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The President's Report 1958-1959 1959

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Array THE
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
1958-1959
,5 uiumest
i*»» «*« « * **l
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THE
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
1958-1959
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER,  CANADA Lecture Theatre, Buchattzn Building. To The Board of Governors and Senate of
The University of British Columbia
Ladies and Gentlemen:
In my report last year on the occasion of our Golden Jubilee, I set
aside some of the continuing problems of the University to record
achievement of which we are all justifiably proud. With the
growth of our sister institution Victoria College in mind, I have
decided this year to consider some of the challenges facing us in
the expansion of facilities for higher education within the Province. The ceaseless demand for trained persons in our provincial
and national endeavours requires that we do all in our power to
make the rewards and benefits of higher education available to as
many of our citizens as possible.
VU. h"f4^^
N. A. M. MacKenzie,
President. "hvi Btutil Some Aspect). o'< lusher tchacuhni />.•■ By/f/sb Columbia
As the Development Fund Campaign continues to bring us the
finances we so badly need, we have been able to start some of the
most urgently required buildings on the campus. Already we have
completed the Buchanan Building, some residences, and new wings
to the Biological Sciences and Chemistry Buildings, the Faculty
Club and International House. Construction has started on an annex to the Buchanan Building, a new wing to the Library, and
new buildings for Medicine and Pharmacy. Plans are being drawn
for other buildings, and we hope to start work on them fairly soon.
Our concern for the students already at Point Grey, however,
has not blinded us to the needs of higher education in the Province
as a whole. In the last few years, I and many of my colleagues have
studied the various ways in which the University might best serve
our communities. Contrary to some reports, I have never been opposed in principle to junior colleges, and they have been the subject of much thought and discussion at the University. As we have
read the briefs in favour of various junior colleges, we have been
conscious that such institutions might help to solve some of our
own problems. Some of my colleagues have seen them as institutions which might help us provide higher education for the increasing number of people who are demanding it. Some, in spite of all
the evidence to the contrary from such places as California, have
even envisaged a situation in which junior colleges would be able
to educate the vast numbers of freshmen and sophomores, leaving
senior undergraduates and professional education to the campus
at Point Grey.
Consequently, we were very interested in the new legislation
passed this year by the Provincial Government which opened the
way to provincial and school district colleges. We have long been
aware of the fact that high school students in some parts of the Province have less chance of attending university than those in the
Lower Mainland area. One of our studies shows, for example, that
the proportion of the 15-19 year age-group coming to the University from the Lower Mainland is almost twice as great as that
coming from the Okanagan or the Peace River, and one and a half
times as great as that coming from the Kootenays, and four times
that coming from the Upper Cariboo. Even when allowances are
made for the fact that there is a higher proportion of professional
and managerial workers in the Lower Mainland (whose children
are twice as likely to come to university as the children of manual
workers), we are forced to admit that there appear to be geographical inequities in the opportunities for higher education in
the Province (see Appendix I).
As one who has repeatedly urged that we try to provide higher
education for all of our young people who have the capacity and
desire for it, who has argued indeed that the future welfare of our
society depends on our willingness to do so, I cannot look at the
present situation with satisfaction. We need as many well-educated
people as we can get. To take only one example of our shortage,
that of teachers, we estimate that Canada will need an additional
44,000 secondary school teachers in the next ten years. At present
we have 20,000. And in the universities, to maintain the present
student-teacher ratio, we shall need an additional 9,000 lecturers.
Unless we hold to the untenable assumption that our growing
population will be satisfied with fewer medical, dental, engineering, etc., services than we now require, we can expect the demands
for all educated people to rise proportionately with those for the
teachers. In recent years we have been able to staff our colleges
and universities only by bringing in large numbers of people from
other countries, particularly from the United States. As their own
educational systems expand with growing populations, however,
we shall find it increasingly difficult to secure such persons. We
must become sufficiently mature, educationally, to supply at least
a large proportion of our own needs for staff.
In addition to the inequity of the present situation and to our
self-interest in educating as many young people as are capable,
there are other arguments for junior colleges. The main ones proposed, I think, are that U.B.C. is becoming too big and that junior colleges would be beneficial to the communities in which they are
located. I cannot agree that the total size of an institution is necessarily significant. Some of the best universities in the world are very
large indeed, and are good at least in part because their size enables
talented men of wide and varied experience to work together. I
would agree that some of our classes could well be smaller and
that the student-teacher ratio could be improved so that the staff
might spend more time with individual students. But we could
make that improvement only if we were prepared to spend more
money per student than we now do. Since I cannot imagine any
government using taxes inequitably to provide, say, classes of
freshmen English of 25 in junior colleges without making the same
thing possible at the University, I cannot see that junior colleges
would substantially alter the amount of individual attention given
to students. If it is the total size of U.B.C. that is objected to, and
no one has been able to show that total size is relevant, I suggest
that as Victoria College enriches its course offerings and increases
its facilities, it will be able to accommodate more students interested in the Liberal Arts.
The other important argument for junior colleges, that they
benefit the community, is irrefutable. The typical junior college in
the U.S.A. provides two years of academic education for students
proceeding to university, terminal courses and vocational courses
for students not going to university, and adult education for the
whole community. But like many other very desirable services,
junior colleges are expensive, and we must decide as a community
whether or not we are prepared to pay for them as well as pay the
increasing costs of our schools and university. Sometimes, to students or parents who see only the immediate cost to themselves,
junior colleges appear as a less expensive way of providing education. But for the community, which is, in final analysis, responsible
for meeting the costs of a junior college, this is scarcely true. It has
been estimated that the new junior college at Lethbridge, the only
public junior college in Canada as far as I know, costs the taxpayer
more than would be spent in giving every student in attendance a
$1,200 scholarship to continue his studies at any institution of his
choice.
Any reservations I have about the desirability of promoting V
I
m
Her Majesty the Queen, H.R.H. The Prince Phillip,
Chancellor A. E. Grauer, and President N. A. M.
Mackenzie at the Faculty Club. the establishment of junior colleges are based largely on the costs
involved. Until we are prepared to spend very much more per student than we now do, I can at present see no way of making adequate financial provision for new colleges without increasing the
shortage of operating revenue for U.B.C. and Victoria College.
When one reviews the history of higher education in our Province,
one cannot fail but note how repeatedly the University has been
hampered by lack of money. In consequence, we must ever be alert
to the dangers of increasing costs through the decentralization of
higher education at this time.
On the other hand, assuming that the Province is prepared
to spend more money per student, I would like to consider the
place junior colleges might occupy in our total educational system.
It is most important that they operate, as does Victoria College,
in very close cooperation with the University, perhaps under a
common Board of Governors. And since it is unlikely that all
the communities wanting junior colleges could get them at once,
I suggest that their location and financing might be studied by an
impartial board of enquiry or Royal Commission. The junior college is essentially an American development. We have little knowledge of it in Canada, and we would certainly be obliged to draw
on the experience of our American colleagues. An impartial board
to decide on the location of such colleges seems to me essential,
particularly when we remember how the establishment of the
University was hindered by the debate between the Mainland and
Vancouver Island over a choice of site, and how in fact the first
Act to establish a university foundered in that debate.
Better, perhaps, would be an enquiry into the whole problem
of education beyond the high school in British Columbia. Such an
enquiry would determine objectively whether there is in fact a
need for junior colleges and what courses of study these junior colleges should offer to provide the maximum benefit to the citizens
of the community in which they are located. At the moment we
have only two institutions of higher education supported by the
Province, and these are located in the two principal centres of
population. In consequence, it is true that students whose homes
are beyond the immediate environs of Vancouver and Victoria
must spend more on their education than those who can live at home while continuing their studies. As a first measure, it might
be prudent to consider the possibility of making "equalization"
grants. By that I mean grants to assist the student who has to live
away from home.
It is, of course, possible to take certain elements of the University to the student rather than to bring the student to the University. For those who seek not a full programme of studies but
certain courses only which will enrich their educational experience
or prepare them for posts in society which do not require a university degree, it is quite possible and feasible to use the facilities
already available through the Department of Education or our
Department of Extension. This latter department, in cooperation
with other faculties and departments, is at present offering courses
in various parts of the Province. I can foresee a time when Extension Centres, located in the principal urban areas of British Columbia, might provide the nuclei of colleges to be developed later.
Another possibility-—perhaps the most straightforward of all
—is to foster the growth and development of Grade XIII classes
in the high schools. Elsewhere in Canada many students choose to
complete senior matriculation in the local high schools before
entering university. This is a sound and practical idea, provided
that the student at once finds himself in an academic environment
comparable to that of the University. However, there is always the
danger that Grade XIII may simply be a continuation of high
school experience and not truly an introduction to the teaching
and research methods used at a university.
If we did create junior colleges, we should have to be most
careful that they were academically equal to the universities. Here
in Canada we have been fortunate because on the whole we have
avoided complex accreditation systems. Almost without exception
our university degrees are comparable, and we are able to accept
one another's standards. It would be disastrous if we were to establish junior colleges whose graduates found that their two years of
work failed to obtain credit at a reputable university. In order that
these students be accepted, we must ensure that the staff is highly
qualified, that the library and laboratory facilities are equivalent to
to our own for the comparable years, and that the teaching and
learning conditions are the same. We cannot expect what is merely
10 a superior high school to receive the status of a university. From
the beginning, the level of instruction in junior colleges, if we are
to have them, must be equal to that of our freshman and sophomore years.
The University by virtue of the studies it has conducted in the
past, and more particularly as a result of practical experience
gained through assisting Victoria College to attain its present
status, has much to contribute to the planning of new facilities for
higher education in the Province. I would hope and expect that,
as our educational system evolves and expands to meet the growing needs of our young people, the University will be called upon
to play its proper and appropriate role. To cite but one example
of our studies, we have recently completed a most extensive survey
of the books required by undergraduates in Arts and Science. In
planning our new College Library, we have prepared a list of titles
that would serve as an excellent guide for any proposed junior
college.
Bearing in mind all I have said both for and against the development of junior colleges, there is a grave and overriding
problem facing the whole university and college system throughout Canada: staffing. Despite the fact that financial considerations
continue to loom large, they are probably capable of immediate
solution, should we so desire. However, the problem of the selection and training of competent university professors is not solved
merely by an allocation of funds. It requires at least seven to nine
years of training to produce a university lecturer, and we at the
University of British Columbia, in common with every other institution throughout the land, are experiencing considerable difficulty
in this matter of staffing. Our Department of Mathematics, for
example, could each year easily employ twice the number of Ph.D's
in mathematics trained annually in Canada.
I do not pretend that the problem of finding staff is insoluble.
So far at the University of British Columbia we have been able to
attract highly competent and qualified members of staff. Nevertheless, we are drawing increasingly on the United Kingdom and on
the United States for many of our new appointments. It seems clear
that Canada is not yet reproducing itself academically, nor do I
anticipate that it will do so within the next decade or more. How
11 htt'jrmiiond Home. long we can expect to be able to import bright young men and
women from Britain and America and other parts of the world, in
view of the expected growth in universities everywhere, I do not
know. We must anticipate a substantial decrease in the overseas
and American supply of teaching and research staff, and as a result,
we must take steps to expand our own graduate schools so that
more young Canadians can prepare themselves for teaching careers
at the university level. It will, I hope, be true that some of the
best of Canadian students will continue to go abroad to the distinguished institutions of Britain and the United States, but, as
a matter of national pride, we must do our utmost to ensure that
training at a comparable level is available in Canada for all those
who wish to continue graduate work.
The Building Programme
The success of the Development Fund has enabled the University to begin a ten-year $35,000,000 building programme. On
June 15, 1959, a total of $8,941,295 had been subscribed to the
Fund and nearly $4,800,000 had been received in cash or payments
of pledges. A summary of recent and planned construction on the
campus will be found on pages 24 and 25.
Two buildings, which were privately financed without the use
of public funds, perhaps need special comment. The Faculty Club
and Social Centre was the generous gift of Dr. Leon Koerner and
the late Mrs. Thea Koerner; International House was the gift of
the Vancouver Rotary Club. Both of these buildings, in their own
way, will I know make special contributions to university life. If
a university is to be more than a mere aggregation of people and
classrooms, there must be centres for people to meet under agreeable social circumstances for the free exchange of ideas.
The Faculty Club and Social Centre, designed by Professor
F. Lasserre, is attractive by any standard. For the first time in our
history, we have a building worthy of the faculty and of the guests
of the University. For the first time, when we entertain those who
once entertained us in other famous centres of learning, we need
neither apologize nor boast. The Club speaks for itself.
The completion of International House—the first in Canada
—is the realization of what looked like a pious hope in 1949 when
13 Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, with Chancellor
A.  E.  Grauer,  opening International House the International Students' Club was formed. The foreign student
is a traditional member of universities, and the great increase in
the number of foreign students at U.B.C. since the war is a sign of
our growing academic maturity. In a non-residential university,
however, special efforts must be made to see that foreign and native
students meet and come to understand one another. With this in
mind, in 1954 the University provided the International Students'
Club with one of our "everlasting" army huts. It was remodelled
by the Marpole Rotary Club and furnished by the Zonta Club of
Vancouver. Partly as a result of the success of that clubhouse, the
Rotary Club of Vancouver undertook to raise $150,000 for the
construction of a permanent International House on the campus.
When this was accomplished, the University provided land and
Professor Lasserre donated his services as architect. The resulting
building was formally opened by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt on March
4th, 1959. The House is a centre for the activities of the International House Club, which' is open to all students. The membership,
representing over forty different nationalities, is about 400, of
which approximately half are Canadians, in keeping with the
policy of the International House Association of bringing together
foreign and native students.
Scholarships, Prizes, Bursaries, Loans
Detailed acknowledgment of scholarships, named bursaries, prizes and other awards, with the names of the current recipients, is made twice a year in special publications for the Spring
and Autumn Congregations, but the recent announcement of the
Provincial Government's new scholarship plan makes this an
appropriate year in which to report the most satisfactory growth in
the number of awards available.
During  1958-59, our Accounting Office administered the
following awards:
no. of awards      value
University Special Bursaries     349 $ 39,292.00
Named Bursaries _     415 75,733.00
Fellowships, Scholarships, Prizes    804 218,110.00
Loans (through University)  1222 325,024.20
Dominion-Provincial Bursaries and Loans    591 209,220.00
3381 $867,379-20
15 Main Dining Roam of the Faculty Club. There were, of course, some awards not paid through our
Accounting Office. Many local organizations make their awards
directly, as do the National Research Council and the Canada
Council. The total assistance was probably over $900,000, of which
$450,000 to $500,000 was in the form of legal loans.
Thus, despite the substantial growth in registration, on a
comparative basis we have managed to provide as many awards as
heretofore. Much of the credit for the increase in scholarship funds
must go to Dean Walter Gage, the Chairman of the Committee on
Scholarships, Prizes and Bursaries. That his untiring work for the
welfare of the students is appreciated was shown by the unusual
applause when he was awarded an honorary degree at the May
Congregation 1958, and this honour bestowed by the University
was unanimously approved by faculty, students and alumni.
Provincial Government Scholarships
The Honourable W. A. C. Bennett's announcement of a
new Provincial Government scholarship scheme for the 1959-60
session was greeted with pleasure and satisfaction by us all. Under
this scheme, students who are residents of British Columbia qualify
for scholarships worth one half of their fees if they obtain first-
class standing and one third of their fees if they obtain good
second-class standing. The following figures showing the number
of students to receive these scholarships in 1959-60 gives adequate
indication of the extent to which our students are being assisted
through this programme. Some of the students may withdraw,
change their minds, go to other institutions, or change faculties,
but as I write it looks as though 1,619 students at U.B.C. will
benefit from the new scheme.
SOURCE
From University Entrance to U.B.C...
From Senior Matriculation to U.B.C.
From Victoria College to U.B.C.
Continuing at U.B.C	
CLASS I
189
23
9
231
*452
CLASS II
241
91
24
811
O                      W.-l^.V^
•(Figures approximate).
*1167
17 PubUc Occasions
The most memorable social occasion of the year, indeed of
many years, was the visit of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and
His Royal Highness The Prince Philip on July 15, 1959. We were
fortunate in that the new Faculty Club was completed just in time
to receive the Royal couple. Her Majesty and Prince Philip were
our guests at a banquet in the Club to which representatives of the
Senate, the Board of Governors, the deans, the faculty, the student
body, and the staff were invited. This great social event was made
academically memorable by the gift of $50,000 by Dr. H. R. MacMillan for graduate scholarships to commemorate the visit of the
Queen to Canada.
On October 24, 1957, honorary degrees were conferred upon:
Lieutenant-General Eedson L. M. Burns, Commander of the
United Nations Emergency Force in the Middle East, LL.D.
Mrs. Fraudena Gilroy Eaton, President of the National Council of Women, LL.D.
John Harry Williams, Director of the Research Division of
the Atomic Energy Commission of the United States, D.Sc.
In 1959 the following honorary degrees were conferred at
the Spring Congregations:
May 19, 1959:
Arnold Davidson Dunton, President of Carleton University,
LL.D.
Charles Edwin Odegaard, President of the University of
Washington, LL.D.
May 20, 1959:
Senator Donald Cameron, former Director of the Banff
School of Advanced Management, Department of Extension of the University of Alberta, etc., LL.D.
Donald G. Creighton, Professor and Head of the Department
of History, University of Toronto, LL.D.
Arthur S. P. Woodhouse, Professor and Head of the Department of English, University College, University of Toronto,
LL.D.
18 Retirements
In reporting the retirement of the following members of the
staff, I would like to express the gratitude of all those associated
with the University to these our friends, teachers, and colleagues:
Mr. F. C. Boyes, Faculty and College of Education.
Miss Marjorie Leeming, School of Physical Education and
Recreation, Assistant to the Dean of Women.
Dean Dorothy Mawdsley, Department of English, Dean of
Women.
The following members of the non-teaching staff retired after
many years of service and I should like to record my sincere appreciation for their contribution to the University:
Mr. Dennis Dyer, Buildings and Grounds.
Mr. Henry Irvine, Buildings and Grounds.
Mrs. S. Taylor, Buildings and Grounds.
Obituaries
With regret i report the deaths of the following members of
faculty:
Mr. Stanley W. Mathews, Registrar Emeritus, Sept. 4, 1958.
Dr. Albert E. Trites, formerly Clinical Associate Professor,
Obstetrics and Gynaecology (retired June 30, 1958),
May 5, 1959.
Dr. Angus Alexander MacMillan, Clinical Instructor, Surgery,
June 23, 1959-
Dr. J. Russell Neilson, Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery,
July 6, 1959-
Dr. Alec M. Agnew, Professor and Head, Obstetrics and
Gynaecology, August 11,1959-
Mr. George A. Gillies, Professor Emeritus of Mineral
Dressing, April 6, 1959.
Mr. Ellis H. Morrow, Professor Emeritus of Commerce,
June 1, 1959-
On behalf of all their colleagues and students, I acknowledge
the University's debt for devoted services.
10 Publications
The two main functions of a member of faculty are, of course,
teaching and research, and much has been said about their importance. Less has been said of the importance of communicating the
results of research to fellow scholars. Perhaps it is true that scholars have always produced rather more lights than bushels and do
not need to be reminded of their duty to make their work public,
but it is also true that they need media of communication—periodicals and books, in the main. Commercial publishers continue to
display their sense of responsibility by publishing scholarly books
that cannot possibly pay for themselves, but more and more universities have been forced to provide, and subsidize, their own presses.
We are still some way from being able to afford a university press,
and we are still unable to accept proper responsibility for scholarly
publication, but I am pleased to report that we are moving in the
right direction.
By the time you read this, our first quarterly ]ouma.l,Canadian
Literature, should be well established. We have been fortunate in
obtaining as editor a most experienced author, Mr. George Woodcock. We thus hope to provide a forum for those studying our
growing literature as well as such indispensable aids to scholarship
as annual bibliographies, reviews, and reports of work in progress.
But if Canadian Literature is our first quarterly, it is by no
means our first publication. I append a list on page 42 of works
published by the University, sometimes in conjunction with other
universities or with commercial publishers. I regret that the list is
almost certainly incomplete. Over the years, various departments
and faculties have arranged for the publication of certain works
but complete records were not kept until recently. Needless to say
I should be glad to be notified of omissions.
A report on the publications of the University is incomplete
without some notice at least of student publications. Some, like
The Ubyssey and The Totem, thrive year after year. Others, more
ephemeral, last for only an issue or two. In quality, they vary tremendously, but in the main they are no better and no worse than
undergraduate publications elsewhere. Some, like the U.B.C. Law
Review, produced by the Law Undergraduate Society, reach a high
20 academic standard and can be considered as learned journals.
Finally, there are many reports, some of which might properly be considered publications were it not for the fact that we do
not sell them. The annual reports to the Senate of the Library and
of the Extension Department, for example, frequently include
much that is of general and academic interest.
Under the chairmanship of Professor S. E. Read, the Editorial
Committee is gaining experience which we hope will lead us in
time to a university press, perhaps in cooperation with other western universities.
Communications Programme
Although it seems inevitable that the major means of communication between scholars will remain human contacts, books
and journals, it may well be that communication between scholars
and the general public will take other forms. Believing that popularization is important and that the newer media of radio and
television are worth studying in themselves, the University was
happy to begin in 1957 an experimental communications programme, financed by a grant from the B.C. Association of Broadcasters.
The grant was intended to enable the University to investigate
its own role in the field of broadcasting and, more particularly, to
explore means by which those in the broadcasting industry could
improve their services to the public. Initially the programme had
three objectives:
(a) To provide a regular series of night classes, conferences,
short courses and seminars for broadcasting personnel in British
Columbia;
(b) to develop the facilities of the University for working in
all kinds of mass communications;
(c) to begin work in such areas as audience research, media
studies, and the communication of the fine arts.
The whole programme was designed with one principle in
mind, that the handling of the technical means of broadcasting
such as television cameras, broadcasting schedules, film production, etc., should not become separated from the more theoretical
kinds of investigation.
21 Under the programme, we have organized a considerable
number of lecture series, seminars, etc. The following is a representative rather than a complete list, but it does give some idea of
the scope of our activities and the degree to which we have been
able to work with various university departments on the one hand
and the broadcasting industry on the other.
Courses
Introduction to Television
Film Production
Speech for Broadcasting
Introduction to Radio
Research Methods and
Measurement
Commercial Writing for
Broadcasting
News for Broadcasting
Summer School, 1959
Communications Seminar
Mr. James Patterson (CBC)
Mr. Robin Pearce
(UBC Extension)
Dr. P. Read Campbell (UBC
Faculty of Education)
Mr. John Ansell (CKWX)
Dr. D. T. Kenney
(UBC Psychology)
Mr. Sam Fogel
(Cockfield-Brown)
Mr. Dorwin Baird
Speech for Broadcasting
Film Production
Dr. Marshal McLuhan,
Department of English,
St. Michael's College,
University of Toronto
Dr. P. Read Campbell
Mr. Ronald Kelly
Conferences and Short Courses
Radio in the Future of Canada. Financed by the grant previously
mentioned and the Koerner Foundation, the Conference was attended by representatives of the CBC, BBC, American broadcasting
agencies and Canadian private stations.
Short Course on Communications. Conducted by Dr. W. S.
Schramm, Director of the Institute of Communications Research,
Stanford University; Mr. Albert Shea, Canadian Research Agency,
Toronto; and Mr. Gene Duckwall, Foote Cone Belding, Los
Angeles.
In cooperation with the Extension Department and with other
22 departments in the University, we have provided a series of lectures
on the CBC and have helped private stations use material prepared
by the National Association of Educational Broadcasters. The
CBC series included the following:
Dr. Blair Neatby (History) Ten Canadian Portraits
Dr. Avrum Stroll (Philosophy)      Philosophy and Religion
Dr. John Conway (History) Modern Germany
Miss M. Primeau Contemporary French Drama
(Romance Studies)
Dr. M. Mackenzie (English) The English Novel
Dr. M. Mackenzie (English) Modern Poetry
The University continues to take a serious interest in broadcasting, in view of the profound influence it has on our lives and
society. We hope that U.B.C. can become a major centre for the
study of communications. Already we have learned much about the
history and operation of broadcasting in Canada and have developed with members of the industry relationships which we expect
to be profitable both to them and to us.
23 i ---iif
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The New Look on Campus
COMPLETED
COST DATE
Buchanan Building (Arts and Science) ..$2,000,000 October, 1958
International House       229,873 March, 1959
(Gift of Vancouver Rotary Club)
Faculty Club and Social Centre. .5. .....     750,000 June^ 1959
(Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Leon J.'^oerner)
Student Residence No. 3-i. -J      486,833 June, 1959
Student Residence  No. 2...     416,796 September, 1959
Student Residence   No. 1..      416,796 September, 1959
Chemistry Building Addition  1,659,665 September, 1959
Biological Sciences Addition  1,381,987 August, 1959
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
COST DATE
Dining and Social Block      929,064 January, I960
South Wing to Library $1,500,000 September, I960
Pharmacy Building ....r      500,000 September, I960
Wing to Buchanan Building 1  1,400,000 September, i960
Student Residence No. 4 !.      417,386 September, i960
Medical Sciences Centre i  2,800,000 September, 196I
IN PLANNING
Fine Arts Building (Music, Drama,
Visual Arts, Architecture)  1,500,000
Education Building  2,500,000
Power House and Services      500,000
Addition to Physics Building ...1... 1,000,000
Engineering Buildings,
(Mechanical, Electrical, Mining
Metallurgical, Chemical)  JR  3,000,000 plus
i|
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
COST Artists'
Additional Residences $1,500,000 Drawings
Agriculture and Forestry -.  1,000,000 by
Administration Building   1,000,000 Thompson
Faculty of Dentistry  2,000,000 Berwick &
Physical Education and Recreation  500,000 pratt,
Cafeteria   Facilities  ..  500,000 'vaimttj
Additional Power and Services  500,000 Architects
(**k ;
f  "'unilnirmniipf im^PmnrBPrir'™      1
..in*-*
I m
Biological Sciences Addition.
-
1
Chemistry Addition
Medical Sciences Centre. The Library
A full account of the work of the Library appears in The
Report of the University Librarian to the Senate, copies of which
are available to members of the University. Consequently, the brief
report which follows does not pretend to be complete.
Two major collections of books were added this year, the
Thomas Murray collection of some 20 thousand volumes, including some rare and important items of Canadiana, and the P'u-pan
collection of 45 thousand works in Chinese. The general collections in the Library continue to grow slowly but respectably, the
total number of books reaching 420,000.
As will be seen from the following figures, the amount spent
on books, periodicals and binding has increased slightly in recent
years.
Library   	
Medicine 	
Law 	
Education    _
Non-University
Total
When it is remembered that both costs and the numbers of
students served have increased, however, it is clear that we are by
no means overspending on the Library.
To give some measure of our Library holdings and expenditures, I append below some comparative figures for other institutions in North America. If we added $100,000 a year to the total
book fund, we would be able to grow at roughly the same rate as
the Universities of Washington (Seattle) and Southern Illinois.
We should still be considerably behind such institutions as the
Universities of Kansas, Florida, Missouri, and far behind Indiana,
Texas, Cornell, and UCLA.
26
1956-57
1957-58
1958-59
$ 87,008.00
$ 95,007.57
$125,366.80
29,346.65
33,326.72
31,175.60
8,778.11
12,612.47
12,274.13
5,038.04
11,972.37
10,541.17
15,880.50
37,577.75
32,896.48
$146,051.30
$190,496.88
$212,254.18 COMPARABLE STATISTICS (1957-58) FOR A GROUP OF
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
(1) (2) (3)
AMOUNT spent
ON BOOKS,
SIZE OF ADDED       PERIODICALS
COLLECTION    YEARLY       & BINDING
British Columbia  387,541 30,258 $190,497
Southern Illinois  306,623 38,570 281,632
Wayne   630,527 42,460 254,965
Louisiana State   749,826 34,907 248,815
Kansas   782,652 50,567 331,317
Florida  788,731 39,335 316,590
Missouri     811,922 48,777 354,982
North Carolina  935,014 40,127 220,283
Iowa _  959,934 31,889 221,417
Washington (Seattle)   971,935 45,251 296,381
Indiana     1,188,877 — 419,956
Texas   1,248,265 42,154 362,764
Ohio State  1,252,819 57,856 327,820
Wisconsin   1,276,217 49,456 321,514
California (L.A.)  _  1,301,075 75,265 474,054
Northwestern    1,322,040 57,783 243,710.
Duke   1,343,768 53,860 250,105
Toronto   1,399,066 45,831 182,272
Pennsylvania   1,570,000 41,587 275,384
Cornell     1,967,599 79,872 361,724
Chicago   1,988,700 49,829 242,299
Much of this year was spent planning the new wing to be
added to the Library. As the result of an initial gift by Mr. Walter
C. Koerner, the new wing is already under construction, some
years before we had dared to hope for it, but certainly not before
we needed it.
The new wing will add seating space for a thousand students
in four floors of new reading rooms. It will provide eight floors of
bookstacks, a stack "well" for later completion, and another en-
27 trance hall into the main library. The chief innovations in the new
wing comprise a College Library; three new Divisional Rooms
specializing in the Sciences, the Humanities and the Social Sciences;
and a Division of Special Collections. The College Library will
contain some 450 seats and an open-shelf collection of 40,000 volumes. These books have been chosen to meet the needs of first and
second year students, and we hope thereby to lessen the demand on
the main stacks while increasing the availability of the books
needed by beginning students. Although numerous periodicals and
large collections of books are absolutely essential for senior students and for the research of faculty, they can at times be a source
of confusion to the freshman student. Lacking the knowledge and
experience to sort out the good from the bad of, for example, the
thousands of publications about Hamlet, he may spend his time on
secondary materials of very minor importance instead of reading
more Shakespeare. Freshmen and sophomores will still be able to
use the main Library, of course, but they should be able to do most
of their studying in the College Library.
Epilogue
As always, when I look back over my Report, I am conscious of
how much it omits, particularly in those two essential fields of
University endeavour: teaching and research. Some idea of the
research that has led to publication can be obtained from the
Annual List of Publications of Faculty and Staff. This year it listed
640 items; last year 434. But what can be said of the teaching that
goes on hour after hour, day after day, during session? We all
know how important teaching is, especially for undergraduates,
but how does one report it? One measure of the effectiveness of our
teaching is the success of our best students at other major universities, where they compete for national and international awards. By
aptitude or inclination other students choose not to go into the
fields of scholarship and research, but undertake important tasks in
our society: education, law, medicine, engineering, politics and
business. Of these I can report that when I meet them in my travels
in the Province, the country and the world, they talk appreciatively
of their University and of the years they spent here.
28 APPENDICES
Appendix I
Revenue and Expenditures
Enrolment by District — Men
Enrolment by District — Women
Enrolment by District      Men and Women
Enrolment by Parent's Occupation
Occupation of Students' Parents by Faculty
Educational Level of Students Admitted for the First Time in
1958
Registration 1958-59 by Country of Citizenship
Canadian University Enrolment, 1920-21 to 1958-59,
Projected to 1970-71
Canadian University Enrolment as a Percentage of the Population
18 to 21 Years of Age, 1920-21 to 1958-59 and Projections to
1970-71
Appendix II
University Publications
29 SUMMARY
OF REVENUE
AND EXPENDITURE
Excluding Capital Additions to Endowment,
Student Loan and Capital Development Funds
April I, 1958 to March 31. 1959
TRUST   FUNDS
GENERAL
TOTAL
FUNDS
NON-ENDOWMENT
ENDOWMENT
Fellowships,
Teaching
Scholarships,
REVENUE
%
and General
Purposes
%
Prizes and
Bursaries
%
Research
%
%
%
Government of Canada Grants
$2,160,61 1.80
22.7
$      47,767.08
8.6
$        	
$ 1,1 1 1,461.08
74.6
$     	
$   3,319,839.96
27.9
Province of British Columbia Grants
4,334,000.00
45.6
20,774.04
3.7
100.00
.1
13,370.30
.9
4,368,244.34
36.8
United States Government
..
,.
41,313.19
2.8
41,313.19
.3
Student Fees
2,713,431.31
28.5
..
..
2,713,431.31
22.9
Gifts and Grants (Commerce,
Industry, Associations,
Foundations and Individuals)
..
382,807.47
68.7
277,360.18
99.8
323,457.70
21.6
983,625.35
8.3
Miscellaneous
303,986.90
3.2
106,440.51
19.0
513.85
.1
662.45
.1
35,451.57
100.0
447,055.28
3.8
$9,512,030.01
100.0
$    557,789.10
100.0
$    277,974.03
100.0
$ 1,490,264.72
100.0
$      35,451.57
100.0
$1 1,873,509.43
100.0
EXPENDITURE
Academic Faculties and Departments
and Associated Services
$ 6,944,718.98
73.0
$    458,851.60
82.3
$      	
..
$      	
$        2,004.60
5.6
$7,405,575.18
62.4
Administration
548,958.71
5.8
1,332.27
.2
550,290.98
4.6
Service Departments and Maintenance
1,387,582.71
14.6
..
1,387,582.71
11.7
General Expenses
215,269.28
2.3
8,427.93
1.5
..
..
223,697.21
1.9
Fellowships, Scholarships,
Prizes and Bursaries
49,492.00
.5
150.80
..
258,187.05
92.9
30,165.72
85.1
337,995.57
2.9
Research
26,142.21
.3
	
1,474,266.94
99.0
..
1,500,409.15
12.6
Miscellaneous
264,184.45
2.8
-
-
-
264,184.45
2.2
$ 9,436,348.34
99.3
$    468,762.60
84.0
$    258,187.05
92.9
$ 1,474,266.94
99.0
$      32,170.32
90.7
$11,669,735.25
98.3
Buildings, including Furnishings,
Equipment and Campus
Development
75,681.67
.7
75.681.67
.6
Non-Endowment Funds carried
forward to meet Expenditures
in 1959-60
89,026.50
16.0
19,786.98
7.1
15,997.78
1.0
124,81 1.26
I.I
Endowment Fund Income Carried
Forward to 1959-60
--
--
	
--
-
3,281.25
9.3
3,281.25
•-
$9,512,030.01
100.0
$    557,789.10
100.0
$    277,974.03
100.0
$ 1,490,264.72
100.0
$      35,451.57
100.0
$1 1,873,509.43
100.0
30
31 ENROLMENT  BY  DISTRICT (1958-1959)
MEN
DISTRICTS
Rocky
Mountains
Trench
Area
Kootenays
Crescent
Valley
Okanagan
Lower
Mainland
Vancouver
Island
Gull
Islands
Thompson
Valley
S. Cariboo
Mid-Coast
Upper
Cariboo
N.W. B.C.
Peace
River
N.E. B.C.
Total
FIRST YEAR
20
1.3%
47
3.0%
76
4.8%
1,214
76.5%
98
6.2%
30
1.9%
25
1.6%
43
2.7%
20
1.3%
13
•8%
1,586
100%
SECOND YEAR
26
1.7%
106
6.9%
99
6.4%
1,002
64.8%
168
10.9%
56
3.6%
22
1.4%
23
1.5%
23
1.5%
21
1.4%
1,546
100%
THIRD YEAR
19
9%
57
5.7%
70
7.0%
633
63.2%
145
14.4%
33
3.3%
II
1.1%
II
1.1%
13
1.3%
9
•9%
1.001
100%
FOURTH YEAR
23
2.7%
50
5.8%
41
4.8%
548
64.0%
130
15.2%
21
2.5%
12
1.4%
10
1.2%
8
•»%
13
1.5%
856
100%
FIFTH YEAR
12
1.2%
48
4.9%
41
4.2%
671
68.9%
131
13.4%
26
2.7%
4
•4%
II
1.1%
13
1.3%
17
1.7%
974
100%
TOTAL
100
308
327
4,073
673
(+451)
166
74
98
77
73
5,969
(+451)
ALL BOYS AGED
15-19 IN 1956*
TOTAL IN DISTRICT
PERCENTAGE
ENROLLED AT U.B.C.
1,114
8.98%
2,534
12.15%
3,324
9.84%
21,822
18.66%
8,357
8.05%
(13.5%)
1,978
8.4%
726
10.2%
2,269
4.32%
1,283
6.0%
745
9.8%
44,152
:   13.52%
(14.54%)
Figures in brackets refer to Victoria College. 'Source:  1956 Census       Canada, 9-1 ENROLMENT BY DISTRICT (1958-1959)
WOMEN
DISTRICTS
Rocky
Mountains
Trench
Area
Kootenays
Crescent
Valley
Okanagan
Lower
Mainland
Vancouver
Island
Gulf
Islands
Thompson
Valley
S. Cariboo
Mid-Coast
Upper
Cariboo
N.W. B.C.
Peace
River
N.E. B.C.
Total
FIRST YEAR
15
1.6%
24
2.5%
63
6.5%
746
77.7%
60
6.2%
16
17%
12
1.2%
II
1.1%
5
.5%
12
1.2%
964
100%
SECOND YEAR
7
1.0%
24
3.5%
37
5.4%
510
74.5%
69
10.7%
10
1.5%
9
1.3%
9
1.3%
5
.7%
5
•7%
685
100%
THIRD YEAR
1
•3%
14
3.6%
28
7.3%
262
68.0%
56 .
14.5% ,
10
2.6%
2
.5%
6
1.6%
2
.5%
4
1.0%
385
100%
FOURTH YEAR
5
1.9%
10
3.7%
13
4.9%
181
67.8%
47
17.6%
6
2.2%
3
1.1%
0
0%
1
.4%
1
•4%
267
100%
FIFTH YEAR
3
1.4%
8
3.7%
II
5.0%
159
72.6%
28
12.8%
5
2.3%
2
•9%
1
.5%
0
0%
2
•9%
219
100%
TOTAL
31
82
154
1,889
265
(+415)
47
28
27
13
24
2,560
(+415)
ALL GIRLS AGED
15-19 IN 1956*
TOTAL IN DISTRICT
PERCENTAGE
ENROLLED AT U.B.C.
1.027
3.0%
2,369
3.46%
3,243
4.74%
22,067
8.56%
7,320
3.6%
(9.3%)
1,824
2.58%
643
4.35%
2.055
1.31%
1.015
1.28%
718
3.34%
42,281
6.05%
(7.04%j
Figures in brackets refer to Victoria College. 'Source: 1956 Census of Canada, 9-1 ENROLMENT BY DISTRICT (1958-1959)
MEN  & WOMEN
DISTRICTS
Rocky
Mountains
Trench
Area
Kootenays
Crescent
Valley
Okanagan
Lower
Mainland
Vancouver
Island
Gulf
Islands
Thompson
Valley
S. Cariboo
Mid-Coast
Upper
Cariboo
N.W. B.C.
Peace
River
N.E. B.C.
Total
FIRST YEAR
35
1-4%
71
2.8%
139
5.6%
I960
76.9%
158
6.2%
46
1.8%
37
1.5%
54
2.1%
25
•98%
25
•98%
2,550
100%
SECOND YEAR
n
t.5%
130
5.8%
136
6.1%
1512
67.8%
237
10.6%
66
2.9%
31
1-4%
32
1.4%
28
1.3 %
26
1.2%
2,231
100%
THIRD YEAR
20
1.4%
71
5.1%
98
7.1%
895
64.6%
201
14,5%
43
3.1%
13
•9%
17
1.2%
15
I.I %
13
.9%
1,386
100%
FOURTH YEAR
28
2.5%
60
5.3%
54
4*%
m
64.9%
177
I5J%
27
2.4%
15
1.3%
10
.9%
9
•8 %
-    14
1.2%
1,123
-    100%
FIFTH YEAR
15
U%
56
4.7%
52
4.4%
830
69.6%
159
13.3%
31
2.6%
6
•5%
12
1.0%
13
I.I %
19
1.6%
1,193
100%
TOt*t
131
390
481
5962
938
(+866)
213
102
125
90
97
8,429
+ 866)
ALL BOYS AND GIRLS
AGED 15-19 IN 1956
TOTAL IN DISTRICT
PERCENTAGE
ENROLLED AT U.B.C.
.2,141
6.12%
4,903
7.95%
6,567
7.32%
43,889
13.58%
15.677
6.0%
1,802
3.24%
1,369
7.4S%
4.324
2 J9%
2.298
3.92%
1.463
6.63%
86.433
.   9.75%
(10.87%)
(H.5%)
»• fij-i-f   ...i r->'    a,-.ii. .i
Figures in brackets refer to Victoria College. Source:   1956 Census of Canada, 9- ENROLMENT BY PARENT'S OCCUPATION (1958-1959)
VANCOUVER METROPOLITAN AREA
REST OF B.C.
ALL B.C.
OCCUPATION
Male
Population1'
Aged 35-44
in 1951
Parents of
Students
1959
Recruitment
Ratio
Male
Population*
Aged 35-44
in 1951
Parents of
Students
1959
Recruitment
Ratio
Male
Population*
Aged 35-44
in 1951
Parents of
Students
1959
Recruitment
Ratio
PROFESSIONAL
& MANAGERIAL
8,925
23.30%
1,995
37.49%
1.60
7,052
16.14%
905
28.11%.
1.74
15,977
19.48%
2,900
33.95%
1.74
SUPERVISORY
ADMINISTRATIVE
HIGHLY SKILLED
MANUAL
6,285
16.41%
869
16.33%
.99
4,523
10.35%
494
15.35%
1.48
10,808
13.18%
1,363
15.96%
1.21
OTHER MANUAL
23,096
60.29%
2,458
46.19%
.73
32,152
73.57%
1,820
56.54%
.75
55,248
67.37%
4,278
50.01%
.74
TOTAL
38,306
100%
5,322
100%
1.00
43.700
100%
3,219
100%
1.00
82,006
100%
8,541
100%
1.00
•Source: 1951 Census of Canada: Vol. IV OCCUPATION OF STUDENTS'PARENTS BY FACULTY (1958-1959)
Arts*!
B.Sc.
cience
B.A.
Agriculture
Home
Economics
Physical
Education
Law
Social Work
Medicine
Applied
Science
Architecture
Nursing
Pharmacy
Forestry
Education
Graduate
Studies
PROFESSIONAL
MANAGERIAL
293
35%
124
31.31%
31
25%
59
30.73%
32
28.57%
71
36.22%
18
36.73%
62
35.23%
284
29.77%
30
34.88%
69
37.7%
31
26.96%
23
21.70%
374
26.66%
77
22.78%
1.578
30.09%
ADMINISTRATIVE
SUPERVISORY
HIGHLY SKILLED
117
14.37%
54
13.64%
13
10.48%
37
19.27%
18
16.07%
22
11.22%
5
10.2%
21
M.93%
132
13.84%
10
11.63%
28
15.3%
22
19.13%
14
13.21%
225
16.04%
38
11.24%
756
14.42%
MANUAL
OTHER MANUAL
404
49.63%
218
55.05%
80
64.52%
96
50%
62
55.36%
103
52.55%
26
53,06%
93
52.84%
538
56.39%
46
53.49%
86
46.99%
42
53.91%
69
65.09%
804
57.31%
223
65.98%
2.910
55.49%
TOTAL
814
100%
396
100%
124
100%
192
100%
112
100%
196
100%
49
100%
176
100%
954
100%
86
100%
183
100%
115
100%
106
100%
1,403
100%
338
100%
5,244
100% EDUCATIONAL LEVEL OF STUDENTS ADMITTED
FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 1958
UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE STANDING
British Columbia    2028
Alberta  25
Saskatchewan     4
Manitoba  18
Ontario             31
Quebec     7
New Brunswick  1
Nova Scotia  2
Prince Edward Island  1
Non-Canadian      _  96
SENIOR MATRICULATION (GRADE XIII, B.C.)
British Columbia — full  338
British Columbia — partial  256
Alberta  43
Saskatchewan      _        31
Manitoba  10
Ontario    34
Quebec  7
New Brunswick   1
Nova Scotia  2
Non-Canadian  54
One Year Victoria College        72
Two Years Victoria College  66
Undergraduate above Senior Matriculation  133
Graduate  220
Non-Matriculation _  21
SUMMARY
University Entrance Level  2390
Senior Matriculation Level  606
Above Senior Matriculation Level  419
Non-Matriculation   21
VI REGISTRATION 1958-59
COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP
NORTH AMERICA
Canada  8625
Mexico     3
United States  122
CENTRAL AMERICA
Barbados    2
British Honduras   2
Dominican Republic  1
Guatemala   1
Jamaica    13
Trinidad  164
Other West Indies   6
SOUTH AMERICA
Argentina     3
Bolivia   1
British Guiana  1
Chile     1
Colombia  1
Peru   1
Venezuela   2
EUROPE
Austria  4
Belgium   2
Czechoslovakia    7
Denmark  13
Eire   4
Finland  3
France    5
Germany — Western Zone  105
Germany — Eastern Zone  4
Great Britain & Northern Ireland  368
Greece   10
Hungary     33
Italy   9
Netherlands     74
38 Norway  21
Portugal ,  5
Romania . :  3
Soviet Union .. :. ..........;....... 23
Sweden  4
Switzerland  5
Yuglosavia ..... 10
AFRICA
Egypt • ------ - - r •• - 1
Gold Coast ..  4
Kenya  2
Liberia ....  1
Morocco .  1
Nigeria  1
Rhodesia ..  1
Union of South Africa  4
ASIA
Ceylon ;  4
China  56
Hong Kong .':.  31
India ,  46
Indochina  4
Iran :.........  1
Japan -.  14
Java j.. 7
HtlXJX.td ........................................ ........................—..................... ...........— j£,
Malaya   .......... ... J 6
Jraicistan ;.. — . ;  o
Palestine (Incl. Israel) •■.,.. 7
Philippines...  5
Sumatra •...._ ,..  1
Syria ..-  ■ . 2
x uricey ■ .*   z,
OCEANIA
Australia ...,  15
New Zealand  6
STATELESS '.................. ..J......... .:... ;. 51 ENROLMENT
IN THOUSANDS
240
200
160
1Z0
ACADEMIC YEAR
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY ENROLMENT
1920-21   TO 1958-59. PROJECTED TO 1970-71
Canadian Universities Foundation, Oct., '59 PERCENT
?5
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MEN
TOTAL
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WOMEN
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JO
192.0 1925   19JO   1935  19AC   19*3   1950   1955   I960   I96S
1921 1926   1931   1936  194]   1946   1951   1956   1961   1966
1970
197!
ACADEMIC YEAR
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY ENROLMENT
AB A PERCENTAGE OF THE POPULATION 18 TO 21 YEARS
19S50-S1    TO    1958-59   AND    PROJECTIONS    TO    1970-71
Canadian Universities Foundation, Oct., '59 PubUcations
Bibliographical Series
Publications of Faculty and Staff
No. 1  (1951) out of print. No. 6 (1956)
No. 2 (1952) No. 7 (1957)
No. 3 (1953) No. 8 (1958)
No. 4 (1954) No. 9 (1959)
No. 5 (1955)
Congregation Series
No. 1 Dilworth, Ira. And ive are here. 1949.
No. 2 Clement, F.M. On looking backward. 1950.
No. 3 Howe, C. D. and MacMillan, H. R. Spring Congregation addresses. 1950.
No. 4 Hutchinson, W. B. and Bunche, R. J. Spring Congregation addresses. 1951.
No. 5 Haig-Brown, R. L. H. Poiver and people. 1952. (Out
of print).
No. 6 St. Laurent, Louis and Morris, Sir John W. Special
Congregation addresses. 1952.
No. 7 Cade, Sir Stanford. Cancer, a challenge to mankind.
1952.
No. 8 Massey, Vincent. Congregation address. 1954.
No. 9 Angus, Henry and MacLeod, H. J. Congregation
addresses, spring 1956.
Education Bulletin now retitled journal of Education
No. 1 March 1957
No. 2 March 1958
No. 3 March 1959
Extension Department
Occasional papers No. 1. Kidd, J. R. Trends and problems in
Canadian adult education. 1954.
42 Occasional papers No. 3. Kidd, J. R. Adult education for
what? 1955.
(Please note: No. 2 of Occasional Papers was never
published.)
Economic Extension Publication Al. Anderson, W. J. The
future of agriculture in British Columbia. 1955.
Education Extension Publication Al. Eagles, B.A. Agricultural
education in British Columbia. 1955.
Menzie, E. L. The marketing of beef in British Columbia.
1956.
Occasional papers No. 4. Thomas, Alan. The liberal education—A re-examination. 1958.
Occasional papers No. 5. Kuplan, Louis. Building a philosophy towards aging. 1958.
St. Clair-Sobell, J., Pronunciation of Russian. 1959-
Forestry Publications
Forestry Bulletin
No. 1 Besley, Lowell. Taxation of Crown-granted timber-
lands in British Columbia. 1951-
H. R. MacMillan Lectureship in Forestry:
1950  (1)  Keenleyside, H. L. The place of the forest industry
in the Canadian economy.
1950 (2)  Martin, C. S. Government and the forest economy.
1951 (1) Chapman, H. H. The problem of second growth in
its relation to sustained yield.
1951 (2)  Gilmour, J. D. The forest situation in the province
of Quebec.
1952 (1) Hagenstein, W. D. Tree farms—an American ap
proach to forest management.
1952 (2) Champion, H. G. Cooperation between state and
non-state organizations in the promotion of
forestry.
1953 (1) Gibson, G. M. The history of forest management
in New Brunsivick.
1953 (2) Dana, S. T. Forest policy in the United States.
1954 Vaux, H: J. An economic viewpoint on Pacific
Coast forest planting.
43 Stoate, T. N. Some aspects of forest establishment
and groivth.
Lutz, H. J. Forest ecology the biological basis of
silviculture.
Lecture Series
Sandwell, B. K. The gods in twilight. 1948.
(Bostock Lecture.)
Keenleyside, H. L. Public service as a career in Canada. 1948.
(Out of print.)
Keenleyside, H. L. Canadian immigration policy. 1948.
Ferguson, G. H. Information: keystone of freedom. 1949.
MacKenzie, N. A. M. The revolutionary nature of the modern
world. 1949.
Woodcock, George. British poetry today. 1950.
Lerner, I. M. Genetics in the U.S.S.R., an obituary. 1950.
Dolman, C. E. Science and the humanities. 1950.
A symposium on legal education 1950.
Davidson, G. F. Issues in social security. 1951.
Sedgewick, G. G. An appreciation of Professor P. A. Boving.
Boving, P. A. An appreciation of Professor W. Sadler.
MacKenzie, N. A. M. Some general problems, of education.
1950.
Brown, H. L. Canada and the Colombo Plan. 1951.
Chisholm, Brock. The nations are learning to live together.
1954.
Keate, Stuart. Press and public. 1955.
Chant, Woodcock, Corbett. Shaw Festival papers. 1956.
Ladner, L. J. et al. International Law—Rivers and marginal
seas. 1956.
Lamb, W. Kaye. A plea for quality and inequality. 1957.
(Bostock Lecture.)
President's Report
Early numbers are out of print:
Available—For academic year:
1952-53 1955-56
1953-54 1956-57
1954-55 1957-58
44 Research Publications
Community Planning Series
No. 1 Marsh, L. C. Rebuilding a neighbourhood. 1950.
No. 2 Arnott, et al. Maple Ridge, Haney, B.C. 1955.
Botanical Series
No. 1 Krajina, Vladimir J. Bioclimatic zones in British
Columbia. 1959.
Institute of Fisheries, Museum Contribution
No. 1 Sunde, L. A. and Lindsey, C. C. Revised key to the
rock fishes (Scorpaenidae). 1958.
No. 2 McPhail, Key to the croakers (Sciaenidae) of the Eastern Pacific. 1958. (Out of print).
No. 3 Ricker, Karl E. Mexican shore and pelagic fishes collected from Acupulco to Cape San Lucas during the
1957 cruise of The Marijean.
Sedgewick Memorial Lecture
No. 1 Woodhouse, A. S. P. Milton the poet. 1955.
No. 2 Davis, Herbert J. The Augustan art of conversation.
1957.
Canadian Slavonic Papers   — University of Toronto Press, in
cooperation with the University of British Columbia.
No. 1 1956.
No. 2 1957
No. 3 1958.
Miscellaneous Publications
Report on the University of British Columbia in world affairs.
1953.
*Corbett, E. A. Henry Marshall Tory, beloved Canadian.
Toronto, Ryerson, 1954.
45 Belshaw, Cyril S. In search of wealth: a study of commercial
operations in the Melanesian Society of Southeastern
Papua. Memoir No. 80, American Anthropologist,
February 1955.
Clemens, W. A. Report on a survey of research in fisheries and
oceanography in the Indo-Pacific region in 1953.
Read, Sir Herbert. Two lectures on art. 1957.
*Ravenhill, Alice. Memoirs of an educational pioneer.
J. M. Dent & Sons (Canada) 1951.
The Doukhobors of British Columbia. Ed. H. B. Hawthorn.
Dent & Sons (Canada) 1955.
Macdonald, John B. A prospectus on dental education. 1956.
* Pitts, F. R. et al. Post War Okinawa. SIRI Report No. 8.
1951.
Tougas, Gerard. Checklist of printed materials relating to
French Canadian literature. 1958.
Bryner, Sobell, Wainman. Three papers in Slavonic studies,
presented at 4th International Congress of Slavists,
Moscow, 1958. University of British Columbia,
Vancouver.
Larkin, P. A.  (ed.). Investigation of fish-power problems.
Symposium,  University of British Columbia, April
1957. Vancouver 1958.
*Dixon, William G., ed. Social welfare and the preservation
of human values, Vancouver, Dent, 1957.
♦Hawthorn, H. B., Belshaw, C. S., and Jamieson, S. M. The
Indians of British Columbia, University of California
Press and U.B.C. 1958.
Logan, Harry T. Tuum Est: A history of the University of
British Columbia, 1958.
Biological Sciences Series
Please note: Nos. 1-3 of this series are out of print.
No. 4 Biochemistry of mental illness. A seminar — June
19-21, 1957.
* These volumes were  not  actually U.B.C.  publications,  though  the University
assisted in their publication.
46 W '■'.' tV 'iV V,1
II III III III III
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Addition to the Chemistry Building.

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