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UBC Publications

Annual Report of the President 1947-1948 1948

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Array THE   UNIVERSITY   OF
BRITISH    COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE PRESIDENT
1947- 1948
VANCOUVER,   B.C.    CANADA tprp    TTNTVFH STT Y'    OF
BRITISH    COL IIM BIA
■-sTAr-
Annual   Report   of   the   President
on   the   Activities   of
The University of British Columbia
September 1947 to August 1948
VANCOUVER       B    C.     CANADA To The Board of Governors and Senate of
The University of British Columbia.
Gentlemen:
There are, I think, solid grounds for satisfaction and
optimism in the report on the academic year 1947-48
which I herewith submit. The satisfaction comes from
the series of achievements of faculty, staff and students in
a year of record enrolment. The optimism comes from
the pattern of future university development which has
begun to emerge, even in the midst of our emergency programme.
The future will bring a decline in our enrolment and a
consequent decline in total revenue. But as we achieve
normal operating conditions we shall find ourselves with
more and better facilities than ever before, with a mature
and experienced staff and with larger revenues in proportion to the numbers of students enrolled, than we have
ever had before, further, because of the importance of
the contribution that we make, not only to the young men
and women who cowie to us, but to the ecoitomy and welfare of the Province and nation as well, I am convinced
that we will receive in an increasing measure additional
support from the Provincial Legislature, from Departments of the Government at Ottawa, and from private
individuals and corporations. All of this should mean that
we shall be able to give more adequate training to the increasing numbers of young men and women that a growing province is sending to us.
A/ r\AuME- \\]^i&pM~ 3 1 HE academic year 1947-48 has made us aware that we
have reached the peak of our post-war expansion and of
the organization of emergency services to meet the needs
of that expansion. Thanks to the gigantic effort of the
faculty and the cooperation of the student body we have
done our best to meet the challenge of the post-war situation. But during these past months we have also seen
more clearly the shape of things to come, and, while still
maintaining our emergency services, we have begun to
plan for the more normal period which will follow.
Student enrolment reached its highest point this year
with the attendance of 9,374 students—an increase of
more than 600 over 1946-47—but there has been a significant shift in the percentage of veteran and non-veteran
students. This year's veteran enrolment has dropped from
4,800 to 4,339 and the non-veteran students, who number
4,917, represent 53% of the total number. These figures
agree with the estimate that, in normal times, we may
expect an enrolment of approximately 5,000 students.
We have not yet finished the emergency period. Our
army hut class rooms and our emergency housing facilities are still full to capacity; our staff is still carrying an
extremely heavy load of teaching and administration; but
our thinking and planning during the past months have
been in part directed to the provision of permanent buildings, staff, and courses which will meet the needs of that
expected normal enrolment.
five Retirements
The passing of time and the devotion of senior members
of the staff have been underlined during the past year by
the approach of retirement for several well-known campus
figures, who voluntarily remained with us during the
heavy demands of our expansion program:
Dr. Isabel Maclrihes, Head of the Department of
German, a member of the original teaching staff and
with us for thirty-two years; Dr. G. G. Sedgewick, noted
Shakespearean authority, Head of the English Department, who has been with us for twenty-nine years; Dr.
Dafhiel Buchanan, who joined the Mathematics Department in 1920, and eight years later became Dean of Arts
and Science; Dr. R;JH. Clark, Head of the Department
of Chemistry since 1928, and on the staff since 1916; Dr.
W. L. Macdonald, a member of the English Department
since 1919; Dr. John Davidson, who began his teaching
in the Department of Biology and Botany in 1917; Dr.
A. E. Hennings, a member of the Department of Physics
since. 1919; and Mr. Frank Buck, for twenty-eight years
a member of the Department of Horticulture—the list
of names reminds us not only of their distinguished
academic careers but of the many and effective ways in
which they have repVesented the University in writing
and speaking and have contributed to many different
aspects of community life. We also said goodbye to Dr.
Harry Ashton, the distinguished French scholar, who was
a member of the University's original teaching staff, and
who, after his years at Cambridge University, returned
to help us in our critical period, and to Mr. Angus
MacLucas, with us since 1926 and Bursar since 1934. Mr.
William Moir and Mr. Edwin Chell of the maintenance
staff also reached retirement after years of efficient and
cheerful service both in the Fairview shacks and on the
Point Grey pampus, , ,
These men and women of decided and varied character have enriched campus life and campus legend.   Their services are a part of the permanent history of the University and their contributions both on the campus and
in community life have helped to make this institution the
vital educational force which it is. Of them all we say,
as did their colleagues on the night of their farewell dinner:
"They have finished their campaign with distinction and
merited a discharge with honour."
Building Program
Our building program during the past years has necessarily included a great deal of emergency construction.
Even in recent months we have allocated and re-allocated
many army huts for classroom and laboratory use. With
the largest veteran enrolment moving into the upper years,
considerable sums have been spent to provide more accommodation in such courses as Engineering, Geology and
Forestry, to instal and refit laboratories and to complete
other emergency measures. This part of our program is
now all but concluded, all our emergency buildings are in
use, and we shall not require further expansion of this
kind.
The permanent building program, which is designed to
meet the needs of that expected enrolment of from 5,000
to 6,000 students, is under way. We have our Physics
Building and the new north wing of the Library. (I shall
be discussing the work of the Library in a later section of
this report, but I should like to mention here that we shall
always regard this magnificent addition as a monument to
the vision and devoted work of our first librarian, Mr.
John Ridington, and his successor, Dr. Kaye Lamb, who
at the close of the year was offered and felt obliged to
accept the post of National Archivist and the task of
planning a National Library for Canada.) The Agricultural Eng fneering and Mechanics Building and the addition
to the Boiler and .Power House are.also in use, and our land
clearing program is nearly completed. Unfortunately, rising costs of labor and materials have
sharply curtailed the plans based on the government's
allocation (in 1945) of $5,000,000 to the University's
building program. We are grateful for the prospect of
further financial assistance which will enable us to attain
some of the goals we must realize if the University is to
put forth its best efforts in terms of the years of service
and the thousands of trained young men and women it
can provide for this province. We look forward to the
completion of the Applied Science Building, and to the
construction of the Biological Sciences and Pharmacy
Building, and of the Preventive Medicine and Nursing
Building (the first unit of our proposed Medical School).
Plans are already advanced for the War Memorial Gymnasium and we are hopeful about a much-needed Women's
Residence. But with the opening of the Medical School
we must also have a Medical Sciences Building and we
realize that our future plans must take into consideration
the following needs:
Women's and Men's Residences
A New Arts Building
A Law Building
A Home Economics Building
An Administration Building
A Modern Cafeteria
A Building for Extension and Adult Education
A University Museum
Additional buildings for Agriculture and Forestry
An Art Centre
Housing and Residences
The University is responsible for the operation of Acadia, Wesbrook, Fort, Little Mountain, and Lulu Island
Camps, and the trailer camps adjoining Acadia and Wesbrook. All this emergency housing is full to capacity. Our
undertaking includes provision for the general comfort
and welfare of all residents of the camps (faculty, staff,
eight married and unmarried students), efficient operation and
maintenance, adequate police and fire protection, and
suitable regulations governing the occupancy of dormitories, trailer camps and married quarters.
In all, the camps provide dormitory facilities for 678
unmarried students and suites for 584 families. The total
population, men, women and children, served by this
accommodation is 2,442. But in addition to this temporary accommodation made necessary by the influx of
veterans and the housing problems of an inflationary
period, we have a continuing problem in the providing of
housing for our many out-of-town students. We are
grateful to the citizens who have cooperated by making
rooms available in private homes, but it is evident that,
even when planning for normal times, we are sorely in
need of residences. The cost of living is particularly hard
on students who have to provide all or part of their board,
and travel to and from outlying districts of the city can
be a serious drain on energy. The young women of the
province, in particular, are often handicapped in their
desire to attend the University by these housing difficulties.
We owe a special obligation to students from the interior
and it is a matter of much regret to us all that some
students are unable to attend the University because they
cannot solve this problem of accommodation. The success
of the temporary arrangements in Acadia Camp, which
this year provided dormitory, lounge and dining room
facilities for 86 women, proves how useful and popular
women's residences would be. However, as I have said, we
are hopeful of being able to make at least a beginning in
this matter of residences and a committee has been set up
to consider the best and most practical methods of organizing them.
Existing and TSfetv Courses of Study
In the session 1947-48 a total of 794 courses were available to students in 4 faculties and 40 departments.   Of
nine these, 110 were added this year: Biology and Botany offer
10 new courses; Commerce, 7; Philosophy and Psychology
3; Agricultural Engineering 4; Architecture 15; Law 4;
and so on; statistics which prove both the demand for
new studies in many fields and the equitable distribution
of new courses undertaken to assist the University in its
task of keeping the students and the community abreast
of the times. The courses now in existence on this campus
have been established as a result of provincial demand. Of
the students taking them this year, 181 in the Faculty of
Law are non-veterans, 1,000 in Applied Science are non-
veterans, and the majority of undergraduates in Arts and
Science are non-veterans. In the light of these facts we
can safely say that the existing departments will be as essential to a University of between 5,000 and 6,000 students
as they are today. With the passing of overcrowded conditions, certain courses can be consolidated, but no fewer
fields of study will meet community needs than are available now. On the contrary we are sure that the community will make new demands upon us which we hope
we will be in a position to meet.
Graduate School
Perhaps the most important academic step taken this
year was the formation of the Faculty of Graduate Studies
with Professor Henry Angus as its Director. The University already offers courses leading to a master's degree in
Arts and Science, Agriculture and Social Work; it can
now accept a limited number of students proceeding to
the degree of Ph.D. in the Department of Physics, Biology
and Botany, and Zoology. We have made a beginning with
those departments in which a minimum additional outlay
was required. We regard what we have done and hope to
do as an obligation to the development of advanced
scholarship in Canada. As we undertake this new venture
we are very conscious of our obligations to the undergraduate. Further expansion of our graduate work must
ten proceed slowly for a time, and will only proceed as we
see our way clear to maintain high standards in both the
undergraduate and postgraduate fields.
Staff
I have already mentioned the magnitude of the task
confronting the University staff during the emergency
period. The problems of large classes, inconvenient accommodation, and short supplies have been met in a spirit
of enthusiastic cooperation which has made my own task
considerably easier than it would otherwise have been. I
am most grateful to the members of the staff for their
efficiency and cheerfulness during very trying times. I
shall refer later to the research program of the University
but this seems the proper place to comment upon the
extent to which such research is, even now, a part of
faculty activity. To contribute to original thought and
the extention of knowledge is, of course, one of the functions of a University, but I consider it remarkable that our
staff, while under extraordinary pressure, has been able to
maintain such a comprehensive program of extra work
in this field.
Teaching problems are not the only ones to confront
our faculty during a time of rising costs and many shortages. The cost of living is sharply present to members of a
salaried group. Helpful work is being done by faculty
committees in studying and making recommendations
concerning the stabilization of tenure and salary increases,
and in our planning for the more normal future consideration must certainly be given to a long term policy
of staff requirements.
During the past year, in line with the peak enrolment
of students, more than 100 individuals were added to the
teaching staff. It now numbers 824, not too large a figure
when you consider it in relation to the 9,374 students who
eleven are its' teaching load.   The following table shows the distribution of staff members:
Deans of Faculties        4
Dean of Administrative and Inter-Faculty
Affairs  1
Director of Graduate Studies  1
Professors    92
Visiting Professors  3
Associate Professors   69
Assistant Professors   70
Lecturers   _. 1 1 72
Instructors   5 5
Special Lecturers   4
Honorary Lecturers ;  2
Part-time Lecturers  32
Part-time Instructors .___: 7
Assistants, including Extension Department 412
Total  824
Research
In the year under review, $83,000 was made available
for research, of which, by far, the greater sum was contributed by public and private donors within the province
and the country. We cannot as yet put aside any large
sums from our own budget for research and we greatly
appreciate the increasing support which this side of the
University's activities is receiving. We look forward to
further encouragement of this kind for both our long
range and immediately useful research work.
Some of our projects carried on during the past year
have been a matter of individual enterprise; many of them
have been undertaken in cooperation with the National
Research Council, the B.C. Research Council, various
Dominion and Provincial Administrative Departments,
and a number of large industrial firms.
twelve The research projects include a study of fruit cooling
methods for B.C. apples; work with natural rubber; freshwater fish and game investigations; work in the field of
nuclear physics; a study of the Canadian family; a demonstration housing survey; a survey of contemporary Indian
cultures in B.C.; studies in comparative literature; research in biochemical prospecting; mineralogical and geological research; a study of B.C. coal and shale; the location
of faults in electric power cables; and many more. The
variety of research indicated here is a remarkable testimony
to the energy and perseverance of an academic staff which
is already carrying an abnormally heavy teaching load.
The Library
The year under review saw the new—and badly needed
—wing to the Library nearing completion. It also involved catering in badly cramped quarters to a record
enrolment of students. The process of linking the new
to the old required the prolonged use of pneumatic drills,
and pneumatic drills and the Library rule of silence are
not easy to reconcile. Conditions were extremely trying
for all concerned but the promise of new and improved
space for books, staff and students made the situation endurable, for although the Library's own staff and book
stocks have grown substantially in recent years the actual
space and service facilities available were not much greater
than they were in 1925 when the student enrolment was
only 1,463.
The Library staff was increased from 42 persons in
September, 1947, to 50 in the autumn of 1948. 121,698
books were circulated from the Main Loan Desk during
the session—an increase of 21% over last year. Reserve
book circulation was 97,837, almost 20,000 more than last
year, and circulation through the Extension Department
showed a 21% increase.
The Library also kept up its special services, the Art
Loan Collection and the Gramophone Record Collection,
thirteen which continue to be popular with students and public.
Once a month, on "loan day," students may borrow or
exchange original paintings and good prints from the Art
Collection. The Record Collection of 2,500 discs acquired
464 new discs during the year and discarded 100 old ones;
its records were borrowed 23,455 times. The Extension
Department made constant use of this borrowing service
with 2,824 loans of records, most of which were sent by
mail to schools, camps, parent-teacher associations and
private listening groups scattered all over the province.
Previous estimates of the size of our book collection
gave us 190,000 volumes but a more accurate count made
possible this year by the reorganization of library facilities
and records shows that we actually possess some 260,000
volumes. During the past year 9,628 volumes were added
to the main collection. 1,400 volumes have been catalogued for the Howay-Reid Collection of Canadiana. The
Library also acquired a very large collection of periodicals
which came originally from the Library of the Royal
Canadian Institute.
The buying program for the H. R. MacMillan Forestry
Collection, which was suspended for a time because of
difficult working conditions, is again proceeding satisfactorily. This fine collection of material is already of very
great and increasing value both to students and to the
lumber industry generally.
As always we are most grateful for the many useful and
valuable gifts which have been made to the Library during
the year. Acknowledgment of benefactions is appended
to this report, but I wish here to assure the donors that
their gifts are not only welcome but put to practical use
by the student body and the community.
The special thanks of the University as a whole are due
to Dr. Lamb and his staff, for the Library is the heart of a
University and they kept it functioning, with a very high
degree of efficiency, during a most trying transitional
period, now happily at an end.
fourteen Summer Session
Summer School enrolment has diminished understandably in the last two years as veteran students have graduated and special courses arranged for them have been removed from the calendar. The drop in enrolment this
year, however, has been proportionately less than the decrease in 1947 and there is an indication that the figure will
stabilize itself in the years ahead at a figure between 1,000
and 1,200. The breakdown of enrolment figures for the
last three years appears in the following table:
1946 1947 1948
First year   688 308 349
Second year   794 513 494
Third year   445 422 342
Fourth year   240 328 300
Graduates   178 237 257
Auditors   13 17 26
Total __._.._„._.___2,358       1,825        1,668
In the Summer Session of 1948, 48 three-unit courses
and four one-and-a-half unit courses were offered as compared with 59 full courses and four half courses in the
previous year.
There were 17 visiting instructors, 10 from Canada, 6
from the United States, and 1 from England.
The Session was, as usual, greatly enhanced by a variety
of interesting short courses offered by the Department of
University Extension. Outdoor work was carried on
whenever possible and such subjects as "Painting for
Pleasure" and "Photography" were attended by capacity
classes. Creative Writing, Music Appreciation, and Weaving were among other courses offered, and the Summer
School of the Theatre presented its annual six-week drama
course. Training in all phases of theatre concluded with
the presentation of a three-act play "A Highland Fling,"
fifteen and two one-act plays, all of which displayed excellent
standards in production and acting.
Casa Espanola was again opened in Acadia Camp,
where students had the opportunity of living in a Spanish
environment, speaking the language, eating Spanish food,
and studying Spanish music and folklore.
The Summer Session Students' Association, in addition
to their usual program of musical, athletic, and social
events, presented a series of five lectures during noon
hours, in which authorities chosen from the Summer Session staff addressed large audiences on a variety of subjects.
The newly-formed University Fine Arts Committee cooperated with the Summer Session and the Department of
Extension in arranging a Fine Arts Festival. Noted artists were brought to the campus to lecture; an exhibition
of painting was provided; musical programs were arranged; and visitors were also given an opportunity of
seeing the work done by the classes in "Photography" and
"Painting for Pleasure" and of attending the dramatic
productions of the Summer School of the Theatre.
As this brief survey indicates, our Summer Session offers
a wide variety of opportunities both to students who are
interested in completing a particular educational assignment and to those who are interested in training in leisure-
time activities. By attendance at Summer Session over a
period of years, many who would have found the task impossible otherwise have accumulated a large number of
courses leading to a University degree. Teachers from all
parts of the province come to the sessions to keep abreast
of developments in education. Many professional people
take advantage of the special courses to acquire some particular training, and many more attend to enjoy the short
courses in arts and crafts while enjoying the pleasant campus surroundings. I am delighted that the University has
been able to offer so varied and stimulating a program and
I hope that its possibilities will become more and more
widely known.
sixteen University Lectures
During the past year the first two University special
lectureships were inaugurated. The first, established by
the Bostock family in memory of the late Senator Hewitt
Bostock and for the purpose of drawing attention to subjects of educational and social importance, was inaugurated the day following the autumn Congregation when
Dr. B. K. Sandwell, then Rector of Queen's University
and Editor of "Saturday Night," delivered a paper on
"The Gods in Twilight" in the University auditorium to
a large and very interested audience. This lecture was
later printed and distributed.
The second of these lectureships, sponsored by the Canadian Club of Vancouver, was inaugurated by Mr. Justice
John E. Read, formerly legal counsellor to the Department
of External Affairs and now a member of the International
Court of Justice. Mr. Justice Read was in residence at the
University for a week and delivered four lectures on the
following subjects: "International Agreements," "The
Early Provincial Constitutions," "International Justice,"
"The Code of Hammurabi."
In the spring term Dr. Hugh L. Keenleyside, Deputy
Minister of Mines and Resources and formerly lecturer in
the Department of History at this University, delivered
two lectures, the first on the subject of "Public Service as
a Career in Canada" and the second on "Canadian Immigration Policy." Both of these lectures have also been published and have been made available to other institutions
and interested individuals throughout the country.
We were gratified with the keen interest which was
shown in these lectures by both students and public, at the
time of their delivery and in published form. We are
pleased with the distinguished start which has been given
to these lectureships and we look forward to an extension
of similar lectureships into other fields of enquiry.
seventeen Meetings of Learned Societies
There has been increasing demand during recent years
for the use of the University facilities for meetings of
various provincial and Pacific Northwest academic and
learned bodies during the summer months. During the
past year, however, for the first time the University of
British Columbia was host to the national conferences of
Canadian learned and educational societies, most of whom
scheduled their meetings in relation to one another during
the month of June. Our guests included the Royal Society,
the National Conference of Canadian Universities, the
Social Science Research Council, the National Research
Council, the Canadian Political Science Association, the
Canadian Historical Association, the American Mathematical Society, the Canadian Institute of International
Affairs, and the Canadian Association for Adult Education. The University, with the assistance of a committee
of citizens of Vancouver and Victoria, was very glad to
make a considerable effort to assist the organizations named
to hold these conferences in the Province of British Columbia for the first time, because we feel that better intercommunication of ideas is essential to our educational and
cultural development, as well as to national unity, and in
so far as the fostering of such intercommunication is one
of the chief functions of the learned societies it was most
gratifying to have them come to the Pacific Coast. The
importance of meeting from time to time in different
sections of the country can hardly be over-stressed, both
for the value to the delegates themselves and also to the
residents of the particular area in which they are meeting.
We remember with very keen pleasure the friendliness, the
far-ranging interest of the formal and informal discussions. During the meetings of the Royal Society the University was pleased to hold a special Congregation and to
confer the degree of Doctor of Science honoris causa on:
W. P. Thomson, Dean of the College of Arts and Science,
University of Saskatchewan, President of the Royal
eighteen Society; Alice Ravenhill of Victoria; Anne Bezanson of
the University of Pennsylvania; and the degree of Doctor
of Laws honoris causa on T. R. P. Geo. H. Levesque, Dean
of the Faculty of Social Sciences, Laval University.
Congregations
The formal opening of the new Physics Building of the
University was held in conjunction with the 21st autumn
Congregation on Wednesday, October 29th, at which time,
Dr. Sandwell being the Congregation speaker, the degree
of Doctor of Laws honoris causa was conferred upon The
Honorable John Hart, Premier of the Province of British
Columbia, and the degree of Doctor of Science honoris
causa was conferred upon four distinguished scientists:
L. A. DuBridge, President of the California Institute of
Technology; E. O. Lawrence of the University of California; C. J. Mackenzie, President of the National Research Council; and O. M. Solandt, Director of the Defence Research Board. 305 degrees were conferred in
course.
In the two days following the Congregation a symposium and series of lectures on scientific subjects was held
by the distinguished visitors and members of the Science
Departments of the University, in the new Physics Building. •
At the 33 rd spring Congregation held on Thursday,
May 13 th, the University was honoured by the presence
of His Excellency the Governor-General of Canada, on
whom the. degree of Doctor of Laws honoris causa was
conferred, together with A. D. P. Heeney, Secretary of
the Cabinet and Clerk of the Privy Council, and G. M.
Weir, formerly Minister of Education and Head of the
Department of Education at the University. The degree
of Doctor of Science honoris causa was also conferred at
that time on the retiring Dean of Arts and Science, Daniel
Buchanan.   The number of degrees conferred in course,
nineteen 1318, was the largest in the history of the institution,
though it is likely that the number at the next spring
Congregation will be considerably larger.
Collections
The University Museum, for which we have many hopes
and plans, was moved this year to larger and more suitable
quarters in the basement of the new wing of the Library,
where, we feel that the Burnett Collection (one of the
best collections of Melanesian Artifacts in North America) is displayed to full advantage. The resources of the
Museum in the portrayal of Indian cultures were increased
by the purchase of seven paintings by George Clutesi, illustrating dances of the Nootka.
Plans have been made for the opening of the Museum
in its new quarters, with displays of interest to the general
public. Our future goals include additions to the B.C.
material now available so that it may be adequate for
teaching purposes; and a general expansion of the resources
of the Museum in the interests both of public education
and of the facilitation of study and research.
Through the generosity of its friends who, in this case,
include the Class of '47, the Provincial Museum, and an
anonymous donor, the University has been able to initiate
its plans for constructing on the campus a Totem Pole
Park, which, it is hoped, will eventually contain poles
representing the work of all the carving tribes of British
Columbia. The University is particularly indebted to Professor Hunter Lewis of the English Department, whose
constant interest in the arts has served us well on many
occasions, for the knowledge and effort which he has devoted to assembling the impressive nucleus of this collection. We have already purchased, or received as gifts, four
large Totem poles, ranging in height from thirty to sixty
feet, and representing excellent work of the Tsimshian,
Haida, and Kwakiutl Indians; five shorter carved House -
twenty poles of Kwakiutl origin, and of several types; two large
Thunderbirds, a large dugout canoe, and the elaborately
carved structural framework of a large Kwakiutl Community House. These poles are at present housed on the
campus being prepared for placement on the chosen site.
A plot of ground, at the juncture of Agronomy Road
and Marine Drive, has been set aside for the park. In it,
poles and Community Houses will be erected against a
semi-natural background of trees, and grouped irregularly
according to their tribal origins. The clearing of this area
has been started, and will be continued to keep pace with
the growth of the collection. An encouraging interest has
been shown in this project by numerous individuals and
groups.
Extra Curricular Activities
The full value of a university education cannot be obtained by the student from contact with the faculty alone
—important though that is. To become the student's own
possession, knowledge must be absorbed, sorted, sifted and
tested, in so far as that is possible. Traditionally in most
universities these processes have been carried on largely by
the students themselves through their clubs, teams and
other organizations. Consequently although almost all the
activities referred to below are carried on within the jurisdiction of the Alma Mater Society itself, some reference
to them is necessary in a report of this kind.
The Alma Mater Society (the student body) collects a
fee of $ 15 from each student. The total fees, administered
by the Students Council, are used to help finance an extremely wide and varied program of activities. During the
past year, in addition to the usual program of social, cultural and recreational events, the Students Council authorized the formation of political clubs on the campus.
This move has attracted a considerable amount of public
attention, and for this reason it seems to me worth while
twenty-one noting the educational role which such clubs share with
the older established debating, discussion, musical and dramatic organizations on the campus. They provide the
necessary opportunities for sorting and testing social, cultural and political ideas and values in, as it were, a kind
of social laboratory. It is, I think most educational authorities would agree, most necessary that university students
should have the opportunity to examine and debate contemporary social and political issues. It follows that they
will often choose to discuss the most contentious of public
issues. It follows equally that they will not all be fully
informed or free from prejudice; that they will make mistakes; that they will change their minds; that they will
sometimes espouse unpopular causes and irritate those of
us who are older and who feel that they are, in relation to
this or that issue, being too emotional or misguided, or
perverse or seeing it in over-simplified terms. Yet if the
development of balanced judgment is one of the chief aims
of the higher education, and I think it is, then we must
allow for some measure of trial and error in achieving that
balance. In a world such as ours beliefs which are accepted
passively are not likely to wear as well as those which have
been gained by that process of extra-curricular discussion
which is a vital part of the educational process. But, the
question is often asked, how do you know that the students
won't emerge with the wrong set of beliefs? There can, of
course, be no absolute guarantee but if we believe and
practise our belief in free and full discussion, and if we
see to it that all points of view have to come under critical
scrutiny, I am confident that the vast majority of students
will adhere to those principles in our society which have
proven themselves worthy of our confidence, that in short
truth will prove more attractive than error.
I am particularly grateful for an increasing understanding on the part of those who report undergraduate discussions and debates, that these extra-curricular activities are
not in fact the studied conclusions of the student body on
twenty-two the questions under review. They may be and frequently
are merely exercises in the handling of ideas. Votes taken
at debates may be merely expressions of opinion on the
merits of the debaters. They may be in effect interim
judgments on the matter being debated, judgments which
are subject to change without notice when more and better
information is available. It is I think important that they
should be treated as such, for their part in the educational
process is an important one, and I am glad to recognize
that the Press, generally shows a disposition not to weight
them with more emphasis than they warrant, but, on the
other hand, with such consideration as they merit. The
quality of responsibility which characterizes the student
government at the University has been well maintained
over the past year. One of the members of the Student
Council was elected president of the National Federation
of Canadian University Students and a number of other
members of the student body undertook work of considerable responsibility in national and international student
affairs.
University Extension
The Department of University Extension, which is organized to bring services of many kinds to individuals and
groups in all parts of the province, has increased its contacts and added considerably to its list of courses and services in the past year.
The subject matter of courses given at the University
and in other centres in various parts of Vancouver ranged
from the purely cultural to the essentially practical —
from music and art to cost accounting and truck fleet
supervisor's training. The fact that many of the courses
were arranged at the specific request of the organizations
concerned is encouraging evidence that there is increasing
awareness of the Department's usefulness among business,
industrial and semi-official groups, as well as among educational and cultural organizations.
twenty-three Trained assistants in the Department have travelled to
many parts of B.C. to give short courses in Home Economics, Handicrafts, Parent Education, Agriculture, and
Co-operative Organization, and pamphlets and advice
have been sent to many individuals by mail. Assistance
to drama groups has been given through advisory services,
and the Department's six-week drama course was a most
popular feature of the Summer Session. The Extension
Library has provided on request books on many of the
arts; in particular plays and texts are selected carefully to
fit the particular needs of the individual or group.
A total of 81 organizations and private listening groups
availed themselves of the Phonograph Record Loan Service during the past year, and courses in music appreciation were offered in the series of winter evening classes.
The Extension program in art developed most promisingly during the year. A series of evening lectures at the
Art Gallery and the continuation of the Summer Session
"Painting for Pleasure" classes during the winter met with
enthusiastic response.
Documentary films have now definitely established
themselves as popular and valuable aids to learning for
both school-age and adult groups. More than 11,000 reels
from the Extension Film Library were circulated to almost
800 organizations, churches, industrial concerns, government agencies, and private individuals.
In its contribution to the success of the Dominion-
Provincial Training School held at our Youth Training
Centre in Acadia Camp from January to March; in its
participation in co-operative educational programs for
B.C. fishermen; in its organization of evening classes, Extension lectures, short courses and conferences; in its dissemination of information through an organized Office of
Information, the Department of University Extension has
taken the University to the province in a most effective
way.
twenty-four In addition to the extremely varied services already
offered by the Department there is an increasing demand
for extra-mural courses which would carry credits towards a university degree. It appears advisable to consider
the possibility of providing correspondence courses for
credit in selected subjects, and of establishing certain evening courses and short courses on a regular basis of credits.
It is the particular function of this Department to go
beyond the campus in taking University services to the
public and it is gratifying that an increasing number of
organizations and individuals are making use to the fullest
possible extent of the many services designed especially
for them and incorporated in our Department of Extension.
The  University in the Community
It is my wish—a wish shared by all members of the
University—that every person in this province should be
fully aware of the University's capacity to serve them.
Our outlook is entirely practical: we are a part of the communities to which we look for support and we feel that
such support should be forthcoming in return for services
rendered. In the carrying out of our major responsibilities,
the education of young men and women, in our programs
of research, in our expanding Extension program, and in
many other ways we provide a service not only to those
who enroll with us but to the province and country as a
whole.
I am always pleased and satisfied when I see audiences
drawn from the communities to which we belong attending University functions, when I hear of the demands made
on our Extension workers, and of invitations to speak on
many interesting and important issues received by members of our Faculty. It is impossible to list here all the ways
in which our links with British Columbia communities
have been strengthened during the past year but I should
twenty-five like to refer briefly to some of the work which we attempt
to do.
An example of the varied program of outside lectures
carried on by the faculty was the successful series of addresses held in conjunction with the Victoria Extension
Association. Large numbers attended this series in the
Victoria Normal School Auditorium, with members of the
faculty speaking in rotation during a six-month period.
The operation of the Youth Training Centre in Acadia
Camp as a conference centre has made it possible for us
to entertain many visitors. This service was particularly
important last summer when we were able to provide
accommodation for the 14 national and provincial conferences which made Vancouver the locale of their annual
meetings. We hope that the Centre will continue to perform this most useful function of bringing various organizations into touch with the University.
An interesting service has developed out of our campus
Veterans Bureau, instituted in the emergency period to
assist ex-service men and women in choosing courses
wisely, with particular attention paid to the vocational
and professional plans of each individual. So successful
was this counselling service that it has recently been applied to non-veteran students entering the University for
the first time, and the methods pioneered with such success in the emergency period have been introduced to the
public through similar counselling services established in
the city. Staff members of our Veterans Bureau have acted
in an advisory capacity in setting up these community
counselling bureaux, which are designed to measure the
interests, abilities, and personality of the individual, in an
effort to assist him in the wise choice of a profession or
vocation.
I wish to thank the members of the Alumni Association,
the press, radio, and special friends of the University who
twenty-six have assisted in bringing our services to the communities
and who have welcomed us warmly wherever we have
gone.
In recent years there has been an increase in requests
for University services but I feel that large sections of the
population are not yet aware of the purpose which this
institution can and should be made to serve. We would
like to see all citizens of the province convinced of our
willingness to assist actively, whenever and wherever possible, in any plan to further the welfare of communities
and individuals in British Columbia.
Naval and Military  Training
Two of the armed services—the Naval Training Division, and the Canadian Officers' Training Corps—have
been represented on the campus up to the present time
and we anticipate the forming of an R.C.A.F. training
unit in the near future.
The U.N.T.D. is attached to the Reserve Division,
H.M.C.S. Discovery, with authority to train 100 students
as junior officers for the Royal Canadian Navy (Reserve)
and the Royal Canadian Navy. The full training program
may be completed during the four years of an undergraduate student's university career. During the summer,
personnel receive general and special training in their respective branches ashore and afloat. Upon successful completion of the full course of training, and upon University graduation, the officer candidate is duly commissioned
as a confirmed Sub-Lieutenant in the R.C.N. (R).
The C.O.T.C. operates in a similar manner, giving instruction during the winter on parade nights and requiring officer cadets to attend a summer camp. 115 officer
candidates received local headquarters training during the
last session and 107 attended the 1948 summer camps.
The Commanding Officer reports excellent morale among
the trainees with a high parade attendance.
twenty-seven finances
Comparative Summary of University Finances
REVENUE
1947-1948 % 1946-1947 %
Provincial Government Grant -—-$1,075,291.89      29.5     $   920,050.00      25.6
Dominion Government D.V.A. Grant     611,281.09      16.8 791,412.60      22.0
Student Fees .     ,683,536.75      46.2      1,712,129.50      47.7
Benefactions    and
Sundry        275,086.57        7.5 166,972.86        4.7
$3,645,196.30    100.0    $3,590,564.96    100.0
EXPENDITURE
Teaching Costs (Salaries, Supplies and
Equipment)   .      ...$1,942,758.94      54.5    $1,541,156.41       39.6
Administration Cost..     240,688.75 6.7 186,969.79        4.8
Buildings and Grounds
(Maintenance, etc.)      480,501.56      13.5 407,383.62      10.5
General Expense—Insurance, Annuities,
etc. , 426,009.72       11.9 275,252.75 7.2
Emergency Program
re Alterations to
Buildings, Equipment of Laboratories, etc. -       478,070.09       13.4       1,472,390.33       37.9
$3,568,029.06     100.0    $3,883,152.90    100.0
DEFICIT FOR YEAR $292,587.94*
SURPLUS FOR YEAR     $77,167.24*
J> Through an understanding arrived at by the University Advisory Committee
with the Department of Veterans' Affairs, deficits incurred in one year for
emergency accommodation for student veterans could be paid out of supplementary grants provided in subsequent years.
twenty-eight As will be seen from the comparative summary of university finances above, the university's income reached
an all time maximum of $3,6.45,196.30 in the year under
review. It should be noted, however, that while the provincial government grant of $1,075,291.89 is increasing
to provide for the increasing normal enrolment of non-
veteran students, the federal government grant on behalf
of the veteran students has already begun to decline.
Within three or four years therefore the University's gross
income will diminish by not only $611,281.09 (representing a grant of $150 per veteran student in receipt of
educational benefits) but also by the equivalent proportion of student fees, amounting to another $790,000 or
thereabouts. This loss will, it is hoped, be compensated
for in some measure by a further increase in the provincial
grant but it is apparent that a very substantial loss in
revenue will have to be faced, unless new sources of income are found.
When we turn from income to expenditure it is encouraging to note the decline from 37.9% to 13.4% of
total outlay required to keep abreast of the emergency
building and equipment requirements of the veteran and
non-veteran record enrolment. We can expect a further
decline in this item in the coming years but this is the
only item in the budget which is easily curtailed. When
the enrolment drops in a few years to 5,000 students or
thereabouts there will of course be some saving on teaching costs but not as much as might be expected, for the
demand for -the number of courses will remain. Only the
number of students per course will decline.
That is to say the University of British Columbia, in
common with all other Canadian universities, is facing a
period of sharply declining revenue at a time when the
provincial and national requirements for university training are increasing. There was a time when, faced by a
situation of this kind, the universities could turn with
twenty-nine some confidence to the possessors of large private fortunes
to provide endowment income. The older universities
on this continent and in Europe owed a considerable part
of their relative affluence to private benefactors. With
the advent of high income tax and succession duties, low
rates of interest and the sharply increasing costs of higher
education, private fortunes can no longer be relied upon
to bridge the gap, though some assistance from this source
can be expected. Only four other possible sources of income remain: student fees, the provincial government,
corporations and the federal government. Student fees
have increased in recent years to the point where they
now amount to 46.2% of our total income. Further general increases will be resisted if at all possible as it is our
wish that as many as possible of the young men and women
of our country who are qualified and want to come to
university should be enabled to come. Certainly they
should not be barred by excessive fees.
The provincial legislature, as I indicated earlier, has
shown a sympathetic understanding of the value of the
university to the community and it is to be expected that
they will contribute their appropriate share on behalf of
the normal non-veteran enrolment of some 5,000 students. The province cannot be expected, however, to
support that part of the university's function which is in
the national rather than the strictly provincial interest.
National defence, national welfare, national development
and prosperity are making ever greater demands on university resources. The means to meet these demands must
be met, if they are to be met, by business, industry and/or
the federal government.
I am very happy to report that this university, despite
its relative youth, is beginning to attract the support of
benefactors for the liberal arts, for the pure and applied
sciences, for professional studies and research. Acknowledgment of recent benefactions is made in an appendix
to this report.
thirty Prizes, Scholarships, Bursaries and Loans
An analysis of the more than 100,000 which was
awarded to students attending the University during the
past academic year in the form of prizes, scholarships and
bursaries shows an extremely wide distribution of awards
throughout the province. 457 students from approximately 100 different centres benefitted from the series of
awards. The largest source, the Dominion-Provincial Fund
alone provided assistance for 262 students, amounting to
$56,825. 60% of each grant from this fund is in the form
of a clear award, 40 % is a loan, which is interest-free until
one year after the student enters gainful employment, at
which time he is expected to begin repayment.
From the University Bursary Fund, 72 more students
received bursaries totalling in all $7,650. This Fund is set
aside annually by the Board of Governors to provide assistance to students of special ability who are in financial need.
An additional 77 students received a total of $11,000 from
the "named" bursaries provided by private donors.
University and "named" scholarships and prizes to the
value of approximately $25,000 were awarded to some 45
students for outstanding work during the year. While
financial need is in no sense a factor in making these awards
they also play their part in making a university education
more possible for a larger number of those who are well
qualified and who are willing to make a considerable personal effort to come.
The University is extremely grateful to the governments
and private donors who are assisting ever increasing numbers of young men and women to finance their own
education.
I would also like to pay tribute to Dean Gage and the
other members of the University Committee on Prizes,
Scholarships, Bursaries and Loans for the effectiveness and
consideration with which they operate.   They have not
thirty-one only administered the funds at their disposal to excellent
effect but they have also been available and eager to advise
the increasing number of those who wish to* establish
prizes, scholarships, bursaries or loan funds. We are very
happy to acknowledge benefactions for these and other
purposes in an appendix to this report.
Self-Help Program
Because there are of necessity limitations to the University's bursary program, and because of the insistent need
of more students for some measure of financial assistance,
the University has extended its efforts over the past year to
provide part-time employment on and off the campus.
This work has been developed by the University's Veteran
Counselling and Job Placement Service and extended to
non-veteran students, with the result that a total of some
70 students are now engaged in part-time work on the
campus, and a total of 3,124 students have been placed in
part-time or casual work at some time, for long or very
short periods during the past year.
Care is taken to ensure that the amount of part-time
work undertaken is not more than the student can carry
along with the course of studies in which he is enrolled.
The same University agency has placed 1,975 students
in summer employment and over two hundred graduates
in permanent employment. In all 5,335 jobs have been
filled during the past year within the expanded self-help
program.
Here again I would like to express the University's
appreciation of the cooperation and assistance which has
been cordially extended by employers in the city and
province and indeed all across the country.
thirty-two Appendix A
REGISTRAR'S REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT
October 25 th, 1948,
1. Attendance, 1947-48
(a) By faculties and year,
(b) By area of residence.
(c) By occupations of parents.
2. Comparative statement of attendance, sessions 1933-34
to 1947-48.
3. Complete statement of degrees conferred, 1934 to
1948; of honorary degrees conferred, 1930 to 1948;
and of diplomas issued, 1934 to 1948.
4. Statement in reference to location of graduates.
5    Statement of scholarships, etc., awarded to graduates.
Charles B. Wood,
Registrar. REGISTRATION FOR 1947-1948
Regular Session
Faculty of Arts and Science
First Year Arts
First Year Home Economics
First Year Physical
Education
Second Year Arts
Second Year Commerce
Second Year Home
Economics
Second Year Pharmacy
Second Year Physical
Education
Third Year Arts
Third Year Commerce
Third Year Home Economics
Third Year Pharmacy
Third Year Physical
Education
Fourth Year Arts
Fourth Year Commerce
Fourth Year Home
Economics
Graduates
Bachelor of Social Work
Master of Social Work
Teacher Training
Extra-Sessional Students
Directed Reading Students
Less Double Registrations
Faculty of Applied Science
Men Women Total
Men Women Total
1032
357
1389
First Year
519
....
519
....
57
57
First Year Architecture
54
2
56
8
5
13
First Year B.S.F.
83
—
83
894
296
1190
Second Year
709
—
709
265
17
73
282
73
Second Year Architecture
Second Year B.S.F.
24
84
	
24
84
Third Year
394
1
395
64
11
75
Third Year Architecture
7
7
32
13
45
Third Year B.S.F.
43
	
43
726
273
999
Fourth Year
180
1
181
272
s   ....
19
52
291
52
Fourth Year B.S.F.
18
....
18
53
6
59
Graduates
36
....
36
40
10
50
2151
4
2155
462
258
720
204
19
223
Faculty of Agriculture
48
48
First Year
78
10
88
209
58
267
Second Year
125
16
141
29
49
78
Third Year
130
16
146
8
19
27
Fourth Year
100
16
116
50
20
70
16
5
21
Graduates
27
5
32
127
48
175
Occupational Course
21
2
23
—44
—8
—52
	
	
	
481
65
546
4447     1705     6152
Nursing
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year
Fifth Year
Certificate Course
thirty-four
Faculty of Law-
20
17
16
20
17
16
First Year
Second Year
188
139
10
4
198
143
11
11
Third Year
66
2
68
14
14
     '
	
34
34
393
16
409
112      112      TOTALS
7472  1902 9374 WHERE THE STUDENTS CAME FROM
.1.947 -   [948
A  A  A  A
•»« 1 !>0 500 3 000
1. East Kootenay ..
2. West Kootenay
3. Peace River	
4. Cariboo   	
5. Northern B. C.~
6. B. C Coast	
7. Vancouver Island 	
8. Lower Mainland 	
9. Okanagan (Kamloops) 	
10. Kamloops  (North Thompson).
11. Vancouver	
12. Canada  (Outside B. C.)-
13. Other Countries  .
138
283
7
55
33
131
932
1457
333
72
4976
827
147 OCCUPATION OF PARENTS
1947-1948
Agricultural
Farmers and Stock Raisers
Foremen
Labourers
Clerical
Accountants and Auditors
Bookkeepers and Cashiers
Office Clerks
Shipping Clerks
Stenographers and Typists
Construction
Owners and Managers
Foremen
Brick and Stone Masons
. Carpenters
Electricians
Painters, Decorators, Glaziers
Plasterers and Lathers
Plumbers and Pipe Fitters
Structural Iron Workers
Other Construction Occupations
Finance
Owners, Managers, Officials
(Finance and Insurance)
Insurance Agents
Real Estate Agents and Dealers
Stock and Bond Brokers
Other Finance Occupations
Fishing
Fishermen
Hunting and Trapping
Trapper
Logging
Owners and Managers
Foremen
Foresters and Timber Cruisers
Lumbermen   (Axemen, Cable Tenders,
Riggers, Etc.)
Labourer
Labourers   (Not Agricultural, Fishing,
Logging, or Mining)
Manufacturing  and Mechanical
Owners  and  Managers
Foremen
Inspectors and Testers  (Chemicals)
Inspectors, Examiners, Gaugers   (Metals)
Inspectors, Graders, Scalers   (Wood)
Bakers
thirty-six
Blacksmiths, Forgemen
14
650
Boilermakers, Platers, Riveters
8
8
Bookbinder
1
7
Boot and Shoe Repairers
11
Butchers and Meat Cutters
15
Cabinet and Furniture Makers
8
363
Cooper
1
23
Dressmaker
1
Electrical Appliances Repairmen
68
157
Engravers and Lithographers
5
32
Filers, Grinders, Sharpeners
10
2
Fitters and Assemblers
2
Furnacemen, Heaters   (Metal)
23
Jewellers and Watchmakers
15
152
Machinists
95
13
Mechanics and Repairmen
77
13
Millers   (Flour and Grain)
2
209
Milliner
1
2
Millwrights
18
51
Moulders, Coremakers,  Casters
10
12
Paper Makers
10
25
Patternmakers
3
3
Photographers
2
25
Polishers and Buffers  (Metal)
1
Power Station Operator
1
Printers
44
Sawyers  (Wood)
42
101
Sheet Metal Workers and Tinsmiths
18
106
Smeltermen
3
82
Stationary Enginemen
56
33
Tailors
18
6
Tool Makers, Die Makers and Setters
3
Upholsterers
2
Welders and Flame Cutters
10
29
Other Occupations in Clothing and
Textile Products
2
Other Occupations in Food
21
1
Other Occupations in Fur Products
5
,
Other Occupations in Leather Products
3
Other Occupations in Liquor
66
and Beverages
5
2
Other Occupations in Metal Products
12
5
Other Occupations in Non-Metallic
Mineral Products
5
67
Other Occupations in Wood
and Paper Products
11
Other  Occupations  in  Other
88
Manufacturing
Mining and Quarrying
'3
260
Owners and Managers
17
51
Foremen
.9
1
Labourers
52
2
Miners and Millmen
4
65
Oil Well Drillers
2
12
Quarriers and Rock Drillers
2 Personal Services
Hotel Keepers and Managers 3 5
Laundry Owners and Managers 2
Restaurant  and Tavern Keepers 20
Boardinghouse Keeper 1
Barbers and Hairdressers 34
Cleaners and Dyers 12
Cooks and Chefs 20
Domestic Servant 1
Elevator Tenders 4
Guards and Caretakers 39
Housekeepers and Stewards 16
Janitors 28
Launderer 1
Nurses   (Practical) , 7
Undertakers 7
Waiters 7
Other Personal Service Occupations 5
Public Services
Firemen 25
Government Inspectors 54
Officers   (Armed Forces) 3 6
Other Ranks   (Armed Forces) 24
Policemen and Detectives 3 5
Postmasters                   - 2,8
Postmen and Mail Carriers 30
Public Service Officials 3 06
Other Public  Service Occupations 9
Professional Services
Architects 14
Artists and Art Teachers 6
Authors, Editors, Journalists 32
Chemists and Metallurgists 66
Clergymen  and  Priests 86
Dentists 47
Draughtsmen and Designers 9
Engineers (Civil) 145
Engineers (Electrical) 42
Engineers (Mechanical) 46
Engineers (Mining) 3 0
Judges and Magistrates 9
Lawyers and Notaries 136
Librarians 3
Musicians  and Music Teachers 14
Nurses  (In Training) 2
Osteopaths and Chiropractors 4
Physicians and Surgeons 151
Professors and College Principals 28
Religious Workers 5
Social Welfare Workers 16
Teachers  (School) 146
Veterinary Surgeons 8
Other  Professional  Services 37
Recreational Services
Owners  and Managers 14
Sportsman 1
Motion. Picture Projectionists 7
Trade
Owners, Managers, Dealers, Retail 404
Owners, Managers, Dealers, Wholesale 89
Floorwalkers and Foremen 5
Advertising Agents 10
Brokers and Agents 47
Collector   (Bills) 1
Commercial Travellers 12
Credit Man 1
Inspectors, Graders, Samplers 2
Interior Decorator 1
Packers, Labellers 2
Purchasing Agents and Buyers 12
Sales Agents, Canvassers 192
Sales Persons in Stores 19
Transportation and Communications
Owners, Officials and Managers 64
Foremen 3 3
Inspectors 10
Agents   (Ticket Station) 29
Aviator  (Not in Armed Forces)         ■ 1
Baggagemen and Expressmen 6
Brakemen   (Railway) 2
Bus Drivers 2
Captains, Mates, Pilots 46
Chauffeurs and Taxi Drivers 8
Conductors  (Steam Railway) 35
Deliverymen  and  Drivers 2
Dispatchers   (Train) 3
Engineering Officers  (Ship) 20
Linemen and Servicemen 17
Lockkeeper, Boatman 1
Locomotive Engineers 56
Longshoremen and Stevedores 21
Messengers 2
Radio Station Operators 3
Seamen, Sailors, Deckhands 6
Sectionmen and Trackmen 4
Street Car Operators 2 6
Switchmen, Signalmen, Flagmen 3
Teamsters and Draymen 2
Telegraph Operators 15
Telephone Operator 1
Truck Drivers 24
Other Transportation Occupations 82
Other Occupations
Invalid
Students
Housewife
Unemployed
7
15
3
3
TOTAL    9374
Retired   ______   ----- 934
Unspecified ....    -  943
Deceased    --— —- 783
thirty- seven REGISTRATION
Arts &
Applied
Nurs
Agricul
Session
Science
Science
ing
ture
1933-34   	
     1147
287
48
63
1934-3 5   	
  .1238
320
57
71
1935-36   _     _.
         1337
336
366
68
47
80
1936-37     	
     1499
95
1937-3 8   	
     1590
416
50
100
193 8-39   	
     .    1634
419
434
59
65
117
1939-40   	
     1664
139
1940-41   	
      1724
466
60
166
1941-42   	
      1763
488
63
155
1942-43   	
      1744
522
98
140
1943-44   	
     1709
515
67
113
1944-45   	
     2098
546
112
147
1945-46	
     4814
1083
128
406
1946-47   	
      5666
2003
141
552
1947-48   	
      5750
2115
112
546
Law
Social
Work
Teacher    Total
Training  Winter
Course     Session
Summer
Session
61 1606 370
66 1652 377
62 1883 464
42     2049 566
67 2223 650
57 2286 659
69 2371 715
71     2487 587
68 2537 457
34 2538 329
26     2430 441
51     20     2974 861
Special   Spring  Session—Ex-Service Personnel—
87               67             47             6632 2368
Special  Spring  Session—Ex-Service Personnel...
240               93             46             8741 1791
409               105              70              9374 1626
Short
Courses
D.R.C &
Bot. Eve.
Grand
Total
124
165
278
306
279
290
253
206
184
98
131
113  3948)
  278)     4226
151  9151)
  2014)11165
294 10826
209 11209
2100
2294
2625
2921
3152
3235
3339
3280
3178
2965
3002 DEGREES CONFERRED
Year
M.A.
B.A.
B.Com.     B.Ed.    M.A.Sc.   B.H.E.     B.ASc.   B.S.F.
B.A.Sc.
Nursing
1934
11
204
31
	
3
	
37
	
5
	
4
October
6
36
5
	
1
	
5
	
	
	
1
1935
14
196
23
	
8
	
57
....
13
	
2
October
12
45
5
	
	
	
5
	
	
	
- 	
1936
15
175
21
	
6
	
■ 50
	
7
	
5
October
10
38
1
	
2
—
3
	
	
	
3
1937
21
190
28
	
4
	
48
	
2
	
7
October
9
54
8
	
	
	
6
	
1
	
1
1938
20
204
31
	
6
	
56
	
7
	
3
October
10
53
3
	
2
	
4
	
	
	
	
1939
19
217
22
	
7
	
71
	
8
	
4
October
5
63
6
	
	
	
9
	
	
_..-•
1
1940
30
212
37
	
4
	
71
	
13
	
3
October
6
62
1
	
	
	
1
	
	
	
1
1941
21
189
26
	
7
	
81
1
8
	
2
October
8
73
9
	
1
	
	
	
	
	
3
1942
14
170
52
	
9
	
82
3
6
2
October
12
51
1
3
	
	
2
	
-
2
1943
13
167
31
2
3
	
92
2
12
	
3
October
8
51
1
3
	
	
1
	
	
.....
1
1944
6
163
37
1
7
87
3
9
	
1
October
1
45
4
7
	
	
1
1
1
	
	
1945
10
189
43
4
	
	
97
3
8
—
2
**.
October
5
41
4
8
4
	
3
	
—
—
1
It
1946
12
220
54
9
2
15
112
12
19
37
1
C?
October
12
96
56
19
10
	
5
1
2
1
3
a
1947
25
385
151
15
14
28
131
9
16
56
11
i'
October
11
151
78
32
7
6
4
1
—
1
2
1948
33
599
208
21
6
39
170
15
14
56
7
B.S.W. M.S.A. M.S.W.     B.S.A.   LL.B.
12
3
19
1
16
2
14
1
19
5
22
2
18
3
19
26
5
25
4
24
3
19
5
32
4
52
4
91
Total
Grand
Total
3 07
3583
57
3 640
332
3972
68
4040
295
433 5
59
4394
314
4708
80
4788
346
5134
77
5211
370
5581
86
5667
388
6055
74
6129
3 54
6483
94
6577
3 64
6941
76
7017
350
7367
69
7436
338
7774
63
7837
375
8212
71
8283
525
8808
209
9017
893
9910
305
10215
[318
11535 HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED
Year
Previous
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
'      (Honoris Causa)
LL.D.
Years 8
1
2
8
1
2
6
1
5
3
1
Year
(Honoris Causa)
LL.D.
1942
1943
1944 (October)
1945
1945 (October)
1946
1946 (October)
1947
1947 (October)
1948 (June)
1948 (May)
Total
4
1
9
1
1
2
1
1
3
65
Year
1944
1945
1946
1946 (October)
1947
1948
1948 (June)
Total
D.Sc.
1
2
2
1
4
1
3
13
Grand Total    78
DIPLOMAS ISSUED
Occupational
Teacher
Public Health
Social
Course in
Year
Training
Nursing
Work
Agriculture
Total
1934
61
10
71
October
3
3
	
6
1935
65
15
3
3
86
October
1
	
7
8
1936
60
15
....
75
October
....
12
	
12
1937
39
16
	
4
59
October
1
5
19
25
1938
65
18
1
3
87
October
2
15
	
17
1939
54
14
2
4
74
October
1
1
24
	
26
1940
66
12
3
5
86
October
2
23
....
25
1941
68
9
1
2
80
October
22
22
1942
59
10
4
4
77
October
	
1
17
18
1943
28
17
2
57
October
12
1
1944
24
29
8
61
October
1 (June)
1
24
26
1945
21
32
1
3
57
October
2
18
20
1946
45
39
(June)
....
18
102
October
5
	
....
5
1947
41
48
	
38
127
October
4
6
	
	
10
1948
58
	
	
8
66
July
5
32
—
—
37
12
forty WHERE OUR GRADUATES GO
ma um i i * i
Vancouver British Canada Great        U.S.A.        Others
Columbia Britain
*      2     *     A
tilt
VANCOUVER   45 07
Other Parts of British Columbia  2300
Other Parts of Canada   884
Great Britain   85
United States     459
Other Countries   44
Total    8279
tr      21
Symbols 50 100       500      1000 SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES, FELLOWSHIPS AND BURSARIES AWARDED TO GRADUATES
1947 - 1948
During the year many scholarships, fellowships, prizes and bursaries have been won by the graduates of the University.    The following list
does not include awards which have been made by the Senate of the University of British Columbia.
Archer, D. H.._.
Attree, Richard-
Barrow, Gordon	
Bartholomew, G. A.Boyd, Alan 	
..National Research Council Bursary..
.. Research Fellowship	
.. Research Fellowship	
-National Research Council Fellowship-.
..Teaching Fellowship	
Brandreth, Harold	
Brockhouse, B. N	
Brown, Harry _
....I.O.D.E. War Memorial Scholarship  (Overseas).
 National Research Council Bursary.. 	
 National Research Council Studentship ,	
Buckland, John Research Assistantship	
Bulman, Norman Teaching Fellowship.^	
Cavers, Stuart Research Fellowship . 	
Carter, D. S National Research Council Studentship.
Codrington, R. S—
Collins, T. I	
Cowan, Phyllis	
Daykin, P. M	
 National Research Council Studentship..
 ...Teaching  Assistantship :	
. British Council Scholarship	
..National Research Council Bursary..
..Graduate Fellowship in English	
Downman, Lorna	
Edwards, T. H National Research Council Bursary	
Fowle, Ann (nee Clemens) Ontario  Research  Commission   Scholarship.	
National Research Council Bursary ...—
J. W. Wood Fellowship. ,	
Teaching  Fellowship. _
Giovando,L. F	
Gourlay, Colin C.	
Irwin, Winifred..- ..	
Kendall, R. A EE__
.National Research Council Bursary..
	
$450.00
Physics	
 $900.00
Chemistry-
	
$1800.00
Chemistry..
	
$900.00
Physics	
	
$900.00
Chemistry..
	
$1400.00
Economics-
	
$450.00
Physics	
	
$750.00
Physics	
	
$2000.00
Chemistry..
	
$800.00
Chemistry..
	
$1800.00
Chemistry..
..._.
$750.00
Physics	
$750.00
Physics	
 $900.00
Physics	
 unknown
Classics....
 $450.00
Physics	
 unknown
English	
 $450.00
Physics	
 $900.00
Zoology	
 $450.00
Physics	
 $500.00
Commerce
 $1000.00
History	
	
$450.00
Biophysics.
University of British Columbia
Princeton University
Notre Dame University
McGill University
University of California
London School of Economics
University of British Columbia
University of British Columbia
Pennsylvania State College
California Institute of Technology
California Institute o£ Technology
University of British Columbia
.University of British Columbia
University of California
University College oi Hull, England
.University of British Columbia
Smith College
University of British Columbia
University of Toronto
University of British Columbia
University of Toronto
Clark University
University of British Columbia Katainen, Violet-	
Latta, Gordon E	
Lindenfeld, Peter	
Maunsell, Charles	
Mitchell, James	
Mitchner, M	
MacDonald, J. C. F..
MacFarlane, T. G.	
McLauchlan, T. A...
Ozeroff, M. J	
Pinchin, H. R	
Reaville, Eric	
Reed, T. G	
Robertson, R. F-	
Rogers, E. DeL	
Roots, E. F —
Stevenson, J. S.	
Sultan, P. E	
Taylor, A. C —
Thomas, Blodwen..
White, P. C. T	
Whittemore, Tom..
Young, J. W	
Research Assistantship in Nutrition	
National Research Council Bursary	
National Research Council Studentship..
University Fellowship	
Fellowship  (study in semantics)	
National Research Council Bursary	
National Research Council Studentship..
National Research Council Bursary	
National Research Council Bursary	
National Research Council Studentship..
Kappa Sigma Fraternity Scholarship	
Teaching Fellowship	
Teaching Fellowship   .	
Research Fellowship	
National Research Council Bursary	
Fellowship in Geology .	
Guggenheim Fellowship.
Assistantship	
U.S. Navy Research Fellowship .	
National Research Council Bursary	
I.O.D.E. War Memorial Scholarship  (Overseas)
Teaching Assistantship. .	
National Research Council Studentship .
$800.00
$450.00
$750.00
$900.00
$600.00
$450.00
$750.00
$450.00
$450.00
$750.00
$300.00
$1200.00
$1500.00
$1000.00
$450.00
$700 or $400
plus tuition
unknown
$1500.00
$120 a month
$450.00
$1400.00
$900.00
$750.00
Home Economics-
Physics	
Physics .	
Physics .	
English _.T.	
Physics	
Physics	
Physics ....	
Physics . ,	
Physics	
Student Activities..
Chemistry	
Economics 	
Chemistry- 	
Physics	
Geology -?	
..Michigan State College
University of British Columbia
..University of British Columbia
..University of California
University of Virginia
-University of British Columbia
..University of British Columbia
.University of British Columbia
..University of Toronto
University of British Columbia
.University of British Columbia
-University of Washington
.Cornell University
.University of Wisconsin
University of British Columbia
Princeton University
Geology  Unknown
Economics  Cornell University
Chemistry  University of Illinois
Physics ,  University of British Columbia
History.   Cambridge University
Physics  University of California
Geology—   University of British Columbia
NOTE: In many cases these scholarships and fellowships carry with them free tuition or exemption from fees   (or travelling expenses)
in addition to their monetary value.
Value of scholarships, fellowships and bursaries awarded to our graduates  (and undergraduates)  by other Universities and Institutes during the 1947-48 Session .     $34,500.00
Total value of such scholarships, fellowships and bursaries since the first awards were made in 1917..
October 26th, 1948.
$837,459.00 Appendix B
GIFTS, GRANTS, AND BEQUESTS
The following list acknowledges gifts, grants, and bequests received during
the period September 1st, 1947, to August 31st, 1948.
Grants and  Gifts for Research and
Research Equipment
Atomic Energy Control Board—-To the Department of Physics as a further grant toward the construction of a Van de Graaf
Generator  $32,500.00
Geological Society of America—To the Department of Geology and Geography for
research work in plant and sub-surface Geology  -$4,000.00
National Defence Research Board — To the
Department of Physics for various research
projects  $20,850.00
National Research Council—
(a) Grants in aid to members of staff—
Department of Botany $1,400.00
Department  of Chemistry. $4,000.00
Department of Dairying . $1,800.00
Department of Mining
and Metallurgy  .'.-.$1,700.00
Department of Physics $14,120.00
Department of  Zoology $1,850,00
(b) Bursaries and studentships...$11,550.00
Gifts  For   Chairs  of Instruction,
Lectureships, and Special Courses
British   Columbia   Forest   Products   Limited—
Grant for professorship in entomology
    $5,000.00
British Columbia Packers Limited—For continuation of work in fisheries $7,500.00
Campbell, Estate of the late Mrs. Anne S.—
To assist needy students, and to assist in
the establishment of a Faculty of Medicine,
or to provide equipment in pre-medical
courses: total to be received over a period
of eleven years $26,800.00
Canadian Club of Vancouver — For special
lectures by Judge J. E. Read $500.00
Canadian Foundation for the Advancement of
Pharmacy-—For assistantships in Pharmacy
 ....... $600.00
Dominion Department of Fisheries—Appropriation for extension of educatonal work in
cooperative producing and selling among
fishermen    $10,000.00
Dominion Government Grant—Appropriation
for social work course $9,430.00
Fiddes, Mr. Robert — Contribution to the
Chair of Music .. $5,000.00
Fisher, Mrs. May C. (estate)—For work in
aeronautics  $75 0.00
Junior League of Vancouver—Final instalment
of grant for Social Work $3,000.00
MacMillan, Mr. H. R., C.B.E.—For work in
silviculture—second instalment  $5,000.00
Powell River Company Limited—$5,000 annually for three years to establish a professorship in Forest Pathology — first instalment  $5,000.00
Vancouver Board of Trade, Advertising and
Sales Bureau—To the Department of Commerce for the extension course in advertising   $1,000.00
Special Trust Funds
British Columbia Packers Limited — From
Directors of the Company, a fund to provide library material in Fisheries — $200
each from Messrs. J. M. Buchanan, George
Kidd, Gordon Farrell, J. P. D. Malkin, J. S.
McLean, H. R. MacMillan, A. C. Taylor,
W. J. Van Dusen, R. E. Walker, A. H.
Williamson  $2,000.00
Law Society of British Columbia—Memorial
endowment fund, the interest On which is
to be used to purchase works on legal History, etc., not usually included in law libraries  . . - $3,000.00
Rogers,  Jonathan   (from  the  estate)—To  be
held in trust pending decision on use	
    $77,839.61
Stewart, Mrs. Douglas — For the President's
Fund    $200.00
Williamson, Mr. A. H.—For the President's
Fund    - $10.00
Anonymous—For the President's Fund	
$10.00
Miscellaneous
Imperial Order, Daughters of the Empire—
Contributions to nursery school, Little
Mountain  $200.00
Various Friends of the University—Contributions toward conferences of the learned
societies 'held in Vancouver during June,
1948    $4,550.00
forty-five GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY
Abel, Mr. W. H. (Montesano, Washington) —
Encyclopaedia of the Laws of England, volumes 1-15, and 1st and 2nd annual supplements.
Berry, Dr. J. C.—143 items: books, booklets,
yearbooks on art; periodicals (chiefly Masters in Art); librettos and scores.
Blakey-Smith, Dr. Dorothy—File of Ubyssey,
1917-18,  1918-1922; miscellaneous items.
Churchill, Mr. Dennis Michael — American
Institute of Banking—Bank Organization
and Operation; Corwin, Thirteen by Cor-
win; Dickens, Tale of Two Cities; Hobson,
American Jazz Music; Jackson, Newspaper
Typography; Sandage, Advertising; and sev- ■
eral other volumes.
Coburn, Mr. Arthur—140 books (sets of Car-
lyle, Ruskin, etc.) and Canadian Bar Review, volumes 1-10, unbound,
r Dorbils, Mr. William—Kamloops and District
Mining Gazette, 9 numbers, January 1899-
March 1900; Dun and Wiman, Canadian
Business Directory (1885); Chittenden,
Queen Charlotte Islands, 1884; Mason, Bibliography of Oscar Wilde; Royce, a Balzac
Bibliography; McKay, Bibliography of Robert Bridges; 250 volumes of Canadiana and
sundry copies of the Canadian Annual Review, Canada Year Book, Debates of Senate
and House of Commons, Annual Reports of
B. C. Department of Mines, Geological Survey Memoirs, etc.; Miscellaneous periodicals
and documents.
Doull, Lieut.-Com. J. Ronald (from his
mother)—Dicey, Law of the Constitution;
Fry, Specific Performance of Contracts;
Leage, Roman Private Law; Keir and Law-
son, Cases in Constitutional Law; Kenny,
Cases Illustrative of English Criminal Law;
Moyle, Institute of Justinian.
Ketcheson, Mr. G. S.—Journal of Heredity,
August,   1938-January,   1948   (incomplete).
Lefeaux, Mr. W. W.—Report of Sirois Commission (3 vols.), Appendixes (1-8), Supplements   (11  vols.).
McGregor, Mr. D. A., and Scott, Mr. Sydney
■—Two cartons of envelopes of newspaper
cartoons (continuation of previous gift);
four cartons of miscellaneous pamphlets,
government documents, periodicals, mimeographed material, etc.
MacKay, Louis A.—Meynell, Alice Meynell a
Memoir; Watt, Landfall, Who Dare to Live;
Webb, Fifty-one Poems; Jameson, The Sultan of Jobat; Milligan, Siluria; Runyon,
Poems for Men; Canadian Art in Brazil
(Press Review); Davidson, Du Vieux Vin
dans des Bouteilles Neuves.
forty-six
McLennan, Mr. Lester W. (Richmond, California)—Head, The Immigrant (2nd. ed.),
London, 1846; Arfwedson, The United
States and Canada; Casgrain, Histoire de
l'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec.
MacMillan, Mr. H. R., C.B.E.—Arrowsmith's
Map, Chart of the World on Mercator's
Projection (1790); two maps of Upper
Canada; Portlock's Voyage 1785-1788; Cox,
Adventures on the Columbia River; Bent,
Life Histories of North American Birds of
Prey; three atlases and twenty-two maps,
among them a set of Buache charts; National Park Forest Guides; Fleming, Report
Canadian Pacific Railway, 1877; Dixon, A.,
Voyage Round the World, 1789; Scottish
National Park Forest Guides (Argyle);
various publications of the Newcomen Society; and a number of other books.
Paul, Mr. J. David—London Times, Sept. 21,
1946—-June 4, 1948 (continuation of previous gift).
Pearson, Mrs. T. R. (South Westminster, B.C.)
—The History of the Revolutions in England Under the Family of the Stuarts from
the Year 1603 to 1690, London (1711)
(continuation of previous gift).
Scott, Mrs. C. O.—3 50 volumes of miscellaneous books.
Scott, Mr. Sydney and McGregor, Mr. D. A.
—see M c Gregor, Mr. D. A.
Tulk, Mrs. Jessie—The Drama, vols. 1-18;
—-The Makers of Canada, vols. 1-21; The
Student's Reference Shelf, vols. 1-3; Rouff
(ed.), The Voluntary Library.
University of Western Ontario Library—Grip,
volumes 36, 37 (unbound); Bulletins of
Modern Art (8 numbers); Roddick, The
Armistice and Other Poems; Stringer, Out
of Erin.
Vancouver Daily Province—Vancouver Daily
Province, Magazine Sections 1924-1944, Financial Page 1945; Daily, Sept.  1946.
Vancouver Public Library—Buschings, Woch-
entliche, Nachrichten Von Neuen Land-
charten, Geographischen, Statischen und
Historischen Buchern und Sachen, v. 1-15,
1773-1787; British Columbia Directory
1939.
Warren, Dr. H. V.—London Times, weekly
ed., 1947, complete; London Observer (continuation of annual gift).
Willis, Mrs. S. J. (Victoria) — Humphrey
(ed.), The Works of Horce (first edition
printed in Canada). MISCELLANEOUS — Other useful and generous gifts from: Adams, Mrs. W. E.;
Allen, Mr. James G. (University of Colorado); Arab Office (Washington, D. C);
Association of British Insecticide Manufacturers' (London, England); Bailey Hortor-
ium (Cornell); Bastin, Mr. C. H.; Bastin,
Dr.; B. C. Research Council; Belgian Ambassador to Canada; Belgian Consul General (Montreal); Brazilian Ambassador to
Canada; British Columbia Federation of
Trade and Industry; British Empire Cancer
Campaign (London, England); Brooke, Dr.
C. Vyner; Brown, Mr. Frank H.; Buchanan,
Dean Daniel; Bunn, John A. (Lulu Island);
Canadian Federation of Labour; Canadian
Jersey Breeder (Montreal); Canadian Library Association (Ottawa); Canadian Medical Association (Montreal); Canadian Metal
Mining Association (Toronto); Canadian
National Live Stock Records (Ottawa);
Canadian Newspaper Service (Montreal);
Canadian Press Club (Winnipeg); Canadian
Society of Forest Engineers (Maritime Section); Carl, Dr. Clifford (Victoria); Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of
Teaching (New York); Carnegie Institution of Washington; Castran, Mr. Peter G.;
Chicago Natural History Museum; Class of
Sociology 400 (University of British Columbia); Clayton, Mrs. H.; Commercial
Intelligence Department, Canadian Manufacturer's Association (Toronto); Connaught Laboratories (Toronto); Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. (Trail);
Cooke, Professor A. C; Cooper, Mr. J. B.
G.; Cowan, Dr. I. McTaggart; Cran, Mr.
G. A. (Vancouver Sun); Davidson, Mr.
Fisher (Toronto); Department of Forestry
(University of British Columbia); de Vries,
Mr. W. P.; Division of Intercourse and Education, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (New York); Draper, Mr. H.
L. (Haney); Empire Club of Canada; Finnish Legation (Ottawa); Foster, Mrs. W.
Garland (continuation of previous gifts);
Gage, Professor W. H.; G. & C. Merriam
Co.    (Springfield,   Mass.);   Government   of
Sierra Leone (through Crown Agents for
the Colonies, London); Guy Tombs Ltd.,
(Montreal); Hummel, Mrs. H. V; Huntington Library (California); International
Auxiliary Language Association, New York;
James F. Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation
(Cleveland); Joseph E. Seagram and Sons,
Inc. (Louisville, Ky.); Klinck, Dr. L. S.;
Larsen, Professor Thorleif; Latvian Legation (Washington, D. C); Library of the
Royal Veterinary and Agricultural College
(Copenhagen); Lind, Mr. Walter J. (Canadian General Electric, Vancouver); Linde
Air Products Co. (New York); Manson,
Mr. James; Marton, Mrs. A.; Mount Allison
University Library; Murdoch, Dr. D. C;
McCloy, Mr. T. R.; McCrossan, George
(Estate); McCutcheon, Dr. R. H. (Estate);
Maclnnes, Dr. Isabel; National Academy of
Sciences; National Association of Silo Manufacturers (Norwich, N. Y.); National
Fertilizer Association (Washington, D. C);
National Interfraternity Conference (Philadelphia); National Research Council (Washington) ; New Westminster Public Library;
Norges Svalbard, Og Ishavs Undersokelser
(Oslo); Northwestern University; Notre
Dame University; Paradis, Mr. Rodolphe;
Petersen, Mr. G. M.; Priest, Mr. Jack;
Ranta, Dr. L. E.; Read, Professor F.; Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research; Rocky
Mountain Regional Conference on Higher
Education; Rowell, Mrs. Newton W. (Ottawa); Royal Bank of Canada Library (Montreal) ; Royal Danish Legation (Ottawa);
Shepherd, Mr. G. H.; Swinton, Mr. George
H.; Smithsonian Institution, Institute of
Social Anthropology; Soward, Professor F.
H.; Stanley, Professor G. F.; Stevens, Mr.
R. and Miss; Sun Directories Ltd.; Texas
Engineers' Library (College Station, Texas);
Toronto Public Library; University of Southern California, Allan Hancock Foundation
Library; University of Washington, College
of Forestry Library; University of Western
Ontario Library; Vancouver City Hall; Van
Steenwyk, Miss C. J. de V.; Watson, Mrs.
J. H.; Wholpley, Rev. J. Elmer.
GIFTS TO THE LAW LIBRARY, FACULTY OF LAW
Bain, Mr. A H.—B. C. Reports and Canada
Law Reports.
Bough Allen, Mr. G. W.—Ontario Law Reports, Manitoba Law Reports, Western
Weekly Reports, etc
Butterworth and Company—Fortnightly Law
Journal, Vol.  12, part 6.
Chalmers, Mr.  M.  J.—Hansard,   1947.
Clute,   Mr.   A.   R.,   K.C.—Nominate   Reports
and Law Journal Reports.
Hartley, Mrs. R. W.—Textbooks.
Law Society of British Columbia — Statutes
Canada.
Maitland, Maitland  & Hutcheson — Reports
(W.W.R.), Statutes and other books.
forty-seven McGeer, Mrs. G. G.—British Hansards, and
miscellaneous.
McKeen, Senator S. S.—House of Commons
and  Senate Debates, Proceedings, etc.
MacKenzie, Senator Ian — Complete set of
Hansard, volumes for the past several years.
Nemetz,  Mr. N. T.—California Code.
Pratt, Mr.  F. D.—Dominion Law  Reports.
Smilie, Mr. H.—Various Statutes and textbooks.
Swanson, Estate of the late Judge J. D.—
Reports, Digests, Canada Law Journal and
textbooks.
Tyrwhitt-Drake, Mr. V. H., K.C—B. C.
Statutes.
University of Toronto—Four textbooks.
Anonymous—British Columbia Reports and
Canada Bar Review; Halsbury Laws of
England (1st ed.), Canada Year Book, Statutes, Miscellaneous Old Statutes, Nominate
Reports, textbooks.
MISCELLANEOUS GIFTS
Departments of Agricultural Engineering
and Mechanics
B. C. Electric Railway Company Limited
(New Westminster) — 80 feet of radiant
heating cable.
B. C. Tractor Equipment Company—Complete
Ford Tractor engine for hydraulic dynamometer unit.
Canadian Liquid Air Company — Oxy-acety-
lene welding unit.
Finning Tractor Company—Used engine parts
for lecture use.
Massey-Harris Company — Used engine parts
for lecture use.
Mid-West Equipment Company—Scrap metal
for welding classes.
Pacific Tractor Equipment Company — Used
engine  parts  for  lecture use.
Young Radiator Corporation, Racine, Wisconsin—Cut-away radiator core.
Department of Animal Husbandry
Fur   Breeders   on   Vancouver   Island—Gift   of
live mink.
Lower   Mainland   and   Vancouver   Island   Fur
Breeders   Associations—Fifty   Mink   valued
at $1500 to $2000.
Department  of Architecture
Architectural Institute of British Columbia—
For equipping a model-making and test department   $ 800.00
Walker, Mrs. R. E.^-Gift of over 200 books
and periodicals from the collection of her
father,  the late Mr.  Eveleigh.
Department of Biology and Botany
Hamilton, Mr. G. H.  (Niagara Falls, Ont.)—.
Asimina Triloba  (young trees).
Hahn, Mr.  Paul   (Toronto)   — Collection of
living fern plants.
Iverson, Mr. Bayard O.   (Kimberley, B. C.) —
Skull of grizzly bear.
fortv-eieht
Department   of   Biology   and  Botany
(Continued)
Seeds and Specimens—
Canada—Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa; Dr. M. Y. Williams, Vancouver.
Argentina Republic—Gardin Botanico "Carlos Thays," Buenos Aires.
England—Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
Finland—Botanical Garden of the University Helsinki, Suomi.
France: Musee National d'Histoire Naturelle,
Paris.
Holland—Botanical  Garden,  Amsterdam.
Ireland—Howth Demesne Gardens, Dublin;
Botanic Gardens,  Glasnevin, Dublin.
Portugal—Jardin Botanique, Faculte des
Sciences, Lisbon.
Sweden—Botanical Garden, Gothenburg.
Switzerland—Botanical Garden, University,
Basel.
Department of Commerce
Bond Dealers' Association—Industrial manual,
supplements thereto, and binder.
Department of Dairying
Provincial Department of Agriculture — For
equipment in Dairy Technology — $1,952.00
Department of Forestry
Department of Lands and Forests, Toronto—
Large collection of trees from St. Williams
Nursery.
Purdue University — Collection of central
hardwoods.
Recknagel, Professor A. B. —■ Series of oil
paintings by Canadian Artists of typical
scenes in the logging and milling industry.
Roche, Mr. R. Gordon—Tree seed. Department of Geology and Geography
Chalmers, Mr. John C. (University of Oklahoma)—Collection of labelled  fossils.
Douglas, Mr.—Specimen of halite and sylvite
from Wilkie, Saskatchewan.
Ebbutt, Mr. F.—Specimen of aikenite from
Cobalt, Ontario.
Ede, Mr. A.—Specimen of yukonite.
Foshag, Dr.—Specimen of livingstonite (U.S.
National Museum).
Frohberg, Dr. M. H.—Several telluride specimens from Eastern Canada.
Jones, Mr. W. R.—Suite of copper minerals
from Peru; suite of tungsten ore from Emerald Mine, Salmo, B. C.
Lamb, Mr.  J.—Several suites of Slocan Ores.
Reinbold, Mr. H. — Suite of minerals from
Black Hills, South Dakota.
Roberts, Mr. K.—Several native 'copper nuggets from Dezadeash Area, Yukon.
Taylor, Major E. D.—Suite of Zeolite minerals from Goose Creek, Va.
Thompson, Dr. R. M.—Several nickel sulphides from Food Mine, Sudbury; several copper arsenides from Mohawk River, Michigan.
University of Mexico—Suite of Mexican minerals.
University of Stockholm—Suite of iron and
lead bismuth minerals.
Warren, Dr. H. V. — Indian artifacts from
near Kleena Kleena, B. C.
Whiting, Mr. Frank—Suite of bismuth tellurides from Good Hope Mines, Hedley, B. C.
Department of Home Economics
Rogers, Mrs. Jonathan—Portraits to be hung
in Home Economics Building.
Department of Horticulture
Burke, Mrs. F. E.—Collection of books, pamphlets, and clippings on Ornamental Horticulture.
Dominion Department of Agriculture, Provincial Department of Agriculture, The B. C.
Co-operative Seed Association, Brackman-
Ker Milling Co.—Contributions toward the
cost of the Vegetable Seed Trial Project.
Dominion Experimental Station, Saanichton,
B. C.—Fruit specimens for systematic study.
Dominion Experimental Station ,Summerland,
B. C. — Shipments of fruit specimens of
pears, apples and grapes for systematic
study.
Eastham, Mr. J. W.—Collection of Seeds and
Nuts; also collection of miscellaneous pamphlets of historical interest.
Robertson, Mr. W. H., Provincial Horticulturist, Victoria, B. C, and district horticulturist and field men: Fifteen boxes of
fruit variety specimens for systematic study.
Department of Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering
Precise Engineering Limited, Vancouver, B. C.
—A cylinder pressure gauge.
Department of Mining and Metallury
Al Steel and Iron Foundry Ltd., Vancouver,
B. C-—Set of Gamma-ray negatives of casting inspections.
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd., Britannia Beach, B. C.—300 pounds of grinding balls.
Carlyle, the late Mr. W. A.—Library of mining and metallurgical books.
Denver Equipment Company, Denver, Colorado—Denver Mineral jig.
Howard, Professor H. M.—Fahrenwald Laboratory Flotation Cell.
International Nickel Company of Canada,
Limited, Copper Cliff, Ontario — Portable
spot-testing equipment; set of samples showing industrial uses of nickel and nickel alloys; set of technical bulletins for the metallurgical library.
Sherritt Gordon. Mines, Limited, Sherridon,
Manitoba—Gas reducers; Electrolytic cell;
Pachuca tank.
Vancouver Iron Works, Limited, Vancouver,
B. C.—X-ray negatives to illustrate weld
inspection methods.
Westland Iron and Steel Foundries Limited—
Graphite blocks and rods for laboratory
melting equipment; Gamma-ray negatives
for laboratory instruction.
Department of Pharmacy
Burroughs Wellcome and Company (Montreal)—Assorted prescription specialties.
Canadian Pharmaceutical Association (Vancouver  Convention   Committee)   —  For  a
Pharmacy library or special equipment	
  $500.00
Carter, Cummings and Company Limited
(Windsor, Ont.) — Assorted prescription
specialties.
DeVilbiss Manufacturing Company (Windsor,
Ont.)—Assorted prescription specialties.
Druggists' Bulletin Service (Vancouver) —
Price book and  continuous revision service.
Ingram and Bell (Toronto) — Assorted prescription specialties.
Merck and Company Limited (Montreal) —
Through Mr. J. Rosin—Merck Index, Manual of Therapeutics, and Materia Medica and
Reagent Chemical and Standards.
Ortho Pharmaceutical Corporation (Canada)
Limited—Assorted   prescription   specialties.
Sharpe and Dohme (Toronto)—Assorted prescription specialties.
forty-nine Various manufacturing firms—Material, equipment, etc., orer the past year to the value
of  $2,000.00.
Department of Physics
Hennings, Dr. A. E.—Number of complete
sets of scientific journals.
Sidney Roofing Company—Two sheets of Ten-
test board.
Slavonic Studies
Rockefeller Foundation (New York)—Grant-
in-aid of visit to principal centres of Slavic
Studies on the Pacific Coast of the United
States  $500.00
Anonymous
Studies —
Grant  for  work  in  Slavonic
 $100.00
Department of Social Work
Cooper, Mrs. Alice (Parksville)—Large collection of books and periodicals.
Community Chest and Council—Donation towards the Camp Institute held for group
work students in Social Work $50.00
Anonymous—Numerous books and periodicals.
Department of Zoology
Insects
Bowles, Dr. and Mrs. A. W., New Westminster, B. C.—A textbook of Entomology.
Buckell, Mr. E. R., Kamloops, B. C.—1142
vials of B. C. Odonata with complete card
map distributional records; 1800 card index
references of The Canadian Entomologist.
Canadian Industries Ltd., New Westminster—
Samples of new insecticides.
Dozell, Miss M., Prince Rupert—-A rare cave
cricket.
Downes, Mr. W., Victoria—Identification of
thousands of Homoptera to species.
Eastham, Mr. J. W. and Mr. W., Vancouver—
Entomological literature.
French, Mr. O., Blue River—Ectoparasites of
mammals.
Graham, Dr. K., Sault Ste. Marie—A large
collection of Diptera.
Grant, Mr. James, Vernon—Ectoparasites of
birds.
Hayes, Mr. Rex, Courtenay—Ectoparasites of
beaver.
Hercules Powder Co., Wilmington, Delaware-
Samples of new insecticides.
Hopping, Mr. G. R., Vernon—Many adult
and immature stages of Coleoptera, identified to species.
Julius Hyman & Co., Denver, Colo.—Samples
of new insecticides.
Leech, Mr. Hugh B., Vernon—Many Coleoptera identified to species; much entomological literature.
fifty
Mathers, Mr. W., Vernon—A collection of
Lepidoptera.
Morrison, Dr. F. O., Macdonald College, Quebec—Economic insects.
Munro, Mr. J. A., Okanagan Landing—Ectoparasites of birds, identification of bird
hosts.
Williams, Dr. M. Y., Vancouver—Ectoparasites of birds and mammals.
Wynne, Mr. J., Vernon — Ectoparasites of
birds.
Yarwood, Mr. J., Vancouver—Ectoparasites of
birds and mammals.
Other Invertebrates
Leech, Mr. Hugh B., Vernon—Fresh water
Crustacea.
Fillsbury, Mr. R. W., Vancouver—Marine invertebrates.
Ray, Messrs. Carl and Michael, Vancouver—
Tarantula.
Smith, Mr. T. F., North Vancouver—Marine
M^llusca.
Tayljw, Mrs. A. J. T., Vancouver—Collection
of;limpets.
li Parasites
Cameron, Dr. T. W. M. and the Institute of
Parasitology, Macdonald College, .Quebec—
Collection of reprint literature of Parasitology.
CoWan, Dr. I. McT., Vancouver—A large collection of internal parasites of B. C. mammals and birds.
Fisher, Mr. H. D., Vancouver—Parasites of
the seal. '   >
Fowle, Mr. David, Toronto—Slides of blood
parasites of birds.
Godfrey, Mr. H., Vancouver—Parasites of the
whitefish.
Guiguet, Mr. Charles, Vancouver—Endopara-
sites of birds and mammals of the Queen
Charlotte Islands.
Hick, Mr. W. B. M., Vancouver—Parasites of
cohoe salmon.
MacLean, Mr. E. D., Vancouver—Endopara-
sites of turkey.
Miller, Prof. R. B., University of Alberta,
Edmonton—Slides and preserved specimens
of various stages of the prairie fish worm.
Musfeldt, Miss Iola, Vancouver ■— Slides of
muskrat worms.
Spencer, Prof. G. J., Vancouver—Collection
of worms from B. C. fish, birds and mammals.
Tener,   Mr.   John,   Vancouver—Collection   of
parasites from ducks.
VanCleave,   Prof.   H.   J.,   University   of   Illinois  —  Slides   of identified  thorny-headed Fish
Breder, Dr. C. M., New York—Specimens of
blind fish.
California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco
—Barracuda, Leopard shark, sting ray, flying fish,  shark  sucker,  electric  ray.
Chang, Mr. H. W., Institute of Zoology,
Shanghai—Specimens of Chinese fishes.
Dominion Department of Fisheries, Vancou-
ver—Salmon and salmon eggs.
Fisheries Experimental Station, Vancouver—
Samples of fish oils and fats.
Hick, Mr. W. B. M., Vancouver—Specimens
of marine fishes.
Provincial Game Commission, Vancouver -^-
Trout fingerlings.
United States National Museum, Washington—
Angler fish.
Vancouver Aquarium, Vancouver—Specimens
of marine .fishes.
Western Chemicals, Vancouver — Samples of
pilchard and herring oils.
Wilby, Mr. G. V., North Vancouver—Specimens of marine fishes.
Birds and Mammals
Allan, Mr. R. E., Vancouver—Specimens of
wood duck.
Gill, Mr.  A. F., Princeton—1   mountain lion.
Goodall, Mr. Edward, Victoria—22 birds from
British Guiana.
Hatter, Mr. James, Vancouver—Specimens (3)
of white pelican.
Jobin, Mr. L., Williams Lake—6 specimens of
rock rabbit.
Martin, Mr. P. W., Vancouver—Specimens of
Sabine Gull, Heerman Gull, Xantus murrelet, red phalarope, northern phalarope, and
magpie.
Mulligan,  Mr.   H.   D.,  North  Vancouver —
Specimens of rough-legged hawk, northwestern
crow and several ducks for study.
Munro, Mr. J. A., Okanagan Landing—Specimens of Ross goose.
Racey, Mr. Kenneth, Vancouver—Specimens
of brown thrasher.
Stewart, Mr. R. M., Massett—6 specimens of
Queen Charlotte Pine Grosbeak, 2 sharp-
tailed sandpipers.
Vancouver Parks Board, Vancouver—Birds and
mammals.
Museums
Biely, Mr. M.   (Mexico City)—Metate.
Douglas, Mr. William (Courtenay) — Stone
head found at Courtenay.
Herring, Mr. S. H. (New Westminster) —
Indian hammers.
National Museum of Canada (Ottawa)—Set
of archaeological specimens.
Robson, Mr. Bert (Atnarko)—Valuable collection of B.  C.  Indian Material.
United States Office of Indian Affairs (Washington, D. C.)—Blueprints and photostats
of the Museum of the Planis Indian.
General
Boak, Professor A. C. E.—Original brief presented to the University Location Committee by the Lower Mainland University Committee.
Fallis, Miss Mary — Donation to initiate the
Women's Residence Programme Fund  $10.00
Harris, Dr. Lawren—Gift of mouldings for
the framing of silk screen reproductions.
Lady Davis Foundation—Special grants.
MacMillan, Mr. H. R., C.B.E.—Gift of silk
screen reproductions.
National Research Council — German glider
for the University Glider Club.
NEW FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES, BURSARIES,
AND LOAN FUNDS
(List also includes awards offered under revised terms.    Unless
;   otherwise stated, the amount given is the total annual value.)
Fellowships
The. H. R. MacMillan Export Company Limited Fellowships in Forestry, $750 for two
sessions  .... - $1500.00
The Sherrit-Gordon Fellowship in Metallurgy,
Session 1947-48 only . $1600.00
Scholarships
The Automotive Transport Association of
British Columbia—Scholarship for students
in Commerce  $150.00
The Alan Boag Special Scholarship — Special
scholarship for essay on Socialism, session
1947-48 only  $50.00
fifty-one The British Columbia Daily Newspapers Association—Scholarship for students in Commerce  $200.00
The Daniel Buchanan Scholarship—Given by
the  Department of Mathematics $100.00
The Canadian Forest Industries—Two scholarships of $200 each, for Forestry students
intending to enter the field of forest entomology—
(a)   British   Columbia   Lumber  Manufacturers' Association  $200.00
. (b)   British   Columbia   Loggers'   Association    .. $200.00
Hobbs Glass Company Limited — Scholarship
for Architecture  $250.00
The Laura Holland Scholarship—For students
in Social Work   $100.00
The Kiwanis Club of Vancouver—Scholarship
for Commerce  $150.00
The Nancy Ryckman Scholarship — From a
trust fund of $6297.97 donated by the late
Nancy E. Ryckman $180.00
G. H. Wood & Company Limited—Scholarship for student proceeding to medical
school, session 1947-48 only $500.00
Bursaries
The Admiral Jellicoe Chapter I.O.D.E.—Two
bursaries for veterans $100.00
The Bastion Chapter of the Imperial Order
of the Daughters of the Empire—Bursary
for veteran from Nanaimo, session 1948-
49  $200.00
The British Columbia Drug Travellers' Association Bursary for students in Pharmacy	
  $200.00
The National Paper Box Limited—Two bursaries for students in Agriculture and Com-,
merce  ., $400.00
The Triple Entente Chapter, I.O.D.E.—Two
bursaries for veterans $150.00
The Sir Charles Tupper Chapter, I.O.D.E.—
Bursary for summer school $50.00
The Vancouver Bar Association—Annual bursary for students in Law, replacing prize ...
 .  $ 100.00
The Vancouver Public Library Staff Association „t— Bursary for students intending to
enter library work . $150.00
The Worthington Memorial Chapter, I.O.D.E.
^-Bursary  for veterans $100.00
Prizes
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association—Special prizes for Architecture,
session 1947-48  $250.00
Dorbils, Dorothy and William—Prize for Canadian History  $50.00
Home Economics Graduation Prize $50.00
Home Economics Second Year Prize — $25.00
Houghland, Mr. C. D.—Two prizes for students in Pharmacy  $100.00
Kiwanis Club of Vancouver—Prize for students in Commerce $50.00
Law Society of British Columbia—Prize for
students in Law, to the value of the call
and admission fee.
Mal.linckrodt Chemical Works of Canada Limited—Prize    $25.00
Merck  and Company,  Montreal—Book  prizes
for students in Pharmacy.
The  Timber  Preservers  Limited  —■  Increased
from previous total of $135.00 $180.00
Anonymous—Contribution to bursary funds.....
  $ 110.00
Medals
The Architectural Institute of British Columbia—Medals and prizes for students in Architecture    $200.00
Student Loan Funds
Bollert, Misses Grace and Florence—The Mary
Bollert Loan Fund . $500.00
Home Economics Loan Fund .
..$200.00
Lady Laurier Club—Assistance  for a woman
student  $500.00
MacMillan, Mr.  H.   R., C.B.E.—For Forestry
Loan Fund  $500.00
Phi Delta Delta Legal Sorority—For the Helen
Gregory McGill Loan Fund $170.75
Summer Session Students' Association,  1948—
For loan funds ,...$800.00
United  Distillers  Limited —  For  emergency
loans  $250.00
Anonymous—For the general loan funds	
 ......  $500.00
fifty-two PREVIOUSLY ESTABLISHED AWARDS MAINTAINED
IN THE SESSION 1947-48
(Unless otherwise stated, the amount given is the total annual value.)
Alan Boag—From the trustees of  the estate,
scholarship    $250.00
Alaska Pine Company Limited—Scholarships   .
 $600.00
Alberta  Meat  Company  Limited—Bursary   ...
 $50.00
Alliance Francaise—Bursary  $25.00
Allied  Officers'  Auxiliary  — Bursary   (trust
fund)  $75.00
Alumni Association, University of British Columbia—Bursary  $50.00
American Woman's Club—Bursaries    $200.00
Armstead, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M.—Scholarship and prize $300.00
Association of Professional Engineers — Book
prizes  $125.00
B. C. Drugs Limited—Scholarship  $150.00
B. C. Tree Fruits Limited, Kelowna—Prizes -
  $300.00
Bell, Mrs. Angela—Bursary   (trust fund)	
  $150.00
Beverley Cayley Scholarship   (provided under
the will of the late Mrs. Cayley)     $100.00
B'nai B'rith District No. 4 Hillel Foundation
—Scholarship      $250.00
B'nai B'rith Auxiliary No. 77—Scholarship ...
  $50.00
Bolocan, Mr. and Mrs. J. L.—Prize  $25.00
Hewitt   Bostock   Lectureship   —   Prize    (not
awarded)   $25.00
Britannia Mining & Smelting Company, Limited—Scholarship    $250.00
British   Columbia   Cooperative   Seed   Growers'
Association—Bursary   $ 100.00
British  Columbia  Electric  Railway  Company
Limited—Scholarships    $ 1000.00
British   Columbia  Fruit   Growers'   Association
—Scholarship    $125.00
British Columbia Loggers' Association — Bursary    . $225.00
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers' Association—Prizes  $175.00
British Columbia Packers Limited — Scholarships  . $800.00
British   Columbia   Sugar    Refining   Company
Limited—Scholarships    $2500.00
British Columbia Telephone Company Limited
—Scholarships  $2500.00
British Columbia Teachers' Federation—Scholarship  $100.00
Burbidge, Mr. W. P.—Scholarships ._ $250.00
Canada Law Book Company—Book prize.
Canadian Association for the Advancement of
Pharmacy—Scholarships      $200.00
Canadian   Association   for   Health,   Physical
Education,  and  Recreation—Scholarship	
  $50.00
Canadian Forest Products Limited—Scholarships  and prizes $500.00
Canadian   Industries   Limited—Fellowship	
 ,  $750.00
Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, Western
Branch—Fellowship   (not awarded)	
  $1000.00
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Company Limited—Scholarship $100.00
Carswell Company Limited, Toronto — Book
prizes  -_ $60.00
Chemical Institute of Canada—Prizes $50.00
Cohen, Mr. S. J.—Bursary  (trust fund)	
  $ 150.00
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company of
Canada Limited—Fellowship  $1200.00
Convocation, University of British Columbia
—Prizes $100.00
Crofton House Alumni—Scholarship ...$175.00
Cunningham, Mr. G. T.—Prizes and scholarships   (not awarded) $150.00
Robert  S. Day  & Son Limited—Bursary	
  $ 150.00
Delta Gamma  Fraternity—Bursary $75.00
Delta Gamma Fraternity—Bursary for blind
student $100.00
Dicks, Mr. W. J.—Bursaries (trust fund)	
  $ 150.00
Dorbils, Mr. William—Scholarship (contribution of $500 a year for four years to provide a scholarship of $2000 to be awarded
in 1950)   $500.00
Dunsmuir Scholarship—(Provided by a trust
fund)  $ 150.00
Engineering Institute of Canada—Prize. $25.00
Engineering Institute of Canada (Vancouver
Branch)—Book prize $25.00
Entomological Society of British Columbia—
Prize    . $15.00
Faculty Women's Club—Bursary and scholarship    $200.00
Frosst Proficiency Awards—Provided through
the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association—..
    $225.00
Gamma Phi Beta Sorority, Alpha Lambda
Chapter—Bursary $ 50.00
General Construction Company Limited —
Scholarships  $500.00
Gladstone Chapter No. 6 C.J., Order of
Ahepa—Prize    $100.00
fifty-three Hogarth,   Major-General   D.   M.,   Toronto  — Northern Electric Company Limited—Prizes.
Scholarships  $250.00  $100.00
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire — Northern   Peat   Moss   Company   Limited   —
Scholarship   (trust  fund) $100.00 Prize  $100.00
Ingledow, Mr. T.*>-Prizes $100.00       Pacific Mills Limited—Scholarship $250.00
John   Inglis   Company   Limited,   Toronto   —       Pacific Meat  Company Limited—Bursary	
Scholarships  $250.00  $200.00
International   Brotherhood   of  Pulp,   Sulphite,       Pattison, Mr. J. W.—Bursaries $200.00
and   Paper   Mill   Workers,   Local   312   — P.E.O.   Sisterhoods,   Vancouver   Chapters   —
Scholarship    $250.00 Bursary    $150.00
I.O.O.F. Grand Lodge, B. C.—Bursaries  Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of
  $1200.00 British  Columbia—-Scholarship   and  prize ....
Llewellyn Jones, Mr. J. R. J.—Prize $50.00 .._  $150.00
Khaki   University   &   Y.M.C.A.  Bursaries  — ■     Players' Club Alumni—Scholarship $50.00
(Trust fund) '. . $500.00      Pop, Mr. R. J.—Scholarship $150.00
Kelly, Mr. William N._ $15.00 Powell   River   Company   Limited—Scholarship
Kelly-Douglas Company  Limited — Scholar- not awarded)    $700.00
ship    $300.00 Price, Waterhouse & Co.—Scholarship $250.00
Kirk, Mrs.' Thomas H.—Scholarship—$100.00 Flying   Officer   Rev.   George   Robt.    Pringle
Kiwanis Club of Vancouver—Prize and Schol- Memorial Bursary  $200.00
arship  $200.00 Provincial Council of British Columbia, Can-
Kiwassa   Club   of  Vancouver—Bursaries  adian Daughters' League—Bursaries  $200.00
 .  $600.00 Provincial   Department   of   Health   and   Wel-
Klein, Mr. I. J.—Scholarship (trust fund)  fare  (Health Branch)—Prizes $100.00
 .  $100.00 R.C.A.F.  Veterans' Fund   (established by  the
Lambert, Brigadier Noel D.—-Scholarship   Wartime Convalescent Homes, War Charity
..  $200.00. Fund, Inc.)  $300.00
Ladner,   Mr.   Leon  J.,   K.C,   and   Family  —       Rotary Club of Vancouver—Bursaries	
Scholarship    « $300.00   $1000.00
Lady  Laurier  Club—Bursary $100.00 Royal   Institution   (trust   funds)   —  Scholar-
Lauder & Mercer Company Limited—Bursary. ships  $1600.00
  $250.00 R.  Randolph Bruce Scholarships   (trust  fund
Lefevre Gold Medal & Scholarship—(Provided established by the late Honourable R. Ran-
by  a   trust   fund   established  by   the   late dolph Bruce)  $200.00
Mrs. Lefevre)   . $150.00       Shaffer, Miss Marion A.—Bursary $200.00
Captain  LeRoy  Memorial  Scholarship   (Trust       Shanahan's  Limited—Scholarship  $500.00
fund   established    by   Universities'   Service Shaw Memorial Scholarship  (trust fund estab-
Club)  ..$150.00 lished   by   the   friends   of   the   late   James
Lions Service Club—Fellowship $1500.00 Curtis Shaw)        .—...$125.00
,,,,       „„                         ..,„„„„ Shell Oil Company of Canada Limited—Fel-
Lipsett, Mrs. Mary C—Bursary $300.00 Wship $1100.00
McGill Graduates   (trust  fund established by Standard   Oil   Company   of  British   Columbia
the McGill Graduates' Society of B. C.)— Limited—Fellowship  $1100.00
  $125.00 Summerland   Scholarship—Established   by   the
McHattie, Mr. C. T.—Bursary . $300.00 citizens of Summerland $250.00
McKee, Mrs. D. A.—Prize  (provided by trust Summer Session Students' Association—Schol-
fund)  $30.00 arships   $150.00
McLean, Mr.  and Mrs. J.  S., Toronto—Bur- Swan, Col. and Mrs. W. G.—Bursary..$250.00
saries    $1000.00 Taylor, Mr. Austin C.—Scholarship ...$250.00
H. R. MacMillaA Export Company Limited— Teamsters' Joint Council No.. 36—Bursary —
Prizes  $550.00   $250.00
Native   Daughters   of   British   Columbia   — Terminal City  Club   (trust  fund  established
Scholarship    $50.00 by Members of the Club) $100.00
News-Herald—Prizes  $3 50.00 David Thom Bursaries and Scholarships   (pro-
Nicholson    Scholarships     (trust    fund    estab- vided by trust funds from the David Thom
lished by the late Dr. F. J. Nicholson)  Estate)  ■. $400.00
 r  $1000.00       Toban, Mr. Louis—Bursary $100.00
Norgan, Mr. G. W.—Scholarships and prizes... Toronto General Trusts Corporation—Prize—
  $1000.00             $30.00
fifty-four Transportation & Customs Bureau, Vancouver
Board of Trade—Prizes ,  $250.00
United Empire Loyalists' Association—Silver
medal and cash prize $25.00
University  Women's  Club—Bursaries $200.00
Vancouver Bar Association—Bursaries $200.00
Vancouver   Daily   Province—Scholarship :.
  $250.00
Vancouver Panhellenie Alumna: Association—
Bursary    . $200.00
Vancouver Primrose Club—Scholarship (trust
fund) ____, . $150.00
 $800.00
Vancouver Sun—Scholarships
Vancouver Section National Council of Jewish
Women—Bursary  $100.00
Vancouver Women's Canadian Clul)—Scholarships (partly maintained by trust fund)	
 .  $300.00
Winspear, Hamilton, Anderson & Company—
Scholarships  . $300.00
Woman's Christian Temperance Union of British Columbia—Prize  $50.00
Woodward, Hon. W. C.—Scholarships  $250.00
Anonymous—-G.   M.   Dawson  Scholarship	
 ,  $50.00
Anonymous •— International Studies Prize
(provided from a trust fund) $30.00
Anonymous—Book prize for Law $25.00
SPECIAL AWARDS
His Excellency the Governor-General of Canada—Gold medal.
Frank W. Horner Limited, Montreal — Gold
medal.
Kiwanis Club of Vancouver—Gold medal.
Law Society of British Columbia—Gold medal.
Sigma   Tau   Upsilon   Honorary   Agricultural
Fraternity—Gold medal.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Contributors to the Dean of Women's Fund—
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority $15.00
Kappa Kappa Gamma Mothers* Club  $75.00
Dominion-Provincial   Student   Aid   Fund   and
Provincial Loan Fund—
Approximately    $40,000    in   bursaries   and
loans   awarded  to 200   students  in   attendance at the University of British Columbia.
French  Government  Medals,  Book  Prizes  and
Scholarships—
Awarded to graduates of the University of
British Columbia.
Government of Switzerland—
Scholarship   to   a   graduate   for   study   in
Switzerland.
Hudson's Bay Company—
Scholarship of , £450.
Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire—
Overseas  scholarships  awarded  to graduates
of the University of British Columbia.
Kappa Sigma Fraternity—
Bursary of $300 for a student in attendance
during Session 1948-49.
Lady Laurier Club—
Special assistance to woman veteran student.
National  Research Council—
Bursaries and Scholarships.
Rhodes  Scholarship Trust
Vancouver   Men's   Canadian   Club—
Because of whose efforts many of the scholarships available for students were obtained.
Vancouver Primrose Club—
$5230 for a trust fund for the Hon. R. L.
Maitland Memorial Scholarship.
fifty-five Printed by
THE KEYSTONE PRESS. LIMITED
VANCOUVER. CANADA
Type faces used
LINOTYPE GARAMOND - LUDLOW GARAMOND

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