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Report of the President for the Academic Year 1964-1965 1966

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OF THE THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT
OIF THE
PRESIDENT
for the Academic Tear ig64-ig6$
BY JOHN BARFOOT MACDONALD
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1966 EDITED BY MALCOLM F. MC GREGOR
DESIGNED AND PRINTED BY
THE MORRIS S PRINTING COMPANY LTD., VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREWORD
The Board of Governors,
The University of British Columbia.
Madam Chancellor and Gentlemen:
I here set before you my report of the activities of the University
during the year 1964-1965. You will, I am sure, rejoice in the accomplishments of the Faculty. You will also, I hope, be heartened
by the magnitude of the gifts received and by the quickening of the
building programme, which I have described at some length. As you
know, formidable problems remain to be solved. The experience of
the past year will give us the confidence that we need to meet them
and to solve them.
Very truly yours,
JOHN BARFOOT MACDONALD TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword 5
i. The University 9
2. The Faculties 17
■oy ()lh,r ]).-:,artp;< a!s of th U^^rjity 37
4. Formal and Informal 49
Publications of the Faculty and Staff 56 1
THE UNIVERSITY
The year under review has been a notable one in the history of
the University of British Columbia. It has been notable in many
ways, most of them encouraging, some saddening. The University
was operating for the first time in its history with a budget in which
the request to the provincial government had been matched by the
size of the grant. The increase was the largest ever received by the
University. The result has been a closer relationship between planning and progress than has been possible heretofore. The University
is grateful to the Government of British Columbia for its recognition
that the University's announced goal, to attain in three years a level
of support equal in dollars a student to the Canadian average, is
vital and indispensable.
The University also has cause for optimism in the number of gifts
received, in the progress made in building, in the strengthening of
the Library, in the launching of a very large campaign for capital
funds, in the improvement of salaries, and in the thoughtful consideration given at all levels to the University's academic goals. All
these justify a sense of accomplishment in the past and confidence
in the future.
On the other hand, the sudden deaths of George T. Cunningham,
Chairman of the Board of Governors, and Dr. Kaspar D. Naegele,
Dean of the Faculty of Arts, brought mournful gloom to the campus.
Mr. Cunningham died suddenly in California on March 7. He was
for a generation one of the University's greatest friends and had
been so recognized in November when he was acclaimed by students
and alumni as Great Trekker for 1964. He planned to retire in June
from the Board on which he had served with striking loyalty and
unselfishness for thirty years. He will be remembered by all who
knew him as a model citizen and for those to come his name will be perpetuated in the George Cunningham Building, the home of
the Faculty of Pharmacy, which he was instrumental in establishing.
The University was proud to confer on him posthumously the degree
of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa.
Kaspar Naegele met his tragic death February 6, 1965, and left
the promise of academic leadership that he had so recently brought
to his Faculty unfulfilled. He was a man of ideas and he thought
deeply about education. During his brief tenure he initiated important discussions about the future tasks of the Faculty of Arts;
these remain to be developed by his colleagues, upon whom his
aspirations made such impact.
In mid-June, Premier W. A. C. Bennett, in an address to the
Convocation of Simon Fraser University, suggested ways and means
of financing the building programmes that must be undertaken by
the three public universities. The Premier guaranteed $40.7 million
from the government in the next five years, $18 million each to the
University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University, and
$4.7 million to the University of Victoria. He then proposed that
the three universities make a combined appeal to the public for an
additional $28 million to be pledged over five years and divided as
follows: 42% ($11,760,000) each to the University of British Columbia and to Simon Fraser University, and 16% ($4,480,000) to
the University of Victoria. But the government's contribution, said
the Premier, will be absolute and will not depend in any way upon
the success of the public campaign.
The three universities met the challenge promptly and the 3-
Universities Capital Fund Campaign was launched before August
disappeared from the calendar. The three Presidents agreed upon
the Premier's terms and the Managing Committee, under the chairmanship of Allan M. McGavin and Cyrus H. McLean, retained a
leading fund-raising firm, G. A. Brakeley & Co. Ltd., to organize
the campaign, the total cost of which was assessed at 1.58% of the
objective. It is worthy of note that direct appeals to the corporations
and individuals are being undertaken by some 5,000 unpaid volunteers and include a canvass of 25,000 alumni in 76 countries.
The 3-Universities Capital Fund Campaign is historic in several
respects: it is the first combined appeal to be made in North America by three public universities; the objective of $28 million is the
highest goal ever set in Canadian fund-raising; by mid-May, 1965,
pledges had reached $15,386,529, a record for fund-raising by
10 Canadian universities; by August, pledges surpassed $19 million and
thus constituted the largest sum raised in any campaign in Canadian
history.
A gift of $2 million by MacMillan, Bloedel & Powell River (B.C.)
Ltd. set the pace for Canadian forestry from coast to coast, which
contributed $4.5 million. From corporations outside British Columbia, many of whom, to be sure, have interests in this province, came
nearly $7 million. The gift of $1,350,000 from Consolidated Mining
& Smelting Co. Ltd. is remarkable in that the amount is equivalent
to $200 for each employee. Within the three universities themselves,
32 members of the Boards of Governors made personal contributions
totalling $251,950. Generous support included private pledges as
large as 20% of a year's income, payable over five years, and the
promise of 6% of a year's salary from the 48 members of a single
union's local.
As a first result of the provincial grants and the campaign the
University of British Columbia has been able to move rapidly into
a capital programme that will expend $30 million in five years
(1964-1969). During the past year an extension to the University
Library ($972,000) added substantially to the space available for
stacks and study. The Henry Angus Building for the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration and for the Social Sciences
of the Faculty of Arts was completed at a cost of nearly $3 million;
the immediate effect was the demolition of fifteen tired huts, an
exhilarating sight to those who dream of a campus without slums.
Construction of the Faculty of Dentistry began, along with additions
for the basic medical sciences ($4 million). The Faculty of Dentistry
began its active life with the enrolment of eight students in September 1964. The number will rise to twenty when the new buildings
are first occupied, in September 1966, and will eventually reach
forty. Drawings for the joint home of the Faculties of Forestry and
Agriculture ($4,355,000) have been finished and building should
commence in the autumn; the basic design of an expansion for the
Departments of the Biological Sciences and the Institutes of Fisheries and Oceanography ($6 million) is taking shape. The same
may be said of a building ($1.5 million) for Music, which is to take
its place between the Lasserre Building and the Frederic Wood
Theatre as part of the Norman MacKenzie Centre for the Fine Arts.
To sum up, we rejoice in the realization that nearly two-thirds of
the five-year programme was subject to active development during 1964-1965; better still, new buildings and other capital assets worth
$7 million were in fact added to the University before the year's end.
The singular hospital of 410 beds, intended for teaching and research, stands apart. At an initially (1963) estimated cost of $18
million, it will be the first, among Canada's twelve medical schools,
to be operated by a university. The pride of the Health Sciences
Centre, it will occupy forty acres on the east side of the campus,
extending south from University Boulevard. Physicians from all
parts of British Columbia, who will use it as a referral centre, will
share in its benefits. The financing arrangement is also unique. P. A.
Woodward, with a gift of unprecedented generosity, will provide $4
million toward the capital cost; the federal government, for the first
time recognizing the costs of teaching and research, has undertaken
to supply $4 million, about four times the normal federal grant for
a hospital of this type; the provincial government has indicated its
enthusiasm by pledging $9 million, half the cost, an amount far in
excess of normal provincial grants in Canada. Construction should
start in July 1966, in which case the hospital will be opened in
1969-
The University was already indebted to P. A. Woodward. The
Woodward Library, which is to serve the biomedical sciences, cost
$953>ooo; of this amount Mr. Woodward donated $440,000. This
Library is the first of the many specialized branches of the University
Library that will appear on the campus during the next few years.
Those who are impressed by the pace of expansion illustrated here
might well glance at other evidence of progress since July 1962: an
addition to the Bookstore; an addition to Brock Memorial Hall;
undergraduate laboratories and the graduate wing for the Department of Chemistry; the Ponderosa Cafeteria; the building for electrical engineering; the Frederic Wood Theatre; the ophthalmic research centre; additions for the Department of Physics; the Totem
Park residences; the Winter Sports Centre; the Woodward Library; renovations to the Graham residence to accommodate the
School for Social Work; acquisition of the Yorkeen property; and
an extension of the steam plant.
It has been said many times in the last few years that the numbers
of graduate students in Canadian universities must be increased
sharply in the immediate future. Not only is there a need for more
teachers, professors, and researchers; business, industry, and government are also looking to the universities for men and women with
12 specialized education and training. With this in mind, the University
of British Columbia has embarked upon two programmes that will
be unique in Canada.
On the campus a building is planned that will house both the
Faculty of Agriculture and the Faculty of Forestry; more than this,
the two Deans, Dr. Blythe Eagles and Dr. Joseph A. F. Gardner,
are determined to introduce integrated teaching and thus to make
at least one third of the new quarters common to both Faculties.
This economical plan, which is academically sound for both fields,
will allow enrolment to double in the next five years, with a higher
proportion of graduate students than is the case now.
Further afield, the University is exploring with Queen's and Laval
Universities a programme of co-ordinated teaching and research in
mineral engineering. The aim is to accelerate graduate training in
mining engineering and mining research, both of which are seriously
underdeveloped in Canada today. Dr. Charles L. Emery, Head of
the Department of Mineral Engineering, warns that a lack of mining knowledge and highly trained mining engineers has placed Canada's mining industry in a perilous competitive position alongside
other countries. Each university participating in this novel academic
adventure is undertaking work in several specialized fields. The plan
envisages students and members of the Faculty moving freely among
the three institutions, although degrees will be granted by the university of original enrolment. The mining industry is supporting the
programme by offering relevant summer employment to students as
well as a number of graduate fellowships.
Generous understanding of the urgent need for many more graduate students has brought gifts to the University this year that are
without parallel in Canadian history. Dr. H. R. MacMillan and the
MacMillan Family Fund led the way in February with two grants,
totalling almost $7 million, that may well be the most generous ever
made to graduate education in this country.
The University hopes that by 1973 some 5,500 graduate and professional students (25 per cent of the enrolment instead of the current 14 per cent) will be registered. This ambition presupposes a
first-rate library and a plentiful supply of graduate fellowships, as
Dr. MacMillan has been quick to recognize. His personal gift of $3
million to the University Library, which already occupies a position
of high priority in the expenditure of general revenues, is even now
permitting an extraordinarily rapid increase in the Library's re-
13 sources. By a single stroke the Library has become one of the ten
wealthiest academic libraries in North America in terms of purchasing power, joining such giants as Harvard, Yale, and the University
of California. In practical terms, the Library is able to compete
effectively in the market for out-of-print books and to afford all new
work written in any of the languages of scholarship. By 1975 the
Library's collections will have tripled in size to more than 2,000,000
volumes and may well represent the best in Canada. All academic
disciplines, be they humanistic or scientific, have their origin and
sustenance in the printed word. The library that can meet the daily
demands of the academic community, in all their wide variety, is
truly the heart of a university. The University Library is becoming
that kind of library, and is already a crucial factor in attracting and
retaining members of the Faculty whose qualifications are of the
very best.
The MacMillan Family Fund turned to the complementary necessity, graduate fellowships that will compete in substance with those
that now lure so many bright young Canadians to the United States.
The Fund will contribute $3.2 million over a period of twenty years
to provide forty-five fellowships of $3,200 each; in addition, each
fellowship will bring to the University an unconditional supplement
of $500 per annum. The fellowships, to be used only at this University, are available to Canadians engaged in doctoral programmes
who undertake to remain in this country for a reasonable time after
graduation if offered satisfactory positions.
In July 1965, the H. R. MacMillan Family Fund donated an
additional eighteen doctoral fellowships of $3,200 a year, plus $500
to the University for each, in honour of the three former presidents
of the University: six Frank F. Wesbrook Fellowships in Microbiology; six Leonard S. Klinck Fellowships in Agriculture; and six
Norman MacKenzie Fellowships in International Relations or International Law or in a field of History, Political Science or Economics
concerned with Canadian affairs.
The greatest challenge that Canada's leading universities can accept today is the building of distinguished programmes in graduate
studies. Success will come only to those universities that assemble the
many essential components into dynamic programmes in which the
best students and the ablest professors realize their highest potential
for productive scholarship. A learned and industrious Faculty, adequate facilities and equipment, a first-rate library, a curriculum that
14 provides time for thought and research, these are all indispensable.
But they are of little moment unless the University can attract the
best graduate students in substantial numbers. Not only must a
larger proportion of the exceptional students be encouraged to enter
the universities; they must also be encouraged to continue their
studies to advanced degrees. For these reasons a rich and imaginative array of scholarships is vital.
The University of British Columbia has, in a single year, become
the beneficiary of 63 annual fellowships made available by Dr. MacMillan; an eloquent testimony to the farsightedness of the donor,
they constitute a landmark in the history of this University. It is to
be hoped that many others will follow the lead of Dr. MacMillan,
for nothing else can be as effective in keeping Canadian graduates
in Canada and in meeting the desperate need that Canada has for
highly-trained scholars in a wide variety of fields.
The gifts of H. R. MacMillan and P. A. Woodward, added to
$150,000 from the Nuffield Foundation, $240,000 from the Wellcome Trust, and several others brought private benefactions to the
University to the staggering total of $12 million. This is far more
than any Canadian university has received in a like period; it approaches the total of private gifts made to the University during its
entire previous history.
Early in the year Guideposts to Innovation, the work of a President's Committee, was published, a document that may have far-
reaching academic effects. It begins with a statement of the aims of
the University: the engendering in students of a permanent spirit of
enquiry and creativity, the fostering of powers of evaluative judgement, the exploration of frontiers of knowledge, and the enrichment
of society's cultural resources. There follows an examination of various aspects of the academic programme and the development of a
series of recommendations. These relate to policies governing admissions, the growth of the University, the quality of instruction, the assessment of achievement, the design of the curriculum, the quality of
student-life, the arrangement of the University's year, the strengthening of graduate work, research and continuing education, and the
administration of academic affairs.
The report was discussed by Senate and the Board of Governors,
by individual faculties, by students, and by alumni. It has evoked
widespread and thoughtful consideration of the University's role and
it has led already to concrete action designed to improve the Uni-
15 versity's academic programme. The recommendations are under
continuous study within the appropriate segments of the academic
community.
The University of British Columbia has been struggling for years
with the enormous problems that inevitably accompany growth: the
demand for buildings, expanding enrolments, rising budgets, an enlarged library, development of computing science, fostering of the
graduate programme, and reorganization of professional schools. In
spite of unavoidable preoccupation with growth, the University is
inexorably dedicated to improvement in quality. The goal of excellence is never forgotten, is never laid aside, even temporarily; all who
serve in this noble cause are continuously grappling with the difficult
decisions that will perforce transform a good university into a great
one.
16 THE FACULTIES
THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
The members of the faculty have continued to stress the coordination of teaching, research, and the efforts in Extension. A
special meeting was devoted to Guideposts to Innovation and on
another occasion younger members, who have recently joined the
Faculty, were invited to expound the types of programmes they
wished to develop.
The Faculty and the University suffered a severe loss when Dr.
A. J. Wood (Professor of Animal Science and Director of the Central Animal Laboratory) resigned in order to become Dean of the
Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Victoria. The work
in Animal Science will now be reorganized. The other area that is
under intensive study is Agricultural Engineering, whose place must
be more precisely defined.
The Faculty, as is customary, collaborated with the Department
of University Extension in the organization of various conferences
for the benefit of the rural areas of the province.
Planning for the new building that is to be shared by the Faculties
of Agriculture and Forestry proceeds continuously.
To commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the Faculty of Agriculture the annual convention of the Agricultural Institute of Canada met here. During the meetings the Institute announced its establishment of the Leonard S. Klinck Lectureship in Agriculture in
recognition of Dr. Klinck's life-long service to agronomy and to
higher education.
M. J. Darling joined the Department of Agricultural Economics
as Assistant Professor. In the Division of Animal Science Dr. Warren
Gifford passed the year as Visiting Professor; Dr. J. C. Berry remained in India in the service of the Food and Agricultural Organ-
17 ization of the United Nations. Dr. G. H. Harris, Professor Emeritus
of Horticulture in the Division of Plant Science, retired from lecturing at the end of this year; in the same Division, Dr. Gursham Singh
Grewal, Academic Dean in the Agricultural University at Ludhiana
(Punjab), gave a series of lectures to Faculty and students from October to February. The Department of Poultry Sciences was strengthened by the appointment of Dr. J. F. Richards as Assistant Professor.
Dr. Leroy H. Wullstein became Assistant Professor of Soil Science
and Jan de Vries accepted appointment as Instructor.
THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
The major development within the Faculty during the academic
year 1964-1965 was the establishment of the Department of Mineral
Engineering in place of the Department of Mining and Geological
Engineering. This action recognized the fairly recent appearance of
Mineral Engineering as an autonomous field of study. The new department will certainly stimulate graduate work in the field and it
is already expected that between ten and fifteen students will enrol
in September 1965; enquiries already received suggest a substantial
increase in undergraduates. Professor L. G. R. Crouch has guided
the Department through its first few months of life; the appointed
Head, Dr. C. L. Emery, arrived during the summer of 1965. The
Department will, from the beginning, co-operate in graduate study
and research with Queen's and Laval; exchanges of staff and students will be encouraged.
The Faculty incurred a serious blow in the spring with the resignation of Dean David M. Myers, who will move to an exciting new
post in his native Australia.
Members of the Faculty and students continued to receive satisfying recognition of their quality. Professor Frank Forward, now on
leave in Ottawa, was elected President of the Canadian Institute of
Mining and Metallurgy; in February he received the Douglas Medal
of the American Institute of Mining Engineering; in May the University of British Columbia conferred an honorary degree upon him.
Dr. J. S. Forsyth, Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering, was awarded a Senior Research Fellowship by the National
Research Council; he will be on leave in 1965-1966.
Two students, Kenneth G. McQuhae (Metallurgy) and J. R.
Young (Mechanical Engineering), won Athlone Fellowships. At the
18 annual Northwest Regional Conference of the Student Chapters of
the American Institute of Chemical Engineers two students from
British Columbia, Brian D. Thorpe and Robin W. Allen, carried off
first and third prizes respectively for delivered papers.
The programme in Community and Regional Planning, hitherto
part of the School of Architecture, is to find a new home in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies.
The School of Nursing, with a staff whose devotion to undergraduate teaching is remarkable, has found time to plan a graduate
programme and a one-year course leading to a diploma in Psychiatric Nursing; the latter has been approved by Senate. The School
is also aware that the time is approaching when its status within the
University must be reassessed.
In the Department of Civil Engineering Dr. M. C. Quick (Assistant Professor) resigned and Associate Professor N. D. Nathan has
been granted a year's leave of absence. Five new appointments will
strengthen the Department of Electrical Engineering: Dr. M. M. Z.
Kharadly as Associate Professor; Dr. Donald Paul Akitt, Dr. Robert
Wellington Donaldson, Dr. John Spencer MacDonald, and Dr. H.
Paul Zeiger as Assistant Professors. Dr. M. P. Beddoes (Associate
Professor) and Dr. A. C. Soudak (Assistant Professor) are looking
forward to leaves of absence; Dr. A. D. Moore and F. K. Bowers
(Professors) will return after similar leaves. Dr. Zeev Rotem spent
the year in the Department of Mechanical Engineering on leave
from the Israel Institute of Technology. Dr. I. J. Wygnanski, I.
Igbal, and C. R. Hazell joined the staff as Assistant Professors. The
Department of Metallurgy enjoyed the presence of Dr. R. Shuttle-
worth, of the University of Leeds.
The School of Nursing lost three members through resignation:
Instructors Tomiko Sugimoto, Elizabeth Walton, and Jo-Ann Wood.
Elizabeth Cawston obtained leave of absence to continue her studies.
The following were appointed to the staff of the School: Assistant
Professor Alice Baumgart, Instructors Margaret Lendrum, June
Nakamoto, Nettie Nevdorf, Helen Niskala, Helen Shore.
THE FACULTY OF ARTS
This has been a difficult year for the Faculty of Arts. Dean K. D.
Naegele, after ten months in office, died February 6, 1965. D. M.
Healy, Head of the Department of Romance Studies, was immedi-
19 ately appointed Acting Dean and undertook, at short notice, the
formidable task of administering the Faculty's complex affairs. By
the end of the year order had been restored and a presidential committee was engaged in the search for a Dean.
During the year Theatre and Creative Writing became departments; John Brockington accepted the Headship of the former and
Robert Harlow is serving as Acting Head of the latter. Dr. Ivan
Avakumovic has been leading the Department of Political Science
until the arrival of the newly-appointed Head, Dr. R. S. Milne. Dr.
Margaret A. Ormsby was appointed to the Headship of the Department of History. Dr. Douglas T. Kenny will return from his leave
of absence to the Headship of the Department of Psychology. The
retirement of Charlotte Black left the Directorship of the School of
Home Economics vacant and its arduous duties will be carried out
temporarily by Winifred Bracher. Towards the end of the year the
President announced the first of a series of University Professorships: Dr. Roy Daniells becomes University Professor of English
Language and Literature, without departmental affiliation. At the
same time Dr. Stanley E. Read was persuaded to postpone his retirement in order to provide an experienced Acting Head for the Department of English; a committee is now at work seeking a successor
to Dr. Daniells.
The Departments of Economics, Anthropology and Sociology,
Political Science, and Psychology are awaiting the completion of the
Henry Angus Building, which they expect to occupy at the end of
the summer of 1965. Throughout this year continuous study has
been applied to details of the move and the furnishings of the new
building. Those departments that are to remain in the Buchanan
Building, that is, the Departments of the Humanities, will suffer
similar reallocation of space and similar disturbance. It would be a
mistake to think that the Faculty will now enjoy a sufficient number
of offices and classrooms. The House Committee in the Buchanan
Building, for example, must find homes of some sort for over one
hundred members of the teaching staff who cannot be housed in
the building's offices. Many are Teaching Assistants, to be sure;
but Teaching Assistants in the Humanities are in autonomous charge
of sections and it is vital that they have reasonable privacy in which
to meet their students. The conclusion is inescapable: the Faculty
must have more facilities for teaching and study, and it must have
them soon. Reorganization in the Buchanan Building will bring
20 some relief, it is true, to those engaged in the teaching of foreign
languages, for the laboratories that have for some years formed an
integral instructional tool are being expanded. The relief, however,
is more apparent than real, for facilities have long been overtaxed.
Despite the inadequacy of rooms and offices, the House Committee
of the Buchanan Building has insisted on setting aside three former
classrooms as Graduate Reading Rooms for the Departments of
English, Classics, German, and Romance Studies. This move should
make conditions more attractive to graduate students.
The Departments of the Faculty examine their programmes continuously and, as a result, each year brings new courses and reorganization. Thus, for example, work in Serbo-Croatian and
Ukrainian will soon be available in the Department of Slavonic
Studies; the Department of Fine Arts is studying the place of Museums of Art on the campus and the advisability of establishing a
programme in Museology; the Department of Classics has introduced a course in Hellenistic Greek and the New Testament. The
committee studying the requirements for the B.A. degree produced
its report, Discipline and Discovery, in the spring. The document is,
to say the least, controversial; some are attracted, others regard its
doctrines as antithetical to liberal education. But, as is the way in a
vital Faculty of Arts, all agree that it must be subjected to careful
analysis.
A listing of the honours and awards won by members of this
Faculty would be long indeed; a few may be selected as illustrative.
Dr. Margaret A. Ormsby received an honorary degree from the
University of Manitoba, Dr. Roy Daniells was honoured in the
same way by the University of Toronto. Congregation in May had
a special appeal, for the University of British Columbia conferred
degrees (honoris causa) upon H. T. Logan (Professor Emeritus of
Classics) and Dorothy Somerset (Acting Head of Theatre), whose
long and distinguished services to the University are well known
throughout the province and across the country.
Once again members of the Faculty of Arts carried off a substantial number of the Senior Fellowships awarded by the Canada
Council for a year's study-leave and research: Dr. Roy Daniells
(University Professor of English Language and Literature), Dr.
C. W. J. Eliot (Associate Professor of Classics), Dr. William E.
Fredeman (Associate Professor of English), Dr. Leonidas E. Hill
(Assistant Professor of History), Albert M. Moore (Associate Pro-
21 fessor of Economics), Dr. J. Lewis Robinson (Professor of Geography and Head of the Department), Ian S. McNairn (Associate
Professor of Fine Arts), Dr. Gerard Tougas (Professor of Romance
Studies). John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowships were won
by Dr. Cyril Belshaw (Professor of Anthropology) and Dr. William
E. Fredeman.
In June Dr. Margaret A. Ormsby was elected president of the
Canadian Historical Association and Dr. John D. Chapman (Professor of Geography) was chosen by his colleagues to head the
Canadian Association of Geographers. In the same month Dean
Emeritus F. H. Soward became President of Section II of the Royal
Society of Canada.
In May University Medals were presented to Timothy C. Pad-
more (First Class Honours in Mathematics and Physics) and Timothy LeGoff (First Class Honours in History), leaders of the Faculty's graduating class.
There are, regrettably, those who believe that in the Humanities
there is little that is new and exciting to attract research by lively
minds. The perceptive know how ignorant and superficial such
comment is. The activity of the Humanists, as well as of the Social
Scientists, in new fields and old, is reflected not only in the mere
listing of publications that may be read in this Report, but also in
the extent to which scholars in these fields are urged to join investigating Commissions and invited to deliver papers at conferences
throughout the continent and overseas. The record is impressive,
particularly when one considers how much easier it must be for an
eastern government or organization to consult the necessary wise
men nearby rather than from distant Vancouver. Again, this University may justly take pride in the number of members of this
Faculty who hold responsible offices in the learned associations of
Canada and other countries. The fact is that the Humanities and
the Social Sciences experience continuous growth, partly as a result
of persistent research and partly as a result of the steady flow of
new discoveries (as, for instance, in archaeology) that expand
knowledge of literature and history in their broadest sense.
Education, we are constantly told, is changing in scope and content. This is certainly and properly true of the sciences, pure and
also applied. There are some values, however, there are some treasures of human knowledge, that do not and should not change. It is
the responsibility of the Faculty of Arts to preserve these values, this
22 knowledge, for Humanists and Social Scientists must look backward
in time to man's accomplishments and dreams. But, in the light of
their experience, Humanists and Social Scientists look also to the
future, alongside their friends in the fields of pure and applied science,
for this too is their responsibility, to maintain, today and tomorrow,
a rational sense of values and the perspective in judgement that will
bring society nearer to the good life.
Once again, the Faculty increased in size, when the following
joined the staff:
Dr. Robert Adler (Instructor in Economics).
Dr. M. Mc. Ames (Assistant Professor of Anthropology and
Sociology).
Dr. Elinor Ames (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
Mary Louise Bailey (Lecturer in Philosophy).
Terrence Bailey (Instructor in Music).
Ellen Bateman (Instructor in Social Work).
Iain J. W. Baxter (Assistant Professor of Fine Arts).
Padraig John Blenkinsop (Instructor in Romance Studies).
Merna Borror (Instructor in Home Economics).
A. Busza (Instructor in English).
Marcia Cameron (Lecturer in Home Economics, second term)
Y. Chang (Instructor in Anthropology and Sociology).
Li Chi (Associate Professor of Asian Studies).
Dr. John Crane (Associate Professor of Social Work).
Dr. R. K. N. Crook (Assistant Professor of Anthropology and
Sociology).
Enzina Del Mercato (Instructor in Romance Studies).
David J. Donaldson (Instructor in Economics).
Paul Douglas (Instructor in Music).
Dr. Moira Feeney (Assistant Professor of Home Economics).
Dr. Donald G. Finiay (Associate Professor of Social Work).
Dr. Heather Franklyn (Instructor in Romance Studies).
Eberhard Frey (Instructor in German).
R. Golledge (Assistant Professor of Geography).
Glen Hamilton (Assistant Professor of Social Work).
Robert Harlow (Associate Professor of Creative Writing).
Emma Harris (Honorary Lecturer in Home Economics).
Charles W. Humphries (Assistant Professor of History).
Howard Jackson (Lecturer in Philosophy).
Dr. Richard C. Jenner (Assistant Professor of Economics).
Hanna E. Kassis (Assistant Professor of Religious Studies).
Dr. Robert Knox (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
Robert J. Levesque (Instructor in Economics).
S. Levitan (Instructor in English).
Dr. Arthur E. Link (Professor of Religious Studies).
23 Eleanore Lund (Assistant Professor of Home Economics).
John MacDonald (Instructor in Social Work).
Horst Martin (Instructor in German).
B. Mayne (Instructor in English).
Dr. Grady McWhiney (Associate Professor of History).
J. Edward W. Mornin (Instructor in German).
Dr. John H. A. Munro (Assistant Professor of Economics).
W. New (Assistant Professor of English).
G. Parry (Assistant Professor of English).
Tomislav Posa (Instructor in Slavonic Studies).
D. Powell (Instructor in English).
Clifford Robinson (Lecturer in Theatre).
Joyce Rogers (Instructor in Social Work).
H. Rosengarten (Instructor in English).
James Shell (Instructor in Music).
A. Shucard (Instructor in English).
Dr. Raouf Simaika (Assistant Professor of Romance Studies).
Jan J. Solecki (Instructor in Slavonic Studies).
Harvey Stalwick (Instructor in Social Work).
Dr. P. Stanwood (Assistant Professor of English).
Klaus Strassmann (Lecturer in Theatre).
Dr. Henry Thomassen (Assistant Professor of Economics).
French Tickner (Assistant Professor of Music).
Kazuko Tsurumi (Assistant Professor of Asian Studies).
Dr. John Vanderkamp (Assistant Professor of Economics).
Dr. W. E. Willmott (Assistant Professor of Anthropology and
Sociology).
Dr. Roderick Wong (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
William Bliss Wood (Assistant Professor of Librarianship).
During the year a number of resignations were accepted:
Dr. Elinor Ames (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
M. Atwood (Instructor in English).
A. R. Bowers (Assistant Professor of English).
A. S. Brennan (Instructor in English).
Dr. W. K. Caird (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
Dr. T. P. Churchill (Assistant Professor of English).
Dr. R. K. N. Crook (Assistant Professor of Anthropology and
Sociology).
G. Elliott (Instructor in English).
Dr. H. Fain (Associate Professor of Philosophy).
N. V. Henfrey (Instructor in English).
Carol Kniebusch (Instructor in Music).
Robert J. Levesque (Instructor in Economics).
Dr. Ernst Loeb (Associate Professor of German).
Dr. George Proctor (Assistant Professor of Music).
Ann C. Rosenberg (Lecturer in Fine Arts).
24- Cor Schwencke (Instructor in Slavonic Studies).
Brian Woodward (Instructor in Slavonic Studies)
Several members of the Faculty took advantage of leaves of absence to pursue their studies:
Dr. Michael S. Batts (Associate Professor of German).
Dr. Edward A. Bird (Assistant Professor of Romance Studies).
Dr. John F. Bosher (Associate Professor of History).
Dr. Robert M. Clark (Professor of Economics).
Dr. Samuel C. Coval (Assistant Professor of Philosophy).
Dr. R. C. Cragg (Professor of Fine Arts).
Dr. Douglas C. Fraser (Assistant Professor of Psychology).
Aristides Gazetas (Assistant Professor of Theatre).
Dr. E. B. Gose (Associate Professor of English).
Dr. Peter Harnetty (Assistant Professor of History and
Asian Studies).
Dr. David J. M. Hooson (Associate Professor of Geography).
Dr. Shuichi Kato (Associate Professor of Asian Studies).
Dr. D. T. Kenny (Professor of Psychology).
Dr. G. F. McGuigan (Assistant Professor of Economics).
Dr. Craig W. Miller (Associate Professor of English).
Gerald W. Pepper (Assistant Professor of Social Work).
Geraldine Roese (Instructor in Home Economics, second term)
Dr. I. S. Ross (Assistant Professor of English).
Dr. Robert J. Rowan (Associate Professor of Philosophy).
Dr. A. D. Scott (Professor of Economics).
Dr. Donald E. Soule (Associate Professor of Theatre).
Dr. W. Tallman (Associate Professor of English).
Both Faculty and students enjoyed the presence of Visiting Professors:
C. P. Fitzgerald (Asian Studies, first term).
Dr. D. G. E. Hall (Asian Studies).
Dr. Yorst Hamnitzsch (Asian Studies, first term).
John D. Legge (History, first term).
Dr. Norman Pollock (Geography).
Giose Rimanelli (Romance Studies).
R. I. Sikora (Philosophy).
At the end of June 1965, Dorothy Somerset (Acting Head, Department of Theatre), Charlotte Black (Director, School of Home
Economics), and Dr. Joseph A. Crumb (Professor of Economics)
brought to a formal close their many years of devoted service to the
University.
2S In February Terry Forrest (Lecturer in Philosophy) died suddenly.
THE FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
For the last five years this Faculty, under the aegis of the Columbo
plan, has been collaborating with the University of Singapore and
the University of Malaya and Kuala Lumpur in the development
of Schools of Business Administration. Teams of professors have
served in the Malaysian institutions under the direction of Professor
L. G. J. Wong and ten students from Malaysia have attained the
degree Master of Business Administration here and returned to
their native land. The project comes to an end this year and Professor Wong and his associates will resume their regular duties in
September 1965.
Members of the Faculty continued the planning of a doctoral
programme, which has now been approved in principle by Senate.
At the same time the curriculum for the Master's degree has been
strengthened and the problems created by a sharp rise in undergraduate enrolment have been faced and solved.
The Division of Marketing, in which Assistant Professor J. Narver
joined the staff, welcomed the arrival of Visiting Lecturer K.B.Haas.
Assistant Professor J. Bray was added to the Division of Finance. D.
B. Fields, Associate Professor of Accounting, returned from his duties
with the Royal Commission on Taxation. R. Heywood, Associate
Professor of Teacher Education (Commerce), and D. L. MacDonald, Assistant Professor of Accounting, took advantage of study-
leave. H. Babiak, Assistant Professor of Accounting, submitted his
resignation. Dean Emeritus E. D. MacPhee retired as Principal of
the Banff School of Advanced Management, although he continues
to teach.
Members of the Faculty have been gratifyingly active in professional associations, especially during the meeting of the Association of
Canadian Schools of Business on this campus in June. Once again
the community has drawn upon the special knowledge and wisdom
of the Faculty. P. H. White, Professor of Estate Managment, at the
request of the Government of Newfoundland, spent two months in
the summer of 1964 as chairman of a Commission of Enquiry that
investigated all aspects of the cost of housing in St. John's. W.
Hughes, Associate Professor of Transportation and Utilities, carried
26 out a mission for the United Nations in Malaysia during May and
June 1965. Dean G. Neil Perry responded to both the federal and
the provincial governments by serving as a Commission of Industrial Enquiry in connexion with strikes.
THE FACULTY OF DENTISTRY
The Faculty of Dentistry began the year in memorable fashion in
September by enrolling its first class of students. Only eight were
accepted from the sixty-five who applied, a reflexion in part of the
high standards that will be maintained. The Dean has continued to
address dental societies and schools on the subject of dental education and the need for superior students.
The staff of the Faculty remains small, for recruitment of highly
qualified men is not easy. Dr. D. J. Yeo arrived as Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Public Community Dental
Health; Dr. H. K. Brown was added to the same department as
Lecturer. Dr. John D. Spouge, Associate Professor of Oral Biology,
was elected to a Fellowship in the American Academy of Oral Pathology.
The year ended well, for in June the Board of Governors approved
the contract for the first buildings that are to be used exclusively by
this Faculty. Regrettably, the high cost of construction has made it
necessary to leave parts of the buildings unfinished in the immediate
plans. It is hoped that this restriction is temporary, for curtailment
of space inevitably causes curtailment of the academic programme,
which, in turn, affects the dental services available in the province.
The acquisition of funds for research is indispensable to a Faculty
of Dentistry that is to be of first quality. So far the sources of funds
have been few and the amounts insufficient. It may well be that the
University will be forced to supply the equipment that the dental
researcher must have. Facilities for research attract good men; and
worthwhile research has its effect upon teaching and students.
THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION
The major event of the year was the move by the Faculty from
the huts to the comparatively luxurious quarters in the new building.
By September 1965, the Faculty of Education will be able for the
first time to operate as a homogeneous unit.
27 The chief concern of this Faculty is the preparation of competent
teachers for the schools of British Columbia. To this end, the curriculum is ever under examination and subject to adaptation, collaboration with other Faculties and with School Boards is continuous,
and research into new methods and ideas is relentless. Education in
this Faculty is never a static thing. The breadth of interest and the
reputation of the members of the Faculty may well be measured by
the extent to which they are invited to hold office in national and
international organizations.
Assistant Professor Stella Shopland died in April. On January i,
the University as a whole was stricken by the death of Johnny Owen,
a man beloved for some thirty years by all those interested in sport
on the campus.
During the year the following appointments were made:
F. Bertram (Assistant Professor).
Dr. C. Brauner (Associate Professor).
Jean Brock (Lecturer in Physical Education).
Dr. A. Clingman (Associate Professor).
Dr. J. Coombs (Assistant Professor).
Dr. L. Downey (Professor).
M. Elliott (Assistant Professor).
F. Fiedler (Assistant Professor).
C. Gillespie (Assistant Professor).
M. Golledge (Assistant Professor).
H. Harder (Instructor).
Ross Heatherington (Assistant Professor of Physical Education).
V. Keenan (Assistant Professor).
Dr. L. Marsh (Professor).
P. Olley (Lecturer).
C. Overall (Lecturer).
Bonnie Phillips (Instructor in Physical Education).
M. Robbins (Assistant Professor).
Harvey Scott (Physical Education).
N. Stacey (Assistant Professor).
Dr. J. Stephens (Professor).
G. Stubbs (Assistant Professor).
M. Tomkins (Assistant Professor).
N. Turner (Lecturer).
D. Webster (Assistant Professor).
Dr. R. Whaley (Assistant Professor).
J. Wolforth (Instructor).
A number of resignations were submitted:
Leroi Daniels (Lecturer).
28 L. Davies (Assistant Professor).
Dr. Evan Davis (Associate Professor).
Dr. J. Ellis (Associate Professor).
H. Goodwin (Instructor).
Dr. Robert Hammond (Assistant Professor).
E. Loomer (Instructor).
Dr. W. Murra (Associate Professor).
Esther Segal (Instructor).
Leaves of absence gave opportunity for leisurely study to Dr. C.
J. Anastasiou (Assistant Professor), Edna Baxter (Associate Professor), R. Heywood (Associate Professor), Dr. D. C. Kendall (Associate Professor, until December 31, 1964), and Dr. H. L. Stein
(Professor and Director of the Graduate Division).
THE FACULTY OF FORESTRY
Dr. Joseph A. F. Gardner, formerly Director of the Federal Government's Forestry Products Research Laboratory, became Dean of
the Faculty February 1. Because of a previous commitment to the
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization of
Australia, he spent March, April, and May in that country as Research Fellow; consequently, the leadership of the Faculty, for the
greater part of the year, fell once again to Dr. R. W. Wellwood.
The promise of a new building, which is to be shared with the
Faculty of Agriculture, has aroused continuing enthusiasm in this
Faculty and many hours have been devoted to planning for a future
that will allow Forestry to enjoy appropriate facilities.
Professors J. E. Bier (formerly of the Department of Biology and
Botany) and K. Graham (formerly of the Department of Zoology)
have been transferred to the Faculty of Forestry. Assistant Professor
J. P. Tessier resigned. Dr. Joran Fries of the Royal School of Forestry, Sweden, joined the Faculty for four months.
The H. R. MacMillan Lecture in Forestry was given by J. C.
Westoby, of the Forestry and Forest Products Division of the Food
and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; his subject
was "World Forest Development, Markets, Men and Methods."
Professor J. E. Bier was elected President of the Canadian Phyto-
pathological Society. Fred Bunnell, who led the graduating class,
won the Gold Medal presented by the Canadian Institute of Forestry;
he then journeyed to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology at
29 Zurich with a Federal Exchange Scholarship to pursue graduate
study.
THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
The announced policy of the University to stimulate graduate
study and to produce more scholars and teachers competent to enter
academic life is already having a marked effect on the Faculty of
Graduate Studies.
Graduate students, it goes without saying, must be subsidized.
Consequently, the magnificent gift by H. R. MacMillan of some
three million dollars for graduate scholarships to doctoral students
has been recognized as the most spectacular incitement ever received
by this Faculty. That a comparable gift was bestowed on the University Library simultaneously by the same donor shows a nice
appreciation of the needs of students and members of the Faculty
who are preoccupied by research.
Dean Ian McTaggart Cowan began his tenure of office by inaugurating a searching examination of the structure and activity of the
Faculty. The future will undoubtedly see an exhaustive report with
sweeping recommendations.
In the meantime, advances are already being made. The Department of Music and the School of Librarianship have been authorized
to offer programmes leading to the Master's degree; the Departments
of Mechanical Engineering and Soil Science have had doctoral
programmes approved. Numbers of students are increasing, especially in the Humanities and Social Sciences. It is not a coincidence
that applications for grants from the University's research-funds
have increased in the past year from 138 to 203 in the Sciences and
from 65 to no in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The funds
have been enlarged but remain insufficient.
Considerable effort has been expended to provide Reading Rooms
(with fundamental books of reference) for graduate students in the
Humanities and Social Sciences; this has not been easy, for classrooms and offices, despite new building, remain at a premium. For
the young scientist, his laboratory provides a home; the University
Library does not fulfill the same function for the young Humanist
and Social Scientist. Thus these Reading Rooms are indispensable
and must be multiplied.
The Institutes of Fisheries, Industrial Relations, and Oceanography fall within the Faculty of Graduate Studies. In future years
30 they will be joined by Community and Regional Planning, which
has just been transferred from the Faculty of Applied Science.
The Institute of Fisheries has built an enviable record throughout
the world. The Institute has been facing a formidable barrier to
further progress: physical space is inadequate and staff are too few.
In 1964-1965 five members of the Faculty directed twenty-eight
graduate students (ten of them doctoral) in what may justly be
called a corner of the Biological Sciences Building. The Institute
has been forced to deny admission to qualified students who are
attracted by its merited reputation. In the summer of 1965, however, prospects were transformed when H. R. MacMillan made a
gift of $750,000 to the University for the purpose of stimulating
graduate work and research in Fisheries. This benefaction will
make it possible to bring together the highly-skilled staff who are
required and to expand the programme of studies into new and
vital areas. The problem of space will be alleviated by the new
building for Biological Sciences that is scheduled for completion
in 1968. Dr. James T. McFadden joined the Faculty as Assistant
Professor at the beginning of the year; the Institute is seeking other
recruits.
The Institute of Industrial Relations has been supporting eight
graduate students, of whom six are proceeding to degrees in Economics. Dr. Martin Meissner (Anthropology and Sociology), Dr.
V. V. Murray (Commerce and Business Administration), and
E. S. W. Belyea (Psychology) undertook projects in industrial relations. The Institute's nomadic life (this year in the Buchanan
Building) should come to an end with the projected move to the
Henry Angus Building, which, it is hoped, will offer a permanent
home.
F. J. R. Taylor joined the Institute of Oceanography as Instructor
(in Oceanography and Botany). Dr. G. L. Pickard (Professor and
Director) and Dr. R. F. Scagel (Professor) were elected to Fellowships in the Royal Society of Canada; the latter was also named
Fellow of the Linnean Society of London, and awarded the Corbaker
Prize in Phycology (1964) by the Botanical Society of America.
Members of the staff continue to answer calls for advice and assistance in Canada and elsewhere. Again, a shortage of space threatens
to hinder progress.
31 THE FACULTY OF LAW
For the second consecutive year the Faculty of Law experienced
a sharply increased enrolment. The trend is healthy, for there is
today a severe shortage of practising lawyers and in addition many
posts requiring legal training are open in government and business.
After spending two years devising a new curriculum, the Faculty
instituted the programme in September. Both students and professors have expressed enthusiasm and desirable changes have so far
been minor. More attention is now being paid to writing and individual supervision.
Two visitors, R. E. Megarry, q.c, of London, England, and
Louis B. Sohn of the Harvard Law School, spent several days on
the campus, to the very great profit of the Faculty and its students.
Assistant Professor A. J. McClean resigned in order to join the
Faculty of Law of Southampton University; Maurice Carr (Lecturer ) accepted a post in the Faculty of Law of Aberystwyth University. In compensation and in the face of the larger number of
students the Faculty added to its ranks Associate Professor J. M.
Maclntyre and Assistant Professors R. W. V. Dickerson, J. Noel
Lyon, R. C. Dunlop, and K. C. MacKenzie.
THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Work has now begun on the Health Services Centre and members
of the Faculty are engaged in planning its administration. One
building, the Woodward Biomedical Library, was opened November 12, 1964, in a fitting ceremony that expressed the thanks of the
University to Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Woodward.
Teaching and research continued to command the Faculty's chief
attention. The Curriculum Committee is studying new methods of
teaching. Numerous members of the staff delivered technical papers
before professional audiences in Canada and the United States.
Dr. Frank A. Turnbull, Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery,
in the year of his retirement, served as President of the Canadian
Medical Association. Dr. K. S. Morton, Clinical Assistant Professor
of Surgery, was the recipient of an Exchange Fellowship to Britain,
under the auspices of the British Orthopaedic Association. Dr.
David Osoba, Clinical Instructor in Medicine, was selected as
Medallist by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons for his
work on the thymus humoral factor.
32 Resignations were submitted by Dr. H. F. Scherrer (Associate
Professor of Anatomy), Dr. W. M. King (Clinical Instructor in
Preventive Medicine), Dr. D. J. Watterson (Assistant Professor of
Psychiatry), Dr. T. P. Millar (Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry), Dr. T. Feir and Dr. W. Goresky (Clinical Instructors in
Psychiatry), Dr. P. J. Doyle (Clinical Instructor in Surgery), Dr.
E. W. Henry (Clinical Instructor in Medicine). Dr. B. Shallard
(Clinical Instructor in Medicine) retired; Dr. T. K. MacLean
(Clinical Instructor in Medicine) died. Dr. G. R. Gray, Clinical
Instructor in Medicine, was elected Fellow of the Royal College of
Physicians of Canada. Dr. D. M. M. Kavanagh-Gray, Clinical Instructor in Medicine, and Dr. D. M. Whitelaw, Professor of Medicine, became Fellows of the American College of Physicians. Dr.
K. K. Pump, Clinical Instructor in Medicine, won a Fellowship in
the Association of Canadian Chest Physicians. Dr. A. J. Elliot,
Professor of Ophthalmology, accepted the presidency of the Canadian Ophthalmological Society; his colleague, Dr. A. Q. McCor-
mick, was awarded a Fellowship for studies in experimental ophthalmology at the Institute of Ophthalmology in London, England.
The following appointments were made: in Biochemistry, Dr.
Michael Smith (Part-time Associate Professor); in Medicine, Dr. S.
Grzybowski (Associate Professor), Dr. H. C. Slade (Assistant Professor), Dr. W. C. MacDonald (Instructor), Dr. H. W. L. Buck,
Dr. F. A. Olakce, and Dr. P. J. A. Bratty (Clinical Instructors);
in Paediatrics, Dr. R. H. Hill (Instructor), Dr. A. B. Murray, Dr.
M. Berger, and J. Edwards (Clinical Instructors); in Pharmacology, Dr. Abram J. D. Friesen and Dr. Harvey D. Sanders (Research Associates and Instructors); in Preventive Medicine, Dr.
Lewis S. Anerson, Dr. E. J. Bowmer, Dr. C. A. Brumwell, Dr. H. K.
Kennedy, Dr. G. D. M. Kettyls, Dr. A. W. Wallace (Clinical Instructors) ; in Psychiatry, Dr. C. J. Schwarz (Clinical Instructor);
in Surgery, Dr. D. A. MacDonald and Dr. J. G. Sladen (Clinical
Instructors).
THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY
The Faculty views with satisfaction the steady increase in the
numbers of those enrolling for graduate work. The availability of
the Woodward Library is having its effect and the prospective
Health Sciences Centre, in which this Faculty will be directly concerned, will also stimulate research.
33 The Faculty is in close touch with pharmaceutical problems that
affect the community, as is demonstrated by plans to offer, in collaboration with the Faculty of Agriculture, a course dealing with
the physiology, toxicology, and chemical properties of pesticides.
On a Saturday in February the Faculty entertained some twenty-
five members, staff and graduate students, of the College of Pharmacy of the University of Washington. The conference was acclaimed
as valuable by guests and hosts alike.
The relationship with the British Columbia Pharmaceutical Association remains intimate. This year Professor Finlay A. Morrison
has collaborated with Gordon B. Hewitt of the Association in preparing a report on Continuing Education in Pharmacy. The Faculty
also offers a variety of refresher-courses for the benefit of practising
pharmacists.
Members of the Faculty are in constant demand to serve on
national boards and councils.
THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE
The Departments of Biology and Botany, Bacteriology and Immunology, and Zoology have devoted intensive study to an effort
to integrate their work in the interests of a more systematic approach
for students. A Life Sciences Council has been established and will
soon make significant recommendations.
The introduction into the curriculum of a course in Astronomy,
the oldest of the sciences, removes a flaw from the curriculum and
suggests that a substantial programme may be developed.
The Faculty has been watching with interest the adjustments
taking place in the schools and the Curriculum Committee will be
ready for the first graduates of the new secondary programme.
Dr. C. E. Dolman, Head of the Department of Bacteriology and
Immunology, was elected President of the Canadian Association of
Medical Bacteriologists in December for a two-year term; in June
he became President of Section III of the Royal Society of Canada.
Toward the end of the year Dr. Dolman submitted his resignation
as Head, a post whose rigorous duties he has fulfilled since 1936;
he will retain his Professorship.
In the Department of Biology aand Botany Dr. T. M. C. Taylor
has been on leave; Dr. J. Stein spent five months as visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and was elected
34 President of the Phycological Society of America. Dr. G. H. N.
Towers, Professor and Head, was sought as President of the Canadian Society of Plant Physiologists; Dr. J. E. Bier, who will be
transferred to the Faculty of Forestry, became President of the
Canadian Phytopathological Society; Dr. R. Beamish succeeded to
the presidency of the Vancouver Natural History Society. Dr. R. F.
Scagel was elected to a Fellowship in the Royal Society of Canada
(Section III). Three appointments were made to the staff:  Dr.
E. B. Tregunna and Dr. G. C. Hughes  (Assistant Professors),
F. J. R. Taylor (Instructor).
The following joined the Department of Chemistry: Visiting
Professors S. C. Charles, R. Lefebvre, and N. L. Paddock; Assistant
Professors N. Basco, C. E. Brion, B. R. James, and T. Money; Instructor J. T. Kwon; Lecturer D. F. R. Gilson. A number of resignations were submitted: Dr. A. I. Scott (Professor); Dr. J. T.
Kwon and Mrs. S. A. Melzak (Instructors), Dr. D. F. R. Gilson
and Mrs. M. K. Jaatteenmake (Lecturers). Dr. C. A. McDowell
(Professor and Head) visited Kyoto University, Japan; Dr. L. D.
Haywood (Associate Professor) spent his leave in Sweden, Dr. L.
W. Reeves (Associate Professor) worked for two months in the National Physical Laboratory of the University of Oxford, and Dr. H.
C. Clark (Professor) resided for a similar period at the Universities
of Punjab and Rajasthan, India. Dr. J. Trotter (Professor) was
honoured by an Arthur P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship.
Dr. Robert Thompson, Acting-Head of the Department of Geology, was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (Section
III). Dr. J. W. Murray accepted appointment as Assistant Professor.
The Department of Geophysics is benefitting from the presence
of Dr. K. Sato, Visiting Professor from the University of Tokyo.
Dr. W. H. Simons, Associate Professor of Mathematics, was
away on leave of absence. The Department grew with the appointments of Dr. D. Drake, Dr. E. Gerlach, Dr. W. McWhorter, Dr. L.
Patterson, Dr. K. M. Rao, Dr. E. Rogak, and Dr. S. Simons as
Assistant Professors; and S. Promislow as Lecturer. Resignations
were received from Dr. S. Simons, Dr. R. Cleveland, and Dr. S.
Cleveland (Assistant Professors); and M. Buchanan (Instructor).
Several changes occurred in the Department of Physics. Appointments included Dr. E. W. Vogt as Professor; Dr. R. C. Williams
as Associate Professor; Dr. B. G. Turrell and P. J. Sykes as Assistant
35 Professors; Dr. J. H. Williamson as Instructor; and S. D. Noble as
Lecturer. A number resigned: Dr. J. B. Brown (Professor); Dr. D.
H. Goode, A. F. Rice, and R. H. Parker (Instructors); and S. D.
Noble. Dr. H. Schmidt completed his term as Visiting Lecturer, as
did Dr. R. R. Haering as Visiting Professor, Dr. M. Bloom and Dr.
W. Opechowski (Professors) took advantage of leaves of absence to
continue their research. The Rhodes Scholarship was won by A. R.
L. Spray, who graduated with First Class Honours in Physics;
Christopher Jo Brealey, with First Class Honours in Physics and
Mathematics, carried off the Governor General's Medal.
Dr. W. S. Hoar became Head of the Department of Zoology. He
received an Honorary Degree (D.Sc.) from the University of New
Brunswick in May and was awarded the Flavelle Medal by the
Royal Society of Canada in June. Losses were incurred through the
resignations of Dr. W. S. Holmes (Associate Professor) and Dr. J.
F. Eisenberg (Assistant Professor). Dr. G. C. E. Scudder (Associate
Professor), on leave of absence, studied in England and Europe; he
was replaced by R. A. Ring (Acting Assistant Professor). Dr. A. B.
Acton arrived as Associate Professor and Dr. J. E. Phillips as Assistant Professor. Dr. W. Murdock worked in the Department as Acting Assistant Professor in the second term; Professor Ivan Good-
body, of the University of the West Indies, found headquarters here
for two months.
36 OTHER DEPARTMENTS OF
THE UNIVERSITY
THE DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION
In many ways this Department is nearer to the community as a
whole than is any other area of the University. Under its auspices
fall courses for credit towards degrees, courses contributing to the
general education of the public, special seminars and conferences on
subjects of topical interest, short-term programmes offering retraining in practical fields, lectures given throughout the province on a
wide variety of subjects.
The establishment of the University of Victoria and Simon Fraser
University has aroused the hope in this Department that a coordinated programme of continuing education may be devised by
the three public institutions that will appeal to the adult students
of the province. This might well include the opportunity of earning
a degree by way of evening courses.
In the meantime the advice of the Department is constantly invited by associations seeking a continuation of professional education. Even now negotiations are under way with the Faculty of
Pharmacy and the British Columbia Association of Pharmacists in
the effort to produce a comprehensive programme for graduate
pharmacists.
The work of the Department is still impeded by the absence of
an appropriate physical centre. It may be that desirable quarters
will emerge from the building programme and the consequent
moves that will occur. If so, the Department will operate more
effectively and more economically.
In 1964 a contract was signed by the University and the Government of Canada according to which the University of British Co-
37 lumbia will assist the University of Rajasthan, India, in the development of a Department of Adult Education. Dr. John K. Friesen
was named Director of the three-year project and has been on leave
of absence in India since November i. In his absence Gordon Sel-
man has been serving as Acting-Director of this Department.
Resignations were received from Frederick Walden (Supervisor,
Study-Discussion Programme), Bertram Curtis (AssistantDirector),
William Mundy (Supervisor), Douglas Kaye (Recordings Librarian), Mary Medland (Administrative Assistant), Ian Docherty
(Co-ordinator, Fine Arts), Trevor Matthews (Supervisor).
The Department was joined by Thomas Brown, Gerald Savory,
Robert Collier, and Sidney Risk (Supervisors), Malcolm Gillis (Instructor) . James Draper went to India as Adviser at the University
of Rajasthan. Knute Buttedahl added the Acting Directorship of
Housing to his already onerous duties in the Conference Office.
Gordon Selman was elected President of the Canadian Association of Directors of Extension and Summer Schools.
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
For many years the Library has been demanding additional funds.
Substantial increases have been allotted recently by the Board of
Governors; yet these were not keeping pace with the needs of a
university that has pledged itself to train graduate students in larger
numbers than ever before. In February 1965, Mr. H. R. MacMillan came to the rescue with a magnificent gift of three million dollars for the strengthening of the Library's collections. Seldom has a
library been the recipient of such munificence. The Librarian now
anticipates that the present holdings, which already number more
than 700,000 volumes, will be tripled within a decade. Graduate
students and faculty should not lack the tools of research.
In September the P. A. Woodward Biomedical Library opened
its doors. The five-fold increase in the circulation of biomedical
books reflects the influence of an attractive and convenient building
upon readers and so upon education.
The University Library, however, continued to be used intensively. On a typical day in February, some 17,500 persons were
counted as they entered the building. This figure is also a major
factor in the statistics kept by all the divisions engaged in pubic
service.
38 During the year, internal alterations and additions almost doubled
the capacity of the book-stacks. The Library is thus ready to cope,
for a few years at least, with the accelerated flow of acquisitions
that will arrive as a result of Dr. MacMillan's gift.
June brought the retirement of Roland J. Lanning, Head of the
Serials Division, who for forty years has given to the University his
discerning and intimate knowledge of the learned journals and
serials. Scholarship at this University will always be in his debt.
INTER-FACULTY AND  STUDENT AFFAIRS
This was a memorable year for students seeking financial assistance. First, H. R. MacMillan, already known as a close friend of
the University, made provision for forty-five graduate fellowships,
each worth $3,200, annually for a period of twenty years. More recently, the same donor added eighteen similar fellowships in honour
of the three former Presidents, the late Dr. F. F. Wesbrook, Dr. L.
S. Klinck, Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie. The stimulus given to the expanding graduate work of the University is already being felt.
Second, the Government of Canada passed the Canada Loans
Act. Dean Walter H. Gage was then appointed Provincial Authority to administer the funds and was all but overwhelmed by applications. During the year more than 5,100 loans were issued to about
4,650 students in the amount of over $3,100,000; approximately
two-thirds of the loans went to students at this University.
The opening of the Totem Park Residences added attractive accommodation for 400 men and 400 women; dining-room, lounge,
and facilities for recreation are enjoyed in common.
Yorkeen House has become a convenient hostel for professors,
alumni, parents, and others who visit the campus for short periods.
39 Registration ig64-6$
(as of December 1, 1964)
FACULT
Y   OF  ARTS
Arts
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
695
652
1347
Second Year
757
510
1267
Third Year
599
384
983
Fourth Year
563
312
875
TOTAL
2614
1858
4472
Music
First Year
15
22
37
Second Year
24
24
48
Third Year
21
25
46
Fourth Year
17
12
39
TOTAL
77
83
160
School of Home Economics
First Year
64
64
Second Year
....
49
49
Third Year
....
50
50
Fourth Year
....
49
49
TOTAL
212
212
School of Social Work
B.S.W.
50
55
105
M.S.W.
27
27
54
TOTAL
77
82
159
School of Librarianship
12
41
53
TOTAL IN FACULTY
2780
2276
5056
FACULTY
OF   SCIENCE
First Year
812
191
1003
Second  Year
752
105
857
Third Year
482
73
555
Fourth Year
439
51
490
TOTAL
2485
420
2905
FACULTY   OF
APPLIED
SCIENCE
Engineering
First Year
305
1
306
Second Year
224
1
225
Third Year
189
1
190
Fourth Year
185
....
185
TOTAL
903
3
906 School of Architecture
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year
Fifth Year
EN
WOMEN
TOTAL
31
2
33
22
1
23
23
1
24
TOTAL
77
4
81
School of Nursing
Basic Degree Programme
First Year
	
27
27
Second Year
24
24
Third Year
	
24
24
Fourth Year
	
26
26
Postbasic
First Year
	
12
12
Second Year
7
7
Third Year
....
7
7
TOTAL
127
127
Diploma Course
78
78
TOTAL
205
205
TOTAL IN FACULTY        980 212 1192
FACULTY   OF   AGRICULTURE
First Year                30 11 41
Second Year                 32 19 51
Third Year                52 6 58
Fourth Year                39 7 46
Fifth Year
Occupational Course                 5 13
TOTAL IN FACULTY                    155 44 199
FACULTY   OF   LAW
First Year
118
2
120
Second Year
87
3
90
Third Year
63
2
65
TOTAL IN FACULTY 268 7 275
FACULTY   OF   PHARMACY
First Year
24
11
35
Second Year
19
12
31
Third Year
31
13
44
Fourth Year
19
14
33
TOTAL IN FACULTY 93 50 143 FACULTY
OF   MEDICINE
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
57
4
61
Second Year
49
6
55
Third Year
53
3
56
Fourth Year
37
7
44
TOTAL
196
20
216
School of
Rehabilitation Medicine
First Year
	
26
26
Second Year
....
33
33
Third Year
....
18
18
TOTAL
....
77
77
TOTAL IN FACULTY        196 97        293
FACULTY   OF   DENTISTRY
First Year 8 .... 8
TOTAL IN FACULTY
8
8
FACULTY
OF  FORESTRY
First Year
58
58
Second Year
34
	
34
Third Year
45
45
Fourth Year
46
....
46
TOTAL IN FACULTY
183
....
183
FACULTY
OF   EDUCATION
Elementary Division
First Year
49
369
418
Second Year
141
531
672
Third Year
100
392
492
Fourth Year
49
141
190
Graduates
22
39
61
TOTAL
361
1472
1833
Secondary Division
First Year
89
69
158
Second Year
143
76
219
Third Year
130
54
184
Fourth Year
100
38
138
Fifth Year
82
37
119
Graduates
157
95
242
Industrial Arts
51
51
TOTAL
752
359
1111 School of
Physical Education
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
23
18
41
Second Year
55
21
76
Third Year
46
14
60
Fourth Year
38
9
47
TOTAL
162
62
224
TOTAL IN FACULTY
1275
1893
3168
FACULTY   OF   COMMERCE   AND   BUSINESS   ADMINISTRATION
First Year
272
12
284
Second Year
205
6
211
Third Year
147
2
149
Fourth Year
112
4
116
TOTAL IN FACULTY
736
24
760
FACULTY   OF   GRADUATE   STUDIES
Course leading to
Ph.D
295
30
325
D.Ed.
7
2
9
M.A.
257
116
373
M.Sc.
172
29
201
M.A.Sc.
92
92
M.S.A.
31
	
31
M.F.
7
7
M.B.A.
36
36
M.P.E.
8
8
M.Ed.
10
11
21
M.S.P.
6
1
7
M.Arch.
TOTAL IN FACULTY
921
189
1110
Unclassified
126
71
197
GRAND TOTAL
10,206
5283
15,489
Extra-Sessional Classes
714
815
1529
Correspondence Courses
569
727
1296
Summer Session  1964
3202
3018
6220 Registration ig64~6^
COUNTRY   OF   CITIZENSHIP
North America
Europe
13912
Canada
14
Austria
2
Mexico
3
Belgium
215
United States
1
Czechoslovakia
19
Denmark
Central America
7
Eire  (Ireland)
1
Bahamas
8
Estonia
3
Barbados
5
Finland
1
Costa Rica
14
France
4
Honduras, British
147
Germany — Western Zone
9
Jamaica
2
Germany — Eastern Zone
63
Trinidad
471
Great Britain & N. Ireland
6
Other West Indies
9
Greece
23
Hungary
South America
2
Iceland
2
Argentina
30
Italy
1
British Guiana
5
Latvia
3
Chile
79
Netherlands
1
Columbia
14
Norway
2
Paraguay
3
Poland
4
Peru
3
Portugal
1
Venezuela
1
Romania
4
Soviet Union
Asia
3
Spain
2
Ceylon
4
Sweden
49
China
6
Switzerland
63
Hong Kong
6
Yugoslavia
63
India
2
Indo-China
Africa
5
Indonesia
1
French West Africa
2
Iran
5
Ghana
1
Iraq
7
Kenya
3
Israel
3
Nigeria
24
Japan
4
Sierra Leone
5
Korea
9
Rhodesia, Nyasaland
1
Lebanon
1
S. Camaroons
17
Malaya
2
Uganda
9
Pakistan
11
Union of South Africa
1
Palestine
5
Philippines
Oceania
3
Sarawak
28
Australia
4
Siam
14
New Zealand
8
Singapore
1
Syria
20
Stateless
3
1  Turkey THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Registration
Total
Session
Arts
*Sc.
H.Ec.
P.E.
Mus.
As. Sc.
Nurs.
Arch.
Agric.
Law
Soc.
Work
Educ
Phar.
For.
Med.    Dent.    Com.
Lib.
Rehab.
Unclass.
Grad.
St.
Winter
Sess.
Year
Summer
Sess.
Con-.*
X-Sess.
GRAND
TOTAL
1920-21
687
....
....
....
200
9
....
51
....
....
....
....
....
—
...
....
....
....
15
962
1921
134
550
1646
1925-26
1083
....
....
....
192
33
—
51
....
....
57
....
....
	
...
....
....
....
47
1463
1926
438
127
2028
1930-31
1494
....
....
....
281
41
....
50
....
....
71
....
....
....
...
....
....
....
107
2044
1931
441
401
2886
1935-36
1211
....
....
....
320
93
....
67
....
25
62
....
....
--
...
....
....
....
160
1938
1936
566
223
2727
1940-41
1591
....
....
....
452
72
....
153
....
26
71
....
....
	
...
....
....
....
163
2528
1941
457
187
3172
1945-46
4034
148
....
....
1053
128
....
376
87
67
47
....
....
	
443
....
....
....
249
t6632
1946
2368
163
9163
1950-51
2951
185
139
....
931
92
97
286
325
142
213
166
142
60
329
....
....
....
374
6432
1951
976
430
7838
1955-56
3040
168
123
....
904
177
91
163
212
84
120
136
111
222
529
....
....
....
323
6403
1956
1810
1038
9251
1956-57
3284
170
101
....
1032
216
94
153
231
77
905
142
129
209
572
....
....
....
384
7699
1957
3507
1649
12855
1957-58
3860
187
103
....
1157
243
100
165
248
76
1125
119
*328
213
605
....
....
....
457
8986
1958
3947
2406
15339
1958-59
4505
198
130
....
1068
224
117
156
252
80
1445
125
*269
213
597
....
....
....
571
9950
1959
3828
2100
15878
1959-60
4734
207
160
....
1043
217
112
175
247
94
1826
141
•191
212
659
....
....
....
624
10642
1960
4256
2196
17094
1960-61
5314
198
177
....
1051
198
87
179
240
102
2188
151
♦183
203
635
• ....
....
....
715
11621
1961
5156
2600
19377
1961-62
6412
207
195
....
987
160
75
204
225
109
2376
139
181
210
617
31
19
124
679
12950
1962
5101
2701
20752
1962-63
6731
196
204
127
972
188
82
191
227
117
2415
147
186
208
616
36
35
176
744
13598
1963
5463
2941
22002
1963-64
A. 4399
Sc. 2749
214
214
148
918
181
78
205
243
147
2740
159
189
213
633
46
68
251
919
14714
1964
6220
2930
23864
1964-65
A. 4472
Sc. 2905
212
224
160
906
205
81
199
275
159
2944
143
183
216    8
!    760
53
77
197
1110
15489
1965
2825
t Includes Special Winter Session, 1946, Ex-Service Personnel.
* These figures include Sopron. YEAR
B.A.
B.Sc.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Degrees Conferred
Undergraduate
B.H.E.        B.P.E.      B.Mus.       B.S.W.      B.A.Sc.   B.Arch.    B.S.N.      B.S.A. LL.B. B.S.P.
M.D.
B.S.F.    B.Comm.       B.Ed.     B.l.S.      TOTAL
May-Oct.
1916-20
205
11
216
1921-25
499
....
....
....
....
....
145
....
12
58
....
....
....
....
....
....
714
1926-30
882
	
....
....
	
151
	
25
40
	
....
....
....
....
....
....  1098
1931-35
1221
	
....
....
	
240
	
36
67
	
	
	
....
122
....
....  1686
1936-40
1268
	
....
....
	
319
....
38
102
	
	
....
....
158
....  1885
1941-45
1139
....
	
....
....
446
....
44
130
....
....
....
13
208
28
....  2008
1946-50
3321
....
198
66
....
330
1262
5
90
472
336
115
....
158
1001
240
....  7594
1951-55
2404
....
178
113
....
280
972
71
77
272
435
227
114
155
398
253
....  5949
1956
299
....
35
19
....
39
132
8
....
25
58
38
60
20
96
36
865
Oct.
116
	
4
7
....
	
19
....
21
7
	
2
....
3
9
84
272
1957
318
....
20
19
....
37
159
14
....
18
52
34
48
25
102
fG 48
S 1
E 10,
■ ....  905
Oct.
119
....
....
3
....
....
3
2
32
4
....
5
2
....
10
G151
S 7
E 25
• ....  363
1958
225
70
32
14
....
35
177
7
....
28
72
36
45
18
•28
103
G 92
S 14
E 29,
■  ....  1025
Oct.
74
19
2
7
....
3
19
1
45
3
....
5
2
1
13
G143
S 17
E 34 J
•  ....   388
1959
247
78
32
17
....
33
193
9
....
29
73
29
42
24
*63
89
G 25
S 27
E 36
•  ....  1046
Oct.
160
28
3
8
....
4
20
....
41
4
....
2
5
3
* 5
12
G 251
S 32
E 60
• ....   412
1960
292
146
34
12
....
37
169
12
....
33
63
28
51
33
•20
116
G 8
S 35
E 37
....  1126
Oct.
122
32
6
5
....
....
24
1
49
4
....
4
4
....
20
G 12
S 44
E 86
413
1961
282
151
36
13
....
49
192
10
—
29
80
30
39
29
•24
95
G 71
S 32
E 51
....  1149
Oct.
133
44
1
9
....
1
23
3
60
7
....
5
2
7
16
G 121
S 45
E 85
■  ....   453
1962
331
185
31
26
7
57
203
16
....
24
75
31
51
26
94
G 6
S 55
E 57,
27  1302
Oct.
128
43
3
10
2
3
13
1
27
8
....
11
1
2
34
G 11
S 73
E 89
1   460
1963
392
238
32
14
12
71
171
13
....
30
60
12
49
26
117
G 10
S 76
E 92
34  1449
Oct.
163
49
1
18
2
2
24
4
26
10
1
2
....
2
29
G 171
S 95
E136
581
1964
528
326
37
19
6
71
196
14
....
33
63
35
43
35
90
G 71
S 76
E 98
► 43  1720
Oct.
187
66
6
9
3
....
21
6
29
15
1
3
....
5
25
G 13]
S 115
E186
1   691
t G - Graduate, S - Secondary, E - Elementary
* Sopron
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Degrees Conferred
Gradual*
YEAR
Ph.D.
M.A.
M.Sc
M.A.Sc.
M.S.A.   M
B.A.
M.P.
M.S.W.   M.S.P.   M.Arch.   M.P.E.
M.Ed.
TOTAL
Total
Grad. ft
Undergr.
Degrees
CUMUL.
TOTAL
May-Oct.
1916-20
11
....
1
....
	
	
12
228
1921-25
....
46
....
15
4
...
...
....
65
779
1007
1926-30
....
71
....
8
7
...
...
....
86
1184
2191
1931-35
....
113
....
27
22
...
....
....
...
....
162
1848
4039
1936-40
....
145
....
31
27
...
...
....
204
2089
6128
1941-45
....
98
....
31
17
...
...
....
146
2154
8282
1946-50
4
241
....
79
51
     48
...
....
422
8016
16298
1951-55
37
207
61
59
57
2
9
118
...
....
550
6499
22797
1956
12
22
11
10
5
1
1
18
...
....
80
945
23742
Oct.
7
17
10
5
1
...
....
2
...
....
42
314
24056
1957
4
15
10
8
6
1
1
17
...
....
62
967
25023
Oct.
7
9
12
4
2
2
2
...
3
41
404
25427
1958
8
26
18
12
4
3
8
...
3
82
1107
26534
Oct.
3
20
10
10
1
...
1
3
...
5
53
441
26975
1959
8
15
12
12
7
...
3
20
1
4
82
1128
28103
Oct.
9
10
23
12
....
1    	
1
8
64
476
28579
1960
18
22
25
13
5
4
4
13
1
8
113
1239
29818
Oct.
9
23
19
14
4
3
4
3
1
11
91
504
30322
1961
3
26
21
16
4
...
8
14
1
5
98
1247
31569
Oct.
5
25
29
10
2
...
....
3     1
1
24
100
553
32122
1962
12
25
31
14
6
1
5
17
2
9
122
1424
33546
Oct.
21
29
29
19
5
1
2
9
32
147
607
34153
1963
2d
34
29
19
5
1
3
21
5
11
148
1597
35750
Oct.
16
39
28
15
1
2
2
5     2
1
39
150
731
36481
1964
26
44
21
24
6
4
4
37
1
13
180
1900
38381
Oct.
30
39
48
15
4
4
1
1     2
2
31
177
868
39249 Registration ig64~6j
GEOGRAPHICAL  DISTRIBUTION   OF   STUDENTS
British Columbia (based on census divisions) :
1)  East Kootenay and Upper Columbia River
152
2)  West Kootenay, Columbia River and Slocan Lake
535
3)  Okanagan, Similkameen, Kettle, and
Upper Shuswap Rivers
783
4)  Lower Fraser Valley and Howe Sound
10,327
5)  Vancouver Island
1,151
6)  North Thompson, Shuswap, Nicola, Chilcotin
South, Lillooet East, Bridge - Lillooet
362
7)  Bella Coola, Knight Inlet, Powell River
145
8)  Nechako - Fraser, Chilcotin North, Cariboo,
Skeena, Takla Lake
214
9)  Atlin Lake, Skeena Coast, Queen Charlotte Islands
160
10)  Northeast B.C.-Laird, Finlay-Parsnip, Beaton River
90
Alberta
321
Saskatchewan
138
Manitoba
83
Ontario
254
Quebec
79
New Brunswick
9
Nova Scotia
17
Prince Edward Island
1
Newfoundland
5
Yukon
22
Northwest Territories
9
Africa
35
Asia
206
British Isles
73
West Indies
66
Central America
15
Europe
37
Oceania
38
South America
18
United States
144 Educational Level
of Students Admitted for the First Time
in ig64
University Entrance Standing
2354
British Columbia
13
Alberta
25
Saskatchewan
16
Manitoba
36
Ontario
16
Quebec
1
Nova Scotia
2
Prince Edward Island
59
Non-Canadian
Senior Matriculation (Grade XIII, B.C.)
615
British Columbia, full
622
British Columbia, partial
42
Alberta
26
Saskatchewan
11
Manitoba
43
Ontario
11
Quebec
3
Nova Scotia
2
New Brunswick
48
Non-Canadian
72
One year, Victoria College
67
Two years, Victoria College
4
Three years, Victoria College
75
Undergraduates above
Senior Matriculation
198
Graduate
20
Non-Matriculation
Summary
2522
University Entrance
1423
Senior Matriculation
344
Above Senior Matriculation
20
|   Non-Matriculation THE   UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Honorary Degrees Conferred
YEAR LL.D. D.Litt. D.Sc.
(honoris (honoris (honoris
causa) causa) causa)
Previous years
8
....
1930-34
12
....
1935-39
17
	
1940-44
9
1
1945-49
34
17
1950-54
37
18
1955 May
3
1
1
October
5
	
1956 May
3
3
October
6
	
	
1957 May
3
2
October
6
1958 May
9
	
July
1
....
	
September
13
	
	
October
2
....
1
1959 May
5
	
....
September
5
	
October
1
1
1960 May
4
2
October
2
2
2
1961 May
4
	
3
October
2
....
4
1962 May
1
	
October
3
	
1
1963 May
1
1
1
October
	
1
1
1964 May
1
	
1
October
1
1
TOTAL
198
5
61
GRAND   TOTAL 264 Summary of Operating Revenue and Expenditure
(Excluding Student Loan and Capital Development Funds and Endowment Capital Sums)
April 1, 1964 to March 31, 1965
GENERAL  FUNDS
1963-64
TRUST FUNDS
I
For  Specific  Purposes
Endowment
%
Teaching  and
General
Purposes
%
Fellowships,   Scholarships, Prizes and
Bursaries %
Research
%
Province of British Columbia Grants
Government of Canada Grants
United States Government
Student Fees
Gifts and Grants (Commerce, Industry,
Associations, Foundations and Individuals)
Miscellaneous
$11,090,000 51.3
2,897,054 13.4
6,623,518 30.6
1,021,825 4.7
$     60,790 4.4
198,240 14.4
7
1,102,831 80.3
12,343 0.9
$   2,100
7,150
501,104
837
0.4
1.4
98.0
0.2
$    57,568
3,132,536
187,383
1,187,707
5,994
1.3
68.5
4.1
26.0
0.1
124,452      100.0
1,210,458
39.7
$ 9,052,430
38.8
6,234,980
22.1
5,485,936
23.5
187,390
0.7
155,272
0.7
6,623,518
23.5
5,429,084
23.2
2,791,642
9.9
2,218,621
9.5
1,165,451
4.1
1,016,953
4.3
$21,632,397      100.0
$1,374,211      100.0       $511,191      100.0 $4,571,188      100.0 $124,452      100.0        $28,213,439     100.0
$23,358,296      100.0
EXPENDITURE
Academic Faculties, Departments and
Non-Faculty Academic and Student Services
Administration
Service Departments and Maintenance
General Expenses
Athletics
Fellowships, Scholarships, Prizes and Bursaries
Research
Miscellaneous
$16,302,900
75.4
$ 881,966
64.2
1,062,296
4.9
8,171
0.6
2,995,054
13.8
6,233
0.5
233,718
1.1
7,026
0.5
69,968
0.3
101,841
7.4
303,442
1.4
....
....
209,431
1.0
....
....
501,547       98.1
4,475,434       97.9
6,946
5.6
$17,191,812
60.9
$14,949,806
64.0
....
....
1,070,467
3.8
939,675
4.0
....
....
3,001,287
10.6
2,643,524
11.3
....
240,744
0.9
228,304
1.0
....
....
171,809
0.6
139,070
0.6
67,862
54.5
872,851
3.1
726,749
3.1
....
....
4,684,865
16.6
3,684,081
15.8
....
36,655
0.2
$21,176,809       97.9 $1,005,237        73.2       $501,547       98.1 $4,475,434       97.9 $ 74,808       60.1        $27,233,835       96.5 $23,347,864      100.0
Reserves carried forward from 1964-65 to meet
expenditures in 1965-66
Buildings including Furnishings, Equipment and
Campus Development
Trust Funds for Specific Purposes carried
forward to meet Expenditures in
1965-66
Endowment Fund Income carried forward
to 1965-66
224,108 1.0
231,480 1.1
368,974       26.8 9,644 1.9
95,754 2.1
49,644        39.9
224,108 0.8
231,480 0.8
474,372 1.7
49,644 0.2
(480,030) (2.1)
309,973 1.3
138,473 0.6
42,016 0.2
$21,632,397      100.0 $1,374,211      100.0       $511,191      100.0 $4,571,188      100.0 $124,452      100.0        $28,213,439      100.0 $23,358,296      100.0 Tht:   CirTLfULIF..     9$&
Ctcrjta Atim (jocrgc C»rtfiinphaiTi ;
tlw (Ji-tat Trekkrr Aw.m1. At the desk
Photograph by B. C. Jennings Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Woodward
Photograph by Gordon Whittaker Dr. Harvey Reginald MacMillan
Photograph by Tony Archer Driili S. Widl Ltttiag with the first diss in. Dentistry.      ffiettpaph l»j trilti StfUnA
Sisters Mary Assumpta and Ian Marie of North Kamloops take their first lesson
on the harmonica at the Summer Session for teachers of music.
Photograph by Gordon Sedawie Dran Dennis M. Hotly,
Faculty ot Arts
Phatmrr'ph l>y A.P.Hr"
Dean Joseph A. F- Gnrdnw,
1 ...   iIty ol Forestry
fk*t«§f*pk   I'Y  !>■  C.  /fTTITJBfl Rod Macdonald (President, U.B.C. Alumni Association) and President Macdonald
share the award given by the American Alumni Council for
the greatest improvement in fund-raising by alumni (for 1963).     Photograph by A. P. Holborne
Dr. W. Kaye Lamb and Dr. W. S. Hoar with the Tyrrell and Flavelle Medals,
presented by the Royal Society of Canada (June 1965).     Photograph by A. P. Holborr,
f ■Mill
Model of the new stadium, Vladimir Plavsic architect
Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry: model of the planned new building
Photograph by A. P. Hotborne W«ttWfiW  Library
Jtnningt The Totem  Part Residences
J'KiHitirafh Jc The HcJiry Attgui Budding
J>A<i!a,rojit| hy /i-«.i»,i Re: Faculty and Staff Publications
To reduce file size, the publications section has not been included. For this information,
contact the University of British Columbia Archives.
1956 Main Mall
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1
Canada
Telephone: 604-822-5877
Fax: 604-822-9587

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