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Report of the President for the Academic Year 1962-1963 1964

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Array (962-1963
REPORT
OIF THE
PRESIDENT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT
OF THE
PRESIDENT
for the Academic Tear ig62-ig6$
BY JOHN BARFOOT MACDONALD
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1964 EDITED BY MALCOLM F. MCOREOOR
DESIGNED AND PRINTED BY
THE MORRISS PRINTING COMPANY LTD., VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREWORD
The Board of Governors,
The University of British Columbia.
Madam Chancellor and Gentlemen
I take pleasure in presenting to you my report for the academic
year 1962-1963. In this document I have aimed at presenting a
brief record of those events that were of significance to the University as a whole. I have attempted also to draw attention to some
of the academic accomplishments of the year and to illustrate the
breadth and depth of interests of our faculty and students.
This account provides evidence that we have made progress; it
will also be clear that, as always, much remains to be done. I trust
that you will derive satisfaction from reviewing this brief history
of an eventful year.
Very truly yours,
JOHN B. MACDONALD TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword 5
1. The University 9
2. The Faculties 17
3. Other Departments of the University 30
4. Public Occasions 41
Publications of the Faculty and Staff 45 1
THE UNIVERSITY
The writing of a report on a year in the life of the University
must, by its very nature, be an exercise in frustration. Who can tell
at the time which events are most significant? How does one compare in importance such differing occurrences as a decision to divide
the Faculty of Arts and Science, a discovery in inorganic chemistry
that attracts international attention and opens up a whole new field
for investigation, the opening of a new building, the publication of
a number of well-reviewed books, the winning of a large number
of Woodrow Wilson Fellowships by the University's students? The
obvious answer is that these cannot be compared. How, then, is one
to choose what to include in an annual report? This year I am
choosing those issues that, I think, bear most profoundly upon the
future of the University of British Columbia as an institution. In so
doing I recognize that the accomplishments of individuals, whether
faculty members or students, in hundreds of fields, are the truly
significant achievements. All else is a means to an end. Yet it is
this means to an end that determines whether academic opportunities deteriorate, remain static, or improve.
Two developments were of particular educational importance in
1962-1963. The first was that the University of British Columbia and
the Province of British Columbia came to grips with the problem
of growth. In 1961-1962 the total enrolment in British Columbia
beyond Grade 12 was less than 17,000 students. Every prediction
indicated that the number would increase to 35-40,000 by 1970.
What is happening in British Columbia is happening all over Canada
and, indeed, all over the Western world. Soaring birth rates following World War II and the "revolution of rising expectations" are
placing on the universities and colleges of today and the future
demands of unprecedented magnitude. When I arrived at the Uni- versity of British Columbia in July 1962, the most urgent task,
clearly, was to provide a comprehensive plan for the development
of higher education in the province. With the approval of the Board
of Governors and the Senate of the University, and with the help
of a small group of able associates, I began immediately the preparation of a report on Higher Education in British Columbia and a
Plan for the Future. Completed by Christmas and published in
January, it established a platform for vigorous discussion concerning
higher education that continued throughout the province for the
rest of the winter and the spring. The document was adopted by the
Board of Governors and the Senate as the official statement of the
University of British Columbia in respect to the future of higher
education in British Columbia; it was endorsed by the Council of
Victoria College and by a number of other groups representing
educational interests or municipalities. The Government acted with
commendable despatch by passing legislation in the spring of 1963
to implement most of the recommendations.
Because the report is available to the public its contents need not
be reviewed in detail here. Its principal recommendations, however,
are of such importance to the future of the University of British
Columbia that they must be summarized briefly.
The recommendations are built upon two prerequisites, each
fundamental to the attainment of excellence in the higher education
of this province: (1) there must be diversification of opportunity
in the kinds of educational experience available and in the places
where it can be obtained; (2) institutions must be independent in
the determination of objectives, of requirements for admission, of
standards, of selection of staff, of curricula, of administrative structure, and of all the other policies that contribute to the operation
of a college or university. These prerequisites, which are discussed
at length, comprise the basic philosophy of the report.
The resulting proposals envisage two kinds of institution: (1) universities and four-year colleges offering programmes leading to
degrees for students with the necessary ability; (2) two-year colleges
offering a variety of programmes beyond Grade 12. Specifically, the
report recommends, in addition to the comprehensive University of
British Columbia, the establishment of two independent four-year
colleges (Victoria College and a new college in the Western Lower
Fraser Valley) to concentrate their efforts upon undergraduate
education in Arts and Science and upon teacher-training, and three
10 two-year colleges, to be placed in the Okanagan Valley, in the
Kootenays, and in metropolitan Vancouver. That several more
two-year regional colleges will be needed by 1971 was also
recognized.
Clearly, the cause of higher education will not be well served if
the several contemplated institutions exhibit widely varying standards
and enter suicidal competition for funds. To guarantee orderly
academic development, while at the same time protecting independence, the master-plan recommends the creation of an Academic
Board, which will be representative of the universities and colleges
and advisory to them. To ensure systematic and equitably conceived
and distributed financial support, the report presses for the appointment of a Grants Commission, the function of which would be to
appraise needs and advise the Government. This Commission would
study estimates, make a combined submission to the Minister of
Education, and, finally, assume responsibility for distribution of
funds.
The most controversial and to many the most alarming aspects
of the report dealt with the estimated costs of higher education for
British Columbia over the next few years. In 1971-1972 the operating expense will reach, according to these computations, $85,000,000
for an enrolment of 37,000 students. The capital outlay demanded,
apart from the University of British Columbia and Victoria College,
was calculated at $14,000,000 up to 1971; but the figure is now
known to have been an under-estimate and more recent information
indicates that the true needs will be substantially higher.
After the publication of the report, the Provincial Government
lost little time in passing "An Act Respecting Universities" to replace the former legislation. The new Act provides for three public
Universities: British Columbia, Victoria, Simon Fraser, each one
independent; it also allows for the establishment of regional colleges.
The recommended Academic Board has been accepted but in place
of a Grants Commission the Minister of Education has been empowered to appoint an Advisory Board, which will counsel him
concerning the division of the Government's grants among the Universities; given able membership and co-operation from universities
and Government, it can serve a useful purpose.
Among the many changes embodied in the Act, that dealing with
the composition of Senate merits its own comment here. The Act
provides that each Faculty shall be represented by its Dean and by
11 one member of the Faculty elected by his colleagues. Furthermore,
the Faculties meeting jointly are to elect a number of members of
the University's Faculties to Senate. The purpose is to ensure that
the membership of Senate will be predominantly academic. This is
particularly significant and desirable, because the academic administration of a large university is a complex undertaking that requires
the special skills of the professor, just as the hospital places medical
administration in the hands of the doctor.
The second important event of the year was the great debate
concerning the financing of the University of British Columbia. The
press and radio presented this as an argument between the University and the Government of the province. In fact, however, the
discussions were of more profound significance and at the same time
far less sensational than much of the public comment implied. What
was the real significance of the debate? The Carnegie Corporation
Quarterly made the point when it observed that the notion that
politics and education should not have anything to do with each
other is based on a misunderstanding both of politics and of the
role of education in a democracy and how that role is determined.
Public education is paid for by public funds. The decision about
how much of the public purse is to be devoted to education is ultimately a political decision. Any society, be it county or country,
must decide how much it will spend on public benefits and how
much it will allocate of the total to each area. How should a society
make these decisions? How much for education? For hospitals? For
welfare? For roads? For industrial developments? For family allowances? For transportation services? For pensions? A society makes
its decisions wisely by seeing that its members are well informed and
well educated about the implications of all the decisions that must
be made. The educational process goes on in the public forum. What
must never be lost to view is not that public money supports public
education but rather that education is one of many vital concerns
of society. Society will make better judgements about how vital
education is when the members of society understand the nature of
education: that education is indispensable to our economic welfare,
that education is a means to a richer life, that education is inseparably a part of the scientific revolution, that education must supply
highly qualified specialists in hundreds of fields important to all of
us, that education is big business occupying the lives of thousands
of the country's ablest citizens, that education is faced with enormous shortages of qualified teachers and professors, that education requires
larger libraries and increasingly expensive instruments, that education must compete for trained minds in a condition of shortage that
is world-wide, that good education cannot be bought cheaply, that
education requires more financial support than we have so far been
willing to advance.
The great debate did much to make these facts clear to British
Columbians. Hundreds of thousands of citizens learned for the first
time of the crisis in higher education. Conferences and seminars
were held by countless interested groups throughout the province.
Newspapers, radio, and television discussed the issues of higher education on a scale never before achieved. The students of the University of British Columbia in their "Back Mac" campaign took
their story of what higher education means to them and what its
needs are to every corner of the province. Their achievement in
obtaining 232,000 signatures to a statement of the goals and needs
of higher education showed that public awareness had been brought
to new and rarefied heights. This new awareness is the most spectacular and beneficial gain of the debate and of the campaign. For, in
the words of Henry Brougham, "Education makes a people easy to
lead but difficult to drive, easy to govern, but impossible to enslave."
The publication of Higher Education in British Columbia and
the adoption of its principal recommendations by the Government
have notable implications for the University of British Columbia.
No longer is this University responsible for all higher education; no
longer is this University faced by the necessity for unlimited growth.
The University has now an opportunity to define more precisely
the role that it should play in the province's educational system.
The University will continue to offer undergraduate education. Indeed, for a few years, until other institutions are in a position to
assist, the numbers enrolled in undergraduate education will continue to increase. Nevertheless, a limit can at last be foreseen. Simultaneously, the University will need to strengthen and enlarge its
graduate programme; and it will be responsible for virtually all
professional education in British Columbia. Growth of the Faculty
of Graduate Studies in particular must now be encouraged in view
of the acute paucity of qualified teachers and professors for schools
and universities, and of specialists for business, industry, and government, not only in British Columbia, but throughout Canada and
the rest of the Western World. The National Research Council of Canada has estimated the needs for full-time instructors for universities and colleges for the year 1970 at 25,000. That is approximately 15,000 more than hold appointments at present. No
Canadian university can boast of a graduate programme that is
large enough in the face of the demands.
The new position of the University in the provincial educational
system raises many questions. What should be the ultimate size of
the undergraduate enrolment? How large should the Faculty of
Graduate Studies become and how fast should it grow? What will
be the demands for professional education? What programmes belong here and what can and should be undertaken more effectively
elsewhere? What changes are wise in the requirements for admission? In what ways can the quality of education in British Columbia
be improved? What will all the innovations mean for the University
Library?
These and other questions, the sequel of a vigorous campaign,
cry out for attention. The University of British Columbia has already
begun a second campaign, this time to seek the answers.
This essay has so far concentrated upon higher education in the
province, the public debate, and the academic effects of what has
often been referred to as the crisis. But the impact of change has
also been experienced by the members of the Faculty and has led
to adjustments in administrative machinery.
The modern large university, into which category the University
of British Columbia falls, is a complex organism, a far cry from
the traditional "Groves of Academe" and the ivory tower. Many
older members of the Faculty can look back wistfully to the good
old days of the quiet campus, the scholarly retreat, and the measured
pace. Those days are gone. "Bigness" has become a characteristic
of the University and the pace of life on the campus has quickened.
We must ask ourselves how we may live with bigness. How
can hundreds of members of the Faculty, dozens of Departments,
numerous Schools and Faculties, all with specialized outlooks, work
together most effectively? How should we best devote our efforts
to academic achievement? How are we all to be cognisant of the
worth-while ideas being generated and how are we to debate them
effectively? How shall we develop and maintain loyalty to an institution in a day when more than one professor is behaving like an
itinerant preacher, rootless and responding to the call of golden
opportunity? The obvious initial answer is that we can accomplish
14 none of these things unless we think they are of the utmost importance. Happily, most members of the Faculty of the University
of British Columbia, in my short experience, do believe in their
importance.
Now it is the task of the administration to organize the activities
of the University in such a way as to place in the forefront what is
truly important. Administration is not an end in itself; it should
have no independent existence; it should be the servant of the
primary goals. I suggest that the key to good administration is individual leadership, at every level. This presupposes the assignment
of responsibility and authority to individuals, to Deans and to
Departmental Heads. It is largely the function of the Dean to determine how his Faculty should be organized, which departments need
strengthening. Similarly, the Departmental Head must have the
responsible authority to administer his department in an appropriate
manner, a manner that will make the development of his discipline
in the University a reflection of his values, his foresight, his aims,
and his ability. While responsibility and authority must accompany
one another, it goes without saying that, if a Dean or a Head does
not fulfill his obligations in such a way as to gain the respect and
support of his constituency, his administration will not be successful.
To gain support is the art of leadership.
Leadership in academic administration is not to be confused with
dictatorship. Leadership implies consent and support. It implies
consultation, persuasion, open-mindedness, and forthrightness. Dictatorship is synonymous with an authoritarian approach, lack of
consent, lack of consultation, and, usually, some form of deviousness,
often intended to give the illusion of democracy. If the University
can respect and use the traditional and legal structure for administration made available to it by the Act, we shall all find ample room
for leadership, for consultation, for widespread discussion, and for
that all-important intangible quality — the feeling of belonging.
The forum for debate and the making of decisions in academic
life is the meeting of the Faculty and the Senate. As a means of
improving communication among faculties, of initiating consideration of items important to the University, and of providing better
opportunity for leadership, a Committee of Academic Deans was
established during 1962-1963. The agenda listed a wide variety of
subjects, many of a routine nature, a number concerned with more
significant problems, affecting the University as a whole. The Com-
i* mittee, in general, is not a decision-making body. It raises issues,
initiates proposals, and studies the implications of suggestions being
made by various groups. Where innovation is recommended, reference is made to the individual Faculties, to the Senate, or to the
Board of Governors, as the case may be. The Committee justified its
existence in 1962-1963. It would be idle to claim that all problems
of communication have now been solved. No such Utopia is likely
to appear. Yet the establishment of a small group, meeting regularly
and concerning itself with matters of university-wide interest, has
facilitated healthy and fruitful discussion. I cite as examples the
creation of an Academic Planning Office, changes in policy governing admission, production of a firm list of building priorities, policy
regarding leave for candidates seeking and obtaining political office,
appointment after retiral (at 65), policy on salary. These are a few
of a very large number of issues that have been discussed by the
Committee. The ultimate decisions have been made after wider
consultation and have helped to construct an improved academic
environment for all members of the University.
16 THE FACULTIES
THE FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE
The faculty has been markedly affected physically by the striking
increase of students at the University and the consequent rapid
expansion of facilities. Steadily, the Faculty of Agriculture is moving southward. In some cases, old buildings have already been
transferred to new sites, which had to be prepared; in others new
buildings have been erected. Thus nearly half of the outside laboratories of the Department of Poultry Science have new homes; the
Division of Animal Science boasts two new laboratories, for beef-
cattle and mink; and new ground is being made ready for the
Division of Plant Science. During this period of transition the
Faculty is working under difficulties in the attempt to maintain a
programme of research that deals with living material, plant and
animal.
At the undergraduate level the curriculum has been adjusted to
make transfer from the Faculties of Arts and Science easier and to
increase the accessibility of liberal studies. The Faculty, after careful study, decided not to add a year to the time normally required
(four years) for the attainment of the B.S.A.; but this change may
come.
Although senior undergraduates do not lack opportunities for
research, especially in connexion with their graduating essays, it is
to the graduate students and the academic staff that one looks for
the bulk of the creative work in this Faculty, as in other Faculties.
The vitality of the staff may be measured partly by their publications
and partly by the authorization granted to offer the Ph.D. in Animal
Science and in Soil Science, and the M.Sc. in Plant Science, Poultry
Science, and Soil Science.
17 The Faculty continues to examine its varied programme in Extension, the place of a programme leading to a Diploma in Agriculture, and the significance and potential of the farm at Oyster
River as a base for teaching and research.
At the end of the year Dr. G. H. Harris, Professor of Horticulture,
retired; and Dr. Nora E. Neilson, Assistant Professor of Dairying,
resigned. T. L. Coulthard, Professor of Agricultural Mechanics, spent
the year at University College of Ghana, where for a time he served
as Dean of the Faculty of Agriculture; Dr. C. A. Rowles, Professor
of Soil Science, carried out a special mission in Venezuela for the
Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. Appointments included Desmond Doran, Research Associate in Agricultural
Economics, and Dr. T. Juusela, Special Lecturer in Agricultural
Engineering and Mechanics.
THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
It is worth noting that, although enrolment in first year has
declined by one third since 1957-1958, the numbers graduating
annually have remained steady at about 200. This suggests that the
Faculty attracts, along with its serious nucleus, a transient population the size of which is difficult to predict. During the same period
graduate registrations have increased rapidly; indeed, they must be
artificially curtailed because facilities and space are not yet adequate
to cope with graduate work on the scale that is now desirable in
this province.
Physical difficulties, however, have not reduced the rate at which
research is being pursued, as a glance at the publications of the
Faculty will show. One may note an accelerating interest in fundamental research of an inter-departmental nature.
The work of an active Faculty will without doubt be persistently
stimulated as new quarters appear for departments that are now
hampered by their physical environment.
Among those already blessed by bricks and mortar is the School
of Architecture, which is now settling down, under a new Director
(Henry Elder) and in the handsome and commodious sanctuary
of the Frederic Lasserre Building. The three-year programme, designed to follow three years of study in Arts and Science, continues
to yield satisfying results to a staff that places emphasis upon the
liberal aspects of architecture. Nevertheless, communication has been
18 maintained with the profession and visiting lecturers have contributed to the vigour of an already healthy programme. The prize
for the best thesis submitted by a Canadian School of Architecture,
the Pilkington Travelling Scholarship, was won, for the third consecutive year, by the University of British Columbia; the thesis was
written by N. R. Bawlf. This year saw the first award here of the
degree Master of Architecture.
In Community and Regional Plaiming, Dr. H. P. Oberlander,
Professor of Plarining and Design, accepted the invitation of Yale
University to lecture as Visiting Professor during the second term.
Dr. J. N. Jackson, Visiting Associate Professor of Planning, assumed
Dr. Oberlander's administrative duties before returning to Manchester in July 1963. Dr. K. J. Cross, Visiting Lecturer, helped
atone for the absence of Dr. Oberlander. The Department has not
yet withdrawn from its advisory supervision of the Institute for
Community Planning at the Kwame Nkrumah University, Ghana.
The School of Nursing has for long been notorious for its devotion
to teaching and public service. The past year has been made trying
by the unusually high incidence of illness, by an increase of students,
and by a shortage of staff. The addition of the facilities of the
Obstetrical Department at St. Vincent's Hospital to those at St.
Paul's provided some relief, which was supplemented by more efficient co-ordination of clinical and other closely related courses. The
members of the staff, as usual, made time to participate in various
Institutes and Conferences for the benefit of the province as a whole.
Retirement brought to a close A. H. Finlay's services as Professor
of Civil Engineering. The University accepted a number of resignations: Dr. P. L. Silveston, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering; J. F. Glennie, Research Engineer (Civil Engineering); Dr. J. F.
Szablya, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering; W. S. Adams,
Lecturer in Metallurgy; Dr. A. E. Cockbain, Instructor, and
R. W. Yole, Part-time Lecturer, in Mining and Geological Engineering; V. F. Lyman, Assistant Professor of Architecture; A. Baumgart
and S. Halpin, Instructors in Nursing. Dr. G. V. Parkinson, Associate
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, on leave of absence, did
research in aerodynamics at the National Physical Laboratory,
Teddington, England.
The following joined the staff: Dr. H. Ramsey, Assistant Professor, and F. G. Furse, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering;
19 R. Clarke, Assistant Professor of Architecture; R. M. Buzzell and
J. S. Chapman, Instructors in Nursing.
It should be recorded that Dr. E. Peters, Assistant Professor of
Metallurgy, in collaboration with J. Skrivanek, was awarded first
prize for the "best publication appearing in the Canadian Journal
of Chemical Engineering for 1962"; and that Dr. W. H. White,
Professor of Geology, was elected to a Fellowship in the Royal
Society of Canada.
THE FACULTY OF ARTS AND SCIENCE
That this Faculty, the academic heart of the University, would
be affected most seriously by a rapid increase of students has always
been predictable. Its twenty-seven departments and schools, embracing half the University's enrolment and bearing responsibility for
about seventy-five per cent of the instruction, found themselves
faced, in 1962-1963, by well over seven thousand students. The complexities of the consequent administrative and other problems led,
after extended debate, to the recommendation that the Faculty be
divided. Thus, on July 1, 1963, the Faculty of Science, comprising
the Departments of the Natural and Physical Sciences along with
Mathematics, began its independent life; the other departments,
with the Schools of Home Economics, Librarianship, and Social
Work, form the Faculty of Arts; the School of Physical Education
has been transferred to the Faculty of Education. The divorce has
been a friendly one, however, and a number of professors hold joint
membership in the Faculties of Arts and Science. Mathematics,
especially, occupies a favoured position, for the Faculty of Arts will
continue to grant a B.A. with Honours in Mathematics.
Students and staff continued to win a gratifying number of
honours. For example, to only one institution did the Woodrow
Wilson Fellowship Foundation award more fellowships than to the
students of this Faculty. Uncounted men and women were appointed
to fellowships and scholarships in the Graduate Schools of this
continent and elsewhere. Dr. Neil Bartlett's preparation of the first
stable compound of the so-called inert gases has been widely acclaimed throughout the scientific world. Dr. James Trotter became
the first scholar outside Great Britain to win the Meldola Medal of
the Royal Institute of Chemistry, an award made annually to the
chemist under 30 within the Commonwealth whose research has
20 achieved the greatest distinction. Dr. G. P. V. Akrigg's Jacobean
Pageant (Harvard University Press) has been warmly received in
literary circles. The reviews of Dr. Kenneth Graham's Concept of
Forest Entomology have been enthusiastic. A glance at the publications listed elsewhere will reveal the scholarly activity of the
Faculty.
Among the myriad extra-curricular attractions for which the
students and staff of this Faculty are responsible, special prominence
should be given to performances and displays by the Departments
of Fine Arts, Music, and Theatre; all are indispensable to a truly
liberal education.
To the School of Librarianship 1962-1963 brought cause for
celebration: accreditation by the American and Canadian Library
Associations. The report of the three external referees was written
in glowing terms and the coveted stamp of approval was acquired
in record time, a further tribute to the foresight and judgement of
the School's Director, Dr. Samuel Rothstein.
As a result of a careful examination of the curriculum the School
of Social Work developed, in its Master's programme, instruction
by tutorial, following the pattern of Oxford and Cambridge.
Retirements:
J. H. Creighton, Professor of English.
H. C. Lewis, Professor of English.
A. C. Cooke, Professor of History.
Dr. A. E. Sawyer, Assistant Professor of English, died after a
long illness.
Resignations:
Dr. A. R. Anderson, Instructor in German.
Dr. H. T. Band, Research Associate in Zoology.
Dr. R. N. Band, Assistant Professor of Zoology.
Dr. M. Benedicty, Associate Professor of Mathematics.
G. C. Bjork, Lecturer in Economics.
Dr. J. N. Butler, Assistant Professor of Chemistry.
G. Cheney, Lecturer in Anthropology and Slavonic Studies.
Dr. H. Ch'u, Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
Dr. R. A. Church, Assistant Professor of Economics.
Dr. R. J. Churchill, Assistant Professor of Physics.
R. Clare, Instructor in Home Economics.
R. Creeley, Instructor in English.
D. F. Crozier, Lecturer in English. L. Devereaux, Instructor in Physical Education.
Dr. H. M. Eckert, Assistant Professor of Education.
E. A. Edinborough, Associate Professor of English.
Dr. A. M. Friedson, Instructor in English.
Y. Flynn, Instructor in Home Economics.
Dr. J. C. Giles, Assistant Professor of Physics.
Dr. Ping-ti Ho, Professor of Asian Studies.
Dr. R. Harden, Assistant Professor of French.
Dr. R. Hochstrasser, Assistant Professor of Chemistry.
R. R. Jeffels, Associate Professor of French.
Dr. R. M. Jordan, Assistant Professor of English.
Dr. S. Kobayashi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
Dr. P. A. Larkin, Professor of Zoology and Director of the
Institute of Fisheries.
H. Little, Lecturer in Home Economics.
Dr. S. M. Lyman, Assistant Professor of Sociology.
Dr. C. McCann, Associate Professor of Social Work.
Dr. J. McNulty, Assistant Professor of Psychology.
D. Macaree, Lecturer in English.
Dr. M. D. Marcus, Associate Professor of Mathematics.
Rev. J. G. Poupore, Lecturer in History.
J. D. Richardson, Instructor in Economics.
M. G. Robinson, Lecturer in French.
Dr. M. B. Smith, Associate Professor of English.
Dr. P. R. Smy, Assistant Professor of Physics.
E. Stenner, Lecturer in Fine Arts.
Dr. A. J. Surkan, Lecturer in Physics.
Dr. W. P. Suttles, Associate Professor of Anthropology.
P. Taylor, Lecturer in German.
M. Toplak, Lecturer in French.
R. Vainstein, Associate Professor of Librarianship.
Dr. Yi-t'ung Wang, Associate Professor of Asian Studies.
G. Westwick, Lecturer in English.
Dr. P. M. Williams, Assistant Professor of Chemistry.
Dean F. H. Soward resigned as Head of the Department of
History; Dr. Margaret A. Ormsby has been appointed Acting Head.
Leaves of Absence:
Dr. J. Adams, Professor of Zoology.
E. S. W. Belyea, Associate Professor of Psychology.
Dr. A. E. Birney, Professor of English.
Dr. A. H. Cayford, Associate Professor of Mathematics.
Dr. K. Cole (June-September), Assistant Professor of
Biology and Botany.
Dr. G. M. Griffiths, Associate Professor of Physics.
Dr. F. C. Langdon, Assistant Professor of Political Science.
22 Dr. C. A. Lindsey, Associate Professor of Zoology.
Dr. M. L. Mackenzie (first term), Associate Professor of English.
Dr. M. A. Ormsby, Professor of History.
Dr. R. F. Scagel (August-December), Professor of Oceanography.
Dr. M. Sion, Associate Professor of Mathematics.
Dr. M. B. Smith, Associate Professor of English.
Dr. M. W. Steinberg, Professor of English.
Dr. Yi-t'ung Wang, Associate Professor of Asian Studies.
Dr. J. Wigod, Assistant Professor of English.
E. Yeomans (second term), Instructor in English.
Dr. John H. Young, Professor of Economics.
Appointments:
C. P. Anderson, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies.
C. T. Anderson, Instructor in Mathematics.
A. Balkind, Lecturer in Fine Arts.
B. E. Bartlett, Lecturer in French.
G. C. Bjork, Lecturer in Economics.
Dr. E. R. Black, Instructor in Political Science.
R. Boyle, Lecturer in Sociology.
Dr. D. J. Bures, Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
Dr. W. Caird, Assistant Professor of Psychology.
D. Castello, Instructor in Home Economics.
T'ung-tsu Ch'u, Associate Professor of Asian Studies.
Dr. M. A. Chinnery, Instructor in Physics.
Dr. R. A. Church, Assistant Professor of Economics.
Dr. B. Chang, Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
Dr. R. A. Cleveland, Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
Dr. Sandra Cleveland, Lecturer in Mathematics.
K. Compton, Instructor in Music.
D. F. Crozier, Lecturer in English.
B. Czaykowski, Instructor in Slavonic Studies.
C. Daem, Lecturer in Home Economics.
D. Dorotich, Lecturer in Slavonic Studies.
W. J. Dusing, Lecturer in Classics.
E. A. Edinborough, Associate Professor of English.
Dr. I. E. Efford, Assistant Professor of Zoology.
Dr. J. Eisenberg, Assistant Professor of Zoology.
Dr. G. P. Erickson, Assistant Professor of Physics.
M. Fol, Instructor in French.
M. Gallostra, Lecturer in Spanish.
A. Gazetas, Instructor in Theatre.
M. Gilroy, Assistant Professor of Librarianship.
F. R. Hamlin, Assistant Professor of French.
Herbert Heaton, Visiting Professor of Economic History.
R. Holdaway, Instructor in French.
Dr. M. G. Humphreys, Visiting Professor of Mathematics.
23 Dr. R. W. Ingram, Assistant Professor of English.
D. E. Kaplan, Instructor in French.
C. Kniebusch, Instructor in Music.
Dr. J. A. Lavin, Assistant Professor of English.
C. F. Letourneur, Lecturer in French.
Dr. Chun-jo Liu, Associate Professor of Asian Studies.
Dr. F. McCapra, Assistant Professor of Chemistry.
D. E. Manning, Assistant Professor of Home Economics.
Dr. P. W. Matthews, Instructor in Physics.
P. Merivale, Instructor in English.
Dr. J. T. Montague, Associate Professor of Economics.
Dr. M. Morehart-Baker, Instructor in Fine Arts.
Dr. G. R. Munro, Assistant Professor of Economics.
N. T. Nosanchuk, Instructor in Sociology.
Dr. P. A. Pearse, Assistant Professor of Economics.
Dr. P. A. Quartermain, Assistant Professor of English.
G. Rimanelli, Visiting Lecturer in Italian.
K. W. Robinson, Visiting Lecturer in Geography.
Dr. R. Rosenblatt, Visiting Professor of Zoology.
Dr. Gideon Rosenbluth, Professor of Economics.
Dr. R. D. Russell, Professor of Physics.
Dr. J. C. Savage, Assistant Professor of Physics.
Dr. A. I. Scott, Associate Professor of Chemistry.
A. Siemens, Instructor in Geography.
Dr. S. Simons, Instructor in Mathematics.
C. G. Schwencke, Lecturer in Slavonic Studies.
F. B. St. Clair, Instructor in French.
E. Stenner, Lecturer in Fine Arts.
Dr. T. Storm, Assistant Professor of Psychology.
Dr. H. Stunkard, Visiting Professor of Zoology.
L. Surette, Lecturer in English.
Dr. A. J. Surkan,, Lecturer in Physics.
Dr. L. Tiger, Assistant Professor of Anthropology.
G. Westwick, Lecturer in English.
Dr. R. Westwick, Assistant Professor of Mathematics.
M. Whisson, Lecturer in Anthropology.
Dr. D. L. Williams, Lecturer in Physics.
J. B. Woodward, Instructor in Slavonic Studies.
W. D. Young, Instructor in Political Science.
A. F. Zweers, Lecturer in Slavonic Studies.
THE FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The Faculty, much concerned by the shortage of Canadians in
this field being prepared to enter academic life, has been engaged
in the formulation of a doctoral programme. It is expected that
this programme will be laid before the Faculty of Graduate Studies
during 1963-1964.
24 The Malayan project, undertaken on behalf of the Government
of Canada in support of the policy of assisting under-developed
countries, has been continued. Eight members of the staff taught
for various periods at the Universities of Malaya and Singapore,
despite the strain imposed upon the resources of the Faculty. Conversely, five students from Malaya, potentially teachers in the
Malayan universities, have been pursuing work towards the Master's
degree here.
The resignations of A. Baxter and J. D. Blazouske, Instructor in
and Assistant Professor of Accounting respectively, were balanced
by the acquisition of V. V. Murray, Assistant Professor of Industrial
Relations, and M. S. Sommers, Assistant Professor of Marketing;
P. A. Lusztig rejoined the staff as Assistant Professor of Finance.
H. Babiak (Assistant Professor of Accounting), N. A. Hall (Associate Professor of Industrial Administration), C. L. Mitchell (Associate Professor of Accounting), and L. G. Wong (Professor of
Finance) spent the year in Malaya, where they were joined for
shorter periods by A. Beedle (Associate Professor of Accounting),
W. Hughes (Associate Professor of Transportation), D. L. McDonald (Assistant Professor of Accounting), and G. D. Quirin
(Assistant Professor of Finance). Study-leave was enjoyed by
D. C. Aird (Assistant Professor of Industrial Administration),
B. E. Burke (Associate Professor of Accounting), and W. O. Perkett
(Assistant Professor of Marketing). H. C. Wilkinson, Associate Professor of Industrial Administration, served as technical adviser in
Korea under the auspices of the United Nations.
Dean G. Neil Perry served the United Nations for a short
period as Economic Adviser to the East Africa Common Service
Organization.
THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION
The opening of the central section of the new College of Education did much to improve morale among students and staff, who
look forward to early completion of the building and abandonment
of huts.
A notable innovation, the first of its kind in Canada, was the
installation of closed-circuit television that made possible in the
new College of Education direct observation of activity in the
schools. The Faculty is indebted to the B.C. Telephone Company
25 for the necessary grant and to the Vancouver School Board for
making available special classrooms in Kitsilano High School and
Queen Mary Elementary School.
The Faculty has been conducting a study of the curriculum that
will bring improvements to the educational programme. The number of students enrolled for graduate work shows a significant
increase.
Resignations were accepted from Associate Professor C. J.
Brauner; Assistant Professors D. Lawson and N. Rajaratnam; and
Lecturer G. J. Caruso.
Four members of the Faculty profited by leave of absence: Professor K. Argue, Associate Professor J. A. S. Macdonald, and
Assistant Professors Ruth McConnell and Hilda MacKenzie; the
latter spent the year, under the auspices of the Colombo Plan, advising the Malayan Government on Elementary Education.
A number of persons joined or were appointed to the staff in
1962-1963:
Dr. C. J. Anastasiou H. Kirchner
T. Bates W. Krayenhoff
G. Batho Dr. A. P. McCreary
Dr. C. J. Brauner Dr. W. Murra
G. J. Caruso Dr. O. Oldridge
G. Cockroft M. Rose
J. D. Dennison L. A. Rousseau
J. Dobereiner M. Russell
E. Evans Dr. W. Schwann
M. Gibbons Dr. L. M. Smith
E. Harris R. Steele
J. Johnson D. Washington
H. C. Jorgensen Dr. T. Westmark
Dr. I. R. Kelsey E. Wiseman
R. Kiewitz
THE FACULTY OF FORESTRY
The Faculty, under the new Dean, T. G. Wright, has been taking
stock of the curriculum and of its professional responsibilities to a
province in which the forests are so vital to the economy. No major
changes are contemplated until staff and student-body are expanded.
F. Malcolm Knapp, Professor and Director of University Forests,
retired; he was succeeded as Resident Director of the University
Research Forest at Haney by R. E. Breadon. J. P. Tessier was transferred to the University as Assistant Professor.
26 THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES
This Faculty, along with Faculties of Graduate Studies in other
institutions, is continuously sensitive to its obligation to accelerate
the preparation of teachers for universities and colleges in the next
generation. The Faculty acknowledges the additional funds made
available by the Board of Governors in support of this goal. Open
scholarships to the value of $25,000 lured some students from outside British Columbia but the number of disappointed applicants of
good academic quality proves that the amount is ridiculously small
and that it must receive a spectacular increase at once. A similar
sum was allocated to the Library for the purchase of materials basic
to graduate study, money that brought special benefit to the Humanities and Social Sciences. Research by members of the Faculty has
been fostered by a grant of $100,000, supplemented by $65,000
from the National Research Council. The vitality of the Faculty
in research may be measured by the fact that the total proved to be
pitifully inadequate to cope with applications.
More departments, especially among the Humanities and Social
Sciences, are planning programmes for the Ph.D. And steadily the
enrolment of the Faculty is climbing.
The young Institute of Earth Sciences recommended seven students for the Ph.D. From the Institute there emerged the new
Department of Geophysics (July 1, 1963).
The Institute of Fisheries has suffered severe loss in the resignation of Dr. Peter A. Larkin but has been fortunate in the appointment of his successor as Director, Dr. Norman J. Wilimovsky.
Dr. J. T. Montague replaced Professor A. W. R. Carrothers as
Director of the Institute of Industrial Relations. Five members of
the University's Faculty participated in the work of the Institute:
D. C. Aird (Commerce and Business Administration), Dr. S. M.
Jamieson (Economics and Political Science), Dr. Martin Meissner
(Anthropology and Sociology), V. V. Murray (Commerce and
Business Administration), Dr. W. H. Read (Psychology). Nine
graduate students were accommodated.
Research by staff and graduate students continued at a brisk
pace in the Institute of Oceanography, where Dr. H. B. S. Womers-
ley, Reader in Botany at the University of Adelaide, served as Visiting Professor for five months (August-December).
27 THE FACULTY OF LAW
This Faculty, in anticipation of a rise in the numbers entering
legal studies, is now engaged in a critical review of its curriculum.
In April, staff and students profited from a week's visit by Dean
Erwin Griswold of the Harvard Law School.
Professor A. W. R. Carrothers was attached to the Harvard
Law School for the year; T. G. Ison and L. Getz joined the Faculty
as Lecturers.
THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE
The members of the Faculty await impatiently the completion
of the Health Services Centre. In the meantime the new buildings
are adequate for the present staff in the basic departments; but the
clinical areas lag. The administrative offices of Dentistry and Medicine have been brought beneath one roof, temporary to be sure,
but one that facilitates a true collaboration. In the meantime architectural planning makes progress, both for the hospital and for other
units of the contemplated Centre. The Woodward Library (for
which thanks are owed to P. A. Woodward), which will serve the
Centre as a whole, should be completed by September 1964.
Dr. A. R. P. Patterson, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, Dr.
D. J. Watterson, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, and Dr. John H.
Read, Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine and Paediatrics
and Director of the Child Health Programme, resigned. Several
new appointments added strength to the Faculty: L. Detwiller,
Hospital Consultant; Dr. G. H. Dixon, Associate Professor of Biochemistry; Dr. J. W. Jull, Assistant Professor of Physiology; Dr.
W. L. Dunn, Assistant Professor of Pathology; Dr. T. L. Perry,
Associate Professor of Pharmacology; Dr. F. J. de Maria, Assistant
Professor of Obstetrics.
THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY
The new four-year programme, which allows greater freedom in
choosing courses, is now in operation. Interest in graduate studies
is growing and the Faculty is continuing its co-operation with the
Dental Division of the B.C. Department of Health Services and
Hospital Insurance and with the B.C. Pharmaceutical Association.
28 Dr. G. A. Groves resigned as Associate Professor to accept a post
in New Zealand. Dr. M. Pernarowski has been appointed Associate
Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and J. O. Runikis joined the
staff as Assistant Professor in January. Norman C. Zacharias will
lecture in Pharmaceutics.
29 OTHER DEPARTMENTS OF
THE UNIVERSITY
THE LIBRARY
The most significant event of the year for the Library — in fact,
for all Canadian libraries — resulted from the invitation extended
to Edwin E. Williams of Harvard University by the National Conference of Canadian Universities and Colleges to make a survey of
the collections of Canadian libraries in the Humanities and Social
Sciences. The "Williams Report," Resources of Canadian University Libraries for Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences
(Ottawa, 1962) amounts to a blunt indictment: Canadian libraries
are ill-equipped to support advanced research in the Humanities
and Social Sciences, except in a few areas, chiefly Canadian. "Canadian universities, for the most part, are only beginning to face the
cost of providing library resources genuinely adequate for advanced
work in the humanities and social sciences. It will not be easy to
advance on all fronts, neglecting neither the new research libraries
that must be created nor the existing collections that ought to be
improved; but books are the soundest long-term investment a university can make, and many of those that are acquired now may
serve Canadian scholars for centuries."
The President and the Board of Governors took immediate action
by assigning to the Library for the year 1963-1964 a gratifyingly
larger sum than usual and by publicly announcing their determination to maintain this policy. Consequently, prospects for the Library
are brighter than ever before; it is recognized that strengthening
of graduate study in the Humanities and Social Sciences presupposes
a major transformation in the status of the Library in those areas
that clamour for funds.
The Senate Library Committee, which advises and assists the
30 Librarian in the formulation of policy, until now representative and
unwieldy, was reorganized tidily as a committee of six members
of the University Faculty, with Dr. I. McT. Cowan as chairman
and the Librarian sitting ex officio.
At the same time the Librarian inaugurated regular meetings of
the professional librarians with groups of scholars in the various
academic disciplines. At these fruitful gatherings the problems of
the Library have benefited from debate and a sympathetic liaison
is being established between librarian and professor. From this pooling of ideas issued the In-Print Buying Programme of books in
English published in the United Kingdom and the United States.
The Library, from a designated fund, purchases all such scholarly
works. The books are made available promptly, little is missed, and
professors may concentrate on the location of second-hand items
and studies in other languages.
The Library will welcome new stacks and other forms of physical
relief. The collection is growing rapidly, as is the number of clients.
The news that bibliographic facilities will be provided in some of
the projected academic buildings was greeted with applause in the
Library.
Once again the Library is grateful to friends, both individuals
and societies, for gifts that have enriched holdings. Among perennial
donors are Walter Koerner, H. R. MacMillan, the Leon and Thea
Koerner Foundation, Mrs. E. T. Rogers, Mrs. B. T. Rogers; Alfred
Blundell added strength in the area of Slavonic law. The Library
acknowledges benefactions from the estates of George Hampdon
Crabtree, Annie Charlotte Dalton, and Mrs. Margaret Jane Boulton.
Among the improvements in service first place should go to the
installation of a Xerox 914 copier, which proved to be a boon,
especially to members of the Faculty and graduate students.
THE DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION
The Department of Extension devoted many hours to the study
of the relationship that exists and should exist between the Department and the more formally academic areas of the University. This
study paid due attention to the possibility of initiating a programme
leading to a degree by way of evening courses and to the implications of the Macdonald Report for work in Extension at other provincial institutions.
3i The principal responsibility of the Department has been carried
out at an accelerated pace: the arrangement of courses for credit,
the organization of series of lectures for the intelligent layman, the
planning of special seminars and discussion-groups on subjects of
contemporary interest to the community. A new centre for lectures
in the evening, Delbrooke High School, has been agreed upon with
the North Vancouver School Board; this is an index of the popularity of the programme.
Alan Booth resigned when the grant from the B.C. Association of
Broadcasters came to an end; Mary Thomson left the staff to join
the Child Study Centre. The Department has acquired the services
of J. Blaney (Supervisor of Programmes in Education) and Margaret Frederickson (Assistant Supervisor in Liberal Education).
THE REGISTRAR
The Registrar's Office is the depository of all academic records.
Statistics compiled by the office are presented in the accompanying
tables.
32 THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Registration
Session
Arts
&Sc.
H.Ec.
P.E.
Mas.
Ap. Sc.
Nan.
Arch.
Agric.
lew
Soc.
Work
Edac.
Prior.
For.
Med.
Com.
Lib.
Rehab.
Grad.
Undass.     St.
Total
Winter
Sess.
Year
Summer
Sess.
Carr. &
X-Sess.
GRAND
TOTAL
1920-21
687
....
—
....
200
9
....
51
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
15
962
1921
134
550
1646
1925-26
1083
—
—
....
192
33
....
51
....
....
57
....
....
....
....
....
....
47
1463
1926
438
127
2028
1930-31
1494
—
—
....
281
41
....
50
....
....
71
....
....
....
....
....
....
107
2044
1931
441
401
2886
1935-36
1211
—
—
—
320
93
....
67
....
25
62
....
....
....
....
....
....
160
1938
1936
566
223
2727
1940-41
1591
—
—
—
452
72
....
153
....
26
71
....
....
....
....
....
....
163
2528
1941
457
187
3172
1945-46
4034
148
—
—
1053
128
—
376
87
67
47
....
....
....
443
....
....
249
f6632
1946
2368
163
9163
1950-51
2951
185
139
—
931
92
97
286
325
142
213
166
142
60
329
....
....
374
6432
1951
976
430
7838
1955-56
3040
168
123
—
904
177
91
163
212
84
120
136
111
222
529
....
....
323
6403
1956
1810
1038
9251
1956-57
3284
170
101
—
1032
216
94
153
231
77
905
142
129
209
572
....
....
384
7699
1957
3507
1649
12855
1957-58
3860
187
103
—
1157
243
100
165
248
76
1125
119
*328
213
605
....
....
457
8986
1958
3947
2406
15339
1958-59
4505
198
130
—
1068
224
117
156
252
80
1445
125
*269
213
597
....
....
571
9950
1959
3828
2100
15878
1959-60
4734
207
160
—
1043
217
112
175
247
94
1826
141
*191
212
659
....
....
624
10642
1960
4256
2196
17094
1960-61
5314
198
177
....
1051
198
87
179
240
102
2188
151
*183
203
635
....
....
715
11621
1961
5156
2600
19377
1961-62 6412 207 195
987
160
75
204
225
109
2376
139
181
210
617
31
19
124
679       12950
1962
5101
2701
1962-63 6731 196 204 127 972
188
82
191
227
117
2415
147
186
208
616
36
35
176
744       13598
1963
2941
t Includes Special Winter Session, 1946, Ex-Service Personnel.
* These figures include Sopron.
20752 Registration ig62-6j
(as of December 1,  1962)
FACULTY   OF   ARTS   AND   SCIENCE
Arts and Science
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
1674
807
2481
Second Year
1494
554
2048
Third Year
928
329
1257
Fourth Year
733
212
945
TOTAL
4829
1902
6731
Music
First Year
29
21
50
Second Year
22
17
39
Third Year
11
7
18
Fourth Year
13
7
20
TOTAL
75
52
127
School of Home Economics
First Year
57
57
Second Year
1
57
58
Third Year
....
42
42
Fourth Year
....
39
39
TOTAL
1
195
196
School of Physical Education
First Year
53
14
67
Second Year
52
11
63
Third Year
36
4
40
Fourth Year
27
7
34
TOTAL
168
36
204
School of Social Work
B.S.W.
33
56
89
M.S.W.
11
17
28
TOTAL
44
73
117
School of Librarianship
9
27
36
TOTAL IN FACULTY       5126       2285       7411 FACULTY   OF   APPLIED   SCIENCE
Engineering
MEN
WOMEN
TOTAL
First Year
303
2
305
Second Year
239
	
239
Third Year
231
	
231
Fourth Year
196
1
197
TOTAL
969
3
972
School of Architecture
First Year
19
2
21
Second Year
13
	
13
Third Year
	
	
Fourth Year
27
1
28
Fifth  Year
19
1
20
TOTAL
78
4
82
School of Nursing
Basic
Degree Programme
First Year
....
29
29
Second Year
....
27
27
Third Year
....
24
24
Fourth Year
	
24
24
Postbasic
First Year
....
13
13
Second Year
	
4
4
Third Year
	
6
6
TOTAL
	
127
127
Diploma Course
1
60
61
TOTAL
1
187
188
TOTAL IN FACULTY
1048
194
1242
FACULTY   OF   AGRICULTURE
First Year
27
7
34
Second Year
58
11
69
Third Year
35
1
36
Fourth Year
42
5
47
Fifth Year
2
	
2
Occupational Course
3
—
3
TOTAL IN FACULTY
167
24
191 FACULTY  OF  LAW
MEN WOMEN TOTAL
First Year                 89                   4 93
Second Year                 69                   3 72
Third Year                61                   1 62
TOTAL IN FACULTY 219 8 227
FACULTY  OF  PHARMACY
First Year
45
12
57
Second Year
17
14
31
Third Year
32
10
42
Fourth Year
13
4
17
TOTAL IN FACULTY 107 40 147
FACULTY  OF  MEDICINE
First Year
56
4
60
Second Year
45
9
54
Third Year
40
5
45
Fourth Year
43
6
49
TOTAL
184
24
208
School of
Rehabilitation Medicine
First Year
....
19
19
Second Year
1
15
16
TOTAL
1
34
35
TOTAL IN FACULTY
185
58
243
FACULTY  OF  FORESTRY
First Year
62
Second Year
51
Third Year
43
Fourth Year
30
62
51
43
30
TOTAL IN FACULTY 186 .... 186
FACULTY  OF  EDUCATION
Elementary Division
First Year
51
362
413
Second Year
133
444
577
Third Year
103
240
343
Fourth Year
45
105
150
Graduates
28
23
51
total 360 1174 1534 Secondary Division MEN             WOMEN TOTAL
First Year 88 54 142
Second Year 121 46 167
Third Year 130 43 173
Fourth Year 64 28 92
Fifth Year 75 26 101
Graduates 127 46 173
Industrial Arts 33 .... 33
total 638 243 881
TOTAL IN FACULTY 998 1417 2415
FACULTY   OF   COMMERCE   AND   BUSINESS   ADMINISTRATION
First Year
185
3
188
Second Year
149
5
154
Third Year
125
5
130
Fourth Year
142
2
144
TOTAL IN FACULTY 601 15 616
FACULTY   OF   GRADUATE   STUDIES
Course leading to
Ph.D.
176
19
195
M.A.
128
65
193
M.Sc.
119
17
136
M.A.Sc.
79
79
M.S.A.
12
1
13
M.F.
13
	
13
M.B.A.
16
16
M.P.E.
4
....
4
M.Ed.
10
3
13
M.S.P.
2
2
4
M.Arch.
2
	
2
Preliminary Year
67
9
76
TOTAL IN FACULTY
628
116
744
Unclassified
131
45
176
GRAND TOTAL
9,396
4,202
13,598
Extra-Sessional Classes
607
814
1421
Correspondence Courses
671
849
1520
Summer Session 1962
2580
2521
5101 Registration ig62-6j
COUNTRY   OF   CITIZENSHIP
North America
Europe
12120
Canada
12
Austria
3
Mexico
3
Belgium
143
United States
1
Czechoslovakia
15
Denmark
Central America
5
Eire (Ireland)
1
Bahamas
4
Estonia
2
Barbados
4
Finland
1
Costa Rica
13
France
4
Honduras, British
145
Germany — Western Zone
13
Jamaica
3
Germany — Eastern Zone
1
Panama
397
Great Britain & N. Ireland
117
Trinidad
10
Greece
7
Other West Indies
42
Hungary
1
Iceland
South America
21
Italy
3
Argentina
3
Latvia
1
Bolivia
1
Luxembourg
1
Columbia
71
Netherlands
1
Paraguay
9
Norway
2
Peru
5
Poland
1
Venezuela
1
Portugal
2
Romania
Asia
1
Soviet Union
1
Ceylon
2
Spain
59
China
4
Sweden
58
Hong Kong
10
Switzerland
63
India
9
Yugoslavia
6
Indonesia
1
Iran
Africa
4
Israel
2
Egypt
25
Japan
6
Ghana
1
Korea
5
Kenya
10
Malaya
2
Nigeria
7
Pakistan
2
Sierra Leone
1
Palestine
4
S. Rhodesia
6
Philippines
1
S. Camaroons
1
Sarawak
1
Tanganyika
7
Singapore
1
Uganda
1
Syria
8
Union of South Africa
8
Thailand
Oceania
21
Australia
2
Fiji Islands
13
New Zealand
56
Stateless Registration ig62-6j
GEOGRAPHICAL   DISTRIBUTION   OF   STUDENTS
British Columbia (based on census divisions) :
1)  East Kootenay and Upper Columbia River
132
2)  West Kootenay, Columbia River and Slocan Lake
4! IB
3)   Okanagan, Similkameen, Kettle, and
Upper Shuswap Rivers
65 1
4)  Lower Fraser Valley and Howe Sound
8998
5)  Vancouver Island
1057
6)  North Thompson, Shuswap, Nicola, Chilcotin
South, Lillooet East, Bridge - Lillooet
282
7)  Bella Coola, Knight Inlet, Powell River
129
8)  Nechako - Fraser, Chilcotin - North, Cariboo,
Skeena, Takla Lake
185
9)   Atlin Lake, Skeena Coast, Queen Charlotte Islands
138
10)  Northeast B.C.-Laird, Finlay-Parsnip, Beaton Rivers    60
Alberta
314
Saskatchewan
130
Manitoba
60
Ontario
243
Quebec
55
New Brunswick
8
Nova Scotia
19
Prince Edward Island
2
Newfoundland
3
Yukon
20
Northwest Territories
9
Africa
28
Asia
191
British Isles
68
West Indies
113
Centra] America
20
Europe
48
Oceania
33
South America
19
United States
84 THE   UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
YEAR
LL.D.
(honoris
causa)
D.Litt.
(honoris
causa)
D.Sc.
(honoris
causa)
Previous years
8
1930-34
12
1935-39
17
....
1940-44
9
1
1945-49
34
17
1950-54
37
18
1955 May
3
1
1
October
5
....
1956 May
3
3
October
6
....
1957 May
October
3
6
...
2
1958 May
July
September
October
9
1
13
2
....
1
1
1959 May
September
5
5
October
1
....
1
1960 May
October
4
2
2
2
2
1961 May
October
4
2
3
4
1962 May
October
1
3
....
1
TOTAL
195
3
57
GRAND
TOTAL
255 Educational Level
of Students Admitted for the First Time
in ig62
University Entrance Standing
2163
British Columbia
8
Alberta
2
Saskatchewan
3
Manitoba
20
Ontario
5
Quebec
1
Nova Scotia
48
Non-Canadian
Senior Matriculation (Grade XII
508
British Columbia, full
480
British Columbia, partial
58
Alberta
44
Saskatchewan
17
Manitoba
38
Ontario
5
Quebec
2
New Brunswick
2
Nova Scotia
39
Non-Canadian
72
One year, Victoria College
77
Two years, Victoria College
130
Undergraduates above
Senior Matriculation
293
Graduate
15
Non-Matriculation
Summary
2250
University Entrance
1265
Senior Matriculation
500
Above Senior Matriculation
15
Non-Matriculation YEAR
B.A.
B.Sc.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Degrees Conferred
Undergraduate
B.H.E.        B.P.E.      B.Mus.       B.S.W.      B.A.Sc.   B.Arch.    B.S.N.      B.S.A. LL.B. B.S.P.
M.D.
B.S.F.    B.Comm.       B.Ed.     B.L.S.     TOTAL
May-Oct.
1916-20
205
11
216
1921-25
499
....
	
	
        	
145
	
12
58
....
	
....
....
	
714
1926-30
882
	
	
«...       ....
151
25
40
....
....
	
....
	
....  1099
1931-35
1221
....
....
....
240
36
67
....
....
122
....
....  1686
1936-40
1268
....
....
....
319
....
38
102
....
158
....  1885
1941-45
1139
	
....
....
446
	
44
130
....
....
13
208
28
....  2008
1946-50
3321
....
198
66
330
1262
5
90
472
336
115
....
158
1001
240
....  7594
1951-55
2404
....
178
113
280
972
71
77
272
435
227
114
155
398
253
....  5949
1956
299
....
35
19
39
132
8
....
25
58
38
60
20
96
36
865
Oct.
116
....
4
7
....
19
....
21
7
....
2
....
3
9
84
272
1957
318
....
20
19
37
159
14
....
18
52
34
48
25
102
to
S
E
48'
1
10
905
Oct.
119
....
....
3
	
3
2
32
4
....
5
2
....
10
G151
S 7
E 25,
-  ....   363
1958
225
70
32
14
35
177
7
....
28
72
36
45
18
•28
103
G 92
S 14
E 29,
■  ....  1025
Oct.
74
19
2
7
3
19
1
45
3
....
5
2
1
13
G143
S 17
E 34 J
388
1959
247
78
32
17
33
193
9
....
29
73
29
42
24
*63
89
G
S
E
25"
27
36 J
■  ....  1046
Oct.
160
28
3
8
4
20
....
41
4
....
2
5
3
* 5
12
G
S
E
25]
32
60 j
■  ....   412
1960
292
146
34
12
37
169
12
....
33
63
28
51
33
*20
116
G
S
E
81
35
37.
....  1126
Oct.
122
32
6
5
	
24
1
49
4
....
4
4
....
20
G
S
E
121
44
86
■  ....   413
1961
282
151
36
13
49
192
10
....
29
80
30
39
29
*24
95
G 71
S 32
E 51
■ ....  1149
Oct.
133
44
1
9
1
23
3
60
7
....
5
2
7
16
G
S
E
12'
45
85
► ....   453
1962
331
185
31
26
7   57
203
16
....
24
75
31
51
26
94
G
S
E
61
55
57 J
27  1302
Oct.
128
43
3
10
2    3
13
1
27
8
	
11
1
2
34
G
S
E
Hi
73
89
1   460
f G - Graduate, S - Secondary, E - Elementary
* Sopron
YEAR
THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
Degrees Conferred
Graduate
Ph.D.
M.A.
M.Sc.
M.A.Sc.       M.S.A.
M.B.A.
M.F.
M.S.W.
M.S.P.
M.Arch.
M.P.E.
M.Ed.
Total
Grad. &
Undergr. CUMUL.
TOTAL Degrees TOTAL
May-Oct.
1916-20
....
11
....
1
....
....
....
....         ....
....
....
12
228
1921-25
....
46
....
15
4
—
....
....
...
....
65
779
1007
1926-30
....
71
....
8
7
....
—
....
...
—
86
1185
2192
1931-35
....
113
....
27
22
....
....
....
...
....
162
1848
4040
1936-40
....
145
....
31
27
....
....
—
...
—
204
2089
6129
1941-45
....
98
....
31
17
....
—
....
...
....
146
2154
8283
1946-50
4
241
....
79
51
—
....
48    	
...
....
422
8016
16299
1951-55
37
207
61
59
57
2
9
118    	
...
....
550
6499
22798
1956
12
22
11
10
5
1
1
18    	
...
....
80
945
23743
Oct.
7
17
10
5
1
....
....
2    	
...
....
42
314
24057
1957
4
15
10
8
6
1
1
17    	
...
....
62
967
25024
Oct.
7
9
12
4
2
....
2
2    	
...
3
41
404
25428
1958
8
26
18
12
4
....
3
8    	
...
3
82
1107
26535
Oct.
3
20
10
10
1
_..
1
3    	
...
5
53
441
26976
1959
8
15
12
12
7
....
3
20    	
1
4
82
1128
28104
Oct.
9
10
23
12
....
....
1
....
1
8
64
476
28580
1960
18
22
25
13
5
4
4
13    	
1
8
113
1239
29819
Oct.
9
23
19
14
4
3
4
3
1
11
91
504
30323
1961
3
26
21
16
4
....
8
14    	
1
5
98
1247
31570
Oct.
5
25
29
10
2
....
....
3     1
1
24
100
553
32123
1962
12
25
31
14
6
1
5
17    	
2
9
122
1424
33547
Oct.
21
29
29
19
5
1
2
9    	
...
32
147
607
34154 PUBLIC OCCASIONS
Construction, with all its unsightly accompaniments, is by now a
familiar sight on the campus. The opening of a new building, however, always impresses one with the sense of accomplishment and
the pleasure of anticipation. The academic year had scarcely begun
when, on October 4, 1962, The Honourable W. N. Chant, Minister
of Public Works, presented the Key of the initial unit of the new
Education Building to the Chancellor, Phyllis Gregory Ross. The
building was opened officially by The Honourable L. R. Peterson,
Minister of Education, who then addressed the many who gathered
for the Auditorium's first ceremony.
Three weeks later, in a colourful ceremony attended by representatives of institutions in Canada, the Commonwealth, and the
United States, John Barfoot Macdonald was installed by Chancellor
Ross as fourth president of the University of British Columbia.
After appropriate salutations had been spoken, President Macdonald
delivered his inaugural address, "Excellence and Responsibility." A
festal day was brought to a close at a banquet offered by the Chancellor and the Board of Governors in Brock Memorial Hall in honour
of President Macdonald.
At the Autumn Congregation (October 26), the degree Doctor
of Laws {honoris causa) was conferred upon Claude T. Bissell
(President, University of Toronto), J. F. K. English (Deputy
Minister and Superintendent of Education), and Sir Ronald Gould
(General Secretary, National Union of Teachers); and the degree
Doctor of Science {honoris causa) upon Michael Lerner (Professor
and Chairman, Department of Genetics, University of California).
Sir Ronald Gould addressed the Congregation.
On Saturday afternoon, January 26, the President and the Board
of Governors received the Faculty and staff in Brock Memorial Hall.
41 The thirteenth annual Tri-Service Parade took place on the first
day of March, with Chancellor Ross presiding. His Honour the
Lieutenant-Governor presented scrolls to sixty-one officers and
officer-cadets and addressed the Parade.
The opening of the Ophthalmology Research Unit of the Faculty
of Medicine, situated at the Vancouver General Hospital, took place
May 14 and created for Dean McCreary the opportunity of expressing gratitude to the University's benefactors, Leon J. Koerner
and the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, B.C. Division
(chairman T. R. Watt).
Spring Congregation fell May 30 and 31. Honorary degrees were
conferred by Chancellor Ross upon Leo E. Marion (Doctor of
Science, honoris causa), Vice-President (Scientific), National Research Council; Adlai E. Stevenson (Doctor of Laws, honoris causa),
American Ambassador to the United Nations; and H. Northrop
Frye (Doctor of Letters, honoris causa), Professor of English and
Principal of Victoria College, University of Toronto. Dr. Marion
and Dr. Frye spoke to the Congregations. On the eve of Congregation the Reverend J. I. Richardson, Dean of Carey Hall, had
preached the sermon at the Baccalaureate Service.
The traditional Cairn Ceremony was observed by torchlight in
the autumn crispness of September 26. Chancellor Ross introduced
the Honourable J. V. Clyne, the invited speaker; later, President
Macdonald made his first public address on the campus.
The University of British Columbia has traditionally been fortunate in its programme of visiting lecturers and other "extracurricular" attractions. The University, to be sure, has created its
own good fortune and in the year 1962-1963 maintained the standards of the past.
As usual, visitors to the Summer Session (1962) benefited from
lectures on Public Affairs and Fine Arts organized by the Department of University Extension. Lecturers included The Honourable
Georges Lapalme (Minister of Cultural Affairs, Quebec), Dr.
Charles Wright (Department of Sociology, University of California), Dr. Amiya Chakravarty (Professor of Comparative Oriental
Religions and Literature, Boston University), Dr. Richard Thoman
(Department of Geography, Queens University); Dr. Louis Dudek
(Department of English, McGill University), Pauline Kael (Film
critic, Vancouver International Festival), Alain Danielou (International Music Council, Unesco), Nathan Cohen (dramatic critic,
42 Toronto). Mr. Cohen also conducted a series of interviews at midday with artists of the Vancouver International Festival.
At the end of September a Special Symposium, consisting of four
sessions, on "Political Freedom and Economic Necessity," resulted
from a private benefaction and brought to the campus Dr. R. T.
McKenzie (London School of Economics), to serve as chairman
for Professor J. Tussman (Department of Philosophy, Wesleyan
University: "Freedom, Authority, and the Government of the
Mind"); The Honourable T. O. Elias (Attorney General of Nigeria:
"Political Freedom in Developing Societies: the African Experience"); Dr. Andrew Schonfield (Director of Studies, Royal Institute of International Affairs: "Economic Planning in Democratic
Societies: an Analysis of the French, British, and American Experience"). All participated in a final discussion: "The Prospects for
Democracy: an American, British, and African View."
During the year eight visitors lectured under the auspices of the
Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation and spent time in various
departments of the University: Dr. I. Michael Lerner (Department
of Genetics, University of California), Dr. Caryl P. Haskins (President, Carnegie Institute, Washington), Dr. Jean Gottman (geographer, formerly of the Sorbonne, now Fellow of the Institute for
Advanced Study, Princeton), Dr. Brian Berry (geographer lecturing
at the University of Chicago), R. A. Skelton (Superintendent, Map
Room, British Museum), Dr. Robert Wark (Curator of Art,
Huntingdon Gallery), Dean Howard Wilson (School of Education,
University of California at Los Angeles), Dean Erwin Griswold
(Harvard Law School).
A notable series, entitled "Urgent Agenda" and extending from
February 8 to March 30, was organized by the Department of University Extension. The lectures, designed for those concerned with
the complex issues facing man in the thermonuclear age, were given
by Dr. Louis B. Sohn (Bemis Professor of International Law, Harvard University: "Legal Machinery for Achieving Disarmament"),
Dr. Fred Warner Neal (Professor of International Relations, Clare-
mont Graduate School: "The Soviet Union and the West: War or
Peace?"), Dr. Brock Chisholm (former Director-General, World
Health Organization: "Resolution of Social Tension"), Dr. Seymour Melman (Management and Industrial Engineering, Columbia
University:  "Alternatives to Military Systems of Power").
43 In January Swami Nityaswarupananda (monk of the Rama-
krishna Order and a founder of the Ramakrishnan Institute Mission
in Calcutta) spoke as the Kapoor-Singh Lecturer on "The Concept
of Mankind as a Whole." The Garnett Sedgewick Memorial Lecture
was delivered in March by Professor Kestar Svendson of the University of Oregon: "Distracted Globe: Poetry and Science in the
Twentieth Century."
Once again The Vancouver Institute, this year under the presidency of Donald B. Fields, attracted substantial audiences to the
University on Saturday evenings with its versatile and topical array
of subjects and speakers.
Other visitors of distinction were invited by many departments
with the assistance of the Committee on Lectures chaired by Dean
Soward. On these occasions and those mentioned above Sir Ouvry
Roberts, in charge of Ceremonies, saw to it that the machinery
functioned smoothly.
This report of what has been deemed the "extra-curricular" programme is not, of course, exhaustive; departments and the students
themselves constantly extend invitations and do their own entertaining. All this contributes to academic life and provides for the students impressive opportunities. It has sometimes been remarked —
and the exaggeration may be forgiven — that a student could obtain
a liberal education by attending only the "extra-curricular" lectures
and symposia.
During the year the University of British Columbia was represented at inaugural ceremonies for the following: Elvis J. Stahr, Jr.,
as twelfth president, Indiana University; Rosemary Park, as president of Barnard College; Dr. C. P. Romulo, as ninth president,
University of the Philippines; Dr. Julius Nyerere, as first chancellor,
University of East Africa.
The birthday — or, perhaps, coming-of-age — of the University
of Victoria, which belongs properly to the report of the President
for 1963-1964, was celebrated with due pomp July 1, 1963; Dean
Chant carried the University's greetings across the Straits.
44 The University from the air: The camera looks east over Vancouver. The University from the air: The camera loi>ks south. The Buchanan Building from the southwest. The University Library with the Buchanan Building and the
mountains of Howe Sound in the background.
The University Library. Chemistry: Thi old building Chemical Engineering: The new building.
Chemistry: New wing. The Honourable Leslie R. Peterson opens the new Education Building. President
Macdonald, the Honourable W. N. Chant, and Chancellor Ross look on. •anci llor congralnlati ■ /■■■/,'': li Ma  i/.j
;I ■     Ii;  in: 11;WflfEn a i)i'Mi,'ft president. President Macdonald's Inaugural Address. / I., Chanct.Uor and      I mgratuiaU rVrnd   Dob   ■
winnt t t>f an awa ■. hip. Spring Congregation: Adlai E. Stevenson signs the book
after receiving an honorary degree. Spring Congregation: Leo E. Marion, recipient of an honorary degree,
delivers the address. Re: Faculty and Staff Publications
To reduce file size, the publications section has not been included. For this information,
contact the University of British Columbia Archives.
1956 Main Mall
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1
Canada
Telephone: 604-822-5877
Fax: 604-822-9587

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