street Armouries.
Training - Special.
(i)   Small Arms School at Camp Sarcee, Alberta.
(ii)   School of Signals at Camp Borden, Ontario.
(iii)   Lieut.Col.Letson completed the Advanced Course,
Officers N.PcA.M.   M.0.399 - 1936.
Musketry.
(i)   Members of the Corps carried out tho prescribed course
of Musketry on Blair Range during October and November, 1935.
(ii) On November 17th, 1935, the Corps participated in the
Annual Inter-University Service Rifle Competition, which v/as fired
at ranges of 200, 500, and 600 yards.
(iii) The Corps entered a team in the Vancouver and District
Indoor Riflo League, Garrison Competitions. This' match consists of
the aggregate scores of teams of eight competitors. 51.
Awards and Presentations.
Tho Maclnnes Shield was awarded to C/Cpl» F,B»Jones,
winning this v/ith a score of 83/95.
Tho Gen. Leckie Shield was won by Cdt. F.R#R.Jones with
a score of 99/105.
Lieut. Col. Lotson was awarded tho Efficiency Deooration.
G.O. 127 - 1935.
The Wesbrook Cup was not competed for this year.
Annual Inspection.
The annual inspection by the D.O.C. M.D. No, 11
Brigadier'D.J.Macdonald, D.S.O., M.C, took place at 8:30 P.M.,
March 4th, 1936.
The parade strength was as follows:
Officers     -8
N.C.O's and Men ....   6l
Total    69.
General Comments.
(a) The practice of holding parades at the University
during the Fall term was continued this year, and was found to
continue to give a greater parade strength. It must be realized
that the Corps is greatly handicapped in carrying on its
activities through oonfliction with University courses. Students
feel that they cannot allow more than one night per v/eek for
Corps work, and some even have difficulty in allotting this.
By having parades from 6:00 to 8:00 P.M., the men were loft the
greater part of the evening for study.
(b) The practical examination for Certificates "A" and
WB" Infantry continued to show a high standard in mutual
instruction.
(c) All ranks again donated all pay and allowance to
Corps funds.
(d) The yearly audit of funds was carried out, and all
books and accounts were found correct. 52.
General Comments (continued)
(e) The ordnance inspection was satisfactory and only
very minor shortages were reported.
(f) Now type uniforms were received and issued, and made
a great improvement in the appearance and morale of tho Corps.
(g) There v/ere no breaches of discipline of any kind
during the year.
The Officer Commanding wishes to record his "appreciation
of the assistance and co-operation afforded him by"the Chancellor,
the President and the Board of Governors, the Committee on
Military"Education, the D.O.C.,'M.D. No. 11 and Staff and"O.C.'s
23rd Inf.Bdo. and tho B.C.Reg't. (D.C.O.R.) and to the Super- -
intendent of the Buildings and-Grounds at the University.
Respectfully submitted,
H. F. G."LETSON,
Lieut.Col. PUBLICATIONS
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY:-AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
.. —■■.....  ■  ■  ... i. ■ — ,— - ■—  i  .........   i     ■■ ,n ..  ,  i  mi.! I ■  ■    n ip ■'. m    -.— i »  I i ■ i PI.M..1-— ■—.J. i
Dr. C. E. Dolman
"A Recent Outbreak of Haemorrhagic Smallpox
in British Columbia."
Canadian Public Health Journal, Vol.27,p.367, 1936.
"A New Method of Detecting Staphylococcus Enterotoxin."
Canadian Public Health Journal, Vol.27, p.489, 1936.
"A Recent Outbreak of Staphylococcal Food Poisoning
in Vancouver."
Canadian Public Health Journal, Vol.27, p.494, 1936.
"Bacteriological Research in Relation to Health and
Disease."
Health, Vol. 4, No. 3, p.65, 1936.
"The Role of Antitoxic Immunity in the Prophylaxis
and Treatment of Staphylococcal Infection."
Proceedings of the Second International Microbiological
Congress, London, August, 1936.
Dr. D. C. B. Duff:
"Quantitative Estimation of Indol by Means of Dialysis."
Canadian Publio Health Journal, Vol. 27, p. 141, 1936.
DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY:
Dr. A. H. Hutchinson:
"The Polygonal Presentation of Polyphase Phenomena."
proceedings Royal Society of Canada, III, Vol.30,
Sec. 5, Pp. 19-2& with three plates, 1936.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY:
Dr. E. H. Archibald and Mr. Gilbert Hooley:
"Atomic Weight of Rubidium."
J. Amer. Chem.Soc, April, 1936.
53. 54.
Department of Chemistry - continued:
Mr. H, J. Bremner and Dr. R. H. Clark:
"The Effect of Hormones and Bios Extracts on
Amylase Activity."
Roy. Soc. Can. XXX, III, 145, 1936.
Dr. W. F. Sever and Mr. Reid Fordyce;
"The Mutual Solubilities of Hydrocarbons - The
Freezing Point Curves of Dotriacontane in
Propane and Butane."
J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 58, 2029, 1936.
Dr, W, F. Seyer and Mr. L. Hodnett:
"The System Caprylene-Sulphur Dioxide."
J.Amer. Chem. Soc. 38, 996, 1936.
Dr. W. F. Seyer and Mr. H. Godard:
"Determination of Sodium Chloride in Air."
Trans. Roy. Soc. Can. Vol. XXX, p. 85* 1936.
Dr. W. F. Seyer and Mr. R. Donald:
"The Corrosion of Milk Tins in Ocean Transit."
Can, Chem. & Met. Vol. XX, No. 6, 1936.
Mr. F. A. DeLisle. Mr. W.R.T.Fowler. Mr. E.L.Lovell
and Dr. William Ure:
"The Thermal Decomposition of Crotoraaldehyde."
Trans. Roy. Soc. Can* XXX, 1113, 65, 1936.
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS, POLITICAL SCIENCE.COMMERCE AND SOCIOLOGY:
Mr. H. F. Angus:
Books:
"Canada and her Great Neighbour"
In Press.
Book Reviews:
"Numerous Book Reviews published in Vancouver
Daily Province." Department of Economics - continued:
Mr. H« F. Angus  T
Articles:
"Beating Swords into Ploughshares"
Dalhousie Review, Vol, xv., No. 3,
October, 1935.
"Liberalism Stoops to Conquer"
Canadian Forum, Deoember, 1935.
"The University of British Columbia"
in The Universities Review, Vol.8, No.2,
April, 1936.
"The Portent of Social Credit in Alberta"
Pacific Affairs, Vol. ix, No. 3, 1936.
Reprints:
"Responsibility for Peace and War in the
Pacific"
A data paper for the To Semite Conference
of I.P.R., Canadian Papers, Vol. II, No.5,
1936.
"A Canadian Farewell"
in a Japanese Journal (Japanese Title).
Newspaper Articles:
"The Economic Outlook for 1936"
Vancouver Daily Province.
Dr. C.W.Topping:
Book Reviews:
55.
Vancouver Sunday Province, November 1, 193$.
Article:
"Sociological Research and Political Leadership"
in Sociological and Social Research, Vol, 21,
July - August, 1936. 56,
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION:
Dr. W. G, Black:
"The Development and Present Status of Teacher
Education in Vfestern Canada, with speoial
reference to the Curriculum,"
Private Edition, Distributed by The University
of Chicago Libraries, Chicago, 1936.
DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY:
Dr. R. W. Brock (Deceased):
"Notes on the Pre-Cnmbrian of the Canadian
Shield with Reference to Pre-Combrian
Nomenclature."
Geol. Magazine, London, Vol. LXXIII, No,86l,
Maroh, 1936.
Dr. R.V.r.Brock(Deceased), Dr. S. J. Schofield. Dr.M.Y,
Williams ancPpr, W. L. Uglow, (Deceased):
"Geological Map of Hong-Kong"
Published by the War Office, England,
December 1935*
Dr. M. Y. Williams:
"A Geological Map of the Manitoulin and Ad^aoent
Islands" (Preliminary edition),
Geol. Survey of ..Canada, 1936.
Dr. H. V. Warren:
"Distribution of Silver in Base-Metal Ores"
Trans. A.I.M.M., Vol. 115, 1935.
Dr. H. V. Warren and Mr. J. M. Cummings:
"Mineralogy of the W.W.W.Veins"
B.C.Miner, Vol. 8, No. 10, p. 29, 1935.
"Relationship of Gold and the Metallic
Minerals in British Columbia."
Roy.Soc, Can. 193&.
"Mineralogy at Nickel Plate Mine"
B.C.Miner, May, 1936.
"Mineralogy of the Surf Point and Hunter Veins"
B.C.Miner, June, 1936. Department of Geology and Geography- oontifiued
Dr. H. V. Warren and Mr. J. M. Oummings:
"Geology and Mineralogy of the Dentonia Mine"
B.C.Miner, July, 1936.
"Mineralogy of the Unuk Gold Group"
B.C.Miner, August, 1936.
Dr. Roy Graham:
"Pennsylvanian Flora of Illinois IT,"
Bot.Gaz.97: pp.156-166.
"Anatomical Study of Carboniferous
Arborescent Lycopods,"
Ann. Bot. 44: pp.  587-608.
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY:
Mr., F. H. Soward:
Book:
"Civilization in Europe"
Sohapiro, Morris and Sawajrd,
Houghton, Mifflin Co., 193°•
Magazine Articlest
"Canada and Foreign Affairs"
Canadian Historical Review, June,1936.
Newspaper Articles:
"A Survey of 1935,"
Vancouver Sunday Province, December 28,1935.
Book Reviews:
Numerous book reviews have been published in
The Vancouver Sunday Province.
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS:
«..--■-  ■»  .1  li   ■ —»■■— -.P-ILPW-WP—■■■■■■I    PI  .P  II.   .IP,
Mr. L, Richardson and Mr. W. H, Gage:
Book:
"Elementary Analytic Geometry"
Copp, Clark Co., Toronto, 1956.
Mr. W. H. Gage:
Book Review:
"Highlights of Astronomy, by Walter Bartky,"
Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of
Canada, July, 1936.
57. DEPARTMENT  OF MODERN !LANGUAGES: *
Dr. A.  F.  B.   Clark:
"Purity and Propaganda in Art and Literature"
In University of Toronto Quarterly, July, 1936*
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS:
Dr.G.M.Shrum and, Mr. Thomas G. How:
"A NOte on the Spectroscopic Determination of tho
Vitamin A Content of Pilchard Oil,"
Canadian Journal of Research, A, 13: 93-98,1935.
DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY:
Dr. C. McLean Fraser:
"Some Japanese Hydroids mostly New,"
Trans. Roy. Soc.Can., (3) 29, sec. v,
pp.105-112.
"Hydroids from the West Coast of Vancouver Island"
Can. Field-Naturalist, 29, No. 9, pp.143-145.
"Hydroids from the Queen Charlotte Islands"
Jour.Biol. Bd. of Canada, l, (6) pp.503-507.
"Report of the Associate Committee on Oceanography
of the National Research Council"
Eighteenth Ann. Rep.Nat.Res.Coun.for 1934-35,pp.99-101«
"Oceanography in British Columbia for 1934."
Trans,Am.Geophy/sical Union, Sixteenth Annual Meeting,
Ft. i, pp.216-218.
Mr. G. J* Spenoer:
"A Check-list of the Fleas of British Columbia with a
Note on Fleas in Relation to Sawdust in Homes"
Proceedings of the B.C.Entomological Society, 1936.
"An Outbreak of Autographa californica Speyer around
Kamloops Summer, 1934.n
Proceedings of the B.C.Entomologioal
Society, 1936. FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE 5?*
DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING:
Mr. C. Batho and Dr. S. D, Lash:
"Further Investigations on Beam and Stanchion
Connections, Including Connections Encased in
Concrete; together with laboratory Investigations
on a Full Scale Steel Frame."
Published in Final Report of the Steel Structures
Research Committee of the Department of Scientific
and Industrial Research of England, Issued by His
Majesty's Stationery Office, London, England,
May 1936.
DEPARTMENT OF MINING AND METALLURGY:
Mr. J. M. Turnbull:
"The University of British Columbia Mining Department"
Published in Special Mining Program Issued by Vancouver
City Golden Jubilee Committee, July, 1936.
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRYING:
Mr. Wilfrid Sadler, (Deceased), Dr. Blythe Alfred Eagles,
Mr. John Francis Bowen and Mr0 Alexander James Wood:
"Cheese-Ripening Studies - The Influence of Different
Extracts on the Acid Production of Lactic Acid
Bacteria."
Canadian Journal of Research B, 14: 139-150,1936.
Dr. Blythe Alfred Eagles. Mra Alexander James Wood and
Mr'. John Francis Bowen:
"Cheese-Ripening Studies - Wildiers' Bios and the
Lactic Acid Bacteria. The Fractionation of Bios
from Alfalfa and the Effect of the Fractions
obtained on the Vital Activity of the Betacooci."
Canadian Journal of Research B, 14: 151-154,1936. 60.
DEPARTMENT OF POULTRY HUSBANDRY:
Mr, E. A. Lloyd:
nReport on Breeding for Improved Meat and
Egg Production in High Producing Strains of
Barred Plymouth Rocks, Rhode Island Reds and
White Leghorns at The University of British
Columbia."
Dom* Gov*t* Report on Poultry Conference at
Ottawa, Marchj 1936.
Mr. J. Biely and Mr. W. Chalmers:
"Vitamin A Requirements of Growing- Chicks. Ii
Can. Journal of Research, D.14:21-24, 1936.

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