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The President's Report 1948-49 1950

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Array THE  UNIVERSITY
OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
PRESIDENT'S
REPORT
1948-1949 THE  UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
THE
PRESIDENT'S
REPORT
1948-49
VANCOUVER,  CANADA
1950 To The Board of Governors and Senate of
The University of British Columbia
Gentlemen:
In submitting this report for the past academic year I
am surprised by the amount that has been begun, developed
and carried to completion. Those of us in the University
are so occupied with day-to-day details during the year that
we do not have much opportunity to note the overall
progress.
I am happy, therefore, to submit this Report because it
records a year of very considerable accomplishment on the
part of faculty, students and non-academic staff alike.
Developments in Graduate Studies and in Medical Education have been especially noteworthy but the record of
normal teaching, research and community service undertakings is, I think, equally encouraging, as is also the report
of the continuing support we are receiving from the
communities of British Columbia.
It is, therefore, with great pleasure that I submit to you
this Annual Report for the academic year, 1948-49.
HtTWAp*^ ^J{Jama
/)
x. This 5,000,000 volt Van de Graaf generator thrusts a polished dome up through
three and one-half stories in U.B.C.'s Physics Bldg. Part of the radioactive
research program, it represents but one field of the research program being
conducted at the University. President's  Report
For   September,   1948   to  August,   1949
A
year ago, when I reported
to you on the University's activities for 1947-48, I stressed
especially the problems and accomplishments linked with
the great period of post-war expansion. I also told you,
however, that we were designing the shape of things to
come when we had entered a more normal period. The
year 1948-49 was, I believe, the beginning of that period.
Highlights of the Year
To select the highlights of the year is no easy task.
But perhaps the two most important academic advances
were the establishment of a Faculty of Graduate Studies,
with Dr. Henry Angus as Dean, and the formal beginnings
of the new Faculty of Medicine, with the appointment of
Dr. Myron Weaver as Dean. The first of these two advances
has already increased the stature of the University as a
Canadian centre for advanced studies in such subjects as
physics, chemistry, and biology—to name but three; the
second has brought assurance to many interested students
and members of the medical profession that the first classes
leading to a medical degree will open in the fall of 1950.
5 Other important developments include the organizing
of the Department of Pharmacy as a faculty; the opening of
the Forest Research Laboratories at Haney, for which the
B.C Loggers' Association supplied the funds; and the
founding at this University of the first Institute of Oceanography in Canada. Two major extracurricular efforts seem
worthy of special mention: the first, the organization by
the voluntary efforts of the faculty, the student body, the
University Chapter of the I.O.D.E. and other devoted
friends of the University, of a comprehensive program of
exhibitions and creative programs in related fields of the
fine arts; and the second, the holding of a most successful
'Open House', planned and carried out in large measure
by the students with faculty support.
These developments mean that the faculty, in addition
to teaching and carrying on very considerable programs of
research, public speaking, and writing, have found the
time and energy to initiate new courses of study and new
educational ventures, to collaborate with the architects on
plans for new buildings, and to seek new sources of support
for much-needed teaching and research equipment and
facilities. My first word in the annual report of 1948-49
must be one of congratulations and very sincere thanks to
the faculty of the University.
The University's very warm thanks are also due to
a large number of donors for the fact that during 1948-49
the University received in gifts, grants, and bequests, the
largest sums of money of any single year in its history.
Provincial government grants to the University last year
amounted to $1,250,000.00; federal grants for research
amounts to $119,020.00; from public trusts and foundations
for the initiation and support of new educational ventures and research we received $62,042.12; and industry and
private individuals contributed $231,700.00.
Details of these gifts, grants, and bequests will be
found in an appendix to this report, but I should like to
note here that this willingness to invest increasing sums of
money in institutions from which immediate and obvious
returns are not demanded is a most gratifying sign that
Canada is recognizing its own relative stability in an
unstable world and is looking to research and teaching to
assist in the future development of our country.
We are most grateful for the trust which is indicated
both by such tangible assistance and by other forms of
encouragement and support which we are proud to receive.
It is by virtue of such assistance that we hope to continue
and to develop our value to our community.
In our permanent building program, the large new
wing of the Library came into full use; the Applied Science
Building, although it will not be fully completed until the
spring of the current year, was handed over in part for
classroom and laboratory purposes; considerable progress
was made on the General Biological Sciences building;
and plans were pushed forward for the Bacteriology and
Preventive Medicine building. To replace the temporary
Home Economics huts, which were destroyed by fire, the
new and very attractive Home Economics building was
rushed to completion in time for the autumn term of 1949.
In addition, a further grant of $1,500,000.00 was
allocated by the provincial government to enable us to
complete the Applied Science and Biological Sciences
buildings, to submit the plans for the new War Memorial
Gymnasium for tender, and to proceed with plans for at
least three units of much-needed Women's Residences. During the year we have also noted the continuing
increase in the non-veteran student body, which has grown
from 2,100 students in 1939 to 5,580 students in the year
under review. During this year also, the student veteran
proportion of the undergraduate population declined
considerably as we graduated approximately 2,000 students,
the largest single class in the University's history.
These are some of the highlights of a year of great
activity and they are, I think, a tribute to, and a reflection
of, the energy, ability, and high morale which animates
the faculty, the staff, and the student body of the University.
The Task of the University
It is, I think, worthwhile from time to time to attempt
to state very briefly what we consider our task to be. If
society, in the broadest sense of that word, is continually
engaged in seeking progressive control over its physical
environment, and in searching for ways and means of living
in harmony within that environment, then it would appear
to be the function of a university to teach students and to
stimulate them to find out for themselves as much as
possible about the physical and biological nature of our
environment, to discover new knowledge that will increase
our control over our environment, and to promote the
social and human values which must operate in order to
achieve harmony within organized society. In concrete
terms, we must be equally interested in helping students
equip themselves for living and for earning a living.
The university has an obligation to help provide some
of the more specialized skills that our local, provincial, and
national development requires. We are still more conscious
of our  increasing need  for skills  in  the  physical  and
8 biological sciences than we are of our needs in the fields
of human and social values, but I am glad to say that there
appears to be a growing consciousness of the need for more
research and study in these latter fields, and an increasing
realization that many of the most pressing problems of our
day, national and international, lie within the areas of
social and human relationships. While there is an awakening to the need for more attention here, there is not, as
yet, the financial support necessary to tackle the problems
of social values and relationships on the scale indicated.
I am hopeful, however, that this will come.
These are, it seems to me, the functions which the
university exists to perform, and it exists to perform them
on behalf of the whole of our society.
Indirectly, of course, all of us benefit from advances
in knowledge, even though such advances may precede
by half a century the industrial or social application of
that knowledge. Improved standards of living or improved
harmony in living do not necessarily follow immediately
upon fundamental research, nor should they be expected
to do so. The university has the responsibility of pursuing
knowledge and truth for their own sakes in the belief that,
in the future, society will benefit materially and spiritually
from that which is currently undertaken in the laboratories
and in private studies. In addition, and also indirectly, the
whole of society benefits by the university's provision of
a larger body of trained and skilled citizens. New attempts
to control our physical environment in the Canadian north,
new developments in industry and in social organization
are dependent upon the supply of those who have the
training to initiate and guide such developments.
In more  direct  fashion,  those  who  are  interested, willing, and able to make the effort—though unfortunately
not all of them—benefit directly from the university by
enrolling in courses of study which will enable them to
develop their capacities for personal satisfaction and social
use. Also, increasing numbers of those who find themselves
unable to devote their full time to furthering their education are finding it possible to devote some time to the
fulfillment of their particular educational needs by using
university extension department facilities.
Further, no university which is alive to its responsibilities can confine itself to training people for the kinds
of jobs that exist in the present. We must have one eye,
at least, on the future. I have referred to the need to train
people who will see and seize the opportunity for developing new industries and new forms of social organization
but I should like to mention in particular a related group
of occupations for which, up to the present, we have not
done as much as we should have. As our society becomes
more complex we are coming to depend less and less on
direct action by ourselves, and we have, in increasing
degree, delegated our responsibilities to others on our
behalf. Government has assumed an infinitely greater role
and has had a correspondingly greater impact on the lives
of individual citizens than it has had at any time in our
past. A great many people are interested in the theory and
practice of politics and in the various fields of public
administration. Some of them may go on to become
members of municipal councils, provincial legislatures, or
the federal House of Commons. Some may become civil
servants and some may want the knowledge to be informed
critics of political action or public administration. Now
it is true that in most universities we offer courses of study
10 in economics, political science, history, sociology and international studies, but we have not yet secured the attention
and support for this related group of disciplines comparable
to those which are given, for example, to the physical and
medical sciences. Yet these fields of social studies and the
humanities are having at least as determining an effect on
the shaping of the present and future as are the developments in atomic energy and the attempts to find cures for
human ills.
Let me take one more example. Because of the
complexity of our world it is no longer possible for anyone
to know at first hand or by word of mouth all the news of
the day. We have created very important industries on
which we must rely for the news and information on which
we base our opinions and attitudes. Considering the vast-
ness of the problems of contemporary society and the
complexity of the subjects that have to be reported on, I
think that our newspapers and magazines, radio and films
do a remarkably able job in a very perplexing sphere.
Here, again, because of the importance of the job they
are trying to do, it seems to me that more research and
training should be undertaken in our universities to assist
those who have the practical and practising responsibility
for this vital area of social function. I am not here
concerned with matters relating to the techniques of
journalism, radio broadcasting, and the other forms of mass
communication. I am more concerned about the kind of
training which should be available to those who aspire to
active participation in public affairs or to reporting on those
public affairs, and I am suggesting that these fields of
specialization should be receiving the combined attention
of the universities and the professions themselves.   Here
11 I am merely stating the problem; to attempt to suggest an
answer at this time would be to indicate that the problem
is less complex than I take it to be.
Who Should go to University?
As university attendance declines from our post-war
peak a good deal of discussion has developed on what is
called the return to normality. Suggestions have been made
regarding limitations and restrictions on enrollment. The
argument which suggests that we can forecast the numbers
who will be required in the near future in the various professions in Canada seems to me to be true only up to a point.
It makes, I think, inadequate allowance for the development of new types of activity, new industries, and new
forms of social and industrial organization. As part of a
developing and expanding economy, the universities of Canada must keep themselves responsive to the needs of the
economy and the desires of our citizens. It also seems to me
likely that more and more people in Canada are going to
consider a university education a desirable thing for their
children. Granted that their children are able to meet the
entrance requirements of the university and are willing to
make some personal sacrifices to come, I feel that they are
entitled to expect enrollment.
While universities do, and will continue to, train
students for the professions, that is, for earning a living,
and for practical service to their community, such training
is not the only test which should be applied. There are a
great many people who want a university education for its
own sake, for personal satisfaction, for living. In my opinion, our universities would be narrow in their view of
their duty if they failed to make sufficient provision for in-
12 creasing numbers of persons animated by these motives.
What I have said here does not, of course, mean that
those who go to university or who benefit directly from
it are better or more useful citizens than those who do not.
There are, as we know, many kinds of usefulness. I am saying only that it is the university's job to provide teaching
and facilities to assist those who want to qualify themselves
for living and for earning a living, that there are likely to
be increasing numbers of Canadians animated by both these
desires and that the universities must not restrict themselves too rigidly to the needs of the present at the expense
of the future, if they do not wish to prejudice the development of our culture and the expansion of our economy.
How Shall We Finance the University?
•I have said that our universities should not restrict
enrollment, for to do so would jeopardize the social and
cultural as well as the industrial future development of
our country. It follows logically that we shall have to face
the question of giving increased aid to the best-qualified
of those who want to attend the university. We shall have
to do this in addition to finding increased sums of money
for equipment, buildings, and new courses of study and research. Where is this money to come from?
There are only seven sources: the provincial government, the federal government, the municipal government,
private industry, professional groups, individuals, and
student fees. Student fees in all universities have recently
been raised as high as and perhaps higher than is desirable
if we wish to keep the universities available to those best
suited to attend. Private industry and individuals have been
increasingly generous to this university and this source of
13 income is doubly satisfactory for it indicates a willingness to
invest in the institutions of our society and a belief in the
value of objective study. They along with professional and
other interested groups have given us valuable support in
the past and show every evidence of a willingness to increase
it in the future. The provincial government has shown itself
very sympathetic to the claims of this university for further
income and I have no doubt that they will continue to provide support as we continue to demonstrate our worth. The
federal government in the past has not held itself nor been
held responsible for making contributions to that part of the
university's operations which are essential in the national
interest and for national development. In recent years, it
has begun to assume some financial responsibility for health
and welfare studies. For some years now the federal government has also made substantial contributions through
the National Research Council to research in Physics,
Chemistry, Biology, and related fields.
Much remains to be done for the humanities and social
sciences as well as for the physical and biological sciences.
The universities are willing and I think able to do more, but
they will have to see increased financial support in prospect.
This support in the quantity required can only be provided by industry, by voluntary gift before taxation, or by
the governments after taxation. I personally hope that the
students who continue to come to university will continue
to enjoy their opportunities by virtue of both private benefaction and public support.
Enrollment
Attendance at the University this year, although less
than in the peak year of 1947-48 was considerably higher
14 than had been anticipated. 8810 students represented a
drop in all faculties of 564 from the previous year rather
than the 1000 drop that had been expected.
As was noted in last year's Report the balance is tilting away from veteran predominance on this campus as
with others in Canada. This year non-veterans were clearly
in the majority with a total enrollment, men and women, of
5580 while the veteran figure dropped to 3230. Next year
the veteran decline will be even more acute and the numbers of non-veterans, it is estimated, will level off somewhere around five thousand students before it starts to increase again. It is for a university of between five and six
thousand students that we have drawn up our plans for
the future. Our buildings, laboratories, residences — all
the facilities necessary for thorough academic training are
being planned for with such an estimated figure in mind.
It is interesting in reviewing the Registrar's Report
to note that our students this year represent 43 racial
groups, that 882 of them are from other provinces of Canada and that 146 of them are from other countries as far
removed from us as Abyssinia, India and New Zealand.
Students have come from a great variety of occupational backgrounds, their parents covering almost every
occupation in the provincial economy and reflecting in a
very real way the varied nature of the university's constituency.
Existing and New Courses of Study
In order to meet some of the most pressing needs the
University's academic offerings have been considerfably expanded in recent years. During 1948-49 a total of 78 new
courses were added and 8 existing courses were dropped,
15 leaving a total of 862 courses of study in all faculties. Such
a figure in itself tells only a small part of the story, but the
total and the number of additions do indicate in striking
fashion the insatiable demand which exists for new lines of
study and new fields of specialization. The degree of specialization which can be afforded in the interests of good
scholarship — no less than of finance — is causing us some
concern and the Dean of Inter-Faculty Affairs is chairman of
a committee charged with the responsibility of eliminating
course overlapping in the various faculties and anything
that looks like duplication. To date the cooperation of the
various fields of specialization has been most encouraging
but the task of reconciling the claims of new fields of study
with the maintenance and development of basic courses is
a never ending one which requires constant scrutiny.
Significant among the many new academic developments was the establishment of an institute of Oceanography, associated with the Faculty of Graduate Studies,
which will train graduate students in this new and important field of enquiry. Such studies have most important
implications for our economic well-being as well as for
our national security and are being undertaken in large
measure as a national responsibility.
For similar reasons we have added to and developed
our Slavonic language and area studies. In the frank recognition that for better or worse we must know more about
the Slav peoples, we undertook three years ago to set up a
Department of Slavonic Studies. This year I am happy to
announce that the Rockefeller Foundation has given us
a grant of $90,000 to be spent over the next five years to
enable us to round out and supplement that which we have
been able to do on our own resources. We are very grateful
16 for both the support and the recognition which that support implies.
While a full report of the detailed plans for the new
Faculty of Medicine would be premature in a report of
the academic year 1948-49, two matters are worth special
mention here. The University was fortunate in securing
the services of Dr. Myron Weaver, formerly Assistant Dean
of Medicine at the University of Minnesota, to assume the
responsibility for organizing and heading up this new and
important faculty. Dean Weaver has come to us with a
distinguished record as a medical scholar and administrator,
and has already made excellent progress in bringing the
faculty into being, with the result that the decision has
been made to enroll the first class in Medicine for the
autumn term of 1950.
In the Faculty of Applied Science there is a general
expansion of instruction, for the most part in fields that
have a direct relation to the welfare of the province. The
Department of Architecture now offers a Town Planning
course as well as a course on the social aspects of Housing
and Community Planning. The Department of Forestry,
while dropping 8 courses, has added 21 new ones. A number of these are for postgraduate work—a further guarantee
of the maintenance and development of the forest resources
and one of the major industries of this province.
Another interesting development is the construction
of a Forest Research Laboratory in a 9,800 acre crown
grant of forest land outside Haney, B.C. Made possible
by a generous gift from the B.C. Loggers' Association, the
Haney Research Forest will enable the forestry students to
receive instruction under actual and excellent conditions.
We will also be able to conduct a number of forestry re-
17 search projects that were not possible before.
The Department of Mining and Metallurgy offers
five new courses this year, another expansion in a field related to a major provincial industry.
The Department of International Studies has developed a cooperative programme based on courses already
offered; and following, within the limitations of the budget,
a program of expanding instruction in the international
field has added a course in Chinese External Policy and
one on the British Commonwealth and International
Organization.
With the addition of six new courses the Department
of Pharmacy rounded out a four-year program to provide
a complete course in Pharmacy and was this year granted
faculty status.
The year 1948-49 saw the graduation of our first class
in Physical Education as well as the addition of 8 new
courses to improve an already well-founded Physical Education curriculum. Traditionally this province has taken a
special interest in the health and physical fitness of its
citizens. For some years Provincial Recreation has administered a program that has won nation-wide acclaim.
Graduates in Physical Education from this institution will
undoubtedly make their services available to such organizations, to schools at the primary and secondary levels and to
community centres throughout the province.
Of particular interest to many individuals is the announcement of our intention to offer correspondence and
extra-mural courses for credit in the near future. On May
10, 1949, our Senate approved draft proposals to initiate
such courses and the Department of University Extension
has been assigned the task of organizing correspondence and
18 evening courses in subjects carrying full credits toward a
university degree. Many people heretofore unable to take
a university education because of distance or lack of time
will now be able to take a considerable number of courses
for credit at their own convenience.
Teaching Staff
During each of the past few years a number of those
members of faculty who laid the foundations of the University and watched over its early development have been reaching retirement age. This University was particularly fortunate in the calibre of the men who were attracted to its
service in its early years and who fashioned its academic pattern, and we are very grateful for the contribution that
they have made. This year four of them have retired (whose
aggregate years of service amounts to 123). Dr. F. M. Clement, Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture and head of the
Department of Agricultural Economics; Dr. A. F. B. Clark,
Professor in the Department of French; Dr. O. J. Todd,
head of the Department of Classics; and Dr. M. Y. Williams,
head of the Department of Geology and Geography.
Dr. Blythe Eagles was appointed Dean of Agriculture
on Dean Clement's retirement; Professor Harry Logan,
after some years away from the University, came back to
replace Dr. Todd as head of the Department of Classics;
and Dr. H. C. Gunning was appointed to the headship of
the Department of Geology and Geography. I am happy
also to report that Dr. Clement, Dr. Williams and Dr. Todd
have found it possible to return for the current year as
special lecturers and to assist us in dealing with the still
swollen post-war enrollment.
Seven of our staff members have been on leave of
19 absence; some to pursue studies to lead to further degrees
and others to assist government agencies in projects of national importance, as in the case of Professor H. F. Angus,
Director of our Graduate School and head of the Department of Economics, Political Science and Sociology and
Anthropology, who is serving as a member of the Royal
Commission on Transportation. Professor Evans, head of
the Department of French, is on a year's leave of absence in
England and France. In his place we are glad to welcome
Dr. J. G. Andison, on loan to us from the University of
Toronto, as acting-head of this Department.
The total number of members of the teaching staff
for the academic year 1948-49, exclusive of those on leave
of absence, amounted to 839. This figure includes all categories of the teaching staff. A tabulated summary of these
classifications is in an appendix to this report.
We have been much saddened during the year by the
deaths of a number of retired members of faculty and staff
who have given whole-heartedly of their abilities and energies in the service of this institution. Professor A. Lighthall, Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering, died on November 3, 1948. Mr. E. Chell, a long-service member of our
employed staff died on April 9, 1948, and on May 5 we
were informed of the death of Mr. John Heaton, another
long-time member of our employed staff.
I am also taking this opportunity of recording the University's appreciation of the services of three additional
members of the University faculty whose deaths have occurred since the period covered by this report. Dr. G. G.
Sedgewick, former head of the Department of English, a
beloved teacher and public figure, died suddenly on September 4. A group of his friends and admirers in the Uni-
20 versity and community have already decided to commemorate his memory by the establishment of a Sedgewick Memorial Fund which will be expended on the promotion of
those fields of interest which were most vital to him.
On October 22, we were further saddened by the
death after a lingering illness of Dr. M. J. Marshall, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Chemistry. On
December 4, death closed the career of Dr. George M. Weir,
former Minister of the Department of Education of this
province, and earlier, head of the Department of Education
at this University. Only a few months prior to his death
Dr. Weir had accepted an Emeritus Professorship in Education from this University. This was offered him as one more
evidence of our thanks for the great service he had rendered
both as a member of the teaching staff and as Minister in
Victoria.
For the work, inspiration, and influence of all these
devoted men we are deeply grateful and offer our sincere
sympathy to relatives and friends.
As all members of the teaching staff are well aware,
although we have surmounted the peak of the critical postwar years, we have not yet reached a period of normal
enrollment. As a consequence, the period of stress is not
yet over and the exceptional efforts which the faculty have
been making to carry their load of teaching responsibility,
research activities, and public and professional services remain a matter for admiration and a cause for concern. On
the purely material side we are not yet satisfied with the
existing level of faculty salaries, the improvement of which
I feel should be a first charge on any increase in grants.
Equally important, however, is the need to reduce some
of the existing teaching loads and to free faculty members
01 for the pursuit of private studies and research. That academic standards have not, I believe, been seriously impaired is due only to the very great efforts made by faculty
to cope with the large numbers, and to the exceptional
maturity of the post-war students who have accepted the
responsibilities imposed by their numbers in an admirable-
way.
Research
Despite the heavy loads being currently carried, the
research record of the faculty is a good one. In addition to
the University's own grant of some $17,500.00 for research
projects by individual members of faculty, sums amounting
to approximately $150,000.00 have been received from
government and private sources for research projects conducted by members of the University staff. The fields covered by these researches are heavily weighted in the direction of the sciences and particularly in those physical and
chemical fields of greatest contemporary interest, but I am
glad to note that at least a small amount of money is becoming available for fundamental studies in the humanities
and social sciences. There is, however, much work of an
urgent kind which is required to be done in the arts and
sciences and I would like to commend this object to that
increasing number of friends of the University who are
prepared to support financially the pursuit of new knowledge and the study of social and human values.
Professional and Community Service
As I indicated in an earlier section of this report, Professor Henry Angus has been granted leave of absence to
serve as a Royal Commissioner studying Canadian transportation problems. The service of university members has
22 been requested for national, provincial and municipal
tasks of this and related kinds increasingly in the past few
years. Although there is, of course, a danger in yielding
to too many requests of this kind I am one of those who
believe that academic instruction is improved by a knowledge of practical affairs and as a consequence believe that
universities should perform this kind of national, provincial or community service to the extent that they can without
jeopardizing the university's own teaching and research
programs. It was as a result of this conviction that I accepted
an invitation to sit on the Royal Commission enquiring into
the development of Arts, Letters and Sciences in Canada.
In accepting this I was particularly interested in enquiring
into the problems facing the arts, letters and sciences in
Canada and in finding out why they have failed to attract
equivalent financial support to that enjoyed by the physical
and biological sciences.
Many other members of faculty, too numerous to
mention in detail, have accepted responsibilities in an extremely wide variety of national, provincial and municipal
organizations, all of them intimately related to their academic work. Of these I might mention in particular the
following office holders during the past year: Dean J. N.
Finlayson, President of the Engineering Institute of Canada; Professor Frank Forward, President of the Dominion
Council of Professional Engineers; Professor Hunter Lewis,
President of the Federation of Canadian Artists; Dean H.
F. Angus, President of the Canadian Political Science Association for the past year; Dr. Ian Cowan, Vice-President
of the American Wildlife Society; Dr. Gordon Shrum, who
as a member of the National Research Council and the Defence Research Board, led a delegation of Canadian scien-
23 tists to the Seventh Pacific Science Congress in New Zealand; Professor R. D. James, Editor of the Canadian Journal
of Mathematics; Professor A. M. Crooker, Vice-President
of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada; Miss Evelyn
Mallory, First Vice-President of the Canadian Nurses Association and President of the Council of University Schools
and Department of Nursing; Dr. J. G. Hooley, President of
the B.C. Academy of Sciences; Dr. H. V. Warren, President
of the Natural Resources Conference of B. C.
This list will at least indicate some of the range of interest of faculty members and some of the responsibilities
in which their proficiency has involved them. I would also
like to note at this time some of the distinctions and awards
which have been given to faculty members during the year:
Dean H. F. Angus, L.L.D. degree, honoris causa, from McGill University; Dean J. N. Finlayson, D.Sc. honoris causa,
Laval University; Dean F. M. Clement, D.Sc, honoris causa,
University of British Columbia; Professor K. C. Mann,
O.B.E., at an investiture in Victoria, January, 1949, for services performed during the war. The Department of Poultry
Husbandry was honored by receiving an invitation to read
a paper at the Eighth World's Poultry Congress in Copenhagen, and Professor J. Biely attended for that purpose.
I am very pleased to record that teaching members
from this University have held positions and done work for
125 provincial organizations, 59 national organizations and
21 international organizations over the year. Thirty of our
teaching staff have received distinguished awards for outstanding service. I record these facts as an evidence of the
vital part which the teaching staff of this University is
playing in a great number of professional and national
services.
24 Congregations
The official opening of the new Library wing accompanied the Twenty-second Autumn Congregation
which took place on October 27. The Senate of the University decided to mark the occasion by the conferring
of honorary degrees on the retiring Librarian, Dr. Kaye
Lamb, then the newly appointed Canadian Archivist, and
on some other distinguished librarians and educationalists.
At that time some 370 students received degrees in
course. The honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred on Mr. John Bennet DeLong, B.A., former Inspector
of Schools in British Columbia; Mr. Ira Dilworth, B.A.,
M.A., General Supervisor, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation International Service; Mr. Francis Thrower Fairey,
B.A., Deputy Minister of Education, Victoria; Miss Jessie
Fisher Gordon, former Principal of Crofton House School
for Girls; Mr. Alexander Russell Lord, B.A., Principal of
Vancouver Normal School; Mr. Luther Harris Evans, A.B.,
M.A., Ph.D., L.H.D., L.L.D., Librarian of Congress, Washington, D.C; Mr. W. Stewart Wallace, B.A., M.A.,
F.R.S.C; and Mr. William Kaye Lamb, B.A, M.A., Ph.D.,
Librarian of the University of British Columbia. Dr. Ira
Dilworth delivered the Congregation Address.
In the spring of 1949 it was necessary to divide the
Congregation and to hold it on succeeding days, May 12
and 13, in order to accommodate the largest graduating
class in the history of the University. On those two dates
1,776 students received degrees in course. On the occasion
of his retirement, the degree of D.Sc. honoris causa, was
conferred on F. M. Clement, B.S.A., M.A., who was celebrating his thirtieth anniversary as Dean of the Faculty of
Agriculture. Honorary degrees were also conferred on Dean
25 William Harold Brittain, B.S.A., M.S., Ph.D., F.R.S.C,
Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture and Principal of Macdonald College, and Mr. James Gordon Taggart, C.B.E.,
B.S.A., Deputy Minister of Agriculture. The degree of
Doctor of Law was conferred on Mr. Basil Joseph Mathews,
M.A. (in absentia), Professor of Church History at Union
College.
Dean Brittain delivered the Congregation Address on
the first day and Dean Clement on the second.
Summer Session
The twenty-ninth Summer Session of the University
of British Columbia opened on July 4th and closed on
August 19th, 1949.
The Summer Session enrollments continue to decrease
with the decline in veteran enrollment, but not at the accelerated rate which was expected. Totals for the last four
years follow:
Enrollments 1946      1947      1948      1949
Credit Courses   2380      1815      1642      1426
Auditors       17 19 26 23
Totals   2397      1834      1668      1449
A gratifying feature of this Summer Session was the
evenness of the various courses. There were relatively few
very large or very small classes. Of the fifty-seven classes
only two contained fewer than ten students, and only five
enrolled more than seventy. Over half the classes had between twenty and fifty students.
In the 1949 Summer Session, for the first time, twenty
bursaries of fifty dollars were provided by the Board of
Governors. These were all used to good advantage. Scholar-
26 ships and loan funds were also provided by the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation and the Summer Session
Students' Association.
The policy of inviting distinguished professors from
other institutions was continued with its usual gratifying
results. This year ten professors from American universities, six from other Canadian universities, and one from
the United Kingdom gave courses for us. We are particularly glad of the opportunity thus provided for an exchange
of views on the subjects taught and the teaching methods.
The Summer Session Students' Association by providing concerts, social and athletic events added greatly to the
enjoyment of the session.
Library
In the interregnum between the departure of Dr. Kaye
Lamb to take up his new position as Canadian Archivist in
Ottawa and the appointment of Dr. Leslie Dunlap, formerly of the Library of Congress, Washington, as University
Librarian, Miss Ann Smith, head of the Reference Division, acted as Librarian for a period of six months. In addition to supervising the normal operations of the Library,
Miss Smith during her period of service had to cope with
some of the problems involved in moving into the newly
completed library wing. We are very grateful to her for
the admirable manner in which she administered the affairs of the Library during this interim period.
Dr. Dunlap brings with him a valuable background of
experience acquired during his years with the Library of
Congress, and his first year of service with us has been
largely devoted to making the best use of the excellent new
facilities provided by the enlarged library quarters.
27 The Acquisitions Division, established little more than
a year ago, handled in purchases and gifts to the Library
during the past year 12,001 volumes as compared with 9,628
in the previous year. A special activity of the Acquisitions
Division during the year was the expenditure of a special
fund for works in Clinical Psychology, and for additional
materials useful in the Ph.D. programs of the Physics, Biology and Zoology Departments.
In addition, a good deal of work was involved in the
acquisition of additional Slavic materials made available
by the Rockefeller grants previously referred to.
Circulation for the year at the Loan Desk amounted
to 108,191 volumes; the Reserve Book Room, 130,941; the
Periodicals Room, 13,281; the Reference Room, 8,788;
and the Fine Arts collection, 3,488 — a total of 264,689
items during the year as compared with last year's figure
of 219,535. This increase in circulation, despite the reduction of the student numbers, is probably the result of the
improved Library facilities.
The Reference Division in the new quarters is, we
feel, a particularly strong feature of the Library, and its
loan services from other libraries have been particularly useful in obtaining scholarly materials required by senior
students and faculty.
The Library also takes great pride in the strength of
its periodical files and a great deal of the credit for this
must be given to Mr. Roland Lanning for his extraordinary
knowledge of Scholarly Series publications. However, the
large and increasing numbers of periodicals acquired have
given rise to a very real binding problem. The 1,849
volumes bound in the Library this year represent only a
small part of the work to be done.
28 The Extension Library operates administratively as
a unit of the Library, but gives attention to groups not
part of the regular Library. During the past year the Extension Library circulated 10,740 volumes as compared with
7,177 in the preceding year, and 5,255 plays as compared
with 3,444 in 1947-48. The beginning of the University's
correspondence and extra-mural courses will make additional demands on the Extension Library.
University Museum
Although the University is now possessed of valuable
geological, biological, zoological, and anthropological collections, the only museum facilities we have up to the
present time are temporary ones in the Library basement.
These are devoted to our anthropological collections.
During the past year under the direction of Professor and
Mrs. Hawthorn the museum was moved to its present
larger quarters in the Library and many new display cases
were provided for the better displaying and use of existing
materials. The museum was formally opened in its new
quarters on March 15 in conjunction with 'Open House'
and since that time has been kept open in the afternoons
and evenings to accommodate a steady stream of visitors
both from the University and from off the campus.
The present arrangements allow for the display of
somewhat less than half of the materials now in our possession which, with some rotation of exhibits, is a fairly adequate proportion. The main task ahead, apart from current
operations of the museum, is the preparation of a system
of cataloguing which will promote better scientific use of
the museum and also promote fuller expansion of holdings.
During the year gifts to the estimated value of $6,120
29 were received, including the Raley collection of Northwest
Coast Indian materials donated by Mr. H. R. MacMillan.
The acquisition of this last collection makes our anthropological museum one of the better among Northwest Coast
collections.
Supplementary to the work of the museum has been
the gathering together of materials for a proposed Totem
Pole Park at the junction of Agronomy Road and Marine
Drive. This work, under the direction of Professor Hunter
Lewis, has been proceeding steadily with the result that the
present collection will be erected in the new site during
the coming spring and summer.
Art Gallery and Workshop
Also temporarily housed in the basement of the
Library are an art gallery and art workshop which, under
the direction of the University's Fine Arts Committee, have
been in full and interesting operation during the past year.
Exhibitions were displayed in the gallery continuously
throughout the year and changed every three weeks. These
attracted an extraordinary amount of attention from both
the student body and the public; the estimated attendance
amounting to 3,000 a month.
Exhibits in the gallery, and the equipment for the
workshop, have been supplied by the University Chapter
of the I.O.D.E. and their continuing support has been a
great encouragement to the voluntary efforts of the University's Fine Arts Committee.
The art workshop room, like the gallery, has been in
full operation and the response to courses in pottery, painting, sculpture, weaving and other arts and crafts has been
most gratifying.
30 Supplementing the gallery and workshop activities,
the Fine Arts Committee has arranged for a continuing
series of lectures, exhibits and performances covering the
various fields of poetry, drama, music and ballet, to name
but a few. Worthy of special attention was a noon-hour
reading of their own poems by Professors Birney and Dan-
iells, and Miss Dorothy Livesay in the University Auditorium. The enthusiastic reception of this program by
the student indicated most clearly their desire for an extension of University activity in the related field of the arts.
University Extension
The Department of University Extension continues to
bring the work of the University to all parts of the province
in a most interesting and useful manner. For the first time
in its history the Department was able to have several of
its members spend a good part of their time in the smaller
urban and rural areas in the province. More people than
ever before have participated in short courses, discussion
groups, film forums and the various other programs offered by the Department. Personal contacts gave rise to
the spontaneous promotion of our work among the communities and for this reason requests for information, advice and specific assistance have come to us in the mail in
unprecedented quantities.
In the past year members of the Extension Department have given short courses in home furnishings and
sewing in Prince Rupert, Smithers, Telkwa, Houston, Fort
Fraser, Prince George, Kimberley, Invermere, Cranbrook,
Salmon Arm, Winfield, Coldstream, Vernon, Sointula,
Alert Bay, Pemberton and several points on Vancouver
Island.
31 In the same manner courses in leathercraft, stencilling,
lino block printing, weaving, pottery and art were provided for many of the remote provincial areas by qualified
members of our staff.
The Agriculture Service continued its lecture and
evening class programs and a farm machinery field day
program similar to that held last year. Members of the Agricultural Engineering staff conducted twenty-nine such field
days, demonstrating the use and maintenance of farm
machinery to an aggregate of more than 2,100 farmers.
The Parent Education Service was able to help thirty-
two Parent Teachers' Association groups; provided demonstration courses for pre-school supervisors, conducted a
Parents' Institute in conjunction with the B.C. Parent-
Teachers' Federation, gave lectures and showed films at a
number of Interior and Vancouver Island points, and
sponsored a number of special speakers in the field of parent education.
The Fine Arts division of Extension work, through its
Theatre Services and Play Lending Library; through the
special courses off ered at Summer School in theatre, creative writing, painting, clay modelling, pottery and Photography; through the encouragement of all these arts and
crafts in a Fine Arts Display in the Brock Lounge; the
organization of private listening groups employing the
Phonograph Record Loan Service; and the promotion of a
winter series of evening classes in music with the services
of Professor Harry Adaskin, Frances Marr and Dr. Ida
Halpern has been of great assistance to the many people
who wanted direction in satisfying their creative desires
and in occupying their leisure time.
The Visual Education Service assisted 134 schools, 62
32 churches, 42 University Departments and 650 other organizations during the year. More than 350,000 persons
viewed the National Film Board and University films provided and administered by this service. Almost 1,000 moving picture films and 1,000 film strips make a wide selection of subject matter available to community groups. The
Service provides projectors, power generators, and where-
ever necessary and possible, an operator to show the films.
The fifth Dominion-Provincial Youth Training program was successfully completed on March 5 of this year.
Sponsored by the Provincial Department of Education and
the Dominion Department of Labor the School was administered by the Department of University Extension.
Ninety-eight students attended the eight-week session. The
curriculum stressed agricultural subjects for men and household science and crafts for women, as well as a broad course
in citizenship training.
The Co-operative educational program for B.C. fishermen is in its ninth year of operation and has shown a
steady growth since its beginning. Instruction in navigation and marine engine maintenance were among the
services provided this year. In addition, a number of conferences, public meetings, advisory sessions and extensive
pamphlet and news services were carried on.
One thousand, six hundred and twenty individuals
took advantage of the thirty-seven Evening Classes arranged
and administered by the Extension Department. In a number of cases the Department cooperated with business, industrial and labour groups to provide special courses of
value in specific industries and professions.
Many lectures were given by members of faculty to
audiences in all parts of the province. An approximate
33 total of 52,000 people listened to 628 University lectures
during the year.
The University attempts to keep the province informed of its policies and developments, through a system
of news releases. More than 6,000 people receive each
month a number of official University publications. In
addition, press releases are distributed regularly to 87 daily
and weekly newspapers, 30 trade journals, 3 international
news services and 15 radio stations throughout the province.
I should like to take this opportunity of thanking the
newspapers and radio stations of the province for their
unfailing interest in the work of the University and their
practical support in our programs of extension activities.
Finances
Summary of Revenues and Disbursements for
Fiscal Year, 1948-49
Revenues
%
Provincial Government      $1,250,000.00 33.21
Dominion Government
Supplementary Grant  466,363.01 12.39
Student Fees .*.... 1,700,865.51 45.20
Research and Sundry Grants 144,465.98 3.84
Miscellaneous  201,619.55 5.36
$3,763,314.05 ,00
34 Expenditures
%
Teaching costs
(including Library)  $2,211,005.50 58.75
Research  159,099.37 4.23
Administration  185,505.57 4.93
Maintenance  476,082.98 12.65
Emergency Accommodation. 176,439.05 4.69
Capital Expenditure  210,077.99 5.58
Miscellaneous and General... 345,103.59 9.17
$3,763,314.05        100.00
As will be seen from the foregoing summary statement
of revenues and expenditures the University's net operating
revenue in something in excess of $100,000 more than that
of the previous year. It is encouraging to note that, while the
federal government supplementary grant, on behalf of the
veteran students, continues to decline, the provincial government grant has been increased to provide for the increasing number of non-veteran students. It is further worth
noting the fact that this year's benefactions on behalf of
research and scholarships created an all time record. However, these sources of revenue are still insufficient to enable us to perform many of the services which the community can rightly expect us to undertake.
The percentage of revenue, 45.20%, paid by the
students in fees, is too large, I believe, in comparison with
other sources of revenue, but I hope that this proportion
will adjust itself in due course as other sources of revenue,
notably governmental and private contributions, increase.
35 On the expenditure side it will be noted that the cost
of emergency accommodation continues to decline, and
academic objectives to increase. This is a healthy development and as we wish to see it. Maintenance costs will continue high until our permanent building program enables
us to dispense with the bulk of our emergency accommodation. The temporary huts, although they are convenient
and necessary at the present time, will become increasingly
expensive to maintain, and this provides one of the primary
reasons for proceeding with permanent buildings as rapidly
as possible.
I am including the following statement of gross revenue and gross expenditure because it illustrates the importance of the University in the economic life of the community.
Gross Revenues %
Grants and Fees  $3,729,206.62                81
Board, Residence and
Service Revenues  917,707.92               19
$4,646,914.54 100
Gross Expenditures
%
Salaries and Wages
$2,416,569.25
52
Other Items	
2,230,345.29
48
$4,646,914.54 100
Only the net balance (either a small surplus or a small
deficit) obtained from the residences, food services, and
bookstore appears in our normal budget. When, however,
the gross income and outlay are added it becomes apparent
that  the   University's  annual  wage  and  salary  bill  of
36 $2,416,569.25, representing 52% of our total expenditures,
is a very considerable asset to the economic well-being of
the province and, in particular, of the Greater Vancouver
area.
Prizes, Scholarships, Bursaries, Loans
The total number of awards granted to students during
the academic year is shown in the following table:
No. of Awards
Description Amount Involved
Scholarships         $ 36,300 150
Prizes  3,400 60
Bursaries  27,000 220
Dominion-Provincial Aid  56,000 270
University Loans  10,000 50
Miscellaneous  2,000 10
Total    $134,700 760
Recipients of Dominion-Provincial Student Aid were
chosen at joint meetings of the Joint Faculty Committee
of the University and officials of the Department of Education. I should like to express the University's thanks to
those officials and, in particular, to Colonel F. T. Fairey,
Deputy Minister, for the sympathetic consideration and
generous treatment of our students. Recipients of named
and special bursaries are selected by a Joint Faculty Committee under the Chairmanship of Dean Walter H. Gage.
I should like to take this opportunity of commending,
on behalf of both the University and the Student body, the
energetic and considerate way in which Dean Gage's Committee has both attracted support for prizes, scholarships
and bursaries, and has distributed them in the interests of
good scholarships and worthy effort.
37 Although all grants, gifts and bequests are formally
acknowledged in an appendix to this report, I should like
to make special mention of the following generous contributions to the scholarship, bursary and loan funds during
the past year. $100,000 was received from the estate of the
late Paul E. Murphy, of Ocean Park, for a student loan fund,
and the Committee has been busy setting up the terms in
accordance with the will under which this loan is to operate.
During the year in excess of $51,000 was received from the
estate of the late Jonathan C Rogers, and over the same
period some $7,000 from the estate of the late Anne S.
Campbell to be applied to these purposes. During the year
also Gault Brothers Limited, in commemoration of the
Company's fiftieth anniversary in British Columbia, made
the donation of $25,000 to provide annual scholarships in
Commerce over a period of ten years. The British Columbia
Electric Railway Company Limited is now providing an
annual grant of $5,000 for scholarships in the several faculties of the University. A further fund of $3,520 was donated by friends and associates of the late Sperry S. Phillips
to provide an annual bursary for students in Agriculture or
Home Economics. For these new funds and for the renewals
of many other scholarship, prize, bursary and loan funds
donated earlier, I should like to express our sincere thanks.
It is, I think, worth noting that of the 760 scholarship
and bursary awards made, the recipients came from approximately 100 different centres in British Columbia; and
that approximately 50% of the total amount was granted
to students from areas outside the lower mainland. The
University is anxious to help any well-qualified student
who wants to come to the University and who needs assistance. Statistics are an inadequate reflection of the actual
38 amount of encouragement that is given by these awards to
the young men and women of the province who are attempting (many of them almost completely on their own resources) to educate themselves.
It is for this reason that we regard the work of our
Prizes, Scholarships and Bursaries Committee as of very
great importance and it is for this reason also that we are
exceptionally grateful to those who have given and are increasingly giving this work their generous and practical
support.
Building Program
On February 17, 1949, the Honourable W. T. Straith,
K.C, Provincial Minister of Education, announced the appropriation of $1,500,000 to aid the expansion program on
this campus. Last year I had regretfully announced that the
rising cost of materials and labor was seriously impeding
our building program, and that without further financial
assistance our plans for expansion would fall considerably
short of our original goals. This generous grant from the
Government has enabled us to go ahead with a substantial
part of our original projects.
The Biological Sciences and Pharmacy Building is
nearing completion although it will lack one floor and one
wing until some future date when more money is available.
Plans have been drawn up for a Preventive Medicine and
Nursing Building and it has been put to tender. The upper
floors of the Applied Sciences Building are now being completed, and an allotment of $200,000 will assist materially
in the construction of our War Memorial Gymnasium.
The University suffered severe losses by fire during
the year. Two large fires, both of them in temporary huts,
39 destroyed a Psychology Laboratory and Library, parts of
our Nursing and Health facilities, and our Home Economics classrooms and equipment in their entirety.
Repairs were completed on the Nursing units, and
substitute accommodation prepared for the others with a
minimum loss of time, as a result of the night and day
efforts of the maintenance staff.
However, I would like to make particular mention of
the Home Economics Building. We had long been contemplating the construction of a permanent unit for Home
Economics. When the fire mentioned above occurred, we
set about the construction of an adequate, fire-resistant
Home Economics Building. With the aid of a gift of $78,-
606 from the estate of the late Jonathan Rogers for that
purpose, a loan of $22,485 from the Parent-Teachers' Association fund, and the insurance from the burned building, we were able to begin building almost immediately.
In order to rush the building to completion for use in the
fall term, the Building Superintendent was asked to undertake the construction. I should like to offer the University's thanks to Mr. Lee and those associated with him for
the completion of this building in time for the opening of
classes. The structure, a fire-resistant unit of hollow tile
and glass, is modern in line and extremely functional. It
is indeed a welcome addition to our growing list of new
buildings.
Of the $1,500,000 granted by the Government $650,-
000 was specifically earmarked for Women's Residences.
We have long needed adequate residences for both men
and women. This amount of money will permit the construction of three modern, fire-resistant dormitories housing
fifty women each. Architects' blueprints are in an advanced
40 stage of development and construction should start some
time in the winter months for use, we hope, in the fall
of 1950.
According to my usual custom in these reports I have
listed below the buildings that are urgently needed and still
remain to be constructed under the expansion plan:
Men's Residences
A new Arts Building
A Law Building
A medical Sciences Building
An Administration Building
A modern Cafeteria
An Extension and Adult Education Building
A University Museum & Art Centre
Agriculture and Forestry Buildings
Housing
The fourth year of the University's housing program
was generally considered a successful one. There was no
appreciable decline in demand for our various forms of
housing. Married quarters for students and staff with children continue to be insufficient to meet the need. It has
been somewhat easier to find accommodation for single
students in private homes, but in spite of this, the waiting
lists for dormitories are longer than at any previous time.
This is because the advantages of dormitory life are becoming better known. The low rates, physical convenience and
social advantages of these quarters have an understandable
appeal.
During the year the Housing Committee took over
three additional buildings at Little Mountain Camp and
made them available to students who were prepared to
41 construct their own suites. Twenty-eight student families
have taken advantage of this plan.
It would appear that there will be a continued need
for low-cost housing for both single and married students,
as well as for members of the staff. The following figures
on present accommodation may be of some interest.
Number of students, men and women, in each camp—
Acadia Camp (single men)  292
Acadia Camp (Single women)     88
Fort Camp (single men)  386
Total  766
Number of married couples in trailer camps-
No. 1 Trailer Camp     24
No. 2 Trailer Camp     27
No. 3 Trailer Camp     18
Little Mountain Trailer Camp     15
Total families  84
Number of married couples in each camp—
Wesbrook   44
Acadia  62
Fort  3
Lulu Island  35
Little Mountain  285
Total families  . 429
Children attending play schools—
Acadia Camp
junior (2-4)  14
senior  (4-6)  16
Total. .    30
42 Little Mountain Camp-
play school     40
grade school     45
Total     95
Total population of camps—approximately 2200.
Much of the experience gained in the operations of
these housing ventures over the past few years has been
most helpful in planning the first units and future administration of our permanent women's residences.
It will be some years yet, however, before the existing
temporary housing facilities will have outlived their use-
fullness.
Counselling and Placement Bureau
The program of Veteran Counselling instituted on the
campus after the war proved to be of considerable value to
the student veteran in assisting him to choose his courses
and his vocation. With the decline in veteran enrollment
the Counselling program is being adapted to the needs of
the non-veteran students. In the year under review, 3,400
student veterans were individually interviewed by the
Counselling staff, and while the veterans still occupied the
major portion of the Bureau's time, it was found possible
to administer personality, aptitude and intelligence tests
to 800 non-veteran students, 700 of whom returned for
interviews and consultations with staff members. Five
hundred pre-medical and pre-dental students were given a
special group of tests.
In addition to service as a Counselling agency
the Bureau supervised Graduate Record and A.A.M.C.
examinations and functioned with gratifying results as a
43 Placement Bureau. More than 4,380 positions were listed
in the Bureau files over a twelve-month period and 3,948
of these were filled by our students.
I wish to thank the business and industrial firms who
cooperated with us by making their job vacancies known
to the Bureau. A follow-up system used by the Bureau
seems to indicate that the majority of our students are
rendering highly satisfactory service.
The Counselling services of the Bureau are administered on a volunteer basis but they are coming to be
considered by the students an important and valuable part
of the service which they expect the University to provide.
Student Activities and Open House
The past year has been a particularly successful and
busy one so far as student activities have been concerned.
Despite the institution of an austerity program undertaken
by the students in keeping with their tradition university
projects, the War Memorial Gymnasium, they maintained
a full program of social, cultural and athletic activities
which were characterized by keen participation and a high
degree of skill.
March 5, 1949 marked the most successful visitors' day
in the history of the University. The Open House Committee made what they regarded as a liberal estimate of
some 20,000 to 25,000 people in attendance, but their plans
allowed the 40,000 friends who actually came to flow in a
steady, enthusiastic stream through buildings, laboratories,
agricultural and engineering plants.
Arrangements for the Open House entailed organization of a major kind. A Committee, headed by an
undergraduate, Mr. Bob Currie, and predominantly under-
44 graduate in composition, worked for four months arranging
for the more than 250 separate displays and demonstrations
that were features of that occasion.
The imaginative and highly effective methods employed by the student organizers were a source of considerable admiration. No detail was overlooked from the
preparation of carefully worked out displays to the establishment of a nursery and play school to care for children.
This proved too small unfortunately to meet the needs of
the many parents who wanted to take advantage of this
service while visiting the University.
In the week leading up to and including Open House
day civic groups and members of the provincial legislature
were entertained by the University and shown over the
premises.
A student guide system employed 1200 undergraduates
on shifts from 10:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and the entire guide
service and booth administration was controlled from a
central exchange over an Army walkie-talkie hook-up that
kept operations on all parts of the campus organized and
completely maintained.
The enthusiasm and responsibility of the students as
hosts was most impressive, with the result that our guests
were, I think, able to see what we are trying to do, what
we have to do it with, and what the University has to
contribute to the community it serves. I should like to take
this opportunity of thanking all those who contributed to
the success of the occasion.
Naval, Army, and Airforce Training
On October 26 the Joint Services University Training
Committee   met   to   consider   the   establishment   of   an
45 R.CA.F. Auxiliary on the campus. Subsequently I recommended Mr. A. R. Haines to command the R.C.A.F.
Auxiliary, University of British Columbia Flight, a position
which he has filled most efficiently thus far.
A program of recruiting was commenced immediately
and was continued until January 10, 1949, when 54 students
were selected from an extraordinarily large number of
candidates. Morale in the Flight has been good and parade
attendance has averaged 96%.
From May 7 to June 26, 43 members of the Flight
participated in an Officers' Induction Course at Abbotsford
Flying Station. Nine others were selected for flying
training.
The University Naval Training Division reports that
22 of the 77 student applicants were enrolled in the first
year of training. Sixteen of these were able to pass the
Selection Board and are now classified as Cadets. Thirteen
second-year men passed the Selection Board to become
Cadets. Parade attendance over the year was 85%. Cadets
saw summer service on a cruiser, a frigate, a destroyer, a
minesweeper and a hydrographical survey ship.
One hundred and thirty-nine officers and cadets in
the Canadian Officers' Training Corps received local headquarters training during the period, and 130 of these
attended summer camps. One hundred and twelve officer-
cadets received practical training during the summer of
1948 and 74 new cadets selected from 150 applicants were
taken on strength after April 1.
46 Appendix   A
Registrar's Report To The President
1
Registration 1948-1949
With Geographic Origins
2
Parental Occupations
Diplomas and Honorary Degrees
Conferred
Location of Graduates and
Cumulative Total of Registration
5
Cumulative Total of Degrees Conferred
Charles B. Wood, Registrar
October 25, 1949 REGISTRATION FOR 1948 49
Regular Session
Faculty of Arts and Science
Men Women Total
First Year Arts
First Year Home
Economics
First Year Physical
Education
Second Year Arts
Second Year Commerce 132
Second Year Home
Economics
Second Year Pharmacy
Second Year Physical
Education
Third Year Arts
Third Year Commerce
Third Year Home
Economics
Third Year Pharmacy
Third Year Physical
Education
Fourth Year Arts
Four Year Commerce
Fourth Year Home
Economics
Fourth Year Pharmacy
Fourth Year Physical
Education
Graduates
Doctor of Philosophy
Bachelor of Social Work 39
Master of Social Work    13
778     368   1146
29
653
207
61
25
532
210
43
38
280
9
Teacher Training
Extra-Sessional
Students
Directed Reading
Students
Less Double
Registrations
Nursing
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year
Certificate Course
110
121
90
43       43
15
5
20
723
279
1002
132
14
146
66
66
65
9
74
12
232
9
57
11
54
11
65
69
14
35
41
885
216
57
72
7
32
242
774
14
224
54
48
49
345
9
108
27
145
13      134
46     136
-110     -21    -131
4063    1659   5722
18
17
14
16
18
17
14
16
35       35
100     100
Faculty of Applied Science
Men Women Total
First Year
275
275
First Year Architecture 35
35
First Year B.S.F.
36
T
37
Second Year
453
....
453
Second Year
Architecture
33
2
35
Second Year B.S.F.
70
70
Third Year
565
565
Third Year Architecture 20
	
20
Third Year B.S.F.
77
77
Fourth Year
352
1
353
Fourth Year
Architecture
8
8
Fourth Year B.S.F.
41
41
Graduates
39
	
39
2004
4   2008
Faculty of Agriculture
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year
Fifth Year
Graduates
Occupational Course       14 1       15
57
8
65
87
12
99
123
13
136
131
16
147
12
1
13
24
8
32
448
59     507
Faculty of Latv
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
TOTALS
Veterans-
Men:
Women:
Non Veterans:
Men:
Women:
Summer Session 1948
All Years
Botany Evening Class-'
1948-49
167
154
128
13
7
4
180
161
132
449
24
473
6964
1846
8810
3046
184
3918
1662
8810
1145
533
1678
12
48 WHERE STUDENTS COME FROM
1948-1949
A A A A
25       100        500 1000
1. Cariboo     	
2. Northern British Columbia..
3. British Columbia Coast	
4. East  Kootenay	
5. West   Kootenay	
6. Peace   River..
46
41
257
162
290
15
917
637
327
107
5127
12. Canada (Outside British
Columbia)    882
13. Other  Countries    146
7. Vancouver   Island.
8. Lower Mainland—.
9. Okanagan   (Kamloops)..	
10. Kamloops  (North Thompson).
11. Vancouver 	
49 OCCUPATION OF PARENTS
1948-1949
Agricultural
Farmers and Stock Raisers
652
Foremen
6
Labourers
7
Clerical
Accountants and Auditors
259
Bookkeepers and Cashiers
21
Office Clerks
140
Shipping Clerks
25
Stenographer
1
Construction
Owners and Managers
148
Foremen
13
Brick and Stone Masons
11
Carpenters
202
Electricians
2
Painters, Decorators, Glaziers
47
Plasterers and Lathers
9
Plumbers and Pipe Fitters
29
Structural Iron Workers
3
Other Construction Occupations
23
Finance
Owners, Managers, Officials,
(Finance and Insurance)
163
Insurance Agents
98
Real Estate Agents and Dealers
66
Stock and Bond Brokers
34
Other Finance Occupations
6
Fishing
Fishermen
29
Logging
Owners and Managers 59
Foremen 4
Foresters and Timber Cruisers 18
Lumbermen (Axemen, Cable
Tenders, Riggers, etc.) 66
Labouring
Labourers  (Not Agricultural,
Fishing, Logging, or Mining) 93
Manufacturing and Mechanical
Owners and Managers 218
Foremen 40
Inspectors, Examiners, Gaugers
(Metal) 2
Inspectors, Graders, Scalers (Wood)    15
Bakers 16
Blacksmiths, Forgemen 11
Boiler Firemen 8
50
Boilermakers,  Platers,  Riveters 9
Bookbinders 1
Boot and Shoe Repairers 10
Butchers and Meat Cutters 17
Cabinet and Furniture Makers 8
Coopers 2
Dressmakers 1
Electrical Appliances Repairmen 70
Engravers ana Lithographers 5
Filers, Grinders, Sharpeners 10
Fitters and Assemblers 3
Furnacemen, Heaters  (Metal) 17
Jewellers and Watchmakers 25
Machinists   (Metal) 87
Mechanics and Repairmen 71
Millers   (Flour and Grain) 2
Milliners 3
Millwrights 14
Moulders, Coremakers, Casters 6
Paper Makers 9
Patternmakers 3
Photographers 3
Polisher  (Metal) 1
Printers 42
Sawyers  (Wood) 42
Sheet Metal Workers 13
Stationary Enginemen 38
Tailors 16
Tool Makers, Die Makers, Setters       3
Upholsterers 2
Welders and Flame Cutters 12
Wood Machinists 1
Other Occupation in Clothing and
Textile  Products 1
Other Occupations in Food 21
Other Occupations in Fur Products II
Other Occupations in Leather
Products 2
Other Occupations in Liquors and
Beverages 4
Other Occupations in Metal
Products 7
Other Occupations in Non-Metal
Mineral Products 5
Other Occupations in Wood and
Paper Products 8
Other Occupations in Other
Manufacturing 2
Mining and Quarrying
Owners and Managers
Foremen
Labourers
Miners and Millmen
Oil Well Drillers
Quarriers
18
8
49
2
2
1 Personal Services
Hotel Keepers and Managers 41
Laundry Owners 1
Restaurant and Tavern Keepers 25
Boardinghouse Keepers 1
Barbers, Hairdressers 25
Cleaners and Dyers 13
Cooks 17
Domestic Servants 2
Elevator Tenders 3
Guards and Caretakers 43
Housekeepers, Stewards 11
Janitors and Sextons 18
Nurses   (Practical) 6
Undertakers 5
Waiters 5
Other Personal Service Occupations     4
Public Services
Firemen 28
Government Inspectors 62
Officers  (Armed Forces) 29
Other Ranks (Armed Forces) 21
Policemen and Detectives 36
Postmasters 24
Postmen and Mail Carriers 27
Public Service Officials 289
Other Public Service Occupations       6
Professional Services
Architects 11
Artists and Art Teachers 8
Authors, Editors, Journalists 27
Chemists and Metallurgists 68
Clergymen and Priests 77
Dentists 49
Draughtsmen and Designers 9
Engineers (Civil) 144
Engineers  (Electrical) 33
Engineers (Mechanical) 46
Engineers  (Mining) 36
Judges and Magistrates 7
Lawyers and Notaries 105
Librarians 1
Musicians and Music Teachers 13
Nuns   or Brothers 1
Nurses  (Graduate) 1
Nurses  (In training) 1
Osteopaths and Chiropractors 4
Physicians and Surgeons 155
Professors and College Principals      30
Religious Workers 2
Social Welfare Workers 16
Teachers   (School) 141
Veterinary Surgeons 11
Other Professional Service
Occupations 38
Recreational Services
Owners and Managers
Actors, Showmen, Sportsmen
Motion Picture Projectionists
Trade
Owners, Managers, Dealers,
(Retail)
Owners,  Managers, Dealers,
(Wholesale)
Floorwalkers and Foremen
Advertising Agents
Brokers and Agents
Bill Collector
Commercial Travellers
Credit Man
Hawkers or Pedlars
Inspectors, Graders, Samplers
Interior Decorators
Packers, Wrappers
Purchasing Agents and Buyers
Sales Agents, Canvassers
Salespersons in Stores
Transportation and Communications
Owners, Officials, Managers
Foremen
Inspectors
Agents  (Ticket Station)
Aviators  (Not in Armed Forces)
Baggagemen and Expressmen
Brakemen   (Railway)
Bus Drivers
Captains, Mates, Pilots
Chauffeurs and Taxi Drivers
Conductors (Steam Railway)
Deliverymen and Drivers
Dispatchers   (Train)
Engineering Officers   (Ships)
Linemen and Servicemen
Lockkeepers, Canalmen
Locomotive Engineers
Longshoremen and Stevedores
Messengers
Radio Station Operators
Seamen, Sailors, Deckhands
Sectionmen and Trackmen
Streetcar Operators
Switchmen, Signalmen, Flagmen
Telegraph Operators
Truck Drivers
Other Transportation Occupations
Other Occupations
Invalid
Student
Housewife
437
77
5
9
31
1
11
1
1
2
1
2
6
204
16
52
32
7
28
2
3
2
2
51
7
29
1
3
16
20
2
57
17
2
5
8
3
21
2
12
20
95
7
12
2
Others Unspecified
TOTAL
2475
8811
51 HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED
1925:
CURRIE, Sir Arthur William
(deceased)
McKECHNIE, Robert Edward
(deceased)
MacLEAN, John Duncan (deceased)
NICHOL, Walter Cameron
(deceased)
PLASKETT, John Stanley (deceased)
SUZZALLO, Henry (deceased)
YOUNG, Henry Esson (deceased)
1929:
BURNETT, Frank
1930:
BOGGS, Theodore Harding
1932:
MARLER, Herbert
PAUL, Edward Burness (deceased)
STEVENS, Henry Herbert
1933:
GRAVIER, Charles Joseph  (deceased)
HATAI, Shinkishi
HOWAY, Frederick William
(deceased)
TAYLOR, Geoffrey Ingram
TORY, Henry Marshall (deceased)
VAN ITERSON, Gerrit
VAUGHAN, Thomas Wayland
WONG, Wen Hao
1934:
TOKUGAWA, Iyemasa
1935:
BABCOCK, John Pease (deceased)
BESSBOROUGH, Earl of
The Right Honourable Vefe Bra-
bazon Ponsonby, Earl of Bessborough, Governor General of Canada
1936:
CLEVELAND, Ernest Albert
HIBBERT, Harold (deceased)
MacMILLAN, Sir Ernest
MURPHY, Denis (deceased)
REID, Robie Lewis (deceased)
THOMSON, David
1937:
PATULLO, Thomas Dufierin
1938:
DUFF,   The   Right   Honourable   Sir
Lyman Poore (deceased)
FARRIS,   Honourable   Senator   John
Wallace de Beque
52
FINLAY, William Viscount Finlay of
Nairn
MacGILL, Helen Gregory (deceased)
VANDERBILT, Arthur Thomas
1939:
BOVING, Paul Axel (deceased)
HAMBER,    The    Honourable    Eric
Werge, Lt. Gov. of B.C.
TWEEDSMUIR,    Lord,    The    Right
Honourable, Governor General of
Canada (deceased)
1942:
FARRIS, Evlyn Fenwick
FRASER, Charles McLean (deceased)
JAMIESON, Annie Bruce
ROBERTSON, Lemuel Fergus
1944:
ATHERTON, Ray
KLINCK, Leonard Sylvanus
LIU, Shih-Shun
MacDONALD, Malcolm
PEARKES, George Randolph
1945:
ATHLONE, Earl of
His Excellency the Right Honourable The Earl of Athlone, K.G.,
Governor General of Canada
BARR, Percy Munson
CODY, Henry John
KEENLEYSIDE, Hugh Llewellyn
LETSON, Harry Farnham Germainc
LETT, Sherwood
MURPHY, William Cameron
PLANT, John Lawrence
ROBERTSON, Norman Alexander
ROSS, Phyllis Gregory
STEAD, Gordon Wilson
VOLKOFF, George Michael
1946:
CRAIGIE, John Herbert
HARRIS, Lawren
PALMER, Richard Claxton
PENFIED, Wilder Gravis
WILLIS, Samuel John (deceased)
1947:
DuBRIDGE, Lee Alvin
HART, The Honourable John, Premier of British Columbia
HEINZE, Bernard
LAWRENCE, Ernest Orlando
MacKENZIE, Chalmers Jack
SOLANDT, Omond McKillop
WOODS, Walter Sainsbury 1948:
ALEXANDER, His Excellency Field
Marshal, The Right Honourable
The Viscount Alexander of Tunis,
Governor General of Canada
BEZANSON, Anne Catherine
BUCHANAN, Daniel
DeLONG, John Bennett
DILWORTH, Ira
EVANS, Luther Harris
FAIREY, Francis Thrower
GORDON, Jessie Fisher
HEENEY, Arnold Danford Patrick
LAMB, William Kaye
LEVESQUE, Georges-Henri
LORD, Alexander Russell
RAVENHILL, Miss Alice
THOMPSON, Walter Palmer
WALLACE, William Stewart
WEIR, George Moir
1949:
BRITTAIN, William Harold
CLEMENT, Frederick Moore
CRONKITE, Frederick Clinton
GRISWOLD, Erwin Nathaniel
MacDONALD, Vincent Christopher
MATHEWS, Basil Joseph
PARRY, David Hughes
RICHARDS, Albert Edward
TAGGART, James Gordon
THOMPSON, Homer Armstrong
WRIGHT, Cecil Augustus
DIPLOMAS ISSUED
Teacher
Public Health
Social
Occupational
Year
Training
Nursing
Work
Agriculture
TOTA
1934
61
10
71
October
3
	
3
6
1935
65
15
3
3
86
October
1
7
8
1936
60
15
75
October
.
	
12
12
1937
39
16
4
59
October
1
5
19
25
1938
65
18
1
1
87
October
2
15
	
17
1939
54
14
2
4
74
October
I
1
24
._
26
1940
66
12
3
5
86
October
2
23
25
1941
68
~9
1
2
80
October
	
22
22
1942
59
To
4
4
77
October
1
17
	
18
1943
28
27
2
57
October
„
12
12
1944
24
29
8
61
October
1 (Tune)             1
24
26
1945
21
32
1
3
57
October
_
2
18
20
1946
45
39 June)
	
18
102
October
—
5
	
5
1947
41
48
38
127
October
4
6
	
10
1948
58
„_
8
66
July
5
32
37
1949
127
18 (June)
	
7
152
July
6
	
 _
6
October
—
8
—
3
53 LOCATION OF GRADUATES
October, 1949
Vancouver
British
Columbia
ft
ft
ti i i i
Canada Great       U.S.A.      Others
Britain
Number in:
Vancouver
Other parts of B.C	
Other Parts of Canada..
Great   Britain	
... 5685
... 2944
_. 1059
92
United States of America    495
Other   countries      44
Number whose address is
unknown 	
1377
TOTAL
Number deceased	
.11696
647
GRAND TOTAL 12,343
N.B. These figures do not include original
members of Convocation.
Symbols
50 10() 5011
tK
1000 REGISTRATION
Session
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945-46
1946-47
vJ!    1947-48
1948-49
Arts &
Science
_ 1147
_ 1238
- 1337
_ 1499
.._ 1590
_. 1634
_ 1664
- 1724
_ 1763
_ 1744
_ 1709
._. 2098
    4814
Applied
Science
287
320
336
366
416
419
434
466
488
522
515
546
1083
Nursing
48
57
68
47
50
59
65
60
63
98
67
112
128
Agriculture
71
80
95
100
117
139
166
155
140
113
147
Law
406
Social
Work
Teacher
Training
Course
Total
Winter
Session
Courses,
Summer   Corresp.   Grand
Session Extra-Sessl: Total
Bot. Even.
	
61
1606
370
124
2100
	
66
1652
377
165
2294
	
62
1883
464
278
2625
	
42
2049
566
306
2921
	
67
2223
650
279
3152
	
57
2286
659
290
3235
	
69
2371
715
253
3339
	
71
2487
587
206
3280
	
68
2537
457
184
3178
	
34
2538
329
98
2965
	
26
2430
441
131
3002
51
20
2974
861
113 3948)
ial Sprii
lg Session-
-Ex-Service Personnel
    278)
4226
5666
2003
141
552
5750
2115
112
546
5172
2008
100
507
151 9151)
Special Spring Session—Ex-Service Personnel  2014) 11165
240 93 46 8741 1781 294 10816
409 105 70 9374 1626 209 11189
473 135 145 8810 1430 282 10252 DEGREES CONFERRED
M.A.
BA.Sc.
Grand
Year  M.A.      BA.    B.Com.  B.Ed.     Sc. B.H.E.     B.A.Sc.   B.S.F. Nurs. B.S.W. M.S.A. M.S.W. B.S.A. B.S.P. B.P.E.   LL.B.   Total   Total
1934  11
204
31
	
3
	
37
 ,
5
__
4
,
12
Oct. 6
36
5
	
1
	
5
 .
	
	
1
	
3
1935  14
196
23
_
8
__
57
 ,
13
....
2
_
19
Oct. 12
45
5
	
	
	
5
-~
	
	
	
	
1
1936  15
175
21
__
6
__
50
, 1, _
7
.
5
_
16
Oct. 10
38
1
	
2
	
3
	
	
	
3
	
2
1937  21
190
28
	
4
48
	
2
	
7
	
14
Oct. 9
54
8
	
	
	
6
 .
1
__
1
  ■
1
1938  20
204
31
__
6
__
56
 .
7
•_
3
, ,
19
Oct. 10
53
3
	
2
_
4
	
	
	
	
	
5
1939  19
217
22
7
__
71
	
8
4
__
22
Oct. 5
63
6
 ;
	
9
	
	
.	
1
	
2
1940  30
212
37
	
4
	
71
	
13
	
3
	
18
Oct. 6
62
1
	
	
	
1
	
3
1941  21
189
26
7
,
81
1
8
2
	
19
Oct. 8
73
9
1
3
1942  14
170
52
9
82
3
6
2
	
26
Oct. 12
51
1
3
2
	
	
_
2
—.
5
1943  13
167
31
2
3
92
2
12
'	
3
	
25
Oct. 8
51
1
3
	
1
	
	
	
1
—
4
1944  6
163
37
I
7
	
87
3
9
1
24
Oct. 1
45
4
7
	
1
I
1
	
	
—
3
1945  10
189
43
4
97
3
8
2
19
Oct. 5
41
4
8
~4
	
3
	
	
■	
1
__
5
1946  12
220
54
9
2
15
112
12
19
37
1
32
Oct. 12
96
56
19
10
	
5
I
2
1
3
—
4
1947  25
385
151
15
14
28
131
9
16
56
11
52
Oct. 11
151
78
32
7
6
4
1
	
1
2
~i
4
1948  33
599
208
21
6
39
170
15
14
56
7
91
Oct. 20
192
64
41
6
6
6
1
4
4
3
4
9
1949  36
698
190
14
12
48
326
41
14
69
5
6
134
47      31
307
3583
	
57
3640
332
3972
__
68
4040
295
4335
_
59
4394
—
314
4708
	
80
4788
346
5134
	
77
5211
—
370
5581
	
86
5667
388
6055
	
74
6129
354
6483
94
6577
364
6941
	
76
7017
	
350
7367
	
69
7436
338
7774
	
63
7837
375
8212
	
71
8283
	
525
8808
	
209
9017
	
893
9910
—
305
10215
59
1318
11535
4
364
11899
101
1772
13671 Appendix B
GIFTS, GRANTS AND BEQUESTS
(September 1, 1948 to April 15, 1949)
The Hamber Endowment British Columbia Forest Products Ltd.:
A gift from the Honourable Eric W. for   instruction   in   Forest   Entom-
Hamber, C.M.G., B.A., LL.D, creat- ology         $5,000.00
ing the Hamber Endowment, to be Canadian Association for the Advance-
used for the purposes of Medical Ed- ment of Pharmacy: for assistance-
cation    $50,000.00          sniPs ln Pharmacy $600.00
Canadian Club of Vancouver for the
Grants and Gifts for Research and Re- Canadian Club Lectureship, $500.00
search Equipment Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company
Atomic Energy Control Board: to the Ltd.: for equipment in Geology
Department of Physics for the Van         $100.00
de  Graaf Generator.  $25,000.00 Department of National  Health  and
British Columbia Academy of Sciences: Welfare, Ottawa: to the Department
annual research grant $150.00 of Bacteriology and Preventive Medi-
Canadian Cancer Society   (B.C. Divi- cine, and Nursing and Health, for
sion) : to the Department of Physics extension  of  facilities  and  training
for Cancer Research  $15,000.00 of personnel in public health	
Defence Research Board:   $19,500.00
to  the  Department  of  Physics  for Fiddes, Mr. Robert: for the Chair of
research   $14,950.00 Music  $5,000.00
National Cancer Institute of Canada: Fisher, the estate of the late May C:
to  the Department of  Physics  for for work in Aeronautics $750.00
Cancer   research  $3,300.00 Gibson,  Mr. David   (Robert Simpson
National Research Council: to the De- Company,   Toronto):   for   Slavonic
partments  of  Biology  and  Botany, Studies  . $100.00
Chemistry, Dairy Bacteriology, Min- Lady Davis Foundation:  for a special
ing and Metallurgy, and Physics for appointment  in  Geology  and  Geo-
various research projects... $38,270.00 graphy and for expenses in connec-
North American Cyanamid Ltd.  (Nia- tion with an appointment in Mathe-
gara Falls): for a special project in matics   $3,500.00
Horticulture  $800.00 Marwell Construction Company Ltd.:
Provincial Department of Agriculture: for the purchase of visual material
(a) for investigational work by the in Architecture — -....$600.00
Faculty of Agriculture and the Pro- MacMillan, Mr. H. R., C.B.E.: for the
vincial   Department   in   seed   and purchase of the Raley Collection for
cleaning and potato harvesting mach- the Anthropological Museum	
inery   .   $1,500.00   $5,000.00
(b) special contribution to the Fac- MacMillan Export Company Ltd., the
ulty of Agriculture for conference H. R.: for instruction in Forest Men-
expenses   —$400.00         suration $4,000.00
_,,   . Pacific Coast Copper Company Ltd.:
Grants and Gifts for Chairs of Instruc- to  the Department  of  Geology  for
tion,    Lectureships,    Courses,    Special special equipment         . $100.00
Facilities and Equipment Rockefeller Foundation   (New York):
American Council for Learned Socie- to Slavonic Studies for the purchase
ties (Pacific Coast Committee for the of audio-visual aids $1,000.00
Humanities) : travel and study grant Shell  Oil  Company   (Vancouver)   for
for a member of the Department of equipment in  Chemistry $250.00
Music   $750.00 Stevens, Mr. W. L.: to the Department
Brettell Electric Company Ltd.: of Physics for special equipment	
for   the   construction   of   the   Art  $75.00
Gallery   $250.00 Vancouver Board of Trade, Advertising
British    Columbia    Electric    Railway and Sales Bureau: to the Department
Company Ltd.:  for the lighting of of Commerce for special courses in
the Art Gallery $1,500.00 Advertising    $1,000.00
57 Miscellaneous
British Columbia Electric Railway
Company Ltd.: membership for the
University in the International Conference of Large Electric Systems
(C.I.G.R.E.)    $50.00
Community Arts Council of Vancouver
further contribution to the Housing
Survey $57.12
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire: for the nursery play school at
Little Mountain  $700.00
Pemberton Women's Institute (Pem-
berton): for Home Economics, $10.00
Ravenhill, Dr. Alice: for a Home Economics  $10.00
Stewart, Mrs. Dougles M.: for the
President's Fund  $200.00
Victoria Home Economics Association
(Victoria): for Home Economics	
 $25.00
Anonymous: for the President's Fund
 $40.00
Gifts for Campus Development
Eddie, H. M. and Sons: five hundred
hybrid tea and hybrid polyantha
roses to plant the new "display and
experimental rose garden."
Fyfe-Smith, Mr. and Mrs.: perennial
plants for the rock garden.
Students, Faculty of Agriculture: design fountain and planting in the
Library reflection pool, in appreciation of the work of Professor Frank
E. Buck in landscaping the University Campus.
Vancouver Board of Park Commissioners: shrubs for campus use and teaching purposes.
Anonymous: three bronze plaques for
use or attachment at suitable points
on the campus to deal with the establishment of the University, the
uniqueness and grandeur of the
present site, and the students' gifts
of buildings.
Gifts to the Library
Bell, Mrs. Gordon: approximately 50
volumes of foreign publications.
Canadian Medical Association (Montreal) : a large number of medical
books.
CIBA (Chemistry and Allied Business) : bound volumes of the CIBA
Review, Zeitschrift, etc.
Conklin, Dr. J. S.: a large number of
medical books.
58
Hope, Mr. C E. (Milner, B.C.): Journal of the Royal Society of Arts, vols.
55 to 96.
Imperial Oil Company (Vancouver):
handbooks, tables and manuals.
Larsen, Prof. Thorleif: a large number of volumes on medicine, drama,
etc.; various transactions, periodicals,
etc.
Manley, Mr. Leander (London, England) : rare copy of the London Daily
Mail, printed in gold ink to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of
Queen Victoria.
Miller, Mr. David Hunter (Victoria):
United States Department of State
Papers relating to foreign relations,
1861-1914, totalling 65 volumes,
some rare and out-of-print.
Miller, Mr. Leonard: miscellaneous collections of volumes and pamphlets.
MacMillan, Mr. H R., C.B.E.: various
pamphlets published by the New-
commen Society, and other volumes.
Stanford University Library (Palo Alto,
California): volumes and numbers
of the University series on Biology,
Geology, etc.
Wood, Professor F. G. C: journals relating to the Theatre, including the
Theatre Magazine.
Other generous gifts from: Agriculture,
Faculty of, U.B.C; Allan, Mr. J. N.,
American Consul-General (Vancouver) ; American Dairy Science Association (Corvallis); American Feed
Manufacturers' Association (Chicago) ; Archibald, Mrs. E. H.; Architecture Department, U.B.C; Beard-
all, Miss G. (Salmon Arm); Bell, Dr.
F. C; Bibliotheque de la Banque de
Syrie (Paris); Blackwell's Ltd. (Oxford) ; Blagdon-Phillips, Mr. N. D.;
British Columbia Electric Railway
Company Ltd.; British Columbia
Lumber Manufacturers' Association;
Bryce, Mr. Murray D.; Buckland,
Mr. F. M. (Kelowna); Burdick, Mr.
U. L. (Cheltenham, Mass.); Cambridge University (Cambridge,
Eng.); Canadian Blower & Forge
Company (Kitchener, Ont.); Canadian Engineering Publications
(Montreal); Canadian Institute of
International Affairs (Toronto);
Canadian Jersey Breeder Ltd.; Carnegie Institute of Washington; Christie, Mr. Hugh (Regina); Christo-
pherson, Mr. A.; Chronicle Publishing Company   (Oliver); Clarke, Ir- win, & Co. (Toronto); Claudet, Mr.
H. H. (Victoria); Cock, Miss Eleanor
F.; Colgrave, Mr. Sidney (Chase);
Cowan, Mr. M. M.; Doe, Mr. W. A.;
Dominion Brewers' Association (Ottawa) ; Donnelley, Mr. T. C. (Chicago) ; Duncan, Mr. George; Empire
Club of Canada (Toronto); Extension Department, U.B.C; Food Research Institute (Stanford University) ; Forestry Department, U.B.C;
Forward, Prof. Frank; Foundation
for Foreign Affairs (Washington,
D.C); French Government; Gage,
Dean W. H.; Geological Society of
America (New York); Gibson, Mr.
W. W. (San Francisco) ; Guthrie,
Prof. P. C. F.; Herschdorffer, Dr. M.
(Zurich); Hoffars' Ltd.; Imperial
Bureau of Biological Control (Belleville) ; Inspector of Schools (Point
Grey District); International Association of Game, Fish, and Conservation
Commissioners; International Nickel
Company (New York); International
Paper Company (Montreal) ; Institut
Danois des Echanges (Copenhagen);
Institute Panamericano de Geografica
e Historia; Jewish Public Library
(Montreal); Jimeno, Prof. E. (Madrid) ; Johnson, Mr. G. H. F.; Kelly,
Mr. L. V.; Kemp, Dr. W. N.; Klinck,
Dr. L. S.; Kraks Legat, Nytorv
(Copenhagen); Lamb, Dr. W. K.;
Layfield, Mr. H. A.; Lett, Mrs. Sherwood; Lloyds' Register of Shipping
(Vancouver); Main, Mr. Robert
(Nelson); Metford, Dr. J.; Midwest
Livestock Press (Hutchinson, Kansas) ; Millbank Memorial Fund (New
York); Morgan, Prof. S. C; Moresby-
White, Miss Ann (Dewdney); Mott,
Dr. John R. (Orlando, Fla.);
Murdoch, Dr. D. C; Murdoch, Mr.
R. (Brooklyn, N.Y.); McCloy, Mr.
T. R.; McDonald, Miss Ruth E.;
MacKenzie, Dr. N. A. M.; McQueen,
Miss Kate; McLennan, Mr. Lester W.
(Oleum, Calif.); National Liberal
Federation of Canada; Neil, Mrs.
Rupert; Nelson, Mr. Robert S.; Nem-
etz, Mr. Nathan; Newton, Dr. R.
(Edmonton); Non-Marine Underwriters of Lloyds' (London); Orange
Press (Winter Park, Fla.); Paimes,
James C. (Librarian, Royal Institute
of British Architects, London); Patterson, Mr. D. S. L. (Toronto); Paul,
Mr. J. David; Peel, Mrs. K. R.; Perkins, Mr. Ronald A.; Players' Club,
U.B.C.; Ragatz, Prof. L.  (St. Louis) ;
Reed College, (Portland, Ore.); Reprint Society of Canada (Toronto);
Ross, Mr. Allan; Royal Canadian
Institute (Toronto); Royal Institute
of British Architects (London);
Saunders, S. J. Reginald, Ltd.;
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary (Evanston, 111.); Schwitzer, Mrs.
E. V.; Scott, Mrs. A. H.; Sedgewick,
Dr. G. G.; Seyer, Dr. W. F.; Smith,
Mr. P. B.; Social Work Department,
U.B.C.; Soward, Prof. F. H.; Spencer,
Prof. J. G.; Stewart, Mr. L. I.; Swiss
Office for the Development of Trade
(Lausanne); Taylor, Mr. John P.
(London, Eng.); Taylor, Dr. W.
H. (Washington, D.C); Tennant &
Co., Charles (Toronto); Tipografica
Editora Argentina (Buenos Aires);
Transvaal Chamber of Mines
(Johannesburg); Ukranian National
Federation, Vancouver; United
Church Publishing House (Toronto);
United Kingdom Information Office;
University of Toronto School for Social Work; U.S. Pulp Producers' Association (New York); Vancouver
Iron Works; Van Nostrand Company
(Toronto); Venereal Disease Education Institute (Raleigh, N.C); Volkoff, Mrs. G. M.; Walsh, Mr. Anthony (Vernon); Watters, Dr. R. E.;
Williams, Dr. M. Y.; Wood, Prof. F.
G. C; Wood, Gundy & Company
(Toronto) ; Anonymous gifts of various books, pamphlets, etc.
Gifts to the Law Library, Faculty of
Law
Bain, Mr. A. H.: miscellaneous periodicals.
Black, Dr. Edgar: Old Canada Statutes.
Briggs, Mr. Joseph: Western Weekly
Reports (1920-1927) and miscellaneous text-books.
Canadian Law List Publishing Company (Toronto); miscellaneous Irish
Reports, text-books and Statutes.
Cassady, Mr. George L., K.C. (New
Westminster): Law Journal Reports,
Vols. 35-83.
Chalmers, Mr. J.; Hansard, 1948.
Davis, Hossie, and Company: Proceedings Canadian Bar Association (25
vols.).
Douglas, Symes, and Brissenden: miscellaneous B.C. Reports, Canada Law
Reports, and Canadian Bar Review.
Doull, Mrs. A. J.: text-books belonging to Lt. Comdr. J. R. Doull, R.C.N.
59 Duncan, Mr. George: copies of British
Columbia Reports, Canadian Law
Review, Canadian Bar Review, Western Weekly Reports, and Advocate.
Harper, Mr. A. M.: Texts, Statutes and
Debates.
Law Society of British Columbia: two
sets of B.C. Reports.
Lawson, Lundell and Lawson: Revised
Statutes of B.C.; 1936 and Annuals.
Meredith, Mr. Elmore: Current B.C.
Reports, Canadian Bar Review, and
Canada Law Reports.
Montgomery, McRae and Montgomery:
Current Reports.
Maclntyre, Dr. M. M.: Statutes of
Manitoba, 1948.
MacKinnon, Mr. J. W. (Prince Edward
Island): Statutes of P.E.I, for 1930-
48 inclusive.
McTavish, Mr. D S. (Salmon Arm):
The Jurist.
Nemetz, Mr. N. T.: text-books.
Russell and Du Moulin: Statutes, Proceedings of the Canadian Bar Association.
Stevenson, Mr. R. C. (Montreal): History of Lloyd's.
Walkem, Mr. Knox: American Bank
Attorney's, June, 1947.
Wilson, Mrs. James: miscellaneous British Columbia and Canadian Law Reports.
Yates, the late Mr. Stuart: a number of
rare and valuable volumes on History
and Institutions.
Attorney-General for Alberta: Revised
Statutes of Alberta 1942 with Annual
Statutes, 1943-47.
Attorney-General for Manitoba: Revised Statutes of Manitoba 1940 with
annual volumes, 1940-47.
Attorney-General for Ontario: Statutes
of Ontario, 1947-48.
Attorney-General for Prince Edward
Island: Statutes for Prince Edward
Island, "1930-48.
MISCELLANEOUS GIFTS
Agricultural Engineering
Air-Seal Western Limited: vacuum
flask for sub-zero testing of lubricating oils.
American Can Company: can-closing
machine.
Continental Can Company: can-closing
machine.
Fleck Brothers Ltd.: cut-away sections
of refrigerator compressors, valves
etc.
60
Nilnoc Company Ltd.: anemometer for
wind studies.
Anthropological Museum
Borden, Dr. C. E.: archeological specimens.
Buchanan, Mr. J. M.: collection of Indian baskets and pipes.
Carl, Dr. G. C (Provincial Museum,
Victoria): Mexican bullfighter implements.
Clough, Mrs. Nancy (Duncan): African
artifacts.
Cooper, Mrs. J. B. G.: model double
Papuan canoe.
Darby, Mrs. G. E.: loan of Bella Bella
and Kwakiutl cultural material.
MacMillan, Mr. H. R., C.B.E.: collection of stone pipes and other Indian
artifacts.
Nation, Mr. J. C: carving of bear.
Provincial Museum (Victoria): African
artifacts.
Raley, Dr. G. H.: Kwakiutl canoe and
other objects.
Read, Professor S. E.: photographs of
Skeena River District.
Scott, Mrs. Allan A.: B.C. Indian artifacts, hammers, beads, etc.
Taylor, Mr. E. Jeremy: Northern B.C.
type of Adze.
White, Mr. A. L. (Bellingham): stone
figure found near Sumas.
Architecture
Bain, Mrs. A. H.: artists colours and
instruments and picture frames.
Barrett   Company   Ltd.    (Montreal) :
working model of roof flashing and
manuals for students.
Hobbs Glass Company Ltd.   (London,
Ont.): glass blocks and sample glass;
student binders.
Townley, Mr. Fred: two plaster heads
(Leonardo  da   Vinci   and   Michael
Angelo).
Biology and Botany
Provincial Department of Agriculture
(Victoria): 16,000 herbarium sheets of
B.C. plants collected and prepared
by Mr. J. W. Eastham.
Civil Engineering
Canadian Institute of Steel Construction (Toronto): 112 copies of handbooks of the American Institute of
Steel Construction.
Commerce
Abbott, Mr. H. P.: 300 copies of address given at Princeton University. B.C. Bond Dealers' Association:
Moody's Industrials and supplement.
Boucher, Mr. D. A.: copies of issues of
Fortune.
Figgis, Mr. D. W. (American Can Co.,
N.Y.) : copies for graduating students
of commencement address delivered
at Stevens Institute of Technology.
King, Mr. Earl C: complete set of
Executive Manuals issued by La Salle
University Extension at Chicago, consisting of 100 manuals in 48 volumes.
Sprange, Mr. A. E.: several text-books
on investments.
Tindle, Mr. Arthur (Dun & Bradstreet
of Canada): The Sinews of American Commerce (Foulke).
Trans-Canada Investment Corporation
Ltd.: 18 copies of Portfolio of Trans-
Canada Investment Corporation Ltd.
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering
English Electric Company of Canada
Ltd. (through Mr. E. Wolstencroft,
district manager), modern type
single phase distribution transformer.
Precise Engineering Company (through
Mr. Walter Fahrni): one reciprocut
electric hand drill attachment.
Stevens, Mr. W. L. (New Westminster) : model of Puntledge Hydro-
Electric Power House in glass case
(built by John H. Boffy, Senior Operator, and his son).
Yuill, Mr. A. C. R.: vols. 47-52 of the
Transactions of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers.
Forestry
B.C. Forest Products Limited: wood
samples and fire control planning
maps.
Bloedel, Stewart, and Welch (Port Al-
berni): flow diagrams of sulphate
pulp mill.
California Forest and Range Experimental Station (Placerville, Calif.):
collection of seed of species of conifers for use in forest nursery and arboretum.
Canadian Forest Products Limited:
wood samples
Coe, Mr. Alan: set of lantern slides
showing logging operations.
Davidson, Prof. John: bulletins and
pamphlets.
Department of Lands and Mines (Alberta) : 200 trees from Alberta Government.
Finning Tractor and Equipment Co.;
fifteen slides of logging systems.
International Plywood Company Ltd.
(Gatineau, Que.): sample boards of
eastern Canadian hardwoods.
Kania, Mrs. J. E.: Torrey pine seeds.
L. & T. Sawmills: wood samples.
Mulholland, Mr. F. D. (Canadian
Western Lumber Co., Ladysmith):
tree seed.
Pacific Logging Congress (Portland,
Oregon): eight copies of loggers'
handbook.
Shier, Mr. Morley: handbook on explosives.
Skagit Iron & Steel Works (Sedro-Wool-
ley, Wash.): series of folders describing logging systems and machinery.
Southeastern Forestry Experimental
Station (Asheville, N.C.): fuel moisture sticks and danger meter.
United States Forest Service (Portland,
Oregon): fire prevention posters.
Universal Box Company Ltd.: wood
samples.
Western Shook Mills Ltd.: wood
samples.
Wright, Mr. T. G.: stem analysis sections from Douglas fir.
Yale University (School of Forestry):
Yale Forest School Bulletins (52
vols); bound volumes (32) of Indian
Forester (1875-1911).
Geology and Geography
Baillie, Mr. George H. (Vice-President,
Western Division, C.P.R.): model of
Glacier Park, Selkirk Mountains,
with case and table.
Whiting, Mr. Frank: suite of telluride
specimens.
Home Economics
Abbott, Mrs. J. M. (Victoria): bound
volumes (5), The Ladies' Treasury
(1877-1882).
Abel, Miss M.: copies of food manuals,
pamphlets, etc.
B.C. Packers' Ltd.: twelve tins of tuna
fish.
Bertois, Mrs. M. L. (Hamilton): texts
and illustrative pamphlets.
Booker, Mrs. Constance (Penticton):
samples of lace, fans, prints, etc
Castley, Mrs. W. J. (Duncan): one
year's issue, The Ladies' Friend
(1865).
Delnor Frozen Foods (New Westminster) , through Mr. H. B. Pearson,
manager: Universal Frozen Food
Cabinet; frozen food cook-book.
Elliott, Miss Isabell: illustrative material.
61 Hood, Dr. Grace Gordon (Winnipeg):
illustrative material.
Hoover Company, Ltd., through Mr.
H. E. Wilson: Hoover vacuum cleaner (1948 model)  and attachments.
Letson and Burpee, Ltd., through Mr.
Hague: three combination pressure
and steam-jacket saucepans; and
steam-jacket pressure saucepan.
Parent Teachers Federation of British
Columbia: a Mason & Risch Piano,
a radio-phonograph, and $70 toward
the purchase of a carpet, all for the
home-management house.
Pineo, Mrs. C. M. (Port Alberni):
sample of lace.
Rogers, Mrs. Jonathan: framed photograph of the late Jonathan Rogers,
to be placed in the new Home Economics Building.
Horticulture
Associated Fuels (Mitchell Island):
twenty units of sawdust.
Buckerfield's Ltd.: one-half ton of
fertilizer.
Dominion Experimental Station
(Saanichton): collection of pear
varieties.
Dominion Experimental Station (Summerland) : collection of grape and
apple varieties.
Insulation Industries Ltd.: fifteen bags
of Terralite.
Mabee, Mr. G. E.: box of Okanagan
apple varieties.
Pilkington Glass Company, Ltd. (Vancouver) : one set of demonstration
glass cloches.
Provincial Staff, through Mr. W. H.
Robertson, Provincial Horticulturist:
collections of fruit varieties for studies in systematic pomology.
Mining and Metallurgy
British Columbia Electric Railway
Company, through Mr. T. Ingledow,
Vice-President: three 25 K.v.a. transformers.
Electro Manganese Corporation (Knox-
ville, Tenn.): ten pounds of electrolytic manganese.
Ker and Ker, through Mr. Miller:
model of Whitewater Mine.
Pharmacy
Desbergers Ltd. (Montreal): prescription specialties.
Hoffman-La Roche Ltd. (Montreal):
prescription specialties.
62
Jamieson & Co. (Windsor): prescription specialties.
Mowatt & Moore (Montreal): prescrip-
' tion specialties.
Rougier Freres (Montreal): prescription specialties.
VVampole Company Ltd. (Perth, Ont.):
prescription specialties.
Slavonic Studies
National Council for Canadian-Soviet
Friendship     (Vancouver    Branch):
various Russian books.
Social Work
B.C. Indian Arts and Welfare Society:
totem pole for student reading-room.
Edwards, Miss Amy: bound volumes of
periodicals, and back copies of Survey Midmonthly and Survey Graphic.
Mess, Miss A. L. (Vernon): magazines,
periodicals, and books useful for research.
Morrison, Mr. A. O.: books and pamphlets for Library.
Zoology
Atlantic Biological Station, through
Mr. J. A. C. Medcof (St. Andrews,
N.B.): fish and invertebrate specimens.
Beebe, Mr. F.: specimens of mammals,
birds, reptiles.
Dorkrill, Mr. A. H. (Bulkley Valley
Colleries): fossil mammal bones
Hart, Dr. J. L. (Pacific Biological
Station): fish specimens.
Jobin, Mr. L. (Williams Lake): mammal specimens.
Leech, Mr. H. B. (California Academy
of Sciences): case of tropical beetles.
Provincial Game Department (Victoria) : 250 Kamloops trout; bird and
mammal specimens; complete series
Progressive Fish Culture, Washington, D.C.
General
Aero    Surveys    Ltd.     (Vancouver):
cover photo for the A.A.A.S. Convention Programme.
Eaton, T. Company Ltd. (Vancouver) :
ten paintings by John Innes and G.
H. Southwell, of incidents in B.C.
History.
Gideon Bible Association: eight copies
of the Bible for reading rooms.
Kirk, Mrs. Thomas H.: group of paintings to be given in perpetuity and
to be suitably inscribed as "The
Thos. H. Kirk Memorial Collection." McKechnie, Mrs. R. E.: silver tray
for display purposes.
Ridington, Mr. Bernard: protrait of the
late John Ridington, former University Librarian.
Schilder, Dr. Gustav: original Fred Var-
ley canvas.
Vancouver Tourist Association: mailing
and payment of postage of programmes to 5000 members of the American Association for the Advancement
of Science (in connection with meet
ings of Pacific Division at the University of British Columbia in June,
1949).
Woods, Dr. Walter: original letter written by Lord Dufferin in 1874.
Special Acknowledgment
Pearce, Dr. J. A. (Dominion Astro-
physical Observatory, Victoria): for
naming the new binary-star system,
investigated by himself, after the
University of British Columbia
(U.B.C.).
MEDALS, SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES, BURSARIES AND SPECIAL FUNDS
Note: If not otherwise stated, the amount given is the annual value of the award
New Awards
Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority (Delta
Zeta Chapter):  bursary for women
students  —$50.00
Alpha Phi Sorority (Beta Theta Chapter) : bursary for women students—
 $50.00
Baynes Manning Ltd.: bursary for engineering students $250.00
Bene, Eva and John: to provide a
scholarship in Psychology for three
years, a donation of. $500.00
Beta Sigma Phi Sorority (Xi Alpha
Chapter): bursary for women students  $50.00
British Columbia Electric Railway
Company Limited: an annual grant
of $5000 to provide:
(1) annual graduate engineering
scholarship $600.00
(2) annual undergraduate engineering scholarships $600.00
(3) annual undergraduate proficiency scholarships $1,000.00
(4) annual special scholarships	
 $1,000.00
(5) annual graduate scholarships in
Arts, Commerce, Law and Social
Work $1,000.00
(6) annual grant to the Agricultural
Institute of Canada for a fellowship in Agriculture $800.00
British Columbia Psychological Association: bursary for students in Psychology    $50.00
Cunningham, Mr. Alvin: bursary for
students in Pharmacy $200.00
Delta Gamma Sorority (Alpha Phi
Chapter): contribution to special
emergency fund for women students
    $50.00
Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity (Phi
Alpha Chapter): bursary for men
students  $50.00
Delta Upsilon Fraternity (B.C. Chapter) : bursary for men students $50.00
Gault Brothers Limited: commemorating the Company's fiftieth year in
British Columbia, a donation of
$25,000 to provide annual scholarships in Commerce for a period of
ten years, as follows:
(1) three annual scholarships of
$300 each for students entering
Fourth Year Commerce._$900.00
(2) three annual scholarships of
$300 each for students entering
Fifth Year Commerce $900.00
(3) an annual graduate scholarship
in Commerce, open to students
in any Canadian University, but
awarded by the University of
British Columbia, for study at
any   approved   institution	
.$700.00
Kappa Kappa Gamma Alumnae:
(1) annual contribution to set up a
trust fund, to provide an annual
bursary of $100, of approximately    $450.00
(2) contribution to a special emergency assistance fund for women
 $100.00
Kappa Sigma Fraternity (Epsilon Epsilon Chapter): bursary for men
students    . $50.00
Klein, Mr. I. J.: donation to provide a
prize of $100 annually for rive years
    $500.00
Minister of Switzerland (Ottawa):
book prize for proficiency in French.
McGill Women Graduates Society
(Vancouver): The Euphemia Laurence McLeod Raphael Bursary for
women students proceeding to McGill University $100.00
MacMillan Company of Canada Ltd.
(Publishers,   Toronto):   an   annual
63 prize for five years for the course in
creative writing. $50.00
Parent Teachers Federation of British
Columbia: prize for a student graduating in Home Economics—$100.00
Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity (Pi
Gamma Chapter): bursary for men
students  $50.00
Provincial Department of Agriculture:
donation to provide prizes in Architecture for design problems of farm
homes _$250.00
Road Builders and Heavy Construction Association:
(1) scholarship for civil   (highway)
Engineering   $250.00
(2) prize for Civil   (highway)   Engineering  $50.00
Rotary Club of New Westminster: bursary for students from New Westminster  $250.00
Sigma Phi Delta Fraternity (Theta
Chapter): bursary for men students
in Applied Science $50.00
Sperry Phillips Memorial Fund: a fund
donated by the friends and associates
of the late Sperry S. Phillips, B.S.A.,
to provide an annual bursary of $100
for students in Agriculture or Home
Economics.   Total fund $3,520.00
Thompson, Mr. Charles J.: donation
to provide prizes in Architecture—
  $1.000.00
Trans-Canada Investment Corporation
Ltd.: scholarship for students in
Commerce  $150.00
Vancouver Quota Club: The Elsie
Scobee Carpenter Memorial Bursary
for women students in Commerce or
Economics  $100.00
Vancouver Sun: training at the Edith
Adams' Cottage for one year with an
allowance of $100 a month for
a student graduating in Home
Economics    $1,200.00
Young, Mr. William Brand: medal for
special project in Architecture	
Zeta Psi Fraternity (Sigma Epsilon
Chapter) : bursary for men students
 $50.00
Special Contributions
Bollert, the Misses Florence and Grace:
contribution to the Mary L. Bollert
Fund $250.00
Kappa Kappa Gamma Mothers' Club-
contribution to Dean of Women's
Fund $75.00
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority: contribution to Dean of Women's Fund
 $50.00
64
Lanning, Miss Mabel: contribution to
the Dean of Women's Fund $5.00
University of Toronto Alumnae (Marion McElhanney Memorial Bursary):
annual contribution to the Dean of
Women's   Fund   $50.00
Anonymous:   contribution   to   special
bursary funds..
..$110.00
Anonymous:   contribution   to   special
bursary funds $100.00
Existing Awards Increased in Value
Ingledow, Mr. T.: annual prizes for
Electrical Engineering $150.00
United Empire Loyalists Association
(Vancouver Branch): History Medal
and a prize of.   $35.00
Established Awards
Alaska Pine Company Ltd.—scholarships $600.00
Alberta Meat Company Ltd.—bursary...
 $50.00
Alliance  Francaise—bursary. $50.00
Allied Officers' Club Auxiliary (trust
fund) —bursary $75.00
American Woman's Club—bursaries	
    $200.00
Architectural Institute of British Columbia—medals and prizes $200.00
Armstead, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel-
scholarship and prize $300.00
Association of Professional Engineers-
prizes    $125.00
Automotive Transport Association of
British Columbia — scholarship	
 . $150.00
B.C. Drugs limited — scholarship	
 $150.00
B.C. Tree Fruits Limited (Kelowna) —
prizes   $300.00
Bell, Mrs. Angela (trust fund) —
bursary $75.00
B'nai B'rith Auxiliary No. 77—scholarship  $50.00
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Vancouver—scholarships  $250.00
Boag, Alan (from the Trustee of the
Estate) —scholarship  $250.00
Bolocan, Mr. and Mrs. J. L.—prize	
    $25.00
Bostock Memorial Prize $25.00
Britannia Mining and Smelting Company   Ltd.—scholarship $250.00
British   Columbia   Cooperative   Seed
Growers'    Association — bursary	
 $100.00
British Columbia Daily Newspapers
Association—scholarship    $200.00
British Columbia Drug Travellers'
Association—bursary  $200.00 British Columbia Fruit Growers' Association—scholarship    $125.00
British Columbia Loggers' Association
—bursary $225.00
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association—prizes $ 175.00
British Columbia Packers Limited-
fellowship    $1,200.00
British Columbia Sugar Refining Company  Ltd.—scholarships $2,500.00
British Columbia Teachers' Federation
-scholarship $100.00
British Columbia Telephone Company
Ltd.-scholarships $2,500.00
Bruce, the late Hon. R. Randolph
(trust fund) —scholarship $200.00
Burbidge, Mr. P. W.—scholarships	
 $250.00
Canada Law Book Company—book
prize $25.00
Canadian Association for the Advancement of Pharmacy—scholarships	
 $200.00
Canadian Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation—
—scholarship $50.00
Canadian Forest Products Ltd.—scholarships and prizes $500.00
Canadian Forest Industries Entomological  Scholarships . $400.00
Canadian Industries Ltd.—fellowship....
 $750.00
Canadian Pulp and Paper Association,
Western    Branch — fellowship	
 $1,000.00
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company
Ltd.-scholarship $100.00
Carswell Company Ltd. (Toronto) —
book prizes $60.00
Cayley, the late Mrs. (trust fund) —
scholarship $100.00
Chemical Institute of Canada—book
prizes $50.00
Cohen, Mr. S. J. (trust fund) —bursary
 $150.00
Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company Ltd.-fellowship__$l,200.00
Convocation, University of British Columbia—prize  $50.00
Cunningham, Mr G. T.—scholarship
and prize $150.00
Day, Robert S. & Son, Ltd.—Bursary	
 $150.00
Delta Gamma Fraternity—bursaries	
 $175.00
Dicks, W. Jack H. (trust fund)—bursary  $150.00
Dorbils, Dorothy and William—scholarship to be awarded in May, 1950—
  $2,000.00
Dunsmuir Scholarship (trust fund)	
 $150.00
Engineering Institute of Canada—prize
 $25.00
Engineering Institute of Canada (Vancouver Branch) —prize $25.00
Entomological Society of British  Columbia—prize  $15.00
Faculty   Women's   Club — scholarship
and bursary $200.00
Frosst,   Charles   E.   Company,   Ltd.—
prizes   . $225.00
Gamma   Phi   Beta   Sorority    (Alpha
Lambda Chapter) —bursary $50.00
General  Construction Company Limited—scholarships $500.00
Gladstone Chapter No. 6 C J. Order
of Ahepa-prize $100.00
Governor General of Canada—His Excellency's Gold Medal
Hobbs  Glass  Company  Ltd.—scholarship  $250.00
Hogarth, Major General D. M.   (Toronto) —scholarships $250.00
Holland, Laura (trust fund established
by friends) —scholarship $100.00
Horner, Frank W., Ltd.   (Montreal) —
gold medal   -
Houghland, Mr. C. D.-prize. $100.00
I.O.D.E.   (trust  fund)—scholarship	
 $100.00
I.O.D.E.  (Admiral Jellicoe Chapter) -
bursaries $100.00
I.O.D.E. (Sir Charles Tupper Chapter)
—bursary $50.00
I.O.D.E.   (Triple Entente  Chapter) —
bursary $75.00
I.O.D.E.   (Triple  Entente  Chapter) -
bursary $75.00
I.O.D.E.   (Worthington   Memorial
Chapter) —bursary $100.00
Inglis Company Ltd., The John  (Toronto) —scholarships __        .$250.00
Jones, Mr. J. R. J. Lewellyn—prize	
 $50.00
Kelly, Mr. William N.-prize $15.00
Kelly,  Douglas  and  Company  Ltd.-
scholarship   $300.00
Khaki University and Y.M.CA.  (trust
fund) —bursaries $500.00
Kirk, Mrs. Thomas  H.—scholarship	
 $100.00
Kiwanis    Club    of   Vancouver — gold
medal, scholarship and prize $200.00
Klein, Mr. I. J.  (trust fund) —scholarship $100.00
Ladner, Mr. Leon J. and Family (trust
fund) —scholarship $300.00
Lady Laurier Club—bursary $100.00
Lambert, Brigadier Noel D.—scholarship  $200.00
65 Lauder Mercer and Company Ltd.—
bursary $250.00
Law Society of British Columbia—gold
medal and prize $200.00
Lefevre,  the  late   Mrs.  J.   M.   (trust
fund) —medal,  scholarship $150.00
Lions   Club    (Vancouver   Central) —
fellowship $1 „00.00
Lipsett, Mrs. Mary C—bursary..$300.00
Mallinckrodt  Chemical  Works  Ltd.—
prize __ $25.00
Mathematics, Department of  (U.B.C.)
—the Daniel Buchanan Scholarship.
 $100.00
Merck & Company Ltd.   (Montreal) —
book prizes.
McGill Graduates Society of B.C. (trust
fund) -scholarship $125.00
McHattie, Mr. C. T—bursary_.$300.00
McKee,   Mrs.   D.   A.    (trust   fund)—
prize $30.00
McLean, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. (Toronto)
—bursaries   $1,000.00
MacMillan,   Mr.   H.   R.—loan   fund
maintained.
National Council of Jewish Women,
Vancouver Section—bursary ..$100.00
National Paper Box Company Ltd.—
bursaries $400.00
Native Daughters of British Columbia
—scholarship $50.00
Nicholson,  the late Dr.  F. J.   (trust
fund) -scholarships $1,000.00
Norgan, Mr. G. W.—scholarships and
prizes $1,000.00
Northern Electric Company Ltd.—prize
 $100.00
Northern Peat Moss Company Ltd.—
prize  $100.00
Pacific Meat Co. Ltd $200.00
Pacific Mills Ltd.—scholarship._$250.00
Pattison, Mr. J. W.—bursaries—.$200.00
P.E.O. Sisterhood, Vancouver Chapter
—bursary $150.00
Pharmaceutical    Association    of    the
Province    of   British    Columbia —
scholarship and prize $150.00
Phi Delta Delta Legal Sorority—Helen
Gregory McGill Loan Fund.
Players' Club Alumni—scholarship .. ..
 $50.00
Pop, Mr. R. J.—scholarship $150.00
Powell River Company Ltd.-scholarship    $700.00
Price, Waterhouse & Co.—scholarship
 . $250.00
Primrose Club  (trust fund) —the Hon.
R. L. Maitland Memorial Scholarship
 $150.00
Pringle, the Flying Officer Reverend
George   Robert    (trust   fund   estab-
66
lished by friends for memorial bursary)   $200.00
Province, The Vancouver Daily —
scholarship   $250.00
Provincial Council of British Columbia,
Canadian Daughters' League—bursaries  $200.00
Provincial Department of Health and
Welfare  (Health Branch)—prizes	
    $100.00
R.CA.F. Veterans' Fund (established
by the Wartime Convalescent Homes,
War Charity Fund, Inc.) —bursaries.
 $300.00
Rotary Club of Vancouver—bursaries..
 $1,000.00
Royal Institution (trust fund) —
scholarships $1,600.00
Ryckman, the late Nancy E. (trust
fund) —scholarships    $180.00
Shaffer, Miss Marion A.—bursaries—	
 $200.00
Shanahan's Ltd.-scholarship ....$500.00
Shaw, the late James Curtis (trust
fund established by friends) —
scholarship $ 125.00
Shell Oil Company of Canada Ltd —
fellowship    $1,000.00
Sigma Tau Upsilon Honorary Agricultural Fraternity—gold medal.
Standard Oil Company of British Columbia-fellowship  $1,100.00
Summerland, citizens of—scholarship.—
    $250.00
Summer Session Students' Association
—scholarships . $150.00
Sun, The Vancouver—scholarships	
 $400.00
Swan, Col. and Mrs. W. G.—bursary	
 $250.00
Taylor, Mr. Austin C—scholarship—
    $250.00
Teamsters' Joint Council No. 36—
bursary $250.00
Terminal City Club (trust fund) —
scholarship    $100.00
Thom, David (trust fund from the estate) —bursaries and scholarships—
    $400.00
Timber Preservers' Ltd.—prizes $180.00
Toban, Mr. Louis—bursary $100.00
Toronto General Trusts Corporation-
prize  __.$30.00
Trail Board of Trade—prizes $25.00
Transportation and Customs Bureau,
Vancouver Board of Trade—prizes	
 $300.00
Universities Service Club—Captain Le
Roy Memorial Scholarship $150.00
University Women's Club—bursaries....
 ..    $200.00 Vancouver Bar Association—bursaries
 $300.00
Vancouver Panhellenie Alumnae—bursary  $200.00
Vancouver   Women's   Canadian   Club
(trust fund)—scholarships __$300.00
Winspear,   Hamilton,   Anderson   and
Company—scholarships   $300.00
Woman's Christian Temperance Union
-prize      $50.00
Woodward,
ships
the Hon. W. C-
-scholar-
..$250.00
Anonymous—G. M. Dawson Scholarship
    $50.00
Anonymous   (trust   fund)
tional Studies Prize	
Interna-
 $30.00
Anonymous—prizes for Home Economics   $75.00
Anonymous—book prize for Law..$25.00
AWARDS MADE BY OTHER INSTUTIONS, BUT ANNOUNCED
BY THE UNIVERSITY
Beaver Club Trust (Toronto) — two
scholarships    £ 1,000
Canadian Bar Association (Viscount
Bennett Trust Fund) —scholarship....
  $1,000.00
Community Planning Association of
Canada (Vancouver Branch, through
Mr. Hugh Martin) —special prize—
    $150.00
Crofton House Alumnae—scholarship..
    $175.00
Dominion - Provincial Governments'
Student Aid and Provincial Loan
Fund—awards for the Session 1948-
49 to the total of approximately	
  $56,000.00
French Government — scholarships,
prizes and medals.
Hyman, Mr. Sam—bursary for the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation on the
Campus   $50.00
Klein, Mrs. I. J.—bursary for the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation on the
Campus   $100.00
National Research Council—awards of
bursaries, studentships and scholarships to graduates of this University,
or to students proceeding to graduate
work at this University, to the total
of   $27,450.00
Rhodes Scholarship Trust—scholarship
   £500
United Odd Fellows—bursaries .
 .  $1,200.00
Vancouver Public Library Staff—bursary $150.00
AWARDS FOR SESSION 1947-48 NOT PREVIOUSLY ACKNOWLEDGED
British Columbia Packers' Ltd.: contribution from Directors of the Company for library material in Fisheries
 $2,000.00
Department of Agriculture (Victoria):
for work in Dairy Technology	
  $1,000.00
Dorbils, Mr. William: large collection
of books, directories, periodicals and
reports for the Library.
Powell River Company Ltd.: for instruction in Forest Pathology	
  $5,000.00
67 GIFTS, GRANTS AND BEQUESTS
April 16, 1949 to August 31, 1949
GRANTS AND GIFTS FOR RESEARCH AND RESEARCH EQUIPMENT
Geological Society of America: for research in biogeochemistry by the
Department of Geology and Geography  $500.00
Kelowna Exploration Company (Hedley) : for research in Biogeochemistry by the Department of Geology
and  Geography $300.00
National Research Council: research
grants to the Department of Bacteriology—estimated value $1,500.00
GRANTS AND GIFTS FOR CHAIRS OF INSTRUCTION, LECTURESHIPS,
COURSES, SPECIAL FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT
Barley Improvement Institute of Canada: for barley studies by the Department of Agronomy $2,000.00
Canadian Liquid Air Company: for research in Mining and Metallurgy—
 $2,000.00
Department of National Health and
Welfare (Ottawa): research grants
to the Department of Bacteriology-
estimated value $1,800.00
Dominion Government: grant for Social Work—estimated value $12,100.00
British Columbia Loggers' Association:
for establishing and equipping the
Forest School Camp at Loon Lake—
 $120,000.00
contributions to the work in Forestry    $6,650.00
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association: contribution to the
work in Forestry $3,750.00
Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Canada Ltd: (a) first
instalment of a five-year grant to defray salary and other expenses of a
professorship in Geology and Geography  $7,500.00
(b) to cover the cost of lead required for installation of a new Geiger
Counter in Geology $86.00
Consolidated Red Cedar Shingle Association: contribution to the work
in Forestry $1,000.00
Department of Agriculture (Victoria):
for completion of refrigeration facilities for the short course in Dairying
 $1,000.00
Department of National Health and
Welfare  (Ottawa): purchase of lin
ens and furnishings to equip demonstration laboratory, valued at—
 $3,000.00
Interior Lumber Manufacturing Association: contribution to the work
in Forestry $500.00
Lady   Davis   Foundation:   for  special
fellowship in Biology and Botany	
  $2,500.00
for special fellowships in Physics	
 .  $10,000.00
MacMillan, Mr. H. R., C.B.E.: for a
professorship in Forestry .$5,000.00
for a special lecturer in Forestry	
 $500.00
Rockefeller Foundation (New York):
first instalment of a grant of $90,000
for Slavonic Studies $9,500.00
Summer Session Students' Association:
for the purchase of Library books	
 . $50.00
Western Lumber Manufacturing Association: contribution to the work
in Forestry $2,000.00
Western Plywood Company Limited:
contribution to the work in Forestry
 $100.00
MISCELLANEOUS
Campbell, Anne S. (estate): for various specified purposes $6,944.65
Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Canada Ltd.: grant to
member of the Department of Agricultural Economics to attend the International Conference of Agricultural Economists in Italy during the
summer, 1949, valued at .$1,600.00
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire: for the nursery play school at
Little Mountain $300.00
Imperial Order Daughters of the Em-
68
pire (University Chapter): for the
trust fund designated for various
projects    $600.00
Kellogg Foundation, the W. K. (Battle
Creek, Michigan): fellowships to
members of the staff of Nursing and
Health for special studies, to be used
over a period ending in 1950, and
with an estimated value of.	
 $10,000.00
Anonymous: for the President's Fund	
 $45.00 SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES, BURSARIES, LOAN FUNDS
Bastion Chapter (Nanaimo), I.O.D.E.
—bursary in the Session 1949-50 for
a  student  veteran  from  Nanaimo,
with the value $200.00
B.C. Teachers' Federation — special
scholarship awarded in Summer Session, 1949, with the value $100.00
Canadian     Association     for     Health,
Physical  Education and Recreation
(B.C. Branch): special prize for the
highest ranking student for the degree of B.P.E. in May, 1949—$50.00
Department of Mathematics: contributions to the Daniel Buchanan Scholarship Fund $235.00
Flesher, Mr. Eric Gregory (see McGill,
Miss Elsie).
Hughes, Dr. Helen McGill (see McGill,
Miss Elsie).
Lipsett, Mrs. Mary C: contribution to
provide the Mary C. Lipsett Bursary
for a period of five years..$1,500.00
Murphy, the late Paul E. (Ocean Park)
—for a  student  loan  fund 	
   $100,000.00
McGill, Miss Elsie (Toronto): joint
contribution of Miss Elsie McGill,
Dr. Helen McGill Hughes (Chicago)
and Mr. Eric Gregory Flesher to the
Helen Gregory McGill Student Aid
Fund $200.00
Phi Delta Delta Legal Sorority: contribution to the Helen Gregory McGill Student Aid Fund $15.00
Rogers, the late Jonathan C.  (estate):
for Scholarship Fund $41,193.19
For Scholarship Fund, bonds 	
  $10,000.00
Summer Session Students' Association:
contribution to Loan Fund—.$500.00
contribution to Scholarship Fund...
 :    $700.00
Surrey Potato Club: contribution to
the Sperry Phillips Memorial Bursary Fund    $10.00
GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY
Clemens, Dr. W. A.: Biological Abstracts, vols. 1-11 (1927-1937) and
indexes vols. 12, 14, 16.
Crease, Mr. A. D. (Victoria): copy of
Perkins, A Profitable Booke of Master John Perkins   (London), 1586).
Cunningham, Dr. and Mrs. E. R.
(West China Union University,
Chengtu): West China Border Research Society Journal, vols. 1-11, 12
A and B-16 A and B, 1922-1946.
Gillies, the late Dr. B. D. (through
Mrs. C. A. Manson, Mrs. D. W. Mof-
fatt and Mr. R. J. D. Gillies): Miscellaneous books and periodical files
approximately 175 volumes.
Okulitch, the late Mr. J. K. (through
Dr. G. M. Volkoff) : several boxes of
books in Russian and English.
Other Generous Gifts from—Allen, Mr.
J.; Amherst College Library (Amherst, Mass.); Arnold, Mr. Hugh E.;
Beardall, Miss G. (Salmon Arm);
Borden, Mrs. Alice; Boucher, Mrs.
H.; Campbell, Mr. D.; Canadian
Chamber of Commerce (Montreal);
Canadian Industries Limited; Canadian Jewish Congress (Montreal);
Canadian Manufacturers Association
(Toronto); Carnegie Endowment
for International Peace (Washington,
D.C.); Casselman, Mr. Bruce; Che
shire Company, the F. W. (Melbourne, Australia); College Fraternity of the United States and Canada; Committee on Modern Languages (American Council on Education) ; Crumb, Dr. J. A.; Danish Forest Society (Copenhagen); Department of Architecture (U.B.C.); Department of Commerce (U.B.C.);
Dolman, Dr. C. E.; Edwards, Mr.
Harold P.; Extension Department
(U.B.C.); Federation des industries
Beiges (Brussels); Gillies, Mrs. R. J.
D.; Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company (New Toronto, Ont.); Grauer,
Mrs. A. E. Dal; Hankinson, Dr. Cecil
H. (Prince Rupert); Harvard University Library (Cambridge, Mass.) ;
Headly, Mr. John A.; Hellenic
Christian Educational Society (Chicago) ; Huntington Library (Cambridge, Mass); Huntington Library
and Art Gallery (San Marino,
Calif.); Indian Institute of Science
(Bangalore, India); Lamb, Dr. W.
Kaye (Ottawa); Lotzkar, Mr. Joe;
Lourie, Dr. M.; Manson, Mrs. C. A.;
Moffatt, Mrs. D. W.; Moresby-White,
Mrs. J. M. (Dewdney); Morsh, Mrs.
J. E.; Morsh, Dr. Joseph; McCloy,
Mr. T. R.; McKenzie, Mrs. A. P.
(Capilano, P.O.); Maclaurin, Dr.
D. L.  (Victoria); McLennan, Mr. L.
69 W. (Richmond, Calif.); National Research Council (Ottawa) ; Nevot,
Senor Carlos (Argentina); Officers'
Reference Library (B.C. Headquarters, Canadian Army, Vancouver);
Oldham, Mrs. K. B. (Cobble Hill);
Ontario Mining Association (Toronto) ; Pacific Oceanographic Group
(Nanaimo); Parent, M o n s. Al-
phonse-Marie (Quebec); Philoso
phical Library Inc. (New York)
Publications Board (Ubyssey); Rid
dehough, Prof. G. B.; Riddell, Dr
V. H. (London, Eng.); Riddle, Mr.
Alexander; Saunders, S. J. Reginald
and Co. (Toronto); Sherborne, Mrs.
A. G.; Smith, Mr. S. G.; Soward,
Prof. F. H.; Standard Oil Company
(New York); Strip, Miss O.; Taylor,
Dr. W. H. (Washington, D.C);
Uglow, Mrs. W. L.; University of
Chicago (Department of Anthropology) ; University of Minnesota Library; University of Oregon Publications (Eugene, Ore.); University of
Texas; Walker, Mrs. Francis; Warren, Dr. H. V.; War Services Committee, National Council of Y.M.
CA.'s of Canada (Toronto); Williams, Mrs. A. H.; Williams, Prof.
D. B.
GIFTS TO THE LAW LIBRARY, FACULTY OF LAW
Campbell, Meredith, and Beckett: Law
Journal Reports and other volumes.
Crease, Mr. A. D., K.C (Victoria): miscellaneous text-books.
Facultv Association: Trial of the Major
War Criminals, vols. 10-22 (through
the United Kingdom Information
Office, Ottawa) .
Macrae, Montgomery and Macrae: miscellaneous Digests and Ontario Reports.
Marshall, Mr. T. C: miscellaneous
United States periodicals.
Schumiatcher, Mr. M. C, K.C: Journal of Comparative Legislation 1903-
46.
Stanford University Libraries: miscellaneous periodicals.
Symcs, Reginald (estate) : miscellaneous text-books.
University of Washington Law Library:
Proceedings of the American Bar Association, vols. 33-74: American Bar
Association Journal, 1925-47.
Anonymous: Western Weekly Reports.
MISCELLANEOUS GIFTS
Agricultural Engineering
Clement, Dean F. M.: Journal of Farm
Economics, complete from date of
first publication to December, 1948.
Animal Husbandry
Brackman-Ker Milling Co. Ltd., New
Westminster (through Mr. Bruce
McCurragh) : ton of dog ration.
Buckerfield's Ltd. (through Mr. K. C.
Clarke): two tons or rabbit ration.
James, Mr.   (Burnaby): 49 mink.
Anthropology
Lipsett,   Mrs.   Mary   C:   collection  of
Japanese porcelain, etc.
Winton,   Mr.   John:   Kwakiutl   cedar
chest.
Architecture
United Kingdom Information Office
(Ottawa): set of 97 slides compiled
and presented by the British Council; includes fine box, slide container
and catalogue.
70
Chemistry
Archibald, Mrs. E. H.: back copies of
the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Chemical Abstracts and
other chemical journals.
B.C. Sugar Refining Co. Ltd.: miscellaneous numbers of Industrial and
Engineering Chemistry, Journal of
the Society of Chemical Industry, etc.
General Ceramics and Steatite Corporation (Keasbey, N.J.): two cu. ft.
porcelain Raschig rings.
Knight, Maurice A. (Akron, Ohio):
two cu. ft. %" Berl saddles.
Reinhold Publishing Co. (through the
offices of the American Institute of
Chemical Engineers and its Corporation members): chemical engineering
catalogues.
Sanford, Prof. C: back copies of Canadian Journal of Research, Chemical
and Engineering News, Canadian
Chemistry and Process Industries. Tyler, Mr. S. L. (American Institute
of Chemical Engineers, New York):
Annual Editions of the Transactions
of the Institution of Chemical Engineers  (London), vols. 41-45.
U.S. Stoneware Co. (New York): two
cu. ft. stoneware Raschig rings.
Wallace & Tiernan Ltd. (Toronto):
chlorine testing comparator and file
of technical literature on water
chlorination.
Wilson, Dr. W. Semple (New Westminster) : laboratory equipment.
Civil Engineering
Canadian Institute of Steel Construction Inc. (Toronto): 112 copies of
steel construction handbook.
Commerce
Douglas, Mr. A. H.: back issues of
Monetary Times.
King, Earl C. (Secretary, Western Lumber Manufacturers' Association of
Canada, Vancouver): complete set
of twelve volumes of Course on Foreign Trade, Business Training Corporation.
Spitzer and Mills Ltd.: magazines sent
to Commerce Department each
month.
Education
Australian Council for Educational Research: books.
Extension
Beardall,   Miss   Gwendolen    (Salmon
Arm): books.
Davis, Mrs. Esme (Galiano): books
Inter-Racial Committee of the United
Nations Association: donation of $25.
Moresby-White, Mrs. J. M. (Dewdney):
books.
Morsh, Mrs. J. E.: books.
McKenzie,   Mrs.   A.   P.    (Capilano):
books.
Oldham,  Mrs.  K.  B.   (Cobble  Hill):
books.
Forestry
Angus, Mr. George (Industrial Engineering Ltd.): loan of 22" power saw
for 3 week period for cutting on
experimental plots at University Research Forest, Loon Lake.
Petrie, Mr. (Industrial Engineering
Ltd): free use for two weeks of 2 _
H.P.   power  saw   for   experimental
thinning work on University Research Forest.
United States Forest Service: 100 Engle-
man spruce trees.
Geology and Geography
Highland-Bell Ltd.: 250-lb. sample of
ore from Highland-Bell.
Paget, Mr. E. (Zeballos): bone of
whale.
History
Sage, Mr. Donald (California): miner's
pick, gold scales and pan from California.
Sherborne, Mrs. Grant: collection of
Indian masks for museum.
Home Economics
Connor & Son. G. H. (Ottawa) and
Mr. A. M. Clark (Manager, Western
Agencies Ltd., Vancouver): Connor
Thermo Washing Machine.
Morsh, Mrs. J. E.: complete sets of
various magazines.
McCallum, Miss J. (Agassiz): textile
illustrative material—unusual or discontinued weaves and patterns, period costumes, books.
Richardson, Mrs. Frances: historical articles of clothing, textiles, etc.
Thompson, Miss Irene, solid mahogany
dining-room suite, two upholstered
easy chairs, grandfather clock, oak
card table.
Thomson, Mrs. Jim (St. George's Residential School, Lytton): textile and
pottery articles.
Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
Bayley, Mr. Edward H. (Duncan):
automobile transmission, sectioned to
show working parts.
Mining and Metallurgy
Canadian Westinghouse Ltd. (Hamilton) : suite of prepared metallo-
graphic specimens.
Cuke, Mr. M. H. (Montreal): donations to University of British Columbia research.
Galloway, the late Mr. J. D. (from his
library): collections of publications,
about 250 vols, in all.
Pharmacy
British Drug Houses (Canada) Ltd.
(Toronto):   prescription  specialties.
Poulenc Freres Laboratory of Canada
Ltd. (Montreal): prescription specialties.
77 Poultry Husbandry
Merck & Co. (Rahway, N.J.): one lb.
experimental animal protein factor,
supplement No. 3, for experimental
use.
Slavonic Studies
Hellor, Mrs. F.: various Polish and
Russian books.
Spanish
Consulate of Mexico (Vancouver):
newspapers and periodicals, posters
and pamphlets.
Department of External Affairs (Ottawa) :  newspapers and periodicals.
Embassy of Argentina (Ottawa): newspapers and periodicals.
Zoology
Brandon, Mr. H. (Telkwa): large collection of Cimicidae.
Evans, Mr. David (Vernon): collection
of Neuroptera.
Racey, Mr. Kenneth: collection Ectoparasites of Birds.
General
Graduating Classes of '49: electric
scoreboard and accessories, to be installed in a suitable position at the
north end of the stadium.
72

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