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Report of the President of the University of British Columbia for the academic year ending August 31st.,… 1931

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Array f
/92 9 -3c
REPORT  OF  THE PRESIDENT
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR ENDING
AUGUST 31st» ,  1930.
W> Ml IW 'IIM*"i!P-»i-'inl»ii*i»'r^^ (I)
CONTENTS
Page
Letter of Transmittal  2.
Teaching Staff  3.
Promotions  3.
New Appointments  4.
Leave of Absence  4.
Substitutes for Members of Faculty on
leave of absence  5.
Resignations  .  5.
Registration ....  6.
Nationality of Students  7.
Points from which Students come :
(a) Vancouver  8.
(b) Points in British Columbia outside Vancouver. 8.
(c) Points in Canada outside British Columbia.... 9.
(d) Other Countries ...  9.
Occupations of the Parents of the Students enrolled.. 10.
Comparative Statement of Attendance 1915-16 to 1929-30 13.
Degrees Conferred 1916-1930  15.
Honorary Degrees Conferred  15.
Location of the Graduates  16.
Scholarships, Fellowships and Bursaries Awarded
to Graduates  17.
Publications  18.
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science. 30.
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science.. 34.
Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture   40.
Report of the Dean of Women  45.
Report of the Director of the Summer Session, 1930.... 48.
Report of the Library Committee  52.
Report of the Extension Committee   52.
Report of the Acting-Head of the University Health
Service  53.
(1) Report of the Medical Examiner of Students.... 55.
(2) Report of the Public Health Nurse   57.
Report on the Maintenance and Development of the
Campus  60. (2)
THE REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT.
To the Board of Governors and
the Senate of the
University of British Columbia,
Gentlemen:-
I have the honour to submit the following
report on the work of the University for the academic
year ending August 31st., 1930.
Information relative to registration, attendance, graduation, and other related subjects has been
prepared by the Registrar. The reports of the Deans
appear in full. All other reports have been considerably
condensed.
Respectfully submitted,
L. S. KLINCK
December 12th, 1931. President. (3)
TEACHING STAFF:
President
1
Deans and Heads of Departments
3
Professors and Heads of
Departments
18
Professors
19
Associate Professors
30
Assistant Professors
18
Dean of Women and Assistant
Professor
1
Instructors
18
Assistants
32
Research Assistants
5
Honorary Lecturer
1
Lecturers in Public Health .
(Part-time)
15
Lecturers in Social Service
(Part-time)
3
Lecturers in Teacher Training
(Part-time)
5
169
Substitutes for members of
Faculty on leave 9
PROMOTIONS:
G. G. Moe, B.S.A. , M.Sc, Ph.D., from Associate Professor to
Professor and Head of the Department of Agronomy.
A.F.B.Clark, B.A., Ph.D., from Associate Professor to Professor
of French.
H.T.Logan, M.C, B.A. , M.A. , from Associate Professor to
Professor of Classics.
Blythe Eagles, B.A., Ph.D., from Assistant Professor to
Associate Professor in Dairying.
H.F.G.Letson, M.C, B.Sc, Ph.D., from Assistant Professor
to Associate Professor in Mechanical Engineering.
John Davidson, F.L.S., F.3.S.E., from Assistant Professor
to Associate Professor in Botany.
D.C.B.Duff, M.A., Ph.D., from Assistant to Instructor in
Bacteriology.
Miss Helen Mathews, B.A., M.A., from Assistant to Instructor
in Bacteriology. PROMOTIONS -(continued
S. S. Delavault, L.en D. from Assistant to Instructor in
French.
Madame G. Barry,      from Assistant to Instructor in
French.
Madame D.Darlington,      from Assistant to Instructor in
French.
Miss Dorothy Dallas, B.A., M.A., from Assistant to Instructor
in French.
Miss Wessie Tipping, B.A., from Assistant to Instructor in
French.
NEW APPOINTMENTSi
W.A.Carrothers, B.A., Ph.D., D.F.C., Professor of Economics,
Sociology and Political Science.
G. F. Drummond, M.A^f.Se. , Assistant Professor of Economics.
William G. Black, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of
Education.
A.C.Cooke, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of History.
W. B. Coulthard, B.Sc, Assistant Professor of Electrical
Engineering.
H. Grayson-Smith, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of
Physics.
Miss Jean M. Auld, B.A., Instructor in Classics.
Frederick J. Brand, B.A., B.Sc, Instructor in Mathematics.
Miss Margaret E. Kerr, B.A.Sc, M.A., Instructor in Nursing.
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
0. J. Todd, Ph.D., Professor of Greek.
Thflrrleif Lars.en, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of English.
V. S. Asmundson, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor
of Poultry Husbandry.
D. G. Laird, 3.3.A., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of
Agronomy.
Miss Janet T. Greig, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of French,
G. H. Weir, B.A., M.A,, D.Paed., Professor and Head of
Department of Euucation ( for four months).
G. A. Gillies, M.Sc, Associate Professor of Mining ( for
four months).
Frank Dickson, 3.a., Ph.D., Associate Professor in Botany.
John Allardyce, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Chemistry. (5)
SUBSTITUTES FOR MEMBERS OF FACULTY
ON LEAVE OF ABSENCE:
Martin Peacock, B.A., Ph.D., (Substitute for Dr. S.J.
Schofield).
E. Owen, M.A.  (Substitute for Dr. O.J.Todd).
Cecil Lamb, B.S.A., M.S.A. (Substitute for Dr. D.G.Laird)
Jacob Biely, B.S.A. (Substitute for Dr. V.S.Asmundson).
D.E.Calvert, B.A., M.A. (Substitute for Mr. T. Larsen).
Madame D. Darlington (Substitute for Miss J. Greig).
Mr. L. M. Black, B.S.A. (Substitute for Dr. Dickson).
Mr. R. H. Fleming, B.A. (Substitute for Mr. Allardyce).
Miss F. L. Fowler, B.A. (Substitute for Mr. Allardyce).
RESIGNATIONS:
P. A. Boving, Cand. Ph., Cand. Agr., (Resigned Headship of the
Department of Agronomy but retains Professorship).
Leonard B. Stacey, B.A.So., Assistant Professor of Electrical
Engineering.
P.A.Child, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. Men
Total
362
605
187
357
122
271
92
201
1434
118
118
55
55
55
55
35
35
263
(6)
REGISTRATION
FACULTY OF ARTS  and  SCIENCE
Women
First Year  243
Second Year  170
Third Year  149
Fourth Year ..   109
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Second Year	
Third Year	
Fourth Year	
Fifth Year	
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE (NURSING)
First Year  10 ■- 10
Second Year  7 - 7
Third Year  4 ■- 4
Fourth Year  8 - 8
Fifth Year  6 - 6
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
First Year  - 14 14
Second Year  - 7 7
Third Year  1 8 9
Fourth Year  1 6 7
Partial  2 7 9
GRADUATES
Arts and Science  24 28 52
Applied Science  - 3 3
Agriculture  - 4    4_
TEACHER TRAINING COURSE 46 21 67
35
46
59
67
TOTAL T90T REGISTRATION (cont'd.
(7)
sat ion aii'l
oi Students
;ours ss
Summer Session, Arts (1930)  ( Degree Course)
Late Afternoon and Saturday
Morning Classes       (Degree Course)
Public Health Nursing       (Diploma Course)
Occupational Course in Agriculture
(Diploma Course)
Short Courses in Agriculture ................
Evening Class in Botany 	
458
105
1
9
124
40
NATIONALITY OF STUDENTS
American
72
Austrian
3
British
1714
Chinese
6
Croatian
1
Czecho-Slovakian
2
Danish
1
Dutch
2
East Indian
4
Finnish
2
French
2
Greek
1
Hebrew
18
Icelandic
3
Italian
6
Japanese
21
Norwegian
5
Polish
2
Russian
17
Swedish
19
Swiss
2
Syrian
1
Total
1904 (8)
POINTS FROM WHICH STUDENTS COME.
Vancouver
1161
Points in British Columbia outside of
Vancouver:
Abbotsford
6
Erie
1
Agassiz
4
Esquimalt
1
Alb e mi
1
Fernie
7
Aldergrove
1
Fort Fraser
1
Alert Bay
2
Galiano
1
Alexis. Creek
1
Gibson's Landing
1
Allenby
1
Gifford
1
Any ox
2
Golden
1
Armstrong
4
Grand Forks
6
Arrowhead
1
Grantham1s Landing
1
Ashcroft
2
Hagensborg
1
Barnet
1
Hammond
2
Bella Coola
2
Haney
1
Bonnington Falls
1
Hatzic
4
Bowen Island
1
Hazelton
1
Brighouse
2
Headquarters
1
Britannia Beach
2
Hedley
2
Bumaby
27
Heffley Creek
1
Burquitlam
1
Hilliers
1
Capitol Hill
1
Hollyburn
5
Cassidy
1
Kamloops
4
Castlegar
2
Kaslo
4
Chapman Camp
1
Kelowna
5
Chilliwack
11
Kimberley
2
CIayburn
1
Kincolith
1
Clinton
1
Kitchener
1
Cloverdale
7
Ladner
11
Coldstream
1
Ladysmith
1
Copper Mountain
1
Lavington
2
Courtenay
4
Lynn Creek
2
Cowichan Station
1
Mara
1
Cranbrook
12
Matsqui
2
Crescent Beach
1
Mayne Island
1
Creston
2
Merritt
1
Cumberland
9
Midway
1
Deanshaven
1
Milner
2
Dewdney
2
Milne's Landing
1
Duncan
6
Mission City
3
Dundarave
2
Mount Lehman
2
East Kelowna
1
Mount Tolmie
1
Enderby
1
Murrayville
1
Erickson
3
Nakusp
3 Points in British Columbia
outside of Vancouver:
(9)
Nanaimo
Naramata
Nelson
New Denver
New Hazelton
New Westminster
Nicola
North Bend
North Bulkley
North Vancouver
Ocean Falls
Okanagan Centre
Okanagan Mission
Oyama
Oliver
Osoyoos
Peachland
Penticton
Port Haney
Powell River
Prince George
Prince Rupert
Princeton
Qualicum Beach
Revelstoke
Riondel
Rocky Point
Royston
Ruskin
Rosedale
Rossland
Saanichton
Salmon Arm
Sandal
Sandon
Sandwick
Sardis
Shawnigan Lake
Sidney
Silverdale
Smithers
Squamish
Steveston
Stewart
Sugar lake
Summerland
Surrey Centre
12
Taghum
1
1
Terrace
1
2
Trail
14
5
Uclwelet
1
1
Upper Capilano
2
109
Upper Lynn
1
1
Van Anda .
2
1
Vanderhoof
2
2
Vavenby
1
49
Vernon
15
2
Victoria
107
1
Waldo
1
1
Wellington
2
2
Westholme
1
2
West Summerland
5
1
2
8
West Vancouver
5
1840
1
3
(c)
4
From points in Canada
out
side
12
1
British Columbia
•
3
13
Alberta
12
2
Saskatchewan
11
1
Manitoba
6
1
Ontario
4
1
Nova Scotia
1
1
Yukon Territory
3
7
37
2
(d)
5
From other countries:
1
1
United States
7
2
England
3
2
Ireland
1
3
Scotland
2
3
India
1
1
China
10
1
Japan
1
1
Austria Hungary
1
9
Mongolia
1
3
27
1
4
1
TOTAL
1904 do)
QgOUPATXgIS OF THE PARENTS OF THE STUDENTS ENROLLED
l""!Wo'^'"l15oluaihg lWe""stuaehta- In*ThT^iacher 'TraTnTng'.Cburge)
Accountant
39
Agent
9
Animal ..Pathologist
1
Architect
5
Artlf't ■
4
Assistant .Superintendent
2
-Auditor
4
Assessor
1
Automobile'Dealer
9
Baker
5
B«nkei
2
Bank .Messenger
1
Barbei
2
Blacksmith
6
Boat- 'Cap-tain
4
Boiler Maker
3
Bond Dealer
1
Bookkeeper
6
Bricklayer
4
Brickmaker
1
Broker
40
Builder
9
Bulb Grower
1
Business. Man
24
lusineas Preaiaen t
6
-Butcher
5
Buyer
5
Cabinet Maker
2
Canneryman
1
Caretaker
3
'Carpenter
&o
Chauffeur
1
Chassis builder-
1
Ohenii cs,l .Engineer
2
Civil Engineer
31
;Givil''%rwaht
14
Claims' Investigator
1
Clergy
40
.Clerk
21
Coal-; Sealer
2
Collector
1
Clothier
3
Commercial Artist
8
Compositor.
3
Comptroller
1
Confectioner
1
Contractor
51
Customs Official
11
Dairyman
6
Deceased
82
Decorator
6
Dental Technician
1
Dentist
16
Department Manager
2
Doctor
65
Draftsman
2
Driver
2
Druggist
16
Dry Cleaner
1
Editor
1
Electrical Engineer
10
Electrician
10
Employee
7
Engineer
47
Engineer's Assistant
2
Farmer
96
Factory Owner
2
* HwX
1
Flshdealer
1
Fisherman
2
Florist
1
Foreman
11
Fruit Dealer
1
Fruit Grower
6
Fuel-Dealer
1
Funeral Director
1
Furniture Dealer
1
Gardener
1
Garage Owner
3
Ga rag e'Pro pr le to r
1
Green-keeper
1
Government Liquor Vendor
2
Grocer
7
Government Service
19
Harbour Commissioner
2
Hairdresser
1
Hop Grower
1
Hotel Proprietor
4
Horticulturist
2
Importer and Exporter
6 II)
OCCUPATIONS OP PARENTS (Continued)
Inspector
14
Paymaster
1
Insurance
24
Photographer
3
Janitor
3
Plasterer
2
Jeweller
6
Plumber
1
Journalist
3
Police
5
Junk Dealer
3
Postman
2
Labourer
6
Postmaster
11
Laundry Owner
2
Powder Man
1
Lawyer
34
Printer
12
Librarian
2
Prison Guard
2
Lineman
1
Property Owner
2
Lithographer
1
Proprietor
4
Logger .
1
Projectionist
1
Lumberman
35
Purchasing Agent
1
Machinist
15
Rancher
12
Manager
40
R. R. Employee
53
Managing Director
2
Real Estate
19
Manufacturer
10
Restaurant Owner
3
Manufacturer's Agent
12
Retailer
1
Marine Engineer
7
Retired
88
Mason
2
River Pilot
1
Master Mariner
5
Salesman
27
Mechanic
12
Sales Manager
3
Mechanical Engineer
4
Salvor
1
Member of Parliament
4
Sanitary Engineer
1
Me rchant
81
Scaler
4
Metal Worker
1
Sculptor
1
Mill Employee
1
Secretary
11
Millman
1
Seedsman
2
Mill Owner
4
Sheet Metal Worker
1
Mill Wright
3
Shift Boss
jL
Mining Engineer
19
Shingle Weaver
1
Mining Operator
1
Ship Builder
1
Miner
D
Shipper
4
Missionary
7
Shipping Merchant
3
Motion Picture Operator
1
Shoeman
2
Musician
1
Sign Writer
1
Music Dealer
1
Smelterman
2
Navjr
2
Stationer
2
News p ap e rman
1
Steam Engineer
2
Notary Public
1
Steamship Manager
1
Night Watchman
1
Steel Worker
1
Operator
1
Stone Mason
1
Optician
1
Structural Engineer
3
Packer
1
Superintendent
9
Painter
1
Surveyor
7 (12)
OCCUPATIONS  OF PARENTS  (continued)
Tailor
1
Teacher
43
Telegrapher
2
Timber Cruiser
1
Tool Maker
1
Traffic Manager
1
Transfer
4
Truck Driver
3
University Faculty
11
University President
1
University Registrar
1
Unspecified
182
Vancouver City Employee
9
Watchmaker
1
Welding Engineer
1
Wholesaler
7
Y. M. C A. Secretary
2
Total 1837 Comparative statement of attendanceat the University
1915-16       to       1929-30.
REGISTRATION BY FACULTIES
Session
Arts and
Science
Appl:
Scie:
1915-36
318
61
1916-17
321
48
1917-18
371
38
1918-19
467
54
1919-20
681
164
1920-21
696
209
1921-22
724
200
1922-23
890
191
1923-24
969
183
1924-25
1119
184
Applied    Double    Nursing
3    Course
6
1
16
28
32
36
Agric- Teacher  Total,  Summer Short   Grand
ulture Training Winter Session Courses Total
Course   Session
7
17
45
51
73
85
69
59
55
53
379
369
416
538
890
962
1014
1194
1308
1451
127
134
208
292
294
65
258
379
640
550
83
157
152
121
379
434
674
917
1530
1639
1231
1559
1752
1866 Comparative statement of attendance at the University
1915-16   to  1929-30   continued)
REGISTRATION BY FACULTIES
Session Arts and Applied
Science  Science
Nursing Agric- Teacher  Total
ulture Training Winter
Course   Session
1925-26
1124
196
1926-27
1219
299
1927-28
1349
242
1928-29
1316
259
1929-30
1486
266
33
35
33
41
35
53
52
55
52
50
57
67
62
62
67
1463
1582
1741
1730
1904
Summer
Short
Grand
Session
Courses
Total
394
127
1984
438
158
2178
487
171
2399 S
402
220
2352
427
279
2610 DEGREES CONFERRED
1916
to
1930
Year
M.A.
B .A.
M
M
.Sc or
.A.Sc
3.Sc
*.A.
;. or B.A,
Sc  Nur!
3ing
M.S.
iA.
B.S.A.
Total
40
Grand Total.
40
1916
40
1917
34
-
1
-
-
35
75
1918
34
-
-
-
34
109
1919
2
47
1
-
50
159
1920
9
50
1
9
-
69
228
1921
3
84
-
13
-
8
113
341
1922
1923
9
14
77
106
1
6
27
34
3
1
10
12
124
176
465
641
M
1924
9
99
1
39
5
2
11
166
807
1925
11
133
7
27
4
1
17
goo
1007
1926
16
145
4
26
3
0
9
203
1210
1927
10
156
1
37
5
2
6
217
1427
1928
17
188
1
22
5
1
7
241
1668
1929
15
160
1
31
6
1
9
223
1891
1930
1925
1118
1
10
LL.
7
1-
34
B,
175
D.
.con.
1
1
5
27
6
I0N0RARY
1      1
1       7
DEGRESS CONFERRED
42
228
1933
2161 16)
LOCATION OF GRADUATES
Number in Vancouver 1003
Number in other parts of British Columbia...... 511
Number in other Provinces   93
Number in United States of America   145
Number in British Isles   15
Number in Australia   1
Number in India   2
Number in South Africa   4
Number in France   3
Number in South America   1
Number in China   2
Number in Japan   5
Number in other countries   5
Number deceased   28
Number whose address is unknown   214
TOTAL NUMBER OF GRADUATES 2032 been won by
been made i
Nar e	
Asiinall.Thos.E.
Cacpbell,  Mildred H.
Cat.sidy,  Eugene H.
Dariells,  J.Roy
Davphinee,   James A.
Davidson,   Jean
Doiley,  Wilfred  G.
Freeman,  Phyllis M.
Go3d , Norman
Hickman,  Walter H.
Liersch,   John Edward
Grtnt,  Margaret
Hot?lett,  Leslie E.
Hu31,  Ralph
«<ank,s,  Ralph D.
Johnston,  A.Elizabeth
laing, Lionel H.
xiucas,   Vema  Z.
1'cKellar, Andrew
McLean
v
Value. Subject
Poultry
SCHOIARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS and BURSARIES AWARDED TO GRADUATES.
During the year many scholarships, reiiowships and Dursuries have~
University.  The following list loes not include awards which have
British Columbia.
Award	
Scholarship in Nutrition
National Research Council Studentship
H.R.MacMillan Scholarship
Western Fellowship
Ellen Mickle Fellowship
University Fellowship
Teaching Fellowship
Trustee Fellowship
Teaching Fellowship
Fr.Government Scholarship
Anderson Fellowship
Teaching Fellowship
National Research Council Fellowship
Fellowship
Fellowship
Scholarship
International Law Scholarship
Demonstratorship
Teaching Fellowship
Teaching Fellowship
National Research Council Studentship
Teaching Fellowship
Teaching Fellowship
American Antiquarian Society Scholarship
graduates of the
n The University of
Where Tenable,
800.
1000.
1000.
500.
1500.
500.
750.
600.
750.
10,000 fr.
600.
500.
1200.
1000.Mathematics
1000.Mathematics
Economics
H. Univ.of Illinois
Zoology
History
English
Medicine
Botany
Economics
History
Economics
Forestry
English
J.Beattie
MnPhails Murchie
I :y.d i gem, Stephen
iorrison, Edmund
ierr5 son, Hugh M.
1 berg, Kalervo
Cmsby, Margaret
Treston,Shirley
Jurdy, H.L.
felwood,Pierce W.
ZRedman, Cecil K.
Stevenson, John S
U:a de rh i 11,Fab ian
Watson,Donald S.
Y.eia, CB.
Vilby, George V.
Teaching Fellowship
A.  Can&£jLan Pioneer Problems Committee
Scholarship.
G.   Graduate Assistantship (2 yrs.)
Teaching Fellowship
National Research Council Fellowship
Paul Williams Research Fellowship
Scholarship (2 yrs.)
Teaching Fellowship
Teaching Fellowship
Research Associate
Demonstratorship
1000.
300.
600.
600.
1000.
800.
1000.
350.
.000.
History
Zoology
Physics
English
Zoology
Physics
English
History
Economics
500.
2100.
1800.
1C00.
1000.
750.
750.
History
Agronomy
Economics
Chemistry
Physics
Geology
Economics
Economics
300. Zoology
Japan
Toronto Univ.
Toronto Univ.
Univ.of Michigan.
Univ.of California.
Smith College.
Univ.of California.
Paris
Univ.of Washington.
Univ.of Toronto.
Toronto Univ.
Univ.of Chicago.
Univ.of Chicago.
Univ.of Washington.
Toronto Univ.
Univ.of California.
Univ.of Washington.
Purdue University.
Univ.of California.
Clark University.
Univ.of Chicago
Univ.of Alberta.
Univ.of Chicago.
Princeton Univ.
Purdue Univ.
Kass.Inst.of Tech.
Univ.of California.
Univ.of California.
Univ.of Toronto.
Univ.of Toronto.
H
-3
Value of scholarships, fellowships, and bursaries won by our
graduates in other Universities and in Institutes in 1930 ...
*
$  27,050.00 (18)
PUBLICATIONS
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE.
DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY:
"A Modification of the Orskov Simple-Cell Technic".
By - Duff, D.C.B.
Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine,
XV, No. 2, p. 186, Nov. 1929.
"A Physiological Study of Certain Parasitic Saprolegneaceae."
By - Duff, D.C.B.
Contributions to Canadian Biology and Fisheries,
N.S.,  Vol. No. 7, 1929.
"An Improved Pipette Manipulator1'.
By - Duff, D.C.B.
Journal of laboratory and Clinical Medicine.
DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY:
"The Specific Effects of Monochromatic Light on the Growth
of Paramoecium."
By - Hutchinson, A. H., and Ashton, M.R.
National Research Council of Canada.
"Effect of the Fraser River on the Waters and Phytoplankton
of the Strait of Georgia."
By - Hutchinson, A. H., and Lucas, C.C.
(Reprint from the Proceedings Fourth Pacific
Science Congress, Java, 1929).
"Seasonal Variations in the Chemical and Physical Properties
of the Waters of the Strait of Georgia in Relation
to Phytoplankton."
By - Hutchinson, A.H., Lucas, C.C, and McPhail, M.
(Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada,
3rd Series, Vol. XXIII, Section V, 1929).
"An Oceanographic Survey of the Surface Waters of the
Strait of Georgia."
By - Hutchinson, A.H., Lucas, C.C, and McPhail M.
With four charts. A summary was presented before
the Society of Western Naturalists at Pacific Grove,
December, 1929, as part of a symposium and the
complete account is presented for publication in
the Canadian Research Journal. (19
DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY continued)
"The Economic Effect of the Fraser River on the
Strait of Georgia."
By - Hutchinson, A. H. - Published in Progress
Reports of the Pacific Biological Stations, 1929.
"The Specific Effects of Monochromatic Light upon
the Growth of Yeast."
By - Hutchinson, A. H., and Newton, D.
Canadian Research Journal.
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY:
"Extraction of Commercial Rare Earth Residues
with a view to the Concentration of Illinium."
By - Fall, R. W. with Harris, J.A.
J. Am. Chem. Soc. 51, 2107.
"A Comparison of Methods for the Extraction of the
Rare Earths from Gadolinite."
By - Pearce, D.W., with Harris, J.A.
Trans. Royal Society, Canada, XXIII,  61.
Iodine Numbers of Lubricating Oils before
and after use in Automobile Engines."
By - Seyer, W.F., and Allen, J.S.
J. Ind. & Eng. Chem. Aug. 1929.
"The Effect of Temperature on the Molecular
Surface Energy of Binary Mixtures."
By - Seyer, W.F., Peck, W.S.
J. Am. Chem., Soc, 52, 14, 1930.
Solubility of Sodium Carbonate and a Method
of Determining Solubilities at High Temperatures."
By - Seyer, W.F., and Todd, E.E.
Trans. Royal Society, Canada, XXIII, 192 9.
"Radioactive Platinum Concentrates of British Columbia."
By - Seyer, W.F.
Trans. Royal Society, Canada, XXIII, 1929.
"The Physical and Chemical Differences Between Eastern
and Western American Lubricating Oils."
By - Seyer, W.F., in "Petroleum Equipment
Exporter"  - Vol. 1, 2, 1930. (20)
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY (continued)
"The Critical Solution Temperature of Sulphur Dioxide
and Normal Paraffin Hydrocarbons."
By - Seyer,W.F., and Todd, E.E.
(Presented by Clark,R.H.)
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV,  1930.
"A New Compound of Cyclohexene Peroxide and Sulphur Dioxide."
By - Seyer, W.F., and King, E. G.
(Presented by Clark, R.H.).
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV,  1930.
"A Further Investigation of the Two Electromers of 2 Pentene".
By - Clark, R. H,, and Hallonquist, E. G.
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV, 1930.
"The Addition of Hydrogen Bromide to Allyl Bromide in
Magnetic and Electrostatic Fields."
By - Clark, R. H., and Gray, K.R.
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV,  1930.
"The Nitration of Benzoic Acid in Magnetic and Electrostatic
Fields."
By - Clark, R. H., and Archibald, R.M..
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV, 1930.
"The Determination of Cholesterol in Blood."
By Allardyce, John.
(Presented by Clark, R.H.).
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV, 1930.
"Blood Normals for Cattle."
By - Allardyce, J., Fleming, R.H., Fowler, F.L
with Clark, R.H.
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV,  1930.
"Haematuria Vesicalis (Red Water)."
By - Clark, R.H., Fleming, R.H., and Fowler, F.L.,
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV, 1930.
"The Solubility of Sodium Me.tavanadate and Lead Metavanadate
in Water and Nitric Acid, and the Separation of Vanadium
from Chromium by Archibald, E.H., and Edwards, H.
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV, 1930.
"The Solubility of Beryllium Hydroxide in Solutions of Sodium
Bicarbonate and the Separation of Beryllium from
Vanadium - Chromium and Uranium".
By - Archibald, E.H,, and Rendle, F.
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV,  1930. 21)
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY (continued)
"The Molecular Surface Energy of Binary Mixtures
Water and Nicotine."
By - Seyer, W.F., and Gallaugher, A.F.
J.Am. Chem. Soc, 52, 1448,  1930.
"The Heat of Adsorption of Oxygen on Charcoal"
By - Marshall, M.J., and Bramston-Cook, HE.
J. Am. Chem. Soc, 51,  2019,  1929.
"A Test of the Radiation Hypothesis of Chemical
Reaction."
By - Ure, Wm., and Tolman, R.C
J. Am. Chem., Soc, 51,  974, 1929.
"A Systematic Study of the Preparation of Alkyl
Chlorides from the Corresponding Alcohols."
By - Clark, R.H., and Straight, H.R.L.
Trans. Royal Society, Canada, XXIII, 77, 1929
"The Reduction of the Nitro Group as a Function of
its Polarity."
By - Clark, R.H., and Hallonquist, E.G.
Trans. Royal Society, Canada, XXIII, 71, 1929.
"Cathodic Halogens - The Electrolysis of Halogenyl
Amides."
By - Straight, H.R.L., and Hallonquist, E.G., with
Clark, R.H.
Journal American Electric - Chemistry Society LVI,
485,  1929.
"A New Method for the Preparation of Rare Earth Bromates"
By - Harris, J.Allen. (Presented by Clark, R.H.
Royal Society, Canada, Section III,  1930.
"A Study of the Absorption Spectra of various series of
Rare Earth Double Nitrates."
By - Pearce, D.W. , with Harris, J. Allen.
(Presented by Clark, R.H.).
Royal Society, Canada, Section III, 1930).
"The Kinetics of the Intramolecular Transformation of
Ammonium Thiocyanate into Thiourea."
By - Ure, William and Edwards, B.
(Presented by Clark, R.H.).
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV,  1930. (22)
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY:  continued)
"Experiments with the Parathyroid Hormone.  Cat Method of
assay, potency factors in preparation."
By - Allardyce, W.J.
Royal Society, Canada,  Section III,  1930.
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS:
"Canadian Penal Institutions"
By - Topping, C.W.
Am. Ed. Pub., March, 1930.
(University of Chicago Press).
"The Passing of the County Jail in Canada"
By - Topping, C.W.
Pub. in 1930 edition of the American Prison,
Association Proceedings.
"The Silver Standard"
By - Drummond, G. F.
Written for the British Columbia Miner.
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH:
"Pronunci ati on"
By - Larsen,Sand Walker, F.C.
Oxford University Press.
"Modern Philology"
By - Larsen, T.
Royal Society, Canada.
(Bibliographical Society's publication).
"Wordsworth, Arnold and Professor Lane Cooper"
By - Sedgewick, G.G.
The Dalhousie Review.
"The Middle Years of George Peele, Dramatist, 1588-1591"
By - Larsen, T. (Presented by Chas. Hill-Tout,)
Royal Society, Canada, Section II, 1930.
DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY
"Geology and Mineral Resources of the Yalakom Map
Area, West Lillooet Block"
By - Schofield, S.J.
With - Brock, R.W,, Williams, M.Y., and Turnbull,J.M. (23
DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY (continued)
"Report of the Commission on Mineral Resources
of the P.G.E. Land Grants."
By - Schofield, S.J.
"Report on Pacific Great Eastern Land Blocks
(Peace, West Cariboo and West Lillooet)"
By - Williams, M.Y.
With - Brock, R.W., Schofield,S.J. and Turnbull, J.M.
"Report of the Commission on Mineral Resources of the
P.G.E.Land Grants."
By - Williams, M.Y.
"The Pierre Seas of Western Canada"
By Williams, M.Y.
Royal Society, Canada, Section IV,  1930.
"Report on the Pacific Great Eastern Land Blocks"
By - Brock, R.W.
With - Schofield, S.J., Williams, M.Y., and
Turnbull, J.M.
"Report of the Commission on Mineral Resources of the
P.G.E. Land Grants."
By - Brock, R.W.
"A New Coal Age"
By- Brock, R.W.
V/estern Branch, CI.M.M. ,  B.C. Miner.
"Japan" (Institute of Pacific Relations Conference)
By - Brock, R.W.
Canadian Papers - 1929.
"Calaverite - A Study of its Crystallography"
By - Peacock, M.A.
"The Geology and Geography of the Modoc Quadrangle, Cal."
By - Peacock, M.A.
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
(Publications in the Depurluent of History, exclusive of
newspaper articles).
D.CHarvey: Review: Polk:  The Diary of a President, 1845-1849.
The Canadian Historical Review, March, 1930, pp.67-68.
"The Loyal Electors: The First Political Society in
British North America."
Royal Society, Canada, Section II,  1930. (24)
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY: ( continued)
W.N.Sage:
Articles:
Wrong, G.M., Martin, C, and Sage, W.N. , The Story of
Canada. Part IV.  British Columbia, pp. 301-351.
Howay, F.W. (Ed.) - The Builders of the West.
Toronto, Ryerson Press,-1929.
(A Chapter on Blanchard and Douglas).
Martin, CS. , and Leebriek, K.C (Ed.) The Pacific
Area, Seattle, University of Washington Press, 1929.
The Three British Empires, pp. 101-117.
The Canadian Historical Association Annual Report,1929.
John Work's First Journal, pp. 21-29.
Reviews:
Washington Historical Quarterly Vol. XXI, No.  1.
(Jan.  1930).   The Dixon-Meares  Controversy (Ed.F.W.
Howay)   -  pp.  61-62;   also  in The Canadian Historical
Review,  March 1930,   pp.  56-58.
F.  W.   Soward:
Articles:
The  Outbreak of the  World War.
The Queen's  Quarterly, Kingston,  Autumn,  1929
pp.  595-618.
The Election of Canadsfto the League of Nations Council
in 1927.
The American Journal of International Law,
Washington, D.C, October 1929, pp. 753-766.
Also published in Annual Report of Canadian
Historical Association for 1929, Ottawa, pp. 31-41.
The Quickening of Canadian Interest in International
Affairs.  The Educational Survey of the League of
Nations'. Geneva, January, 1930, pp. 65-71.
Also published in the B.C. Teacher, Vancouver,
March, 1930, pp. 35-40. (25)
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS:
"The Problem of Three Bodies"
By - Buchanan, D.   (Presidential Address)
Royal Society, Canada, Section III, 1930.
"Periodic Orbits in the Restricted Problem of
Four Bodies with Repelling and Attracting
Forces."
By - Buchanan, D.
Royal Society, Canada, Section III, 1930.
"An Illustrative Orbit in the Restricted Problem of
Four Bodies."
By - Pollock, Miss Mary E. (Presented by D.Buchanan)
Royal Society, Canada, Section II, 1930.
"Tangential Coordinates"
By - Nowlan, F.S., and James, R.D. (Introduce-
by D. Buchanan) - Royal Society, Canada,
Section II, 1930,
"Transformation of Units in a Simple Matric Algebra"
By - Nowlan, F.S. (Introduced by D. Buchanan)
Royal Society, Canada, Section II, 1930.
"Sets of Integral Elements of Certain Rational Dickson
Algebras."
By - Nowlan, F.S., and.Hull, R. (Introduced
by D.Buchanan) - Royal Society, Canada,
Section II, 1930.
"On the Direct Product of a Division and a Total
Matric Algebra."
By - Nowlan, F.S.
Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society
Vol. XXXVI, No. 4, April, 1930, pp. 265-268.
"The Pendulum Orbit of the Normal Hydrogen Molecule"
By - Buchanan, D.
Trans. Royal Society of Canada.
Vol. XXIII, Series III, 1929, pp. 125-131.
"Second Genus Orbits for the Helium Atom."
By - Buchanan, D.
Trans. Royal Society of Canada.
Vol. XXIII, Series III, 1929. pp. 227-245.
DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES:
"Moliere"  (Republic of Letters Series)
By - Ashton,H.
Routledge, London. (26
DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES (continued
"La Princesse de Cleves"
By - Ashton, H.
Scribner, New York.
"Le Roman Social Sous La Monarchic De Juillet"
By - Evans, D.C
(Picard)
"Rostand versus Gross - an alleged plagiarism by
the former.
By - Ashton, H.
(For the Modern Language Review - England)
"Garibaldi's French Writings"
By - Ashton, H.
(French Quarterly - England).
"Critical Text of Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac"
By - Ashton, H.
(For Scribner - New York).
"Literary Scholarship in Canadian Universities"
By - Clark, A.F.B.
(Article published in Canadian Forum, April, 1930)
DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY:
"Some Free-Swimming Copepods of the Vancouver Island Region"
By - Campbell, Miss Mildred H. (Presented by C
Mclean Fraser).
Royal Society, Canada, Section II, 1930.
"The Razor Clam, Siliqua Patula (Dixon) of Graham Island
Queen Charlotte Group "
By - Fraser, C.McLean.
Royal Society, Canada, Section II, 1930.
"Some Cumacea of the Vancouver Island Region."
By - Hart, F.L. (Presented by C.Mclean Fraser)
Royal Society, Canada, Section II, 1930.
"Spawning and free swimming larval periods of Saxidomus
and Paphia."
By Fraser, C.Mclean.
Trans. Royal Society, Canada, Sec. V, 1929, pp.195-198. (27)
DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY continued
"The Necessity in Marine Biological Investigation for
data regarding physical and chemical oceanography
and plankton content and distribution."
By - Fraser, 8. McLean.
(Fourth Pacific Science Congress, Java, 1929).
"Another Household Pest Arrives in Vancouver"
By - Spencer, G. J.
Proceedings B.C. Ent. Soc. 1929.
"The Fire Brat, Thermobia Pack, in Canada."
By - Spencer, G. J.
Can, Ent., Jan. 1930.
"The Status of the Barn Swallow Bug - Oeciacus vicarius
Horvath"
By - Spencer, G.J.
Can. Ent., Jan. 1930.
G. J. Spencer:
"Beetles emerging from prepared Timber in Buildings"
"Notes on Phalacrocera vancouverensis Alexander, an
aquatic Crane fly."
"Insects of the season in Vancouver district, 1929."
"Insect pests and insect allies that have recently
arrived in Vancouver district, British Columbia,
1928-1929."
Josephine F.L.Hart:
"Some Decapod Crustacea of the Southern Vancouver Island
Region."
"Work on the taxonomic and distributional study of the
Cumacea of the Vancouver Island Region."
Royal Society, Canada, 1930.
FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY -  reported in Arts
DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY      reported in Arts
DEPARTMENT OF MINING and METALLURGY:
"Development's at Owens Lake*'
By - Turnbull, J.M.
"Flotation Practice at the Duthie and Silver Cup Mills"
By -Gillies, G.A. (28)
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRYING:
"An Alleged Feed Flavour in Milk Caused by
Specific Bacteria."
By - Sadler, Wilfrid,  Irwin, M.Lenora and
Golding, N.S.
The Milk Dealer.  Milwaukee,  1929
"Flavour Defects in High Grade Milk"
By - Sadler, Wilfrid.
Scientific Agriculture, Vol. X, No. 2. Ottawa, 1929.
"Is All Milk Equally Suitable as a Medium for the
Preparation of Starters?
By - Kelly, C.D. 1930.
Scientific Agriculture, Vol. X, No.5, Ottawa.
(Work done in co-operation with Professor Sadler
in the University Laboratory).
"The Effect of Ammonium Salts on the Growth of
P.Roqueforti in Cheese".
By - Golding, N.S.
RoyalSociety, Canada,  1930.
"Feed Flavour or Stable Odour in Milk Caused by a -
typical strain of Aerobacter oxytocum."
By - Sadler, Wilfrid and Irwin, M.Lenora, 1930.
DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE:
"Tree-Fruit Farming in British Columbia"
By -  Clement,  F.M.  and Wilcox,   J.C
An Economic Study of Five Hundred and Twenty-six
Farms.     (A Five  Year Summary).
Province of British  Columbia Department of
Agriculture,  Bulletin No.  105:     1-54,     1929.
(College of Agriculture Bulletin, No.  13.)
"The Influence of Top on Root as Determined by Root
Respiration of Young Fruit  Trees."
By - Harris,  G.  H.
Proc Amer.  Soc.  Hort.  Sci.  26:  329  - 334.
Figs.     1,  2,     1929. (29)
DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE continued
"Studies on Tree Root Activities"
An Apparatus for Studying Root Respiration and
Factors which influence it."
By - Harris, G. H.  Scientific Agric 9: 553-565,
Fig.  1. Plates 1-15.  May 1929.
"Studies on Tree Root Activities"
Part II.  "Some Factors which influence Tree
Root Respiration."
By -  Harris,   G.  H.
Scientific Agriculture 10  - 564 - 585:       Fig.   1
Charts 1-6.  (May 1930).
DEPARTMENT OF POULTRY HUSBANDRY:
"Inheritance of Plumage and Skin Colour in the Ancona"
By Asmundson, V.S. and Milne, Helen I.
Scientific Agriculture, Vol. 10, Jan. 1930.
"Farm Survey Records and Flock Management Problems
in British Columbia".
(World's Poultry Congress).
By - Lloyd, E.A. and Riley, W.J. - Feby. 1930.
"Master Breeder's Guide"
By Lloyd,E.A.
(Written for the R.O.P. Assoc).
"Fish Oils as Sources of Vitamin D. for Poultry"
By - Asmundson, V.S. and Allardyce, W.J. and
Biely, J.
Scientific Agriculture, Vol. 9,  May 1929. (30)
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY
OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
New Courses.
Commerce.
A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Commerce was approved by the Faculty, Senate and Board and
arrangements were made to offer the work in the various
years.  There is a close relationship between the work
required for Commerce and for Arts and Science.  The first
two years of Commerce may count as the first two years of
Arts and Science and, of the 30 units required for the last
two years in Commerce, a minimum of 15 units and a maximum of
21 units consist of subjects which carry credits in Arts and
Science.  Provision is made for a candidate to complete the
work for the two degrees B.A. and B.Com. in five years.
Social Service.
The course outlined in the session 1928-29 for
the Diploma of Social Service was expanded, particularly in
the more technical subjects of Social Service.
Home Economics.
A year ago a tentative First Year -Course for Home
Economics was drawn up.  This spring the course was extended
to cover the First two years.  The work consists of two full
years in Arts and Science with emphasis upon the Science
subjects.  None of the technical courses in Home Economics
has been included.  When a Department of Home Economics is
established and provision is made for housing and equipping this
Department, an extension will no doubt be made in this course.
It may then be found advisable to alter the work prescribed
for the earlier years.  In the meantime, candidates who
complete the course as outlined will receive credit for two
years in Arts and Science and may proceed to the B.A. degree,
should it be found impossible to make the necessary arrangements
for extensions in Home Economics. (31)
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF ARTS
AND SCIENCE (continued)
Failures.
While the question of failures has occupied
much of the time of the Faculty and of the Dean during the
last session, we have not been unmindful of the fact that
among our undergraduates and graduates of 1930 are scores
of really brilliant students to whom may be safely entrusted
the high reputation of the University which has been won by
graduates of preceding years.  As in the family so in the
University - it is the weaker no doubt, who receive more of
the paternal care, at any rate who cause more paternal anxiety.
The low marks of First Year students at Christmas
with the resultant large number who were asked to withdraw at
that time were a decided disappointment. During the Fall Term
an extra effort had been made by the various Instructors of First
Year students and by the Dean to "check up" on delinquents both
as to attendance and to work.  The Christmas Examinations, however,
showed that about 10$ of the First Year had made an average under
40$ and were therefore required to discontinue attendance for the
remainder of the session.  Of those who withdrew 82$ were men
and of those in Class 1 80>o were women.  A special committee
of Faculty considered the question of failures and made certain
recommendations which were adopted by Faculty and, v/ith slight
alterations, accepted by the various student organizations such
as the Students' Council, Athletic organizations, Fraternities,
etc. The report of the Committee has already been submitted in
full. With the co-operation of the student organizations, an
effort will be made next year to limit the student activities
of First Year students who have "fallen down" in their academic
wo rk.
Exchange of Undergraduates.
At tho close of the 1928-29 session certain regulations
were drawn up pertaining to exchange of undergraduates v/ith other
Canadian Universities. One of our students took his Third Year
at McGill, and a McGill student took his Third Year with us. Two
of our graduates wore recommended as exchange students at the
University of Toronto last fall, but while they could not be
admitted on the basis of exchange they were given scholarships.
Exchange Professors.
There is a strong feeling that while good arises (32)
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF ARTS
AND SCIENCE (continued) ~
from the exchange of professors with the other Western
Universities a modification of the present plan can be made
to much advantage.  It is suggested that the Public Lecture
be held late in the afternoon instead of at 11 a.m.  At
the latter hour the majority of the students are at lectures
and even when these are cancelled only a very few attend the
Public Lecture. While probably only a few would attend the
lecture in the late afternoon, they would nevertheless be
those who were interested in the lecturer's subject and
there would be no loss of time from the regular lectures.
Accommodation
Classrooms and offices are urgently needed. Certain
large classes like Biology 1 and English 2 have from 300 to
350 students with classroom provision for 275.
The large numbers in the First Year always present
difficulties.  It is of course advisable to divide the classes
into sections but the number of sections is limited by the
number of Instructors and by the classrooms available.  On
the other hand when the number in a section is large the classrooms are too small. The Second Year classes are increasing
in numbers and more sections are required. While the number
who completed their First Year in April was somewhat smaller
than usual, there were several with supplemental which will
no doubt be removed and there will be several others who will
qualify from the Senior Matriculation classes in the High
Schools.
The arrangements made last year for Commerce students
to use draughting tables in Applied Science were not satisfactory.  Through the kindness of Dean Clement a small room
in the Agriculture Building is to be made available next year
for students in Statistics and Accounting.  This will accommodate
only about 25 students.
More offices are needed in the Arts Building and
no more Common Rooms are available.
Certain of the laboratories are filled to capacity.
From physical necessity we shall soon be bound to limit numbers
and limit options (certain classes are more crowded than others).
Let us hope that in the immediate future a NEW ARTS BUILDING
and an extension to the Science Building will arise, where now (33)
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF ARTS
AND SCIENCE (continued)
the "gardens smile", either through publio or private generosity
or both.
Researches and Publications
A great many researches were carried on by various
members of the staff and by various graduate students working
under the direction of staff members. Numerous papers were
presented by members of the University of British Columbia
at the Royal Society and at other learned societies and a
very creditable showing was made.  Appreciation was expressed
by various JSastem University men of the high type of work
undertaken and accomplished by our University and by our
graduates.
Conclusion.
I wish to express my sincere appreciation of the
cordial cooperation of the various members of the Faculty
and Staff throughout the session.
Respectfully submitted,
D. Buchanan
Dean. (34)
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
I.  Attendance and Distribution of Students.
To the figures of students registered in Applied
Science should be added about 130 first year Applied Science
students who must register in their first year in Arts.
Session 1928-29 Session 1929-30
Engineering              259                        266
Nursing and Health 47 36
Total registered in Applied
Science 306 302
Total registered in First
Year Arts 130 about    130
Total in Applied Science
about    436 about    432
Registered by Departments
Fourth Year
192E
Chemical Eng.
Chemistry
Civil Eng.
Electrical Eng.
Mechanical Eng.
Forest Eng.
Geological Eng.
Mining Eng.
Metallurgical Eng.)
Nursing 7       8
The Department of Nursing and Health does not show
much growth.  The reason seems to be that this course is not
known to most students until after they are in attendance at the
University and cannot switch into Nursing without spending an
extra year at the University, which few are willing to contemplate
in their first or second years, or, if they do know of it, they
1928-29
1929-30
4
3
3
6
13
13
7
16
1
4
8
8
)       8
6
Fifth
Year •
1928-29
1929-30
6
5    ■
1
-
6
2
9
10
3
6
3
1
2
8
3
2
1
1
6
6 (35)
REPORT OF THE DEAN
OF APPLIED SCIENCE (continued)
are too young to enter Nursing. It is hoped that the Double
Course referred to later will meet these difficulties to some
extent.
It is desirable to have more students avail themselves of the course as it provides not only a very suitable
education for women students,.but also entrance into a profession that stands in need of more properly educated practitioners.
2.  General Policy.
The general policy remains unchanged from that outlined in last year's report. It is summarized in the Calendar
(page 171).
Having found that students who fail in Second Year
Science are students who enter this year poorly prepared,
especially those who are weak in English as well as in Mathematics and Physics, a regulation has been introduced that a
fifty per cent mark will be required in each subject of the
First Year instead of the 40$ in English and a language which
was accepted as a passing mark provided 50$ was made on the
total year's work. , Furthermore they may not proceed with
Second Year work if they have a supplemental outstanding.
3«   New Courses.
The new courses in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering mentioned in the report of last year were given during
the past session.  In addition in Mechanical Engineering new
courses in Mechanics of Materials and Prime Movers have been
introduced.
A course in Health Education was given to the
students of the Social Service Course, and the coming session a
cotrse in Public Health will also be given to this class. These
Health courses might be open to other students of Arts or
Agriculture if it should be considered desirable.
4.  More Important Changes in Courses
Mining 6 is being changed from a Draughting course to (36)
REPORT OF THE DEAff
OF APPLIED SCIENCE (continued)
a Seminar in the second term,
In Nursing and Health the courses given by members
of the permanent staff are being lengthened with a corresponding
shortening of courses given bycertain part-time lecturers.
5. Double Course Leading to the Degrees of B.A., and B,A.Sc«
in Nursing and Health.
In conformity with the practice that has been followed
in Engineering of granting the double degree by taking an
extra year in Arts, a six year double course is now offered
in Arts and Nursing, that it is hoped will prove attractive to
women students.  The brightest students come, to the University
too young to enter Nursing, and having started in Arts naturally
wish to secure the Arts degree. Heretofore if they wished to
secure the Nursing training four or perhaps five more years
were required, which few undertake.  It is hoped that many of
the students may no?/ take this double course, and also that
students who come to the University for Nursing may be induced
to broaden their education by entering for the Arts degree as
well, as this will greatly benefit the profession.
6. Researches under Way.
Chemical Engineering - reported in Arts
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering.
Increment Losses in Direct Current Machines.
The effect of armature reaction with the brushes
in the neutral position on the compounding of
D.C. generators.
Limiting value of the slip for pulling into step
in the synchronous induction machine and also
its other characteristics.
Mechanism of explosion in gaseous mixtures with
an attempt to settle the question of afterburning
and variation of specific heats using the Cathode
Ray Oscillograph. (37)
REPORT OF THE DEAN
OF APPLIED SCIENCE (Continued
Rectification of dry contacts by the oscillograph
Commutation in polyphase commutation motors
Regenerative braking in iUCmotors generally.
Forest Engineering.
In cooperation with Eddy Tree Breeding station in
Forest Nursery.
A test of various species of pine trees, various
other species, mulches, fertilizers and weed killers are being
tried.
Geological Engineering.    reported in Arts.
Mining Engineering -  general research in ore dressing,
7.  Increased Accommodation.
The number of students in Applied Science is 48$
greater than when the present accommodation was planned. It
allowed for an increase of 25$ except in one or two instances,
when a 50$ increase was anticipated.  In Mechanical and Electrical
Engineering the increase in the numbers of students is 100$.
Accommodation is taxed almost all along the line,
except where it has been possible to subdivide classes.  The
possibilities of such subdividing seems to have been exhausted
due to time table limitations.
NEEDS
I. Immediate
(a)   Class Rooms.
Lecture Room for Applied Science Second Year to
seat 150.
202, the present room, has seating for 112 but the
class has numbered 124 at the beginning of the session.
If a larger room is provided Room 202 will be available
for Third Year Science whose present room seats 72 only,
whereas the class last year numbered 77. (38)
REPORT OF THE DEAN
OF APPLIED SCIENCE, (continued
An extra class room is needed for Electrical and
Mechanical Engineering and a small classroom for Nursing.
Laboratories.
A draughting room to accommodate about 45 students is
required by the Department of Electrical and Mechanical
Engineering.
A new laboratory for the Junior Class in Electrical
Engineering is required. This would enable the present
Junior Laboratory to be used by the Senior Class, which
with its present laboratory would provide it with
sufficient accommodation. Both these laboratories are
at present badly overcrowded.
The Hydraulic and Testing Laboratory of the Department
of Civil Engineering is too small.  About 25 feet
should be added to it.
The Department of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering
asks for an aeronautics laboratory, and a Department
reference library and reading room.
(c)    Offices
A small office is required for the Assistant to the
Dean. At present he has no place for his work but has to
rendezvous with the student at my office and then find a
classroom or laboratory that is for the moment free, where
they may work together.  It is becoming increasingly
difficult to find such a room and if successful the
chances are that in a short time they are driven out by
an assembling class.
An office is required for the Instructor in Nursing.
An additional office is required for the Department
of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering.
Anticipated Needs - 1935
Needless to say it is impossible to foresee the developments in Applied Science in half a teoade. It depends
first uuon the industrial expansion of the Province, (39
REPORT OF THE DEM
OF APPLIED SCIENCE continued)
second upon the continuation of the drift of male students
from pure Arts to Professional courses, and thirdly upon
whether the newly constituted Commerce Course attracts
many students into commerce who formerly came into Ar.plied
Science.
At the moment it seems probable that the rate of growth
during the coming five years will not be so rapid as
during the past five years, in v/hich event the accommodation
mentioned above as urgent may be sufficient for 1935 except
as noted below:
Two additional class rooms - one for Nursing and one
for Electrical.
A High Tension Laboratory.  This is wanted now.
A laboratory and museum for Nursing about double the
present one.
Two offices, one for Nursing and one for Electrical.
8    Other Matters:
(a) A full time employee is required for the Forest Laboratory and Nursery. The Forest on the Campus is a priceless asset from educ ational, aesthetic and recreational
standpoints, but it requires constant care and never-
ceasing work to preserve it and to develop its full potentialities.
(b) The Departments of Civil Engineering and Electrical
and Mechanical Engineering are anxious for facilities to
enable graduate work leading to the M.A.Sc to be offered
in these Departments.
9.   Publications  (See list of Publications).
Respectfully submitted,
R.W.Brock.
Dean. (40)
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
The work of the year has been carried on in the
same general way as in former years. Some changes in detail
should however be noted.
The immediately previous report drew attention to
the changing emphasis in Agriculture. While all teaching has
received and must receive prompt and careful attention, the
tendency has been to lay a still greater emphasis on research.
There are certain pressing problems and an endeavour has been
made to bring the best information, ability and energy that
the science departments can offer to bear on them.  This
principle of departmental cooperation and coordination can well
be exemplified by reference to two examples:
(1) Fowl Paralysis — where the Departments of Poultry
Husbandry, Bacteriology and Zoology are cooperating.
(2) Plant Genetics — where the Departments of Agronomy
and Botany are cooperating — in both teaching and
research.
Other examples are to be found in the Animal Husbandry,
Chemistry and Horticulture Departments.
The tendency seems to be that while departmental
integrity is still maintained, the men in the departments work
in steadily improving cooperation.
The most far-reaching changes in teaching policy are
to be found in the 1930-31 Calendar. These are the results of
discussions held throughout the whole of the academic year.  In
principle the courses are now more fluid and are so arranged
that the requirements and needs of the individual student can
be met.  In addition to the options previously referred to in
the Calendar, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture,
Poultry Husbandry, Plant Pathology and Entomology, some
emphasis can now be laid on Plant and Animal Genetics, Plant
and Animal Nutrition, Soil Bacteriology, Dairy Bacteriology,
Agricultural Economics and Marketing and other subjects specifically in the field of Agriculture. A student can now take a
general course in preparation for farming or "District Agriculturist" work or can take a more specifio pure science course
in preparation for post graduate work in the highly specialized
fields of study. (41)
REPORT OF THE DEAN
OF AGRICULTURE (continued
It might be of interest at this point to note that
all students of the senior class— both those who completed and
those who did not— were either placed in technical positions
or had decided on their future course, before the date of congregation.  There is a marked demand for good men in the several
fields of Agriculture.
Special reference should be made to the grant of
$2,000,00 for Research Equipment. The whole amount was used to
equip a plant nutrition laboratory in the Department of Horticulture. For this purpose Room 104 and the adjoining preparation room in the Agriculture Building were reconstructed and are
now being used for the purposes planned.  Dr. Harris, Assistant Professor of Horticulture, devotes practically his v/hole
time to research. Special mention is made of this work elsewhere.
The construction of a seven compartment greenhouse
during the year marks a definite step forward in the research
and teaching programmes.  This "Laboratory" might be considered
a joint enterprise in that rooms are being used by the Departments of Zoology, Botany, Agronomy, Horticulture and Plant
Genetics.  Each room has separate controls for electric appliances,
light, heat, humidity and temperature.  It should also be stated
that while a number of departments v/ork in these houses, the
technical management i3 under the Department of Horticulture.
This saves considerable expense to the University as a whole
but cuts rather heavily into the budget of the Department of
Horticulture.
The construction of a hard surfaced road north of
the Farm Buildings has proved a great convenience and has made
all farm buildings more readily accessible besides reducing
the fire hazard to a large degree.
In the Department of Poultry Husbandry four small
breeding houses were constructed to permit of the extension of
the work in Genetics.  These houses are satisfactory.
The Faculty has been particularly fortunate in
receiving grants for special researches. Mention only is made
of these at this point as some are dealt with more specifically
in the department reports. (42)
REPORT OF THE DEAN
OF AGRICULTURE (continued)
Empire Marketing Board - For research into
Cheese Ripening Processes $3,500.00
Powell River Company - For research in
Pulp and Paper 5,000.00
National Research Council - For research
into an Alleged Feed Flavour in Milk      3,000.00
National Research Council - For research in
Poultry Paralysis. 2,000.00
$13,500.00
Toward the close of the year a very definite attempt
was made to put the Farm Survey v/ork on a more efficient basis.
Hitherto this work has been directed by three departments and
the Dean*  The items in the Budget for this work have now
been brought together and the work of two departments coordinated
under the direction of one man, Professor Hare of the Department
of Animal Husbandry. Mr. Hare is directly responsible to the
Dean of the Faculty for this work.
I wish to record also my regret at the necessary
retirement because of ill health of Professor P.A.Boving as Head
of the Department of Agronomy.  Mr. Boving came to British
Columbia in 1916 and rendered excellent service as Head of the
Department from 1919 to 1929.  He is continuing as a Professor
in the Department.  Since the retirement of Professor Boving,
Dr. G. G* Moe has carried on as Professor and Head of the Department.
The student registration has remained approximately
the same during the past few years.  The number of degree grade
was fifty.  While this appears low when compared to the registration in Arts and Science, it nevertheless compares very
favourably with the other agricultural faculties in Canada. The
registration decreased steadily for a number of years, but
during the last few years has remained practically constant.  I
believe an increase in registration can be looked for next year,
especially in the First and Second Years. (43)
REPORT OF THE DEAN
T^FAIJRICULTURE (continued)
A few words on the general principle of organization
± feel v/ould not be out of place.  Over a period of more than
ten years an effort has been made to bring together a staff
of competent men who v/ould supplement and complement each
other.  The soil is basic to all v/ork and we now have an
experienced man in soil bacteriology and chemistry; the interrelations of plants and soils are considered in the laboratory
in the Department of Horticulture (Plant Nutrition or Plant
Chemistry and Plant Physics); the improvement of the plants
and animals is provided for in the Departments of Poultry
Husbandry and Agronomy (Plant and Animal Genetics); a small
beginning has been made in Animal Pathology (Fowl Paralysis);
and special studies in Dairy Products are being made in the
Department of Dairying (Bacteriology and Bio-Chemistry);
Plant Pathology is in the Department of Botany, Faculty of
Arts; the economic aspects are given some consideration
(Agricultural Economics). An attempt has been made to give
consideration to all the main points of an efficient organization.
The §2,000.00 annual grant for research equipment
which I hope it will be possible to continue v/ill permit of
the better equipment for research of one department each year.
The grant is fundamental to the progress of the v/ork.
THE SHORT COURSES
The Short Courses have proved to be popular. During
the past year three have been held, one each in Poultry Husbandry,
Horticulture and Animal Diseases and Nutrition. The tendency
in the Short Courses is toward the more definite and specific
topics. The students are demanding more accurate information.
General discussions seem to be less popular. A feature of the
courses v/as the hearty cooperation of the Provincial and Dominion
officials for which our sincere thanks and appreciation are
hereby expressed.  The registration was 124.
THE 2XTENSIGT1 SCHOOLS
The Extension Schools were first organized in 1919
and carried on for five years with assistance from funds voted
under the Agricultural Extension Act.. They were discontinued
in 1924. Last Winter an attempt was made to revive them and (44)
REPORT OF THE DEAF -
OF AGRICULTURE (continued)
courses were held at Invermere and Nakusp. They proved to be
popular and I believe some good was done.  It is planned to
continue this work.
Special needs are dealt with by the departments but
I wish to emphasize the advisability of further consideration
of the requests that are made from time to time for more
clerical and technical assistance.   The estimates for this
year will further emphasize this point.
Respectfully submitted
F. M. Clement
Dean. U5)
REPORT OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN
As Dean of Women I beg to submit the following
report of the work of my Department for the year 1929-30.
As usual, this report must be somewhat general and Informal
in character and may be summed up under the following general
headings: Academic, Housing, Student Organizations, Employment, Social, Vocational, General.
ACADEMIC:   I have conferred with students and their parents
and v/ith professors who have asked for information and advice
about many matters such as the student's lack of ability in
certain courses, lack of interest generally in college work,
lack of sufficient money to continue in college, etc.
HOUSING:   I have inspected boarding houses for out-of-
town students, have advised regarding the housing of the
women students and of a number of the men, have kept closely
in touch with house-holders to ensure that, as far as possible
the discipline and conditions of a well-conducted home prevail
in their houses.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS:  As Honorary President of the Women's
Undergraduate Society, the Panhellenie Council, the International
Club, the Studio Club, and the Women's Literary Society I have
attehded meetings and have advised in the arrangement of programs
and in other matters, and have spoken at numerous student
meetings.  The new system of "bidding" for sororities which
was initiated last year by which the announcement and the
acceptance of "bids" are made through the office of the Dean
of Women has worked out satisfactorily and the students have
voted to continue it. Progress during the year has been made
also in the direction of the reduction of the number of social
functions in connection with "rushing".  After many conferences
and much informal discussion the disadvantages inseparable from
the sorority system seem to have been reduced to a minimum.
Early in the autumn I assisted with the organization
of a Public Speaking Course in the second year and acted as
Judge and Critic at the weekly meetings.
EMPLOYMENT: Although the new Employment Bureau has shown some
activity, the majority of persons who will give v/ork to women
students, and probably all of the women students who wish to
obtain work during the college term or during the vacation,
apply for assistance at my office.  I have placed students who
have given light services for room and board, taken care of (46)
REPORT OF THE DSAT7
OF WOJlEB' (continued)
children, tutored backward or delicate children, and who
have performed other services by which they earned the whole
or part of their way through college.  I have also placed a
number of girls for the summer in summer hotels and camps,
housev/ork, in stores, in the Y.W.C.A. and in other v/ork which
v/ill make possible their return to the University next fall.
SOCIAL:   In the capacity of chaperon I have attended
practically all of the functions organized by the students
under the name of the University and have been consulted by
them in their preparations.
Complaints are voiced, sometimes, about the
excessive social life in our University, but, as a matter
of fact, there are more unsocial or socially inexperienced
girls than oversocial.  A special effort has been made to
interest such girls in one of the student activities, and
also to bring them together under conditions v/hich v/ill break
down the inhibitions caused by timidity, supersensitiveness,
lack of money and other causes.  It need not be recorded that
due care has been taken in this connection not to encroach
upon the study time of the students concerned.
At Thanksgiving and at Christmas, arrangements
were made that all the out-of-town women students who could
not go home had an invitation for part of the vacation from
some place in the city.  In this work I was assisted by the
Convener of the Student Welfare Committee of the Faculty
Women's Club and by the President of the Women's Undergraduate
Society.
I have kept in touch withstudents who have been
ill, or in financial or other distress.
I have also assisted in securing loans for women
students and have placed gifts of money, clothing and text
books from the University Women's Club, McGill Women's Association and other sources v/ith deserving students who were
not entirely successful in their efforts to earn their way
through, and others who were unexpectedly in need.
VOCATIONAL:  Much time has been spent in advising a large
number of the women students in their choice of a vocation,
giving them literature, information regarding the number of
openings, the necessary preparation and where it can be obtained,
the demands of the work, the financial and other rewards, the
promotional possibilities etc (47)
REPORT OF THE DEAN
OF WOMEN (continued)
GENERAL:  During the year I have been consulted about their
teaching and other problems by a large number of graduates of the
University, have served on two national and on a number of local
committees and have been the President of the Vancouver University
Women's Club.  I have delivered a number of addresses to various
organizations, among them the Women's Canadian Clubs of Vancouver,
Victoria and Nanaimo, Teachers Conferences, etc
Since the presenting of my last report I have
represented the Canadian Federation of University Women on the
Council of the International Federation of University Women at
their triennial conference in Geneva, have attended as a delegate
the biennial conference of the World Federation of Educational
Institutions and have spent some weeks in college residences
chiefly in Oxford and London.
I am asked by the Executive Committee of the Second
Pan-Pacific Women's Conference to head the delegation of women
from Canada at the meeting of the Conference in Honolulu next
Augus t.
Respectfully submitted,
Mary L. Bollert.
Dean. Us)
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE SUi&ES S3S3I0F OF 1930.
I beg to submit herewith a copy of the report of
the Summer Session of 1930:
PREPARATORY READING EXAMINATIONS.
Number of students registered for examinations
Number of students who wrote examinations and
passed in all papers
Number of students who wrote examinations and
passed in some papers only
Number of students who withdrew - giving
notice
Student deceased
Number of students registered who did not
write examinations, but changed courses
to 4 l/2 units of work
Number of students not in attendance - did
not give notice of withdrawal
73
28
3
10
1
25
5
~T5
Number of supplementals
ENROLMENT, NUT[355 WRIT]   LtAi: C
10
COMPLETED
YEAR
ENROLLED
WROTE EXAMINATIONS  YEAR      WITHDREW
Partial
32
27
•          -
First
164
157
31          2
Second
135
130
17 (1 by    2
supplemental)
Third
47
45
10
Fourth
28
27
8 (and 1
from Second Year) -
Graduates
49
38
3
Social Service
_3
3
3
Totals
458
427
69
Of the 9 who completed the Fourth Year, 3 took all their
work in Summer Sessions and late afternoon classes. (   9)
ENROLMENT AT SftJMKES SESSIONS     1926-1930
Year
Total
Enrolment
University
Courses
Commercial
Work
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
438
487
402
427
458
385
448
357
383
53
39
45
44
(Commercial v/ork no longer taken in
connection v/ith University - all
students enrolled for University
v/o rk).
PUBLIC LECTURES
July 9
July 16
July 23
July 30
Aug.  6
"Naturalism and Spiritualism"
Dr. J. M. McEachran,
"The Problem of Three Bodies"
Dr. D. Buchanan.
"Exhibit of Reproductions of Famous Paintings
President L. S. Klinck.
"Modern Literature and the New Universe"
Dr. L. A. Stevenson.
"As Custodians of our Traditions."
Professor D.C.Harvey.
With the exception of No. 3, the lectures were not
ver;/ well attended.  These lectures v/e re held on Wednesdays
from 4 to 5 p.m. so as not to interfere with the regular lectures
and laboratory periods.
SEQUENCE OF COURSES
The arrangement of courses into Constants (chiefly required
courses of the first two years) and Variables (chiefly Third and
Fourth Year courses, offered in alternate years) seems to be working
satisfactorily. The registration for certain courses, however, did (50
not warrant the offering of these courses. Instructors had
been engaged in March and it did appear to be unsatisfactory
to inform them in July that their services would not be required.
To prevent the heavy charge upon the finances of the Summer
Session of giving courses for fewer than 18 (or 10 ?) students,
it is suggested that certain courses for which a small registration
is anticipated be marked in the Announcement with an asterisk
and a note added to the effect that unless at least 18 (or 10?)
candidates notify the Director on or before April 1 (or some
other specified date in the spring) of their intention of taking
this course, the course will not be offered. Unless some such
arrangement as this is made it will be exceedingly difficult
to put into effect ,the ruling of the Board that no courses be
given to fev/er than 18,  In view of the fact that such courses
are mainly of the Third and Fourth Years and are to be offered
in alternate years, and, further, since these courses have
frequently fewer than 18 students in the winter session, it is
respectfully suggested that the minimum be changed from 18 to 10.
PREPARATORY EXAMINATIONS AND REGISTRATION
As already noted, very few students (31) took the
preparatory reading examinations. An outline of the preparatory
readings for each course appears in the Summer Session Announcement and no "extra-mural" work is given in connection v/ith these
readings.  The candidate prepares his work by himself and writes
the examinations at the opening of the Summer Session.  In
view of the fact that there is no extra-mural assistance given
during the winter, it does not seem necessary to require registration for these courses by November 30th (later extended to
December 31st).  It is therefore proposed that the last day
for registration for preparatory reading examinations be May 15
and that a fee of $2 be charged at the time of registration. If
the candidate attends the Summer Session immediately following,
this fee will apply towards his fees for that session whether
he v/rites the preparatory examinations or not.  In no case is
the ;?2 fee returnable or carried over for a later session.
OPENING
Two days at the beginning of the session v/ere devoted
to the preparatory and supplemental examinations. Since so
few wrote these examinations it is proposed that they be held
on the first Saturday after the opening. This will permit the (51.)
lectures to begin on July 2 (or the opening date) and to close
two days earlier than formerly.
LIBRARY
Fev/er students than v/ere anticipated made use of the
Library for the preparatory readings.  At present there is a
collection of over 200 volumes marked and reserved for "Preparatory
Readings". Last year the total number of these volumes loaned
was 17 and only 7 different books were taken out.  It is suggested
that the $500 set aside for sueh books be turned over to the
Library Committee for the general book-appropriation and that
the volumes already marked for Preparatory Readings be placed
in general circulation.
CONCLUSION
In conclusion the Director for the year 1930-31 desires
to record his appreciation of the splendid spirit of cooperation
manifested by all the teaching staff and others connected with the
Summer Session; and not least is his appreciation of the harmonious
spirit prevailing among the student body.
Respectfully submitted,
D. Buchanan,
Director (52)
REPORT OF THE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
The Report of this Committee was printed and
distributed to members of the Senate and to members of
the Board of Governors shortly after the beginning of the
1930-31 academic year.
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION COMMITTEE.
The period covered by the Report submitted by Dr.
W.L.MacDonald, Secretary of the Committee, is from April
1st, 1929 to torch 31st, 1930.
During this period the number of lectures reported
was 207, of which 62 were arranged through the Committee.
The total attendance reported was 18,608, or an average of
about 90 persons per lecture. (53)
REPORT OF THE ACTING - HEAD OF THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE.
I have the honour to present herewith,
My Report on the University Health Service for
1929-30, including:
Report to me of the Medical Examiner, Dr.Harold
White, and
Report to me of the Public Health Nurse, Mrs. CA.
Lucas.
Respectfully submitted,
H. W. Hill,
Acting-Head.
The year 1929-30 was satisfactory in the progress that
was made in the Office Records, through a whole-time stenographer, financed by special grant; in the establishing of a
regular budget for this service; in the relative smoothness
and promptness of the service given,, due to the earnest work
of the Public Health Nurse and her increased office facilities,
and finally, in the degree of success achieved in the main
objective of this service - the good health of the students-
which was dependent, at least in part, on the previously
recited factors.
No serious epidemic outbreak occurred; although several
infectious students were discovered.  They were promptly
isolated, and correlative precautionary measures were taken
with the other students thus being exposed.
Of the recommendations I wish to make or which have
been made to me, those not yet arranged for and which I v/ish
to call to your attention are as follows:-
(I)  That the question be reopened of establishing a
"caution-money" fund from "conscientious objectors", for
the care of smallpox cases arising amongst them. (54)
(2) That consideration bo given,(in conference with Dr.
Young) to the triple position still held by Mrs. Lucas as Public Health Nurse of the University Health Service, of the
Medical Health Office of the University Endowment Lands, and of
the Medical Inspection Service of the University Hill School.
This with a view to relieving her of the rapidly increasing
v/ork of the latter, which makes it increasingly difficult for
Mrs. Lucas to cover satisfactorily all her numerous duties
without grave danger of physical injury to herself. I therefore renew my previous suggestion that an assistant nurse be
secured to act under her in all her capacities; or that Mrs.
Lucas be definitely and entirely relieved of the School v/ork.
The former of these alternatives is to my mind much the better,
since v/hile sufficiently freeing her, it v/ould also permit her
to keep the run of the health conditions in the school and
therefore also in the University Endowment Lands. This latter
work is part of her duties as Public Health Nurse to the Medical
Health Officer of the University Endowment Lands, and it is the
latter v/ork which is the source of the major part of her income,
i.e. that part supplied by the Provincial Health Office.
(3) That in view of the future needs of the University
in Physical Education, a Committee be appointed to draw up a
plan into v/hich developments as they become possible may be
fitted. Data in considerable quantity has been collected by
me from other Universities and could readily be compiled forour
Own guidance if authorization be granted.
(4) In our one case of diphtheria in a University student who had exposed many others, an attempt to take cultures of
the student contacts failed of efficient results from the difficulty of securing the students promptly for examination.
Wholesale culturing of students under the above circumstances is not as practical in the University as it is in a
school, nor is it as much called for, except under special circumstances, since 90$ of adults are immune.
Should diphtheria again similarly appear at some
future time, examination of all sore throats by inspection, with
cultures from suspicious ones, and warning of all contacts should
be substituted for wholesale cultures; the latter to be done
only if required by the Medical Health Officer. (55)
(5) That the Medical Certificates presented to Deans after
return of students from absences during term be filed immediately
thereafter by tho student with  the University Health Service.
Respectfully submitted,
HeW.Hill
Acting-Head.
REPORT OF TEE MEDICAL EXAMINE? CF ST7DENTE
I beg to submit the annual report upon the physical
examinations of students entering the University for the first
time, women participating in major athletics, and certain
students whoso physical condition was unsatisfactory last year
The most striking fact brought out by examination
this year as in former years, was that ae the termTs work proceeded the physical condition of the students receded.  In discussing this fact v/ith the individual students the inevitable
conclusion was reached that not enough time is devoted to physical
education, an important part of a brosd education.
Another striking fact brought out. was that large
numbers of students are using to the limit of endurance, - eyes
that are very defective, and unrelieved by the use of lenses,
here in the city, whore relief may be so easily obtainod.
A few are attending- lectures v/ith defective hearing,
undoubtedly a great handicap.
Many, chiefly those from outlying districts have defective teeth which are undermining their health.
Careful account was kept of the localities v/here
students having the above mentioned defects had. received their
preliminary education, and it was noted that comparatively few
had attended the Vancouver city schools where a constant health
service is maintained. (56)
Hernia was found in a considerable number v/ho had not
known the fact -one of these had been playing rugby. Organic
disease of tho heart was found in five students or .75 per •
cent of those examined. The usual number of such cases found
in school children is one per cent. Tv/o cases of albuminuria
were found.
In cases of heart and kidney trouble the students v/ere
told as little as possible - some students were  not  told at
all,  but  in each of the above mentioned conditions,  the parents
or family doctors v/ere notified by telephone or letter.
It is satisfactory to note that 76 per cent of the men
and 78 per cent of the v/omon have been successfully vaccinated
at some   time during their  lives.
Inmost cases of those re-examined this year,  considerable  improvement was noted,  but  as usual only a small percentage
of those found decidedly unfit physically last year had returned
for their second year at the University.
The new system of notifying each student of his  time for
examination and of obtaining his presence at that  time v/orked
admirably;  a great improvement upon conditions obtaining  in former years.
Through the kindness of Dr.  F.C.Bell, General Superintendent of  the Vancouver General Hospital, we v/ere again allowed
to use  the Out-Patient rooms at the Hospital, v/hich are v/ell
suited to  our purpose.
Respectfully  submitted
Harold White,
Medical Examiner of Students (57)
HEP01T OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH NURSI
In presenting the third annual report covering
the work of the' 1929-30 session, as part-time Public Health
Nurse in the University Health Service of the University of
British Columbia, I must first make brief reference to the
study made of the University Health Service throughout Canada,
during last July.
I am very much indebted to President Klinck v/hose
introductions made the study possible and pleasant, and secured
for me., a cordial reception from the various officials, who
placed themselves unreservedly at my disposals and gave me all
the time necessary to cover the requirements of the study. This
study, a copy of which ycu have, shows three points of interest
to this University, namely: (I) Physical Education is compulsory and non-credit in all of the Universities under survey.
(2) Vaccination is a compulsory law in the provinces of Quebec
and Ontario, thus, employees and students entering the Universities of these provinces must be vaccinated, and no time is
wasted by the University Health Officials in argument: people
entering are merely required to conform to the Provincial Law.
(3) The University of British Columbia is the only University
in Canada providing a Public Health Nursing Service.
I.  First Aid Department.   (All chronic treatments have been
eliminated from the service.)
Eighteen hundred and forty-one interviews and consultations were held, including members of the Faculty, Staff
and Workmen.
Seven hundred and eighteen students sought advice
about health and various physical defects.  Of this group, (a)
one hundred and fifty-seven were referred respectively to: the
Family Physician, Specialists, or to Dentists.  The remaining
group, (b) coming within the province of the University Health
Service were given advice and the usual "follow-up", where this
procedure was indicated. Approximately twenty-two students
received injuries at Rugby which involved minor dislocations and
fractures, and were referred to Physicians. All other injuries
received attention at the Department,  Three students have had
Appendectomy performed as a result of being referred to
Physicians. (58
Follcw-up of Defects found by Medical Examiner.
Seven hundred end thirty-six students were sent to
the Medical Examiner for the purpose of having their Medical
Physical Examination,
Supervision of Infection.
A very strict supervision of all contacts has been
observed throughout the session,  A glance at the Statistical
Report under the heading "Communicable Diseases", will show
the gratifying results of this supervision.
IV. Vaccination.
There are still a number cf students who do not treat
the Vaccination Questionaire with the respect it merits; this
number, however, is decreasing each year.  Attached hereto, ejid
for your information, we have prepared a special report on the
numbers of students who have been vaccinated at any time. The
report shows that eighty-six point two- eight percent, of all
first year students have been vaccinated. Among this group are
included nine students who, although not vaccinated, have had
Smallpox at some time, and who have been listed among those
considered to be immune, in order to facilitate statistics.
The above plan obtains with regard to second year
students, eighty-nine point nine - one percent.of whom are
vaccinated. Four of this group have had Smallpox at some time.
As my efforts have been directed chiefly to first
and second year students, the percentageT  eighty-five point
three-nine percent, of vaccinated students for all years must
be taken as approximate, since many of the senior students failed
to fill in the Vaccination Questionaire and time has not permitted further investigation.  I think that the showing is very
satisfactory and I must draw your attention to the fact of this
report being based on the full registered student population,
numbering one thousand nine hundred and four.
Students of all years filing Affidavits of Conscientious Objection number one hundred and seventy-five; of these,
one hundred were received this year.
V. Health Education.
Two hundred and forty students have registered for (59)
Health Education.
Sanitary Inspection.
Cafeteria inspection shows no hand-washing facilities
adjacent to the toilet used by the Waitresses; this is at variance
with our recommendations of previous years. May I suggest that
an additional room be added to this Department for the use of
the women workers?
Improvements made in U.H.S. Offices.
The appointment of a stenographer for the full session
has simplified the work and has allowed a full time service to
function.
The removal of wash-basins from two offices has given
,us a little more room, and the addition of a fixture of wood and
glass on the lower part of the office windows has improved the
ventilation conditions appreciably.
Recommendations.
1. That the Medical Card have additional data, as
suggested in my recent discussion with you on the subject.
2. That some means be established, perhaps through
the registration card of ascertaining what, if any, employment
the student intends to take up during the course of the University
Year.
3. That if possible, the Health Service be notified
of the withdrawal of a student from the University during the first
half of the session, in order to facilitate appointments for the
Medical Examiner.
Respeotfully submitted,
C. A. Lucas.
Public Health Nurse (60)
REPORT ON THE MAINTENANCE AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE CAMPUS.
This report on campus development briefly reviews the progress made with respect to the following subjects:
1. Acreage cleared, graded, manured and seeded to either
temporary or permanent lawns.
2. Acreage cleared fcr "the Playing Fields"
3. Amount of sprinkler and watering systems installed
4. Amount of crushed granite paths, stepping stone v/alkB
and cinder roads built.
5. Quantities of trees and shrubs used.
6. Drainage systems laid, etc
There is submitted also a third "folio of plans" consisting of 20 plans making a total of 47 plans prepared from the date
of the inception of the work in 1927.
The work of campus development on its present basis commenced in the Spring of 1927, although a small amount of work was
done around the "Science Building" the previous Autumn. The first
report covered campus development which took place during the year
1927, the second report covered v/ork accomplished during 1928 and
this report accounts for the 1929 v/ork.
There are logical reasons for these reports and special
reasons for the preparation of the "plans" v/hich are submitted as
appendices to the reports*  These plans are prepared (for several
reasons) first to enable each individual problem to be studied
carefully and executed in the most economical and efficient manner.
Also the plans provide a complete record of the dates of
planting trees and shrubs, the dates of seeding the lawns and the
grass mixtures used for them, and they naturally aid in the acquisition of other data necessary for a systematic development of this
work. (61)
Further at the present time these plans constitute the
only record of the many interesting varieties of trees, shrubs
and flov/ers used on the University campus, since, owing to lack
of funds, it has been found impossible to institute, as yet,
any system of labelling the plants. For this last reason in
particular, it is most desirable to have deposited in another
building, to that in which the originals are filed, a duplicate
set of these plans as a safeguard against the possible loss of
the data through fire, etc..
It should be stated that the collections of plants on
the University campus already include species and varieties not
found elsev/here in Canada or the North-Eastern States, since
they are not hardy except in these warmer parts of British Columbia.
For that reason they are of great interest to visitors to our
Province who take an interest in flowering plants, and it is most
desirable to preserve a record v/ith respect to the history of
these plants.
1. ACREAGE IN LAWNS
Permanent Lav/ns        llf acres
Temporary Lav/ns 3§- "
The temporary lav/ns v/ill be dug up and reseeded to permanent mixtures just as soon as funds are available. In the
meantime the purpose is to encourage a good growth in order to
dig in as much sod as possible to save manure. Our lawn experiments are already furnishing valuable data which is capitalized
in supplying answers to many enquiries from the general public
2. ACREAGE CLEARED FOR THE PLAYING FIELDS      13& acres
This work has been dealt with in detail in another connection.
3. AMOUNT OF SPRINKLER_AND WATERING SYSTEMS INSTALLED
Linear feet of galvanized iron pipe of •§. li- and 2 inch
diameters 11,836 feet
Wooden stave pipe 4 inch diameter     1,250 "
The plans indicate the extent to which the lawn areas (62)
have been provided v/ith watering services.    A copy of this plan
and of  several others relating  to services are also filed in
the office of the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds.
4.       LINEAR FEET OF CRUSHED GRANITE PATHS
Linear feet  of stepping stone walks
1,496
355
These walks and paths are in all cases much cheaper  than
concrete walks and in some cases are more desirable.     They
have been built  out  of campus development funds.
5.       QUANTITIES OF PLANTING MATERIAL USED
Trees (to
the
Fall of 1929)
300
Varieties
109
Shrubs
3,055
Varieties
193
Vines
150
Varieties
6
Over 80 per cent,   of these materials have been propagated and grown by the Horticulture Department  of the University
and this Department now has several thousand additional shrubs
and  trees ready for transference  to the campus as soon as v/e arc
ready to use them.
6.       DRAINAGE SYSTEMS
Linear feet  of tile drains 1,479
Linear feet of rock drains 137
From now on very little  additional drainage v/ill have  to
be provided on the areas v/hich are now seeded to lav/ns,  since it
is expected  that the amount now installed will be adequate  to
meet future requirements.    Four inch agricultural tile has been
used in most cases. (63)
7   UTILIZATION OF ROCKS
Tons used   488
This last item has reference to tho utilisation of
rocks v/hich otherwise v/ould havo cost a considerable sum
to haul away and dump over the cliffs. They have been used to
good purpose in the construction of rock walls, rock banks
and "rockeries".  In addition to these rocks, many hundred
additional tons have been used in fills and in road-bed base
courses.  Two very good serviceable roads havo been built to
give access to the new Gymnasium.  Those roads are across a
former swamp area and they have a base of about 18 inches of
heavy rock v/here they cross this swamp area.  Thoy have beon
surfaced v/ith gravel and cinders. The walks and paths also
have been provided at a low cost.
Photographs to illustrate some of the typos of rock
construction, etc., will be filed v/ith the p3.ans at some later
date.
Respectfully submitted
F.E.Buck
Associate Professor of
Horticulture.

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