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Report of the President of the University of British Columbia for the academic year ending August 31st.,… 1931

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Array REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR ENDING
AUGUST  31st., 1931. CONTENTS
Letter of Transmittal  2.
Teaching Staff  2.
Promotions  3.
New Appointments  3.
Leave of Absence  3.
Resignations  3.
Report of the Registrar:	
Registration  7,
Nationality of the Students  8.
Points from which Students come  9.
Occupations of Parents  9.
Comparative Statement of Attendance 1928-'29 to
1930-'31  10.
Degrees Conferred 1929 to 1931   10.
Location of the Graduates  11.
Scholarships, Fellowships and Bursaries Awarded
to Graduates   12.
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science... 13.
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science.... 16.
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture........ 20.
Report of the Dean of Women  23.
Report of the Director of the Summer Session.......  26.
Report of the Library Committee  32.
Report of the Extension Committee  32.
Report of the Acting-Head oftbe University Health Service:
Report of the Medical Examiner of Students  33.
Report of the University Public Health Nurse  34.
Report oii the Maintenance and Development of the Campus. 36.
Report of the Officer Commanding, Canadian Officers'
Training Corps, University of British Columbia
Contingent  41.
Publications  43. THE REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT.
To the Board of Governors and
the Senate of the
University of British Columbia.
Gentlemen:-
I have the honour to submit the following report
on the work of the University for the academic year ending
August 31st., 1931.
TEACHING STAFF:
Deans and Heads of Departments 3.
Professors and Heads of Departments 20.
Professors 17.
Associate Professors 30.
Assistant Professors 22.
Dean of Women and Assistant Professor 1.
Instructors 15.
Assistants 37.
Research Assistants 9.
Honorary Lecturer 1.
Lecturer (Veterinary Soience)
(Part-time) 1.
Lecturers in Public Health
(Part-time) 14.
Lecturers in Social Service
(Part-time) 3.
Lecturers in Teacher Training
(Part-time) 5.
Leoturers in Commerce
(Part-time) 3.
Substitutes for members on leave 2. PROMOTIONS:
Mr. H. F. Angus, B.A., B.C.L., M.A., from Professor in
the Department of Economics, Sociology and Political
Science to Professor and Head of the Department;   D.G.
Laird, B.S.A., M.S., Ph„D., from Assistant Professor of
Agronomy to Associate Professor of Agronomy;   John
Allardyce, M.A.(Brit.Col.), Ph.D. (McGill), from Instructor
to Assistant Professor of Chemistry.
NEW APPOINTMENTS
Miss Gertrude M.Smith, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of
Zoology.;    Mr. Martin A. Peacock, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in Geology;   Mr. E. Owen, M.A., Assistant Professor
in Classics;  Mr. Britton B. Brock, B.A.Sc, Instructor
in Civil Engineering;   Mr. Edward S. Pretious, B.A.Sc,
Instructor in Civil Engineering;   Mr. D. G. Gillespie,
B.Sc, Instructor in Physical Education (Teacher Training
Course).
LEAVE OF ABSENCE:
William E. Duckering, A.B., B.S., C.E., Professor and Head
of Department of Civil Engineering, for one year from
September 1-1930.
George M. Weir, B.A., M.A., D.Paed., Professor and Head- of
Department of Education from January 1-1931 to April 30-1931.
Miss Dorothy Dallas, B.A., M.A., Instructor in French, for one
year from September 15-1930.
Miss Wessie Tipping, B»A.,M.A., Instructor in French, for
one year from September 15-1930.
RESIGNATIONS:
Theodore H. Boggs, M.A., Ph.D., Professor and Head of the
Department of Economics, Sociology and Political Science;
D.C.Harvey, B.A., M.A., Professor and Head of the Department
of History;     William E. Duckering, A.B., B.S., C.E.,
Professor and Head of the Department of Civil Engineering;
John C.Oliver,B.A..B.A.Sc..Instructor in Civil Engineering. The University buildings were planned to accommodate
fifteen hundred students.  This number was exceeded in the fall of
1927, and every year since that date the lack of adequate classroom,
laboratory, library and office space has become increasingly evident.
During the year under review, the congestion became so great that
the Board of Governors instructed the President to make a survey
ayf the situation and to submit a report thereon.  The data on which
-tuds reP°rt was based were collected by the Deans of the Faculties
!._, consultation with the Heads of Departments. The survey showed
that many of the classes were being conducted under very unfavourable conditions, notwithstanding the many minor adjustments that
had been made during previous years to increase the lectureroom
and laboratory accommodation. In certain of the Departments the
quality of the instruction was adversely affected as the result of
overcrowding and the consequent adoption of less effective methods
of teaching. In other Departments the number of students enrolled
in some of the courses far exceeded the number of seats available, -
a condition which continued to exist even after these classes had
been divided and sub-divided into from eight to fourteen sections.
In the laboratories the congestion was as serious as it
was in the classrooms. Here, too, the number of students in the
upper years was increasing and the limited locker space could not
be made to do additional duty. Furthermore, in the opinion of
many, this congestion constituted a serious fire hazard.  In this
opinion, however, the Provincial Fire Warden did not concur.
When the limits of economical adjustments were reached in
the utilization of space, in the re-arrangement of the time-table,
and in the imposition of heavier teaching loads on the professorial
staff, the Board of Governors decided to include in the supplementa
estimates items of capital expenditure sufficient to meet the more
urgent building requirements of the University. When these estimat
together with the memoranda on which they were based, v/ere submitte
to the Honourable the Minister of Education, he expressed his willingness to meet with the Board of Governors and with the Senate for
tho purpose of considering the more important questions v/hich the
memoranda of the Governors had raised. At these meetings, the
Minister stated that it was not possible for the Government to provide the accommodation requested. This being so, he suggested that
some form of limitation of attendance be adopted which would ensure
that the number of applicants granted admission to the University
would not exceed the number for which the Board of Governors could
provide the accommodation, equipment, and professorial staff requisite for proper instruction and essential to the efficient cond-
of the University. Following the amendment of the University Act v/hereby authority to determine the basis of limitation was vested in the Board
of Governors, and following the reduction in the legislative grant
to the University, the Board fixed the maximum First Year registration for the 1931-32 session at five hundred students in Arts and
Science and in Agriculture, and at fifteen in Nursing and Health.
The Board of Governors then appointed a Committee of Faculty
to draw up rules and regulations governing the admission of First
Year students for the following academic year.  The report of this
Committee, as amended and adopted by the Board of Governors, is
as follows:
"The number of First Year Students in the Faculty of Arts
and Science and the Faculty of Agriculture is limited to"
500. The number of First Year Students in Nursing and
Health is limited to 15.
Candidates will be admitted in order of the following
categories and in order of merit in each category.
All applications for admission must be in the hands of
the Registrar on or before Saturday, August 29th,1931.
Blank forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Offi c e._
1. Candidates who have obtained 60$ or over in the
complete British Columbia Junior Matriculation Examinations
Candidates who have obtained 60$ or over in the
complete British Columbia Junior Matriculation Examinations
in June 19 31 but who have supplementals, v/ill be allowed
to register provisionally.
(Note: The average in this as in all categories will
be determined by taking the mark obtained in
the first examination written in each subject.)
2. Candidates, not exceeding 50 in number, v/ho come from
districts in which Senior Matriculation is not offered, but
v/ho have obtained between 50$ and 60$ in the British Columbia
Junior Matriculation Examinations.
3. Candidates other than those admitted under 2 hereof
who have obtained between 55$ and 60$ in the complete British
Columbia Junior Matriculation Examinations. 4. Candidates who have failed to make a complete pass in
the First Year of The University of British Columbia or the
British Columbia Senior Matriculation Examinations but who
have obtained at least 9 units of University credit.
5. All other candidates with British Columbia Junior
Matriculation or equivalent.
6. Candidates who have attempted full First Year, University of British Columbia, or full British Columbia Senior
Matriculation, but who have obtained University credit for
I*»ss than 9 units.
7. All other candidates.
Note: Candidates v/ho have obtained exceptionally good
Matriculation standing in examinations other than
those of this Province will be given consideration."
The heavy cut in the grant to the University resulted in
drastic reductions in the appropriations to all Faculties and Departments.  Several vacancies in the professorial ranks were left
unfilled, and the staff of teaching and laboratory assistants was
considerably reduced.  As a result of this reduction, certain
courses were discontinued, others were suspended, and still others
were added to the list of those which were offered only in alternate
years.  Further, the number of options was reduced and the registration in certain of these was limited. Research work was adversely
affected in all Faculties.
The reduction in the legislative grant also necessitated
an increase of |25.00 per session in the tuition fees for undergraduate students.  The adoption of this policy, in so far as it
affected the more capable students was offset, in a measure at least,
by the establishment on the part of the Government of a generous
schiolarship fund which is administered by the Lieutenant-Governor-
in-Council for the benefit of students of ability who, on account
of lack of means, would otherwise be unable to attend the University.
The adoption of the policy of limitation is the outstanding event of the academic year.
All of which is respectfully submitted,
L.S.Klinck,
December 12th, 1931. President. REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR
REGISTRATION:
FACULTY OF ARTS and SCIENCE:
First Year	
Second Year	
Third Year	
Fourth Year	
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE:
Second Year	
Third Year ..„	
Fourth Year	
Fifth Year 	
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE (NURSING)
First Year •	
Second Year	
Third Year	
Fourth Year	
Fifth Year	
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE:
 First Year	
Second Year	
Third Year 	
Fourth Year	
Partial 	
GRADUATES:
Faculty of Arts and Science .....
Faculty of Applied Science ......
Faculty of Agriculture 	
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE: 	
Women  Men  Total
222
359
581
167
210
377
150
138
288
143
105
248
1494
1
104
105
-
73
73
w
54
54
M»
49
49
17
w
17
6
-
6
6
w
6
5
—
5
7
7
41
w
15
15
-
14
14
-
3
3
1
9
10
1
7
_8
32
54
86
-
8
8
1
12
13
49
22
71
71
T 0 •£■
Classification and Enrolment of Students
wtio) are not taking the full Undergraduate Courses.
Women Men Total
Summer Session, Arts and Science (1930)
(Degree Course) ........219
Extra-Sessional Classes
(Degree Course) • 22
Social Service
(Diploma Course)........ 9
Publio Health Nursing
(Diploma Course)........ IS
Occupational Course in Agriculture
(Diploma Course)........ -
Short Courses in Agriculture.  68
Evening Class in Botany  87
236
455
83
105
1
10
-
12
10
21
10
216
48
NATIONALITY OF THE STUDENTS:
The great majority of students, as in previous years,
are of British origin, although many other nationalities are
represented.  According to the number of students enrolled,
the order of the principal groups, exclusive of those who
are registered in the Teacher Training Course, is as follows:
American, Russian, Hebrew, Japanese, Swedish, Italian and
Chinese. While the cities of Vancouver, Victoria and New
Westminster continue to send a large number of students to
the University, the steadily increasing enrolment fromnany
widely separated centres in the Province is very gratifying.
Other provinces and other countries continue to send students
in numbers proportionate to previous years.  The following
tabulated summary indicates, in a general way, the geographical
areas from which our students are drawn:
(a) Vancouver 1250
(b) Victoria  128
(c) New Westminster  110
(d) Other provincial points   477
(e) Other provinces  .»..  42
(f) Other countries   5?
Total.. 2044
OCCUPATIONS OF PARENTS:
A study of the records of the occupations followed by
the parents of the students indicates that, while the mercantile
agricultural, and professional groups predominate, no important
profession, trade or calling is without representation.  The
following figures indicate the relative representation from a
few of the larger groups:
Merchants  112
Farmers  Ill
Doctors  74
Railroad Employees  66
Professional Engineers  53
Lawyers  45
Clergy  39 COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF ATTENDANCE AT THE UNIVERSITY
1928-29  to  1930-31.
Arts and Applied  Nurs- Agric-
Session  Science  Science  ing   ulture
Teacher Total Summer Short Grand
Training Winter Session Courses Total
Course  Session
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1316
1486
1580
259
266
289
41
52
35
50
41
63
62 1730
67 1904
71    2044
402
427
455
220
279
401
2352
2610
2900
H
o
Year
1929
1930
1931
B.A.
160
34
175
24
211
DEGREES CONFERRED
14
1929
M.Sc.or
M.A.Sc-
to
B.
B,
1931.
.Sc. or
•A •Sc.
B.A.Sc
Nursing
M
.s.
A.
B.S.A.
Total
1
31
5
6
1
1
9
1
223
42
1
27
3
6
1
1
7
1
228
31
2
39
7
2
13
308 11
LOCATION OF THE GRADUATES:
—PM—I      ■Hill     ——#wOWWMH   ..■■■■■HIIW.I.WWIII—    IH'      UN— IM—I1I III   ■■■
Number in Vancouver ...,  1149
Number in other parts of British Columbia.. 613
Number in other Provinces of Canada ....... 135
Number in United States of Amerioa • 166
Number in British Isles   19
Number in Australia  1
Number in India • 1
Number in South Africa •  4
Number in France  4
Number in South America • 2
Number in China  4
Number in Japan • • 8
Number in other countries  5
Number deceased   33
Number whose address is unknown  183
2305 GRADUATES
svn.uiui±c&iL±xa j  FELLOWSHIPS and BURSARIES AWARDED TO „.w ~^~
During the year many scHolarships", 'fellowships and bursaries have been won by graduates of
the Un.iversityr TV.e following list does not include awards which have been made in Die
University of British Columbia:
Ifame
7^-uderson,Elmer 0«
BlakeyjDorothy
f
Campbell,Mildred H.
Fisher,Mary Jean
Fleming.,  R.H.
GrahamjRoy
Grantr Donald B.
Gibson,James A.
GraysKenneth R.
Hart,,Josephine F.L.
Hebb, Malcolm H.
Itter, Stuart
Itter, Stuart
Laing, Lionel H.
McPhail,Murohie K.
Marshall>H„Borden
Marshall ,H.Bord en
More,Kenneth R.
Morley, Frank S.
Munn,. Russell R.
Ormsby.Ma:   it
Poole. Ai:   R*
Award
Teaching Fellowship
Travelling Scholarship Canadian
Federation of Univ'.Women
Research Council Studentship
Special Open Fellowship (and tuition)
Research Assistant
Fellowship
H.R.MacMillan Scholarship
Rhodes Scholarship (3 yrs.)
National Research Council Bursary
National Research Council Bursary
Teaching Fellowship
Research Fellowship
Research Fellowship
University Fellowship
Research Council Studentship
Scholarship
National Research Council Bursary
Teaching Fellowship
I. CD.E.Fellowship
Scholarship,Library School
Fellowship
Assistantship
Teaching Fellowship
Commonwealth Fund Fellowship(3yr.)
National Research Council Fellowship
(2 yrs.)
Stevenson   l S.
Warren,Ha   /".
Williams5    H.
#Not a   ;ed.
Value    jholarships9 fellowships, and bursaries won by
other Universities and in Institutes in 1931
Value Subject   Where Tenable
f750 "Physics Univ. of California"
1250 English Univ. of London
750 Zoology
500 Math.   Toronto Univ.
1200 Chemistry Univ..of California
500 Geology  Univeof Chicago
1000 Economics Orient
1200 History  Oxford
750 Chemistry
500 Soology
800 Physics  Univ.of Wisconsin
(700) Chemistry John Hopkins Univ.
900 Biochemistry Washington.
550 History  Harvard University.
750 Zoology
(750) Chemistry Stanford University.
750 Chemistry
750 Physics  Univ.of California.
16 0 0 Hi s t ory  Ed i.r<h urgh.
1000 Columbia Univ.
860 History  Bryn Mawr
750 Math. California Institute
of Technology.
800       Massachusetts Inst.
of Technology.
3000 Geology Calif ar*)* a Institute
of Technology.
Univ. of Chicago.
our graduates in
H
$21,610.00
Total
i of scholarships, fellowships, and bursaries won by our
graduates in other Universities and in Institutes since
the first awards were made in 1917  «•«..	
$427,750.00
S.W.Mathews,
Registrar. 13
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF
ARTS AND SCIENCE.
Changes in Courses.
There were few changes in courses in the session
1930-31. About the only changes were those in connection
with the Commerce Course.  A course in Economic Geography
was added as an obligatory subject in the Second Year.  The
temporary arrangement, pending an appointment in Geography,
to have the course given by the Department of Economics but
controlled (nominally) by the Department of Geography is
working harmoniously.  Mathematics 3 (Mathematics of Finance)
previously given only in alternate years was likewise made
an obligatory subject in Second Year Commerce and now has
to be offered every year. This is a large class and a considerable amount of extra work is involved in giving the
class each year.
Changes in Passing Mark.
The passing mark for Junior Matriculation was raised
from a 40 per cent, minimum and average of 50$ to the same
minimum with an average of 60$ or, as before, 50$ in each
subject.  This rule will come into operation in June 1932.
No change was made in Senior Matriculation inasmuch as the
passing mark there would necessarily have to be the same as
in First Year Arts.  It is anticipated that in the near future,
the passing mark in both the First and Second Years will be
raised to a straight 50$ in each subject.
Researches and Publications.
■nn m^n..,.,,,^. ■.,■„„„„»», ■ ■ „—  —~. ■«,„■, „...,„„ ,.„„.,„„i, ,~..i ■„„„ „„„■„■.—***,,mmmmm«-tm--W ,■—,■-■■ Mil-	
Attention is directed to the researches and publications of the various departments, details of which are submitted
elsewhere. These researches were carried out by instructors
v/ho all carried a full teaching load and several in addition
had the many administrative tasks incident to running a Bepart-
ment or serving on the increasing numbers of committees. Attention is also directed to the many outside lectures given by the
staff, the details of which are to be found in the Report of
the Extension Committee. 14
Exchange Students.
During the session the University had tv/o Exchange
students from the East, Miss Catherine Fish and Miss Althea
Banfield.  Both are from the University of Toronto. British
Columbia did not send any students under the Exchange scheme
this year.
Withdrawals at Christmas.
The following numbers were asked to withdraw because
of their poor standing at the Christmas examinations:
First Year        Second Year
Total in Year 547 374
Number withdrawing 24 9
This was a much better showing than the previous year when the
results were:
First Year       Second Year
Total in Year 587 350
Number withdrawing 58 14
The minimum mark required has been the same for several years,
a total of 40$.
At the opening of the session each year I send a
circular letter to the parents of all the First Year students
pointing out the pitfalls into which the unwary students
invariably fall.  The "new freedom" from the constant supervision of the High School leads too many to start too late
to "get down to work", and the new environment affords too
many avenues for activities which are not always academic or
curricular.  The parents are particularly urged to exercise
a restraining control over the "social activities" of their
offspring partially committed to the care of the State for
educational purposes. It is also suggested that the students
in their homes be given time to study and a place where the
distractions of modern inventions will not frustrate a diligent
effort to acquire the art of concentration.
In spite of this paternal advice to parents, mirable
dictu,! I have not yet received any letters which contain
anything but offers of heartiest cooperation nor have I as
yet seen any adverse comments either in the "Common Round" or
in "Letters to the Editor" of the Sunday Province concerning
my paternal appeal. 15
Mid-term examinations are held about the end of
October for all First Year students.  In certain cases standings
at mid-term are based upon weekly tests, laboratory exercises, etc.
All failures (under 50$) are reported to my office. If a candidate fails in three or more of the five subjects, a,note is
sent to the parent stating this fact.  The student is called
into the Dean's office - somewhat of an ordeal for both concerned.
In the majority of the interviews I have had v/ith First Year
students I found that a little encouragement was more effective
than much chiding.
During the year the Fraternities and the Students'
Council contributed effectively in reducing the "wastage" at
Christmas.  "Rushing" now is not permitted during the Fall term
but only after the Christmas examinations. While probably not
many students were affected by "rushing", those who were "rushed"
were much affected.  The inauguration and enforcement of eligibility rules for participation in sports have acted as a deterrent
along physical lines and a...stimulus along mental lines to tho se
whose physical development seems to be outstripping their mental
achievement.
Accommodation
Hany of the classes during the session v/ere filled to
overflowing.  This was particularly true of Biology 1, English 2,
Chemistry 2, and certain courses in Commerce, to specify only a
few.  Limitation in numbers, either in certain years as a whole or
in certain subjects is a physical necessity with the present
accommodation, staff and equipment.
Graduate Facilities.
Increasing numbers of candidates are presenting themselves for graduate work.  In certain Departments where Assistant-
ships are available candidates usually take two years to complete
the work for the Master's degree. The great majority of our M.A.
students proceed to postgraduate work elsewhere usually with
scholarships.  Their achievements in the Graduate schools of
Eastern Canada, United States, Great Britain, France and Germany
bring great credit to the University of British Columbia. With the
necessary curtailment in assistantships there v/ill no doubt be a
diminution in the numbers of graduate students in future.
Lack of space in the Library and a diminution in the
Book appropriations seriously hamper graduate work in those Departments for which the Library is the laboratory.
Respectfully submitted,
D. Buchanan,
Dean. 16
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF
APPLIED SCIENCE.
I. The General Policy of the Faculty outlined in
the Calendar for Applied Science remains unchanged.
The higher standard of scholastic attainment
required for entrance into Applied Science has been put
into effect.  It is hoped that this will reduce the
failures in Second Year Applied Science, and also keep
down the number of students to what can be handled properly
by our present accommodation and staff.
The policy of gradual improvement of equipment
that has been followed to the present has been replaced
for reasons of economy by an endeavour simply to maintain
our present degree of efficiency.
It is obvious that the closest possible touch
should be maintained between the departments and the
industries.  It is gratifying to note that this intimate
relationship is developing.  An improvement in this
respect is marked in Forestry.
2.*  New Courses.
A field trip has been introduced in Forestry and
several new courses have been introduced in Electrical and
Mechanical Engineering.  The Double Course in Nursing
leading to the degree of B.A. and B.ASc inaugurated this
year gives promise of fulfilling the purpose for which it
was instituted, explained in the report for last year.
3^.  More Important Changes in Courses.
In general courses are modified gradually in
accordance with developments in the science or the demands
of industry and art.  Often it is merely a change in
emphasis placed upon the various aspects of the subject. 17
There is a growing emphasis upon principles and the
economic factors and less and less upon technique, The
latter is too changeable, and too readily acquired outside
the University, to be worth much time within it.
Forestry 10 has been strengthened by adding a half
unit.
Mining 6 has been altered from a course in Mining
draughting to one of designing, reading and seminar. The
new magnetic separator has enabled magnetic separation to
be added to the course in ore-dressing.
In Nursing and Health progress has been made in
incorporating short courses, given by outside lecturers
into long courses given by the permanent staff, and in the
substitution of regular courses in other departments for
special courses for Nursing students.
4_. On account of insuperable time-table difficulties
Economics I has been dropped from the course in Geological
Engineering.  As explained in the preceding paragraph,
several short courses for nurses have been dropped.
5.   (a)    Including first year science students, enrolled
in First Ye&r Arts, about 450 students are in attendance for
Applied Science work.
The distribution of students in the various
departments for the last three years is shown in the following table:-
Registration by Departments
Department
Fourth Ye
ar
Fifth Ye
ar
'28-29
'29-30
'30-31
/
'28-29
'29-30
'30-31
Chem. Eng.
4
3
9
I
6
5
4
Chemistry
L
1
Civil Eng.
3
6
5
i
6
2
5
Elect.Eng.
13
13
13
9
10
7
Mech.Eng.
7
16
12
3
6
14
Forest Eng.
1
4
2
3
1
5
Geolog.Eng.
8
8
2
2
8
5
Mining Eng. )
■
Me tall.Eng. j
8
6
11
3
2
7
Nurs ing
7
8
5
/
6
6
r, 18
While the number of students in a Department to some
extent reflects the state of the industry a oouple of years
earlier, a certain degree of stability in the distribution of
students seems to have been reached, if one groups together
Electrical and Mechanical: and Geology, Mining and Metallurgy.
Within t-ach of these groups the students pass freely from one
branch to the other apparently according to the relative demands
of industry for graduates in each.
(b) Chemical Engineering is once more attracting students
in numbers and is feeling the lack of accommodation for senior
students.
Space needs of Electrical, Mechanical and Civil Engineering were stated in last year's report.  An office for the
Assistant to the Dean has been arranged in the dark store-room
219.  While unsatisfactory, it does make it possible for him
to work with a student undisturbed.
(c) The Machine Shop in Mechanical Engineering has become
an asset to the University, and it is now possible to manufacture
some of the equipment needed in the University.
The small Machine Shop in the Mining Laboratory is now
supplying some of the Department needs.
(d) The training furnished by the courses Civil 30 and 31
which Professor Duckering was brought here to install, is making
itself felt throughout the Faculty.
An improvement in the English of the students particularly in their essays and theses is already noticeable as the
result of the work done by Mr. Ker.   This experimental work
is giving promise of success.
(e) The beneficial result of a higher standard for entrance
into Applied Science seems to be shown by the drop in failures
in the Second Year.  This year the total failures ves?3?e thirty-
two against fifty-two the preceding year in classes of about
the same size.  The preceding year forty failed at Christmas and
twelve at the spring examination.  This year for several reasons
only sixteen were dropped at Christmas, with the result that the
spring failures rose to sixteen.
(f) Mention should be made of the good work done by the
student societies, the Chemical Society, the Forest Club, the 19
Student Branch of the Engineering Institute of Canada, the
Radio Club and the Dawson Geological Discussion Club.  These
give them training in preparing and delivering papers and
debating, and enable them to meet and listen to outside men
who are engaged in professional work.  They are brought into
close contact with their professors, with one another and
with leaders in the professions and industries.  They all
seem to be in a healthy condition.
Respectfully submitted,
R.W.Brock,
Dean. 20
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE.
The year just closed has been marked by a definite
curtailment of activities, especially in the field experiments.
For the past five months the Faculty has been operating on a
basis of approximately $100,000.00 per annum for current expenditure.  This compares with about $129,500.00 for the previous
year.  Consequently, all development work has been brought to
a standstill.
Outside Activities Curtailed.
The reduction in the legislative grant necessitated
curtailment in all Departments to the point where certain
materials necessary to effective teaching are no longer available.
In the Departments of Agronomy and Horticulture,
very limited plantings were made this year. All crops in the
ground and all perennial crops were given as much attention as
funds would allow.   Due to the shortage of labour, the Department of Horticulture found it impossible to harvest, dry, sort
and replant about one-half acre of home grown tulip bulbs of
popular varieties.  In all Departments, areas of ground which
previously had been cultivated have been seeded to grass and
clover.
Men Retired.
Regret is expressed at the necessary retirement of
eleven trusted employees in the outside Departments. Some of
these men have found it necessary to seek unemployment relief.
Regret is also expressed at the necessary retirement of two
members of the inside staff. Both of these men had given more
than eight years of service to the University of British Columbia
and both of them had served in the forces overseas.
Researches in Relation to Teaching,
With the exception of those projects that are being
brought to a conclusion, all researches now under way have a
direct relation to teaching.
Undergraduate Registration.
It may be of interest to note that even though in the
minds of the public the future of the Faculty was uncertain for 21
some months, the registration in undergraduate work promises
to be maintained. A number of British Columbia matriculants
have registered in Agriculture in eastern institutions; but,
in spite of this, the prospects for registration for next year
are particularly bright. Several students now doing senior
matriculation work have expressed their intention of registering
in the Faculty of Agriculture.
Post-Graduate Registration.
It is very gratifying to note that the number of
students registering for post-graduate work is increasing steadily.  Men of experience and accomplishment who have been working
on the Experimental Farms and in technical branches of the Civil
Service are among those registered.
Agriculture in the High Schools.
During the year Agriculture has been recognized by
the Department of Education as a subject of Senior Matriculation.
Manuals for Agriculture 1, 2 and 3 of the High Schools have been
prepared and printed by the Department of Education,  This
appears to be a milestone in the history of agricultural education in this Province.  Even though Agriculture has been
recognized as a subject in the High School Course of Study, no
provision has been made to date for the training of teachers
to give instruction in it; nor are graduates in Agriculture who
have completed the Teacher Training Course granted tho Academic
Certificate. These steps are advisable if marked progress is
to be made in agricultural education.
Assisted Researches.
The work on "Poultry Paralysis," v/ith assistance
from the National Research Council, has been continued. Some
progress has been made.  The work on "Feed Flavours", with
assistance from the National Research Council, has been brought
to a conclusion.  The report is being submitted to Ottawa.  The
work on "Cheese Ripening", under the Empire Marketing Board, has
been vigorously prosecuted.  The Powell River Company renewed
its grant for pulp and paper research.  The findings to date
have warranted a further extension of the grant into the coming
year.
Alfalfa Improvement.
The years of v/ork with alfalfa have brought gratifying
results.  tfe now have scores of alfalfa plants that spread by 22
underground root stocks.  However, the multiplication and
distribution of these plants is not possible with our present
appropriation.  Consequently, further action with regard to
this project must be left in abeyance.
The Farm Survey.
The intensive study of farms has been continued. We
now have business records on more than 400 farms for a period
of ten consecutive years.  These data are the basis of .the
teaching work in Farm Management, and also in Agricultural
Economics A.  It is hoped that some means will be found by
which this work can be continued; and, further, that provision
will be made whereby tft^ee valuable data may be compiled, interpreted and published for the information of the farmers of
the Province.
Respectfully submitted,
F.M.Clement,
Dean. 23
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN.
As Dean of Women I beg to submit the following
report of the work in my Department for the year 1930-1931.
As usual, this report must be somewhat general and informal
in character and may be summed up under the following general
headings:  Academic, Housing, Student Organizations, Employment, Social, Vocational, General; and as usual, since the
Dean of Women cannot strictly be said as yet to have a
department, I must report on my own personal work.
ACADEMIC.:  As a member of the Department of English I taught
a class of v/omen students.
In connection with the work and general interests
of the women students, I was consulted on the average each
month by something over 250 persons - students, parents and
professors.
HOUSING:   I inspected boarding houses for out-of-town students.,
a'dVised regarding the housing of the women students and of a
number of the men, kept closely in touch with house-holders to
ensure that, as far as possible, the discipline and conditions
of a well-conducted home prevail in their houses.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS:  As Honorary President of the Women's
Undergraduate Society and the Literary Forum and as faculty
representative on the Panhellenie Council^ I attended meetings,
advised in the arrangement of programs and in other matters,
and at the request of the student organizations, addressed
eighteen of their meetings.  The experiment initiated by the
sororities, of "bidding" through the office of the Dean of
Women, has gone beyond the stage of experiment and has reduced
the friction inseparable from the bidding period, to a minimum.
A revision of the Constitution of the Panhellenie Council will
reduce still further the weak features of the sorority system.
In spite of all possible effort, however, I am increasingly
convinced that the disadvantages of the fraternity life in our
University greatly outweigh the advantages both in number and
in kind and that the opposition to the system so frequently
expressed on our own campus and in other universities is well
founded. 24
EMPLOYMENT:  Requests for assistance in procuring part time
employment during the academic year and full time during the
vacation were almost twice as many as during any previous year.
Unfortunately,, work was obtainable in inverse ratio. However,
positions were secured for a number of students who gave light
services for room and board, took care of children, tutored
backward or delicate children, and who performed other services
by which they earned the whole or part of their way through
college.  A number of girls were placed also in the summer
hotels and camps, in housework, in stores, in the Y.W.CA. and
in other work which made possible their return to the University.
SOCIAL.:  In the capacity of ohaperon I attended the majority
of the functions organized by the students under the name of
the University and was consulted by them in their preparations.
I may be permitted in this connection to quote from my report
to you last year, "Complaints are voiced, sometimes, about the
excessive social life in our University, but, as a matter of
fact, there are more unsocial or socially inexperienced girls
than oversocial.  A special effort has been made to interest
such girls in one of the student activities, and also to bring
them together under conditions which will break down the
inhibitions caused by timidity, super-sensitiveness, lack of
money and other causes. It need not be recorded that due care
has been taken in this connection not to encroach upon the
study time of the students concerned."
At Thanksgiving and at Christmas, arrangements were
made that all the out-of-town women students who could not go
home had an invitation for part of the vacation from some place
in the city. In this work I was assisted by the Convener of
the Student Welfare Committee of the Faculty Women's Club and
by the President of the Women's Undergraduate Society.
I kept in touch with students who were ill, or in
financial or other distress.
I assisted also in securing loans for women students
and placed gifts of money, clothing and text books from the
University Women's Club, McGill Women's Association and other
sources with deserving students who were not entirely successful in their efforts to earn their way through, and others
who were unexpectedly in need.
VOCATIONAL:  Much time was spent in discussing with parents
and in advising students regarding the choice of vocations, giving
them literature, information regarding the number of openings, the
necessary preparation and where it can be obtained, the demands
of the work, the financial and other rewards, the promotional 25
possibilities,etc.
GENERAL:    During the year I  served on the Committee  of the
National Council  of Education and on the National Executive
of the Canadian Federation of University Women,  and the Executive of the Pan-Pacific Women's Association.
I attended the meeting of the National Association
of Deans of Women held in Detroit and on the return journey
delivered addresses to University Women's Clubs and Women's
Canadian Clubs in Toronto, Winnipeg, Regina and Calgary. I
attended also as head of the Canadian delegation the second
conference of the Pan-Pacific Women's Association held in
Honolulu.
I addressed also some 17 meetings  in Vancouver and
nearby places,  including Bellingham,  Tacoma and Portland.
Among the interesting women who as Dean of Women
I entertained last year may be mentioned the party of British
Head Mistresses;  Miss Neurotsos of Oxford;    Miss Lav/ of the
National Couniitee  of the Y.W.C.A., New Zealand;    Miss Kaufman,
General Secretary of the Y.W.C.A.,Tokyo;  Miss Laila Scott
of Trinity College,  Toronto and President  of  the Canadian
Federation of University Women, and Miss Dodd, Dean of Women,
of the University of Alberta.
A few of the events of interest among  the v/omen
students during  the last year were  their voting,  after a very
warm contest,  to adhere to the decision of eight years ago
not to permit smoking among v/omen on the campus,  and at University functions*     their raising of approximately $1000 toward
the much desired Women's Building;   the improving  of the  dignified
but friendly ceremony of welcome which has  taken the place
of  the  old barbaric form of initiation; and the winning by
the Alpha Gamma Delta of the prize for scholarship in competition
with the other forty-four chapters of  this Fraternity.       It may
be  of value in this connection to record that in addition to
Miss Dorothy Blakey,   the winner of the Canadian Federation of
University V/omen's Scholarship,  there were  three other candidates
of unusual merit from this University.     This is  the largest
number that has been considered from a single university in a
single year during the  ten years history of the scholarship.
Respectfully submitted,
Mary L.Bollert,
Dean. 26
PJSPORT  OF  Tirg DIRECTOR QF_ THE SUI-irHR SESSION
STAFF
Dr. D. Buchanan, Director.
Biology 1 (3 units) - Dr. F. Dickson; Miss M.Halliday; Miss
M. Ashton.
Chemistry 1 (3 units)- Dr. W.F.Seyer;    Dr. W. Ure.
Economics 1 (3 units)- Dr.  C.W.Topping.
Economics 6 (3 units)- Professor G.F   ^rummond.
Education 2 (3 units)- Dr.  J.W.Hedley (Normal School,  Regina).
Education 3 (3 units)- Dr.  John MacDonald  (Univ.  of Alberta).
English 1       (3 units),      English 2  (  3 units)
English 14    (1 l/2 units)Tfflglish 9  (  1 1/2 units)
- Dr. F1.C.Walker; Mr.  Hunter C.Lewis; Miss D,
Mawdsley;  Mr.  E.A.Birney.
English 17  (1 l/2 units)- Dr. G.  G.  Sedgewick.
French 1      (3 units)  - Mme. Darlington.
French 2       (3 units)  - Dr. D.O.Evans.
History 1    (3 units)  - Professor A.L.Burt (Univ. of Minnesota)
History 13  (3 units)  - Professor A.CCooke.
Latin lb, 2b  (3 units)-Professor L. Robertson.
Mathematics 1(3 units)-Dr. D. Buchanan;  Professor L.Richardson.
Philosophy 4 (3 units)-Professor J. Henderson.
Physios  1     (3 units)     -Physics 2  (3  units)-Dr.H.Grayson-Smith;
Mr.  A.C.Young. 27
ENROLMENT, NUMBER WRITING EXAMINATIONS, ETC
YEAR
MROLLED
WROTE
EXAMINATIONS   COMPLETED YEAR
WITHDREW
PARTIAL
14
11
..
.,
FIRST
164
158
26
(1 Nursing)
3
SECOND
134
133
16
~
THIRD
37
36
12
-.
FOURTH
36
35
9
(ana 1 from Finl&t Year
1 n  Second n
1 "  previous session)
GRADUATES
52
42
1 (M.A.)
-
SOCIAL SERVICE 4
4
4
69"
**
441
419
3
ENROLMENT AT SUMMER SESSIONS  1926- 1931:
Total
Year
Enrolment
1926
438
1927
487
1928
402
1929
427
1930
458
University
Courses
385
448
357
383
Commercial
Work
53
39
45
44
(Commercial work no longer taken
in connection with University -
all students enrolled for University work).
1931
441 REGISTRATION BY COURSES
Biology  1
57
Chemistry 1
16
Economics 1
Economics 6
41
19
Education 2
Education 3
74
39
English  1
English  2
English  9
English 14
English 17
33
55
23
15
31
French   1
French   2
47
33
History  1
History 13
44
54
Latin  1 b
Latin  2 b
10
13
Mathematics 1
75
Philosophy 4
33
Physics    1
Physics    2
8
9
Reading Courses
PREPARATORY READINGS.
Examinations on the preparatory readings were waived
on May 13.  All candidates were allowed to register for 6
units who would have been allowed to register for this number
if they had passed the preparatory examinations.
The following table shows the number who passed in
five or more units without taking the preparatory examinations THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMER SESSION 1931.
SUMMARY OF RESULTS OF STUDENTS TAKING MORE THAN 4 l/2 UNITS OF WORK
WITHOUT PREPARATORY READING
Year
No.of students
taking 5-6 units Passed   Passed 3 or  Failed
of New Work 6 units 5 l/2 units 5 units all units raore Units   all units.
First
19
18
Second
49
41
Third
14
14
Fourth
14
14
1
10
7
2
5
41
8
-
ro
«5
-
13
-
1
-
14
-
-
96
87
78
15 30
The above figures lead one to consider whether
or not the preparatory readings in a course would be sufficient
without requiring preparatory examinations, particularly when
there is uncertainty as to the offering of a course until the
registration for that course has been completed.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT...
The Budget for the Summer Session was as follows:
Teaching Staff (Including
travelling expenses up to $400.00)     $ 11,600.00
Stenographic Assistance - 2 mos.
(For Faculty) .................. 150.00
Stenographic Assistance
(Registrar's Office) 900.00
Clerical Assistance
(Library)  200.00
Supplies  (Director's Office) 50.00
Supplies & Expense
(Registrar's Office) 200.00
Examination Expense
(Registrar's Office) 150.00
$ 13,550.00
In view of the fact that the Special Grant of $4000
towards the Summer Session had been discontinued, the fees were
raised from $23 to $26 per 3 units.
Total fees collected      $ 15,180.95
Total Expenditure .................       12 631.25
Surplus....     $ 2,549.70 31
In concluding this report the Director wishes to
record his appreciation of the splendid spirit manifested
by the staff inasmuch as they began and continued the work
for two weeks before they knew for a certainty that there
would be a Summer Session; and his appreciation of the
students who changed their plans as to courses without
demur although not without great disappointment.
Respectfully submitted,
D. Buchanan,
Director. 32
REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE.
The Report of the Library Committee to the Senate
was issued as a separate publication in September last.  This
Report was received and adopted by the Senate and by the Board
of Governors early in the 1931-32 session.
REPORT OF THE EXTENSION COMMITTEE.
The period covered by the Report submitted by Dr.O.J.
Todd, Secretary of the Committee, is from April 1st., 1930
to March 31st., 1931.
Exclusive of 22 radio addresses, the number of lectures
delivered was 257.  The total attendance reported was 21,824.
Arranged according to districts, these lectures were distributed
as follows:-
Vancouver
136
North Vancouver
4
New Westminster )
Burnaby        )
Strawberry Hill )
15
White Rock     )
Cloverdale     )
Hall's Prairie )
Rest of Fraser
Delta
31
Okanagan Valley
& Oliver
20
Kootenays
6
United States
10
Manitoba, Alberta,
Ontario.
6
Victoria
18
Upper Island
10
West Vancouver
1
To tal...
257 33
REPORT  OP  THE ACTING-HEAD OF  THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE
I have the honour to submit the annual report  of
the University Health Service,   consisting of  the reports  to
me  of the Medical Examiner  of Students and of  the Public
Health Nurse:
a. Report  of  the Medical Examiner  of  Students.
b. Report of  the Public Health Nurse.
Respectfully submitted,
H.W.Hill,
Acting-Head.
REPC3T OF THE MEDICAL EXAMINER OF STUDENTS
I have the honour to submit the annual report upon
the physical examinations of the students of the First Year,
those of other years who entered the University this year
for the first time, women participating in major athletics,
and certain other students v/hose physical condition v/as distinctly unsatisfactory last year.
In reviewing the statistical report, it is interesting
to note that the average height, v/eight and chest expansion
of the men are slightly greater than of those examined last
year. In the case of the v/omen, though the height and chest
expansion are greater than those•of last year, the average
v/eight is less, due no doubt to the prevailing fashion among
the women.
The posture and the reaction of the hearts to exercise were not quite so good this year.
The number of those studying under the handicap of
defective vision uncorrected by glasses continues to be large
and among the men, many have defective teeth.  These and the 34
students having other minor defects have been reported for checking by the nurse next autumn, while those with major defects will
be re-examined by the medical examiners.
All in need of treatment have been referred to their
respective private physicians and dentists.
As in former years, great need is shown for physical
training among the student body, those taking part in athletics
being easily distinguishable from the others. As usual, the general complaint is lack of sufficient time for exercise.  Too much
time is wasted in riding in buses, motor cars and street cars.
Noon-hour lectures continue to rob the students of much needed
rest and recreation at the noon-hour.
Through the kindness of the authorities of the Vancouver General Hospital, the Out-patient Department was once
more made available for this work.
Respectfully submitted,
Harold White,
Medical Examiner of Students,
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY PUBLIC HEALTH NURSE.
I have the honour to present my fourth annual report
as part-time public health nurse of the University of British
Columbia.
Very excellent health conditions have prevailed in the
University during the year, and, although the usual opposition and
difficulties were encountered, the results obtained are fairly
satisfactory.
Very considerable publicity assistance has been rendered
by the Editors of the "Ubyssey", who have proved themselves to be
first-class Epidemiologists. Then, too, the members of the 35
Students'  Council have helped in many ways,  and are going  to
include Health Service information in tho"General Information"
section of tho Student Handbook for the 1931-32 session.  This
is a great concession and will facilitate our public health
efforts very much indeed.
FIR3T AID AND HEALTH DEPARTMENT:
Two thousand and nine persons received assistance
through the Health Service, including thirty-nine members of
the Faculty,   staff and workmen;   of  these, nine hundred and
sixty students wore  referred  to the   proper  agencies,   including
seven hundred and seventeen to tho University Medical Examiners,
One hundred and  twenty-three  students v/orc vaccinated
(twenty boing re-vacoihated)   against  smallpox;  ninety-four
Conscientious Objector Affidavit  Certificates wore  filed.
"Follow-up"  of contacts numbered 181.
I havo consulted with one hundred and twenty parents
and physicians on behalf of students,  and havt; received forty-
six written :uid verbal reports from physicians.    During the
year a marked reluctance was shown on tho part of certain
physici-^ns to  issue medical certificates to  students referred
to them "oj the Health Service for professional advice.     Conversely,  ono physician gave a certificate bearing the diagnosis
"Common Gold",-  the first I have over  seen,
.0AF1TERIA;
Proper rest-room and hand-cashing facilities for use of
the waitresses are still lacking.
Respectfully submitted
Cell- A.Lucas,
Public Health Nurse 36
REPORT ON TKE MAINTENANCE AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE CAMPUS
In connection v/ith the v/ork on the University Campus,
the current year may be considered somewhet unique for two
reasons.  In the first place, the "maintenance work" had to be
almost abandoned about the middle of the year.  In the second
place, in regard to new developments, the largest annual project
attempted since the University v/as established was initiated
and carried through to a reasonable stage of completion.
The severe cut in appropriations v/as responsible for
the first situation.  Watering and care of the lawn areas
oeased early in July and weeds became rampant in every direction.
The lawns dried up as never before and the whole place took on
a most neglected appearance which continued until the fall
rains restored things to almost normal condition.  Much of the
work slated to be taken care of during the year under the head
of "maintenance" was never started.
The Playing Fields' project, which required the raising of about seventeen thousand dollars for the construction
of student playing fields constituted the second important
factor.  Possibly the temporary setback in connection v/ith the
"maintenance work" was more than balanced by the implementation
of this one single project which will have a very definite
influence on the :Tdevelopment work" of the future in connection
with other parts of the campus, as well as on that large area
of swamp land lying immediately east of the Science and Library
blocks.
MAINTENANCE.
Although it was necessary to allow the regular maintenance work to go by the beard for the latter half of the year,
an effort was made in the earlier part to have the campus appear
at its best, particularly for the graduation exercises. A
special effort also was made during the rest of the summer to
keep alive, by watering, any recently planted trees and shrubs.
The working staff of seven or eight required to carry on under
normal conditions was reduoed to a 2-g- basis, i.e. five men
working half time only,
DEVELOPMENT WORK.
As already stated, the largest single development
project of any year v/as started on January 5th, 1931. The large 37
amount of fill required (twenty thousand cubic yards) to bring
the site of the "Playing Fields" to grade, necessitated the
removal of approximately ten thousand cubio yards of soil and
gravel from other parts of the Campus.  Over six thousand
yards of excellent gravel were removed from the north end of
the main Mall and some five thousand yards of soil from the
area and roadways just east of the Library.
The changes affected in the appearance of these
areas were very considerable and satisfactory. The cost for
this work v/as charged to the Playing Fields' project.
Following is a sy»~-r»sis of the work accomplished
during 1931.  The bare statement of materials handled will
indicate the volume of the work completed during the past ten
months.
SUMMARY OF THE IMPORTANT FEATURES CONNECTED
V/Ifil jgE PLAYING- FIELDS' PROJECT" AKD CAMPu5~
 gmmr gagi m 1951. ~~~
1. Yardage moved.
Amount of "fill" used to construct the playing fields
(Approximate)
Soil from the same site 8,500 yards
Soil from Campus areas 4,000 "
Gravel from Mall areas 6,000 "
Top soil 1,000 "
Cinders 200 "
Clay 100
1
2. Drainage - installed on the Playing Fields' area
18 inch concrete pipe
8 inch vitrified pipe
8 inch agricultural pipe
6 inch agricultural pipe
4 inch agricultural pipe
3 inch agricultural pipe
19.800
Tf
:a
950
feet
400
n
900
n
500
IT
5,500
II
600
"  P
8,850
tt 38
3.  Sprinkling System - installed on the Playing Fields' area.
4 inch iron pipe 100 feet
2-§- inch galvanized pipe 150 "
2 inch galvanized pipe 350 "
li inch galvanized pipe 1,250 "
1,850' "
4.  Roads - graded or constructed to a fair sub-grade
1 - East Mall 495 feet
2 - New road east of Playing Fields 1,100 "
3 - Farm Road 1,425 "
4 - Other roads partly graded 1,500 "
4,5'SO "
( The value of this road work is roughly $7,000.00)
5. Walks
Walks or paths on areas adjacent to the
Playing Fields (mostly cinder construction)
Along University Boulevard 700 feet
Science and Library Blocks, east side 555 "
Science and Library Blocks, through
the centre. 870 "
Other places 150 "
27275" "
6. Tennis Courts
One being a special gift by the Summer
Session Students' Association.
Two full match size day courts, value
approximately $1.000.00
7.  South Field for Cricket and Grass Hockey.
The grading finished and area seeded,
Spring 1931. 39
8.  Boulevard Strips elon/r the Fa;rm Axia Road
Graded, tile drained and planted with
shade trees.
9•  Tree Planting along Newly Graded Roads.
Laburnums along road west from barns to
Marine Drive;
Horse Chestnuts along road east from barns
to Wesbrook Crescent;
Oaks to complete planting along Main Mall.
10.  Farm Buildings.
Agronomy Building - grading and planting
in part;
Horticulture Building - planting in part.
The following data are also submitted for information:
Lawns
Total area on the Campus already sown
to lawns, temporary lav/ns, or graded
for the purpose of seeding down to
lawns (acres)
Of this 25-g- acres about 12 are seeded
down to permanent lawn mixtures.
25.63
Trees
Number of trees of all kinds, based on
a count made December 1931
750
Shrubs
Vines
Number of ornamental shrubs consisting of
several hundred different varieties and
including those used for hedge purposes.
5,500
Vines  consisting of about 7 different
varieties.
176 40
Rockeries, Rock Plants, Important Flower Groups
Some progress has been made during the
past few years in establishing these
features on the Campus but much more
remains to be done.
They are necessary for many reasons,
having definite uses in connection
with both the landscape plans,
the courses given in landscape v/ork
and in other v/ays.
Respectfully submitted,
F.E. Buck,
Associate Professor of
Horticulture. 41
REPORT OF THE OFFICER COMMANDING
CANADIAN OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA CONTINGENT
The activities and progress of the Contingent during
the year were normal.
The composition of the Committee on Military Education
remained unchanged with the exception that Lt.Col.H.F.G.Letson,M.C.
assumed command on the transfer of Lt.Col. H.T.Logan, M.C, to
the Reserve of Officers Canadian Militia at his own request.
All arms, stores, records, etc., were turned over in
excellent condition, and the discipline, training and efficiency
of the personnel was of the highest.order.
Capt.(Temporary Major) A.H.Finlay, M.C, returned to
his own unit at his own request. Major W.A.Carrothers, D.F.C.,
assumed command of "A" Company,
The following were granted commissions:
2./Lieut. J.L.Plant to R.C.A.F.
2./Lieut. W.Thornber to Vancouver Regiment and R.C.A.F.
Cadet N.C.O.'s G.Stead and W.W.Mathers to B.C.Regiment,
Cadet N.C.O. C.E.G.Brown to Vancouver Regiment.
At the opening of the training season Capt. G.E.Walls
and Q.M.S.I. W.J.Gibson, M.C, were detailed as instructors
to the Corps.  They were relieved in November by Capt. E.M.
MacBrayne and Q.M.S.I. A.H.Smith.  They gave most devoted and
excellent service.
The training of the Corps consisted of weekly parades
and lectures with a week-end at Victoria.
The following course of lectures was delivered:
(1) Col. Birdwhistie,V.D.  "Rifle Shooting".
(2) Capt. W.G.Colquhoun, M.C, "Mechanization".
(3) Lt.Col. H.F.G.Letson.M.C. "The Gallipoli Campaign". 42
The Corps carried out the usual musketry training and competed for the first time in the Inter-University Matches.
The annual inspection v/as held on 4th March.  The Corps
parading 8 officers and 61 O.R. out of a strength of 8 officers
and 74 O.R. The authorized establishment of this Corps is 133
all ranks. The Corps strength v/as therefore 62$ of the establishment.
In November 10 candidates presented themselves for examination by tho War Office for Certificate "A" and all were "successful.  In March 1931 seven candidates presented themselves and
six were passed.  In Certificate "B" six candidates wrote, four
passed and tv/o passed v/ith one supplemental. Members of the Corps
were successful in the R.C.A.F. training and also at the Small
Arms School.
The record of candidates from the Corps is among the highest of any University in the Empire.
A smoker and dance v/ere held during the season and both
proved very enjoyable.
The results of examinations, and other Corps training in
detail may be found in the Commanding Officer's Report and
Appendices 1 and 2.
The Officer Commanding v/ishes to record his appreciation
for the assistance and co-operation afforded him by the Chancellor,
the President, the Board of Governors, the Committee on Military
Education, the D. O.C.,M.D. No. 11 and Staff and the O.CI's
Artillery Bde. and B.C.Regiment.
Respectfully submitted,
H.F.G.Letson,
Officer Commanding. 43
PUBLICATIONS
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
Department of Bacteriology:
Dr. H.W.Hill.
"Wassermann and Kahn Reactions Fundamentally
Identical."
Vancouver Medical Association Bull., Feb., 1931.
"Bacteriological Diagnosis of Diphtheria"
B.C.Laboratory Bulletin, Feb., 1931.
"Bacteriological Diagnosis of Gonococcal Infections."
B.C.Laboratory Bulletin, March, 1931.
"Bacteriological Diagnosis of Tuberculosis."
B.C.laboratory Bulletin, April, 1931.
"Baoterial Examinations in Typhoid, etc"
B.C.laboratory Bulletin* May, 1931.
"Blood Cultures."
B.C.Laboratory Bulletin, June, 1931.
Dr. D.C.B.Duff.
"Detection of Indol in Bacterial Cultures,"
American Journal of Public Health,
Vol. XX, No.9, September, 1930.
Department of Botany:
Dr. A. H. Hutchinson and M.R.Ashton.
"The Effect of Radiant Energy on Growth and
Sporulation in Colletotrichum Phomoides."
Canadian Journal of Research, 3, 187-199- 1930.
"Specific Effect of Monochromatic Light upon
Plasmolysis in Paramecium."
Canadian Journal of Research, 4, 614-623 - 1931. 44
Dr. A. H. Hutchinson and CC.Lucas.
"The Epithalassa of the Strait of Georgia."
Canadian Journal of Research, complete number,
August, 1931.
Department of Chemistry:
Dr. William Ure and T.Bentley Edwards.
"The Rates of Intramolecular Change between Ammonium
Thiocyanate and Thiourea."
Trans. Royal Society, Canada, XXIV, (III) 153, 1930.
Denis W.Pearce and Dr, J.Allen Harris.
"A Study of the Absorption Spectra of Various Series
of Rare Earth Double Nitrates." Part I,
Trans. Royal Society, Canada, XXIV, (III),. 145, 1930.
Dr. J.Allen Harris:
"Studies in the Rare Earths - The Preparation of the
Bromates of Cerium Group Rare Earths."
J.Am.Chem. Soc, 53, 2475,. 1931.
Dr. W. F. Seyer and Eric Todd.
"The Critical Solution Temperatures of Normal Paraffin
Hydrocarbons and Sulphur Dioxide."
Jour. Ind. and Chem. Eng., 23, 325, 1931.
Dr» John Allardyce,
"The Determination of Cholesterol in Blood"
Can. Jour. Research, Vol. Ill, 125, 1930.
Dr. John Allardyce, R.H.Fleming. F.L.Fowler and Dr. R.H.Clark.
"Blood Normals for Cattle - Some Pathological Values."
Can. Jour. Research, Vol. Ill, 120, 1930.
R.H.Fleming. F.L.Fowler and Dr. R.H.Clark.
"Haematuria Vesioalis."
Can.   Jour.  Research,  Vol.  Ill, 125, 1930. 45
Dr. R.H.Clark and R.M.Archibald.
"The Action of Nitric Acid on Benzoic Acid in Magnetic
and in Electrostatic Fields."
Trans. Roy.Soc, Can., XXIV, 121, 1930.
Dr. R.H.Clark and X.R.Gray.
"The Addition of Hydrogen Bromide to Allyl Bromide
in Magnetic and Electrostatic Fields."
Trans. Roy. Soc, Can., XXIV, III, 1930.
Dr. R.H.Clark and E.G.Hallonquist.
"A Further Investigation of the Two Electromers of 2
Pentene."
Trans. Roy. Soc, Can., XXIV, 115, 1930.
Department of Economics;
Mr. H. F. Angus.
"Legal Status in British Columbia of Residents of Oriental
Race and their Descendants."
Canadian Bar Review, Feb., 1931.
"Pacific Relations."
Proceedings of the Canadian Political Science
Association, 1930.
"Canadians of Oriental Race."
Queen's Quarterly, July, 1931.
Dr. W.A.Carro the rs«
"Some Currenoy Problems in Relation to Mining."
The Miner, January, 1931.
"Indian Currency Reform and the Silver Problem."
The Miner, February, 1931.
"Stabilizing the Price of Silver."
The Miner, March, 1931.
Mr. J. F. Day.
"Cost Accounting in Relation to the Economics of
Today."
Magazine of Canadian Cost Accountants and Industrial
Engineers, May, 1931. 46
Mr.  G.F.Drummond.
"The Re-Monetization of Silver*"      Part I.
The Miner,    August, 1931*
"The Re-Monetization of Silver."      Part II.
The Miner, September, 1930.
"The Silver Situation."
The Miner, November, 1930.
"Statistical Chart Showing Relationship Between
Production and Price of Silver."
The Miner, December, 1930.
Dr. C.W.Topping.
"The Report of the Ontario Royal Commission on
Public Welfare, 1930.  Penal Reform, An International
Review of Penal Information, Vol. 1, No. 1, London.
"Culture,  Custom and Contact."
Social Welfare,  Vol. XIII,    No. 2, November,  1930.
Toronto.
Department of Education:
Dr.  G.M.Weir.
"Interim Report on the Survey of Nursing Education in
Canada."
June issue - Journal of the Canadian Medical Association.
Department of English:
Mr. T. Larsen.
"George Peele in the Chancellor's Court,"
Modern Philology,  November, 1930.
"The Growth of the Peele Canon."
The library, December, 1930. 47
"The Father of George Peele."
Modern Philology, November, 1930.
Dr. W.L.MacDonald.
"Daniel Defoe."
The Queen's Quarterly.
Department of Geology:
Dr. R.W.Brook.
"Batholithic Instrusion."
Proceedings of the Royal Society of Canada.
Dr. S.J.Schofield.
"The 'Coast Range Batholith of British Columbia."
Proceedings of the Royal Society of Canada.
Dr. M.Y.Williams.
"New Species of Marine Invertebrates, Fossils from
the Bearpaw Formation of Southern Alberta."
National Museum of Canada, Bull. 63, Pts. 1, and 11
"Sub-Surface Structure in Alberta and Saskatchewan."
Canadian Mining Journal, Vol. LI, No. 46, Nov.14, 1930.
"Geology of Southern Alberta and Southwestern Saskatchewan."
By- - Dr. M.Y.Williams and W.S.Dyer.
Canadian Geological Survey, Memoir, 163, 5 plates,
4 texts figures, 1930.
"Geological History of the Southern Plains of Canada."
Proceedings of the Royal Society of Canada.
Dr. M.A.Peacock.
"The Distribution between Chlorophaeite and Palagonite."
Geological Magazine, London, LXVII, 1930.
"On Crystallographic Classification"  (By - V.Goldsohmidt,
translated by Dr. M.A.Peacock from the German at the
request of Professor Goldschmidt./
American Mineralogist (Menasha, Wis.) XVI, 1931. 48
"Autonomous and Singular Nodes" - By V. Goldschmidt -
Translated by Dr. M.A.Peacock, American Mineralogist,
XVI, 1931.
"Classification of Igneous Rook Series."
Journal of Geology (Chicago) XXXIX, 1931.
"The Modoc Lava Field, Northern California,"
Geographical Review (New York), XXI, 1931.
Department of History:
Mr. D.CHarvey.
"George Etiene Cartier".
Ryerson Press Reader, Toronto.
Ryerson Press, 1930.
"The Loyal Electors, Ottawa."
Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada
Third Series, Vol. 24, Section II, 1930.
"Canadian Historians and Present Tendencies in
Historical Writing." Ottawa.
Report of the Canadian Historical Association, 1930.
Review:
"Responsible Government in Nova Scotia" - by W. Ross
Livingston.
The Washington Historical Quarterly, October, 1930.
Dr. W.N.Sage.
Book: "Sir James Douglas and British Columbia."
Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 1930.
"Sir James Douglas" in the Ryerson Canadian History
Readers:   Toronto, Ryerson Press, 1930.
"Simon Fraser, Explorer and Fur Trader" in Proceedings
of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical
Association, 1929. Los Angeles, MoBride Printing Co.1930, 49
"The Teaching History in the Elementary Schools of Canada"
Canadian Historical Association Annual Report, 1930.
Ottawa, 1930.
Review: "Two North West Company Documents in Canadian
Historical Review, Vol. XI, No. 2, June, 1930.
Review: "Frederick Niven",  Canada West Canadian Historical
Review, Vol. XI, No. 4, December, 1930.
Mr. F.H.Soward.
"Canada and the League of Nations." With a foreword by Sir
Robert Borden.    Ottawa -  League of Nations Society in
Canada, 1931.  Chapter One.
"Canada Enters the League of Nations" was republished
as an article in Interdependence, April, 1931.
"Ten Years of the League of Nations."
Kingston, Queen's Quarterly, Spring, 1930.
"President Polk and the Canadian Frontier."
Report of the Canadian Historical Assoc, 1930.
Review:  "The Dominions and Diplomacy by A.Gordon Dewey."
American Journal of International Law, Oct. 1930.
Review:  "The Survey of American Foreign Relations."
192*9.  Edited by Charles P.Howland.
Review:  "Economic Foreign Policy of the United States."
lSy- Benjamin H.Williams, in the Canadian Historical
Review, December, 1930.
Department of Mathematics:
Dr.D.Buchanan.
I— « ■■III,   III,.—IMIH   l^i ■  —  ■
"Periodic Orbits in the Problem of Three Bodies with
Repulsive and Attractive Forces. American Journal of
Mathematics, Vol. Ill, No. 4, Oot. 1930.
"Crossed Orbits in the Restricted Problems of Three
Bodies with Repulsive and Attractive Forces."
(Rendiconte' del Circolo Matematico di Palermo.)
"Semi-circular Orbits in the Restricted Problem of Four
Bodies with Repelling and Attracting Forces."
Trans. Royal Soc. of Canada. 50
Dr. F.S.Nowlan.
Book.  Analytic Geometry.
Department of Modern Languages:
Dr. D.O.Evans.
wle Roman Social Sous la Monarchie de Juillet."
Paris. (P.cart.) 166 pages.
Pepartment of Physics:
Dr. J. G. Davidson.
"Senior Matriculation Laboratory Manual for British
Columbia High Schools." (With the Oo-operation of
a Committee of High School Seaohers.)
Dr. G.M.Shrum.
"Some Experiments with Arcs between Metal Electrodes."
By- G.M.Shrum and H.G.WJest
Canadian General Eleotrio Co.  - Hew York.
Mr.   O.E.Anderson and Mr. K.R.More.
"The Arc Spectrum of Nitrogen."
Mr. A.CCreelman and Mr. A.C.Young.
"The Spectrum of the Corona Discharge in Oxygen,
Nitrogen and Air."
Department of  Zoology:
Dr.   C.McLean Fraser.
"The Razor Clam, Siliqua patula  (Dixon)  of Graham Island."
Queen Charlotte Group.
"Notes on the Ecology of  the Cookie,  Caraium corbis Martyn." 51
Mr. G.J.Spencer.
"The Oviposition Habits of Rhyncooephalus Saokenu, Williston."
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of British
Columbia.
"An Important Breeding Place of Clothes Moths in the Home."
Canadian Entomologist.
"On the Habits and Distribution of Cancer magister L. in
Clayoquot Sound."
Note: Research on the Commercial Crab. Sent in some
years ago, being published summer 1931 by
Biological Board of Canada as a Bulletin.
Mr. Geoffrey Beall.
"Observations on the Distribution and Habits of Fermites in
British Columbia."
Proceedings of Entomological Society of British Columbia.
Mr. Hugh Leech.
"Two short publications on Beetles."
Miss Mildred H.Campbell.
"Some Free-swimming Copepods of the Vancouver Island Region."
II.
Miss Josephine F.L.Hart.
"Some Cumacea of the Vancouver Island Region."
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE.
Department of Forestry:
"The Forest Club Annual." 52
Department of Civil Engineering,:
Mr. A.H.Finlay.
"A Contribution to a Technical Discussion1!
Published in the Transaction of the American
Society of Civil Engineers.
Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering:
Dr. H.Vickers.
"Rectification at Dry Contacts."
"Increment Losses in Direct Current Machines."
"Starting Conditions in Synchronous Machines and the
Calculation of Limiting Value of the Slip for
Pulling into Step."
American Institute of Electrical Engineers.
"An Analysis of the Synchronous Induction Motor."
American Institute of Electrical Engineers.
Mr. E.G.Cullwick.
"Magnetic Phenomena in Static Balancers."
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, New York,
(Accepted for Pacific Coast Convention in Vancouver.)
"Laboratory Manuals of Experiments."
Mr. W.B.Coulthard.
"Commutation in the Polyphase Commutator Motors."
Doctorate Thesis.  University of London.
Department of Nursing and Health:
Dr. H.W.Hill.
"Epidemiology of Tuberoulosis."
Western Hospital Review, Sep, 1930. (Presented June,
1930, before the\American Public Health Assoc. Western
Branch, Salt Lake- City.) 53
"Hereditary Susceptibility in Tuberculosis."
B.C.Laboratory Bull., Jan. 1931.
"Distinctive Tastes of Pasteurized and Raw Milk."
B.C.Lab. Bulletin, Feb. 1931.
Mjss Margaret E.Kerr.
"A Clean Newspaper, the Public Health Nurse's Friend."
Canadian Nurse. Jan. 1931.
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE.
Dean F.M.Clement.
"Some Economic Aspects of Agriculture'!
Published in the Dominion Mortgage and Investment
Year Book, 1930.
"Some Business Aspects of Agriculture."
Published in Industrial Canada, July, 1931.
Department of Agronomy.
Dr.D.G.Laird.
"Bacteriophage and the Root Nodule Bacteria".
Published in the Archiv fur Mikrobiologie, 1931
Gottingen, Germany.
Department of Animal Husbandry.
H.R.Hare and H.M.King.
"Swine Feeding Suggestions."
Mimeographed for U.B.C.Students and for Swine Breeders,1930. 54
Department of Dairying.
Dr.B.Eagles and Mr.W.Sadler.
"Nitrogen Distribution in Kingston Cheese-Ripening."
Published in "Nature" No. 3210, Vol. 127, pp.705-6,
London, 1931.
"Nitrogen Distribution in Kingston Cheese-Ripening."
Journal of Dairy Research, Cambridge.
Mr. Wilfrid Sadler.
"A Critical Appreciation of Orla-Jensen and His Work."
Copenhagen.
Dr. N.S.Golding.
"A Preliminary Report of the Substitution of Pilchard
Oil for Butterfat in Milk for Calf Feeding."
By T*A.Leach and Dr. N.S.Golding.
Scientific Agriculture,   Ottav/a.
Miss Hudsonand Mr. Mackenzie.
"The Cultural Characteristics of the Original atypical
strain of Aerobacter oxytooum recovered from corn silage"*
Canadian Journal of Research, pp. 200-204, Vol. 3,
September, 1930.
Dr. A. F. Barss.
"Effect of Moisture Supply on Development of Pyrus
Communis."
Published in the Botanical Gazette,  1930.
Department of Poultry Husbandry.
Dr.  1. *. S. Asmunfl a on ♦
"Experimental modification of the shape of the hen's
Proc Twenty-second Annual Meeting Poultry
Science Assoc, 1930, p. 21.
Effect of hormones on the formation of the hen's egg."
Poultry Science,"  Vol. X, (4); 157 - 165. 55
"Formation of the hen's egg" Part 1. Sci. Agric XI,
9, 590-606. Parts II and III Sc. Agric. XI (10),
662-680. Part IV, Sci. Agric XI (II): 775-788.
Messrs Lloyd, Asmundson. Riley and Biely.
"Feeding for Egg Production."
Revision, Bulletin No. 6, Dept. of Agr. Bull. 93.
Mr. E.A.Lloyd.
"Comparison of Laying Rations and Methods of
"eeding".
University Mimeograph Circular, March 31-1931.
"World's Record Producers."
Published in American Hews Weekly, May 10-1931.

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